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washed

washed Sentence Examples

  • That familiar cold feeling washed over her again with a wave that was staggering.

  • Realization washed over her in alternating waves of pain and numbness.

  • The money would dry, and her clothes could be washed.

  • I washed your clothes.

  • Lisa ate the food and washed the dishes.

  • He carefully worked the ATV down a steep washed out trail that threatened to overturn the vehicle several times.

  • Lisa washed her hands and put the biscuits in the oven before picking her up.

  • A flood of heat washed up her throat to stain her cheeks.

  • A wave of loneliness washed over her.

  • They need washed, too, don't they?

  • Then she lit the oven and washed her hands.

  • He stomped his boots and shook white flakes from his hat and coat before entering the house Cynthia poured them both a cup of coffee as he washed at the sink.

  • He took a bite of his sandwich and washed it down with coffee.

  • He washed and bellied up to the table, proving his statement as he delved into the food.

  • He replaced his weapons and washed his face, feeling very much like this was to be his last day alive.

  • Familiar coldness and silence washed over her before the quiet was replaced by the storm's furious bellow.

  • Dizziness washed over him, and he his body strained to Travel.

  • A burst of need washed over her as her body responded to his scent.

  • Damian's home videos played, intertwined with those of others, until a wave of power washed over her.

  • Terror washed over her at his calm, controlled words.

  • Despair washed over her, but she forced herself to concentrate.

  • A feeling other than anxiety washed over her.

  • Even Bird Song's gilded front sign, advertising the bed and breakfast, had been washed of a year's dust from the unpaved side street.

  • And somebody washed out the coffee pot.

  • A cold chill washed over him.

  • They washed away their disappointment with cold beer and dove into the rest of their treasures.

  • Relief washed over him once he knew they were safe.

  • At the house, she washed her hands, watching the water turn red and swirl down the drain.

  • It had been washed, but the color was different in that area.

  • Deidre washed her face and redid her makeup before venturing to peek into the bathtub again.

  • You say Sasha washed up somewhere?

  • The Council is working together for once, and Sasha tricked us into thinking he was returning to the Council, disappeared and washed up at the Caribbean Sanctuary.

  • Cynthia carefully hand washed the articles of clothing from Fred's box of historical goodies and hung them outside in the sun to dry.

  • Dean was close enough that he could smell the musk of her freshly washed body as she took a deep breath and let out a long and resigned sigh.

  • The headlights of a slow moving car washed her white body, shadowing the curve of her buttocks, the roundness of her shoulder, painting her golden hair in its light.

  • Her door was ajar and the chill from an open window washed over him.

  • He cleaned the kitchen, dusted the entire downstairs and, as the weather remained mild, even washed the first floor windows, hoping when and if Cynthia saw them it would not be in the sun.

  • Relief washed over him, and he instantly relaxed, hopeful.

  • She opened her eyes and smiled at him, then horror washed over her face and she jumped up.

  • Heat then red light washed over them.

  • Nausea washed over her.

  • Another wave of dizziness washed over her.

  • A feel­ing of caring he had never before experienced washed over him.

  • We thought we could lock the file drawer on this case when a body washed up, but no such luck.

  • They told me if Jeff's body wasn't found the first couple of weeks, it had probably washed out to sea and would maybe never be located.

  • Fastening the snaps, she rolled up the sleeves and washed her hands.

  • After Alex left, Carmen threw the sheets in the dryer, washed dishes and cleaned his kitchen.

  • Anger washed over her in a bold wave.

  • The faint smell of disinfectant soap was washed away by expensive cologne.

  • After supper she washed dishes, pushing him aside when he offered to help.

  • Carmen and Alex met them at the washed out bridge.

  • Of course, the trail would be twice as dangerous now, with slippery wet rocks and washed out places.

  • Katie washed a dish and rinsed it in silence.

  • She took Brutus back to the house and washed his muzzle off.

  • After supper she put leftovers away and washed dishes while Alex browsed through the paper.

  • Its wool was as soft as freshly washed hair and it bleated when she scooped it into her arms.

  • I'll get washed up.

  • Yet, why was it that when a woman married a man with money and merely washed his clothes, cooked his meals, cleaned up after him and tended his stock... why did people think he was taking care of her?

  • "I'll get washed up," he said as she exited the bedroom into the hallway.

  • Once home she washed the roasting hen and put it in a pan.

  • "Supper will be ready by the time you get washed up," she called to him as she dumped the gravy into a bowl.

  • Her hair looked like it hadn't been washed in a month and her coat was wrinkled and full of holes.

  • A calmness washed over her and she stared up at him coldly.

  • She trudged to the bathroom and washed the tears from her face.

  • He washed the egg from his face and grabbed the towel.

  • Rolling up his shirtsleeves, he washed his hands in the kitchen sink.

  • Desperate to maintain her position as her people's protector and outlive those threats hedging closer, she washed her face and changed clothing to prepare for her return journey.

  • She had changed her clothes and washed the makeup from her face.

  • She maneuvered the car around washed out places and eased it over rocks that erupted from the surface of the dusty road.

  • She splashed cool water over her face and washed the sleep from her body.

  • She nearly choked on the sandwich, and washed it down with some coffee.

  • At the cabin, she washed a dress in the sink and hung it on the line to dry, taking pride in the fact that she was making do with what was available.

  • She leaned forward and he held her waist as she washed her hands and formed them into a cup.

  • His scent and heat washed over her.

  • The yellow precipitate obtained is washed with a solution of potassium acetate and finally with dilute alcohol.

  • The liquid is precipitated by alcohol, and the washed and dried precipitate is then dissolved in water and allowed to stand, when the salt separates in dark-coloured crystals.

  • The town proper occupies an elevated promontory, washed on the north by the Charente and on the south and west by the Anguienne, a small tributary of that river.

  • high, of which three sides are washed by the Fiddich and the fourth was protected by a moat.

  • Its width is as a rule about 24 ft.; at present its surface is formed of rough cobbling, upon which there was probably a gravel layer, now washed away.

  • The coast, constantly encroaching on the sea by reason of the alluvium washed down by the rivers of the Pyrenees and Cvennes, is without important harbours saving that of Cette, itself continually invaded by the sand.

  • On the whole, however, France is inadequately provided with natural harbours; her long tract of coast washed by the Atlantic and the Bay of Biscay has sqarcely three or four good seaports, and those on the southern shore of the Channel form a striking contrast to the spacious maritime inlets on theEnglish side.

  • Her worship was early transferred to Rome, localized by the Lacus Juturnae near the temple of Vesta, at which Castor and Pollux, after announcing the victory of lake Regillus, were said to have washed the sweat from their horses.

  • There are two piers, of which the Palace pier, near the site of the old chain pier (1823), which was washed away in 1896, is near the centre of the town, while the West pier is towards Hove.

  • The dark product obtained is washed with water, hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid, and finally calcined again with the oxide or with borax, being protected from air during the operation by a layer of charcoal.

  • After fusion, the melt is well washed with dilute hydrochloric acid and then with water, the nitride remaining as a white powder.

  • Silurian rocks are well developed in western Tasmania, and the Silurian sea must have washed the south-western corner of the continent, if the rocks of the Stirling Range be rightly identified as of this age.

  • A terrible struggle took place for the possession of his body, until Apollo rescued it from the Greeks, and by the command of Zeus washed and cleansed it, anointed it with ambrosia, and handed it over to Sleep and Death, by whom it was conveyed for burial to Lycia, where a sanctuary (Sarpedoneum) was erected in honour of the fallen hero.

  • Rolled pieces of amber, usually small but occasionally of very large size, may be picked up on the east coast of England, having probably been washed up from deposits under the North Sea.

  • It occurs in Miocene deposits and is also found washed up by the sea near Catania.

  • the damping off of seedlingsand in saturated soils not only are the roots and root-hairs killed by asphyxiation, but the whole course of soil fermentation is altered, and it takes time to sweeten such by draining, because not only must the noxious bodies be gradually washed out and the lost salts restored, but the balance of suitable bacterial and fungal life must be restored.

  • Travers picked up a seed of Edwardsia in the Chatham Islands, evidently washed ashore from New Zealand (Linn.

  • Another region so called is that part of the Sahara washed by the Atlantic. The name is also used to designate the territory under French jurisdiction west of Timbuktu and north of the Senegal.

  • At this point was another passage of the river, defended by the castle which gives its name to the spot, and which stands on a high hill overhanging the right bank, its base washed by an abundant stream, the Sanjeh (Gr.

  • The log should be washed in fresh water when practicable, to prevent oxidization of the wheels, and be lubricated with suitable oil through a hole in the case.

  • The precipitate is washed, collected, and dried at a very moderate heat.

  • The former presents an intimate mixture of boulders brought from Finland and Olonets (with an addition of local boulders) with small gravel, coarse sand and the finest glacial mud, - the whole bearing no trace of ever having been washed up and sorted by water in motion, except in subordinate layers of glacial sand and gravel; the size of the boulders decreases on the whole from N.

  • As lately as the middle of the 18th century the town stood a quarter of a mile from the river, but is now on the bank, the intervening space having been washed away, together with a large part of the town, by the stream continually encroaching on its left bank.

  • Demeter, at first enraged, afterwards calmed down, and washed herself in the river Ladon by way of purification.

  • In 1898 the island had been washed away, but in 1 9 00 H.M.S.

  • He arrogated to himself the privileges of royalty, made servants attend him upon their knees, compelled bishops to tie his shoelatchets and dukes to hold the basin while he washed his hands, and considered it condescension when he allowed ambassadors to kiss his fingers; he paid little heed to their sacrosanct character, and himself laid violent hands on a papal nuncio.

  • In 1891 excessively heavy autumn rains washed the arable soils to such an extent that the next season's corn crops were below average.

  • The finely powdered and washed mineral is too crystalline and consequently of insufficient opacity to be used alone as a paint, and is therefore mixed with "white lead," of which material it is also used as an adulterant.

  • the emulsionizing power, the To a property of penetrating oily fabrics, and lubricating impurities so that they can be readily washed away.

  • In this way curd, mottled or marbled soap is formed, and such mottled appearance was formerly highly valued as an indication of freedom from excess of water or other adulteration, because in fitted soaps the impurities are either washed out or fall to the bottom of the mass in cooling.

  • The crude product is very impure and possesses an offensive smell; it may be purified by forcing a fine spray of lime water through the liquid until the escaping water is quite clear, the washed bisulphide being then mixed with a little colourless oil and distilled at a low temperature.

  • These are washed with ammonium chloride until the filtrate is colourless, ignited, fused with caustic potash and nitre, the melt dissolved in water and nitric acid added to the solution until the colour of potassium ruthenate disappears.

  • Tradition tells of an older town buried under the sea; and Roman coins and other remains have been washed up on the beach.

  • (a) Gravimetric. - This method is made up of four operations: (I) a weighed quantity of the substance is dissolved in a suitable solvent; (2) a particular reagent is added which precipitates the substance it is desired to estimate; (3) the precipitate is filtered, washed and dried; (4) the filter paper containing the precipitate is weighed either as a tared filter, or incinerated and ignited either in air or in any other gas, and then weighed.

  • It is washed by ejecting a jet of water, ammonia or other prescribed liquid on to the side of the filter paper until the paper is nearly full.

  • The different ultramarines - green, blue, red and violet - are finely ground and washed with water.

  • When freed from excess of water it is laid on a sheet of thick white blotting-paper, and a piece of smooth washed calico is placed upon it (unwashed calico, on account of its "facing," adheres to the sea-weed).

  • They are then preserved in envelopes attached to a sheet of paper of the ordinary size, a single perfect specimen being washed, and spread out under the envelope so as to show the habit of the plant.

  • Elsewhere Asiatic Turkey enjoys the advantage of a sea frontage, being washed in the north-west and west by the Euxine, Aegean and Mediterranean, in the south-west by the Red Sea, and in the south-east by the Persian Gulf.

  • Its object was the acquisition of gold, which was caught by the inhabitants of Colchis in fleeces as it was washed down the rivers.

  • Several times during summer the trees ought to be regularly examined, and the young shoots respectively topped or thinned out; those that remain are to be nailed to the wall, or braced in with pieces of slender twigs, and the trees ought occasionally to be washed with the garden engine or thoroughly syringed, especially during very hot summers.

  • Nitrogen is always being synthesized from the atmosphere (by plants, and by electrical discharges which combine nitrogen and oxygen), and this combined nitrogen is either utilized by land organisms or is washed down into the sea in the water of the rivers.

  • Part of the site has been washed away by the sea.

  • The eastern foot of Demavend is washed by the river Herhaz (called Lar river in its upper course), which there breaks through the Elburz in a S.-N.

  • Belgrade occupies a triangular ridge or foreland, washed on the north-west by the Save, and on the north-east by the Danube; these rivers flowing respectively from the south-west and north-west.

  • The rubber thus formed is washed and dried.

  • Under certain conditions, as when latex is allowed to stand or is centrifugalized, a cream is obtained consisting of the liquid globules, which may be washed free from proteid without change, but, either by mechanical agitation or by the addition of acid or other chemical agent, the liquid gradually solidifies to a mass of solid caoutchouc. The phenomenon therefore resembles the change known to the chemist as polymerization, by which through molecular aggregation a liquid may pass into a solid without change in its empirical composition.

  • The washed product contains in its pores a notable proportion of water, which is removed by hanging the rubber for some days in a warm room.

  • ceremony, at which the xoanon (ancient wooden statue) of Athena was washed in the river Inachus, a symbol of her purification after the Gigantomachia.

  • The solution is filtered, the precipitate well washed, and, generally, is put up in the form of a paste in well-closed vessels.

  • Powdered galena is dissolved in hot hydrochloric acid, the solution allowed to cool and the deposit of impure lead chloride washed with cold water to remove iron and copper.

  • The treatment is the prompt use of emetics, or the stomach should be washed out, and large doses of sodium or magnesium sulphate given in order to form an insoluble sulphate.

  • Thus the vessels used at the Passover are "kosher," as are also new metal vessels bought from a Gentile after they have been washed in a ritual bath.

  • It is then covered with salt for about an hour and afterwards washed three times.

  • The residue is washed, extracted by dilute hydrochloric acid, and again well washed with boiling water.

  • The precipitate, after having been collected and washed, is digested with a warm concentrated solution of ammonium carbonate, which dissolves the uranium as a yellow solution of ammonium uranate, while the hydrated oxide of iron, the alumina, &c., remain.

  • Solutions of uranyl salts (nitrate, &c.) behave to reagents as follows: sulphuretted hydrogen produces green uranous salt with precipitation of sulphur; sulphide of ammonium in neutral solutions gives a black precipitate of UO 2 S, which settles slowly and, while being washed in the filter, breaks up partially into hydrated UO 2 an sulphur; ammonia gives a yellow precipitate of uranate of ammonia, characteristically soluble in hot carbonate of ammonia solution; prussiate of potash gives a brown precipitate which in appearance is not unlike the precipitate produced by the same reagent in cupric salts.

  • The alluvial extracted, which in the Malay Peninsula and Archipelago carries from 5 to 60 lb of tinstone (or "black tin," as it is termed by Cornish miners) to the cubic yard of gravel, is washed in various simple sluicing appliances, by which the lighter clay, sand and stones are removed and tinstone is left behind comparatively pure, containing usually 65 to 75% of metallic tin (chemically pure tinstone contains 78.7%).

  • in diameter, leaves the stamps in suspension in water, and passes through a series of troughs in which the heavier mineral is collected; this then passes through a series of washing operations, which leaves a mixture consisting chiefly of tinstone and arsenical pyrites, which is calcined and washed again, until finally black tin containing about 60 to 65% of metal is left.

  • Of the impurities of the ore the wolframite (tungstate of iron and manganese) is the most troublesome, because on account of its high specific gravity it cannot be washed away as gangue.

  • (I) Commercially pure tin is treated with nitric acid, which converts the tin proper into the insoluble metastannic acid, while the copper, iron, &c., become nitrates; the metastannic acid is washed first with dilute nitric acid, then with water, and is lastly dried and reduced by fusion with black flux or potassium cyanide.

  • Stannous Oxide, SnO, is obtained in the hydrated form Sn20(OH)2 from a solution of stannous chloride by addition of sodium carbonate; it forms a white precipitate, which can be washed with air-free water and dried at 80° C. without much change by oxidation; if it be heated in carbon dioxide the black SnO remains.

  • The precipitate is filtered, washed, dried and ignited.

  • The idea is that any traces of acid not washed away by the washing process or produced later by a slow decomposition of the substance will be thereby neutralized and rendered harmless.

  • The action is very rapid, and the product, which rises to the top of the acids, is separated and washed successively with cold and then tepid water, and finally with water made slightly alkaline with sodium carbonate or hydroxide, to remove all adhering or dissolved acids which would otherwise render the product very unstable.

  • Fitzstephen tells how, when the great marsh that washed the walls of the city on the north (Moorfields) was frozen over; the young men went out to slide and skate and sport on the ice.

  • The Strand was filled with noble mansions washed by the waters of the Thames, but the street, if street it could be called, was little used by pedestrians.

  • Successive flexures or ridges are ranged in more or less parallel lines, and from between the bands of hard, unyielding rock of older formation the soft beds of recent shale have been washed out, to he carried through the enclosing ridges by rifts which break across their axes.

  • The fractions are agitated with strong sulphuric acid, and then washed with a caustic soda solution.

  • The washed products are then refractionated.

  • Every twenty-four hours or so the flow of juice may be conveniently stopped, and, after all the impurities have subsided, the superincumbent clear liquor may be decanted by a cock placed at the side of the cone for the purpose, and the vessel may be washed out.

  • Here they are discharged (washed and freed from any adherent soil) into an elevator, which carries them up to the top of the building and delivers them into a hopper feeding the slicer.

  • From the centrifugal the sugar is either turned out without washing as raw sugar, only fit for the refinery, or else it is well washed with a spray of water and air until white and dry, and it is then offered in the market as refined sugar, although it has never passed through animal charcoal (bone-black).

  • In a process employed with great success in some refineries the raw sugars are washed before being melted, and thus a purer article is obtained for subsequent treatment.

  • The dirty bags and sheaths are then washed, mangled and dried, and made ready for use again.

  • After the sweets have come away, cold water is passed through the char until no trace of lime or sulphate of lime is found in it; then a large manhole at the bottom of the cistern is opened, and the washed and spent char is removed.

  • In the best-appointed refineries the whole of the work in connexion with the char is performed mechanically, with the exception of packing the filter cisterns with fresh char and emptying the spent and washed char on to the carrying bands.

  • When the massecuite, well pugged and prepared for purging, is in the centrifugals, it is first washed with syrup of low density, to assist the separation of mother-liquor of similar quality, this washing being supplemented by the injection of pure syrup of high density, or " clairce," when very white sugar is required.

  • As fast as the rock of a cliff is weathered its fragments are washed to the ground by the rain, and carried down the slopes by small streams, ultimately finding their way into a river along which they are carried until the force of the water is insufficient to keep them in suspension, when they become deposited in the river bed or along its banks.

  • Nitrates are very soluble in water and are therefore liable to be washed out of the soil by heavy rain.

  • Both are easily removed by passing chlorine through the cold solution, to produce ferric and manganic salt, and then digesting the liquid with a washed precipitate of basic carbonate, produced from a small portion of the solution by means of sodium carbonate.

  • The precipitate, even after exhaustive washing with hot water, still contains a trace of alkali; but from the oxide, prepared from it by ignition, the alkali can be washed away.

  • But in practice the results were not wholly satisfactory, and it was a long time before he recognized one important reason for the failure in the fact that to prevent the alkalis from being washed away by the rain he had taken pains to add them in an insoluble form, whereas, as was ultimately suggested to him by experiments performed by J.

  • The crystals are collected, washed, pressed and recrystallized, whereby the impurities are easily removed.

  • When he came near the tombs, he drew some water with which he washed the gravestones, afterwards anointing them with perfume; he then sacrificed the bull on the altar calling upon Zeus Chthonios and Hermes Psychopompos, and inviting them in company with the heroes to the festival of blood.

  • Evidently the idea of the great Yokoya experts, the originators of the style, was to break away from the somewhat formal monotony of ordinary engraving, where each line performs exactly the same function, and to convert the chisel into an artists i It is first boiled in a lye obtained by lixiviating wood ashes; it is next polished with charcoal powder; then immersed in plum vinegar and salt; then washed with weak lye and placed in a, tub of water to remove all traces of alkali, the final step being to digest in a boiling solution of copper sulphate, verdigris and water.

  • Gold is washed from the river sand in small particles.

  • In 1170 the land between Stavoren, Texel, and Medemblik was washed away, and a century later the Zuider Zee was formed.

  • He aspired to the dominion of all the seas which washed the Scandinavian coasts, and before he died he succeeded in suppressing the pirates who so long had haunted the Baltic and the German Ocean.

  • The pan, about two-thirds filled with the " pay dirt " to be washed, is held in the stream or in a hole filled with water.

  • The incline of the sluice varies with the conformation of the ground and the tenacity of the stuff to be washed, from 1 in 16 to I in 8.

  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

  • The fields are small and composed of terraces by which the soil has been walled up along the contours of the hills, with enormous labour, to save it from being washed away.

  • The solution of metallic chlorides or sulphates so obtained is precipitated by iron, the metallic bismuth filtered, washed with water, pressed in canvas bags, and finally fused in graphite crucibles, the surface being protected by a layer of charcoal.

  • in width, called the Dasht-i-Hamdamao, or Dasht-i-Ardewan, formed by the talus or drift of the higher mountains, which, washed down through centuries of denudation, now forms long sweeping spurs of gravel and sand, scantily clothed with wormwood scrub and almost destitute of water.

  • Captain Phipps in 1773 secured samples of soft blue clay in this manner from a depth of 683 fathoms, but as a rule when sounding in great depths the sample is washed off the tallow before it can be brought on board.

  • The town, with wide streets and picturesque promenades, is finely situated on a promontory, the base of which is washed on the south by the Cousin, on the east and west by small streams. Its chief building, the church of St Lazare, dates from the 12th century.

  • Within them was found the Fountain of Youth; the pebbles which give light, restore sight, and render the possessor invisible; the Sea of Sand was there, stored with fish of wondrous savour; and the River of Stones was there also; besides a subterranean stream whose sands were of gems. His territory produced the worm called "salamander," which lived in fire, and which wrought itself an incombustible envelope from which were manufactured robes for the presbyter, which were washed in flaming fire.

  • In some anthracite collieries in America the small coal or culm and other waste are washed into the exhausted workings by water which gives a compact mass filling the excavation when the water has drained away.

  • upwards, are washed on plain sieve plates, but for finer-grained duff the sieve is covered with a bed of broken felspar lumps about 3 in.

  • This on being washed and decomposed with hydrochloric acid yielded a stream of acetylene gas.

  • The vessel, however, which contains this mixture has to be of earthenware, porcelain or enamelled iron on account of the free acid present; the gas must be washed after purification to remove traces of hydrochloric acid, and care must be taken to prevent the complete neutralization of the acid by the ammonia present in the gas.

  • Dr Wolff employs purifiers in which the gas is washed with water containing calcium chloride, and then passed through bleaching-powder solution or other oxidizing material.

  • The wool product of the state in 1900 was 9,638,002 lb, and in 1910 was 8,943,750 lb washed and unwashed and 3,040,875 lb scoured.

  • The alluvial soil, composed of what has been washed from other soils, together with decayed vegetable matter, covers about 6% of the surface of the state and is found in the river bottoms, of greatest extent in that of the Missouri; it varies much in fertility.

  • When the oxidation is complete, the anthraquinone is separated in a filter press, washed and heated to 120° C. with commercial oil of vitriol, using about 22 parts of vitriol to i of anthraquinone.

  • It is then removed to lead-lined tanks and again washed with water and dried; the product obtained contains about 95% of anthraquinone.

  • Methyl chloride CH 3 C1, is a gas, boiling at - 23°, obtained by chlorinating methane, or better, from methyl alcohol; wood spirit is treated with salt and sulphuric acid, or hydrochloric acid gas conducted into the boiling spirit in the presence of zinc chloride, the evolved gas being washed with potash and dried by sulphuric acid.

  • The rivers rising in the southern mountains, which no longer reach the Oxus, terminate in vast swamps near Akcha, and into these the debris of such vegetation as yearly springs up on the slopes of the southern hills is washed down in time of flood.

  • All crucibles and other materials which might contain precious metal are ground up and washed in a pan, and the pannings together with a selection from the floor sweepings are remelted.

  • In England gold and copper blanks are protected from oxidation, and after their passage through the furnace are merely washed in colanders with water and dried with sawdust in a rotating drum.

  • The soluble phosphates washed out of the guano may become fixed by entering into combination with the elements of the rock beneath.

  • The larger valleys of the Black Hills district contain fertile alluvial deposits washed from the neighbouring highlands, but in the plains adjoining these mountains the soils consist of a stiff gumbo suitable only for pasture land.

  • Thus in Syria one who touched a dove became taboo for one whole day, and if a drop of blood of the Hebrew sin-offering fell on a garment it had to be ritually washed off.

  • So Chrysostom says: "Although our hands may be already pure, yet unless we have washed them thoroughly, we do not spread them upwards in prayer."

  • For the processes of the paper manufacturer esparto is used in the dry state, and without cutting; roots and flowers and stray weeds are first removed, and the material is then boiled with caustic soda, washed, and bleached with chlorine solution.

  • The remaining mud of calcium carbonate and hydrate is washed, by decantation, with small instalments of hot water to recover at least part of the alkali diffused throughout it, but this process must not be continued too long or else some of the lime passes into solution.

  • And a certain Pharisee, a chief priest, whose name was Levi, met them and said to the Saviour, Who gave thee leave to walk in this place of purification, and to see these holy vessels when thou hast not washed nor yet have thy disciples bathed their feet?

  • But defiled thou hast walked in this temple, which is a pure place, wherein no other man walks except he has washed himself and changed his garments neither does he venture to see these holy vessels.

  • He saith unto him, I am clean; for I washed in the pool of David and having descended by one staircase, I ascended by another and I put on white and clean garments, and then I came and looked upon these holy vessels.

  • The precipitate is washed and then distilled from iron retorts.

  • Stas recommends solution of the iodine in potassium iodide and subsequent precipitation by the addition of a large excess of water, the precipitate being washed, distilled in steam, and dried in vacuo over solid calcium nitrate, and then over solid caustic baryta.

  • 65, describes the first communion of the newly baptized: " After we have thus washed the person who has believed and conformed we lead him to the brethren so called, where they are gathered together, to offer public prayer both for ourselves and for the person illuminated, and for all others everywhere, earnestly, to the end that having learned the truth we may be made worthy to be found not only in our actions good citizens, but guardians of the things enjoined.

  • And this food is called by us Eucharistia, and of it none may partake save those who believe our teachings to be true and have been washed in the bath which is for remission of sin and rebirth, and who so live as We should probably omit the words bracketed.

  • In the latter case the precipitate is dissolved in water, reprecipitated by ether, and washed with ether-alcohol.

  • The grey precipitate first formed is allowed to stand for some hours, well washed, and then oxidised by a warm solution of ferric chloride: 6K 2 Fe[Fe(NC) 6] + 30 = Fe7(NC)18 + 3K 4 Fe(NC) 6 + Fe203.

  • The stomach must be washed out and large doses of emetics given as soon as possible.

  • Smaller lakes were formed by the deposition of washed drift around the longest-lasting ice remnants; when the ice finally melted away, the hollows that it left came to be occupied by ponds and lakes.

  • Under these conditions sediments from the high lands were washed out and distributed widely over the plains, giving rise to a thin but widespread formation of ill-assorted sediment, without marine fossils, and, for the most part, without fossils of any kind, and resting unconformably on Cretaceous, Eocene and Miocene formations.

  • It seems probable that the Lafayette formation of the Gulf coastal plain is continuous northward and westward with gravel deposits on the Great Plains, washed out from the Rocky Mountains to the west.

  • Opposite the refectory door in the cloister are two lavatories, an invariable adjunct to a monastic dining-hall, at which the monks washed before and after taking food.

  • Outside the refectory door, in the cloister, was the lavatory, where the monks washed their hands at dinner-time.

  • The precipitate obtained is filtered, well washed with hot water, dried and then ignited until the weight is constant.

  • In the form of a chromate, it may be determined by precipitation, in acetic acid solution, with lead acetate; the lead chromate precipitate collected on a tared filter paper, well washed, dried at loo° C. and weighed; or the chromate may be reduced by means of sulphur dioxide to the condition of a chromic salt, the excess of sulphur dioxide expelled by boiling, and the estimation carried out as above.

  • Chromium trioxide, Cr03, is obtained by adding concentrated sulphuric acid to a cold saturated solution of potassium bichromate, when it separates in long red needles; the mother liquor is drained off and the crystals are washed with concentrated nitric acid, the excess of which is removed by means of a current of dry air.

  • After being dried, the hanks are packed in linen bags and boiled for three hours in a weaker soapy solution, then washed out in pure warm water and dried in a centrifugal hydroextractor.

  • Silks to be finished white are at this point bleached by exposure in a closed chamber to the fumes of sulphurous acid, and at the close of the process the hanks are washed in pure cold water to remove all traces of the acid.

  • Before the silk can be manipulated by machinery to any advantage, the gum coating must be removed, really dissolved and washed away - and according to the method used in achieving this operation the result is either a " schappe " or a " discharged yarn."

  • Thence the silk is taken to a washing machine, and the loosened gum thoroughly washed away.

  • It may be washed or dyed just as required, either in hank or in warp.

  • By popular preference made of the wood of a sacred tree, it was brought into church, and washed first with water and then with wine, or anciently perhaps with blood of a victim.

  • The western two-thirds consists of a low plain, composed of an uplifted coral reef and matter washed down from the mountains; but on the E.

  • These liinus, as they are called by the Kanakas, are washed, salted, broken and eaten as a relish or as a flavouring for fish or other meat.

  • In some places along the coast there is a narrow strip of decomposed coral limestone; often, too, a coral reef has served to catch the sediment washed down the mountain side until a deep sedimentary soil has been deposited.

  • Fleet Road similarly recalls the more famous stream which washed the walls of the City of London on the west.

  • The whole was bedded, not in mortar, but in clay, which has mostly been washed out of the joints; originally the surface was probably protected with a coating of stucco.

  • 8, § 9); if the Pharisees washed, the Essenes bathed before dinner; if the Pharisees ascribed some things to Fate, the Essenes ascribed all (Jos.

  • On certain days the cross was washed, and the water in which it had been washed was a sovereign charm for curing sickness in men and animals and for bringing fertility to the land.

  • The whole of the interior surface is washed with a fountain of alkali, kept in circulation by means of a small centrifugal pump. In this apparatus, and with about one horse-power utilized at the transformer, the absorption of gas is 21 litres per hour ("The Oxidation of Nitrogen Gas," Trans.

  • " washed his weapons in the great sea," and exacted tribute from the kings of Tyre, Sidon, Byblus and other cities, including Arvad (Keilinschr.

  • In this case very great care has to be taken to prevent the cement from being washed away from the other constituents when passing through the water.

  • in height, the foot of which is washed by the Avon, stand the ruins of Cadzow Castle, the subject of a spirited ballad by Sir Walter Scott.

  • The overflowings of the Alpheus have washed away all certain indications of its limits.

  • It had grown into a custom to send the books which he had done with in a chest along with his linen to be washed at Gorcum.

  • He not only served but carved and helped the dishes, proffered the first or principal cup of wine to his master and his guests, and carried to them the basin, ewer or napkin when they washed their hands before and after meat.

  • The filtrate, now containing roughly two molecules of alumina to one of soda, is concentrated to the original gravity of 1.45, and employed instead of fresh caustic for the attack of more bauxite; the precipitate is then collected, washed till free from soda, dried and ignited at about looo C. to convert it into a crystalline oxide which is less hygroscopic than the former amorphous variety.

  • The most probable explanation is that the Flysch consists of the detritus washed down from the hills upon the flanks of which it was formed.

  • Iron pipes are the best conductors; they should lead to a capacious open reservoir placed outside the garden, and at the highest convenient level, in order to secure sufficient pressure for effective distribution, and so that the wall trees also may be effectually washed.

  • River sand and the sharp grit washed up sometimes by the road side are excellent materials for laying around choice bulbs at planting time to prevent contact with earth which is perhaps manure-tainted.

  • Washed sand is best for all plants like heaths, which need a pure and lasting peaty compost.

  • For the destruction of weeds on gravel walks or in paved yards a strong dose of salt, applied either dry or in a very strong solution, is found very effective, especially a hot solution, but after a time much of it becomes washed down, and the residue acts as a manure; its continued application is undesirable, as gravel so treated becomes pasty.

  • 4.-The constitution of hypo-eutectic white or cementitiferous cast iron (washed metal), W.

  • In the United States the charge usually consists chiefly of wrought iron, and in melting in the crucible it is carburized by mixing with it either charcoal or " washed metal," a very pure cast iron made by the Bell-Krupp process (§ 107).

  • After being purchased at the auction sales they are washed, then stretched upon a hoop, when all blubber and unnecessary flesh is removed, and the pelt is reduced to an equal thickness, but not so thin as it is finally rendered.

  • This is filtered off and well washed with water.

  • The terraces can be worked at all seasons, and the material is partly washed out by leading streams on to it.

  • square, with free access to the river bank; the gravel and sand were washed in cradles provided with screens of perforated metal, and the concentrates were sorted by hand on tables by means of an iron scraper.

  • At Argos, his native place, during the festival of Athena, his shield was carried through the streets as a relic, together with the Palladium, and his statue was washed in the river Inachus.

  • east of the Caspian, and have in many parts been excavated and washed away by the rivers (which have frequently changed their beds) or been transported by the winds, which sweep with unmitigated violence across those wide unsheltered expanses.

  • These are collected in water, scraped over the edge of a shell to free them from adhering cellular tissue and epidermis, and more than once washed in a running stream, followed by renewed scraping till the desired purity of fibre is attained.

  • Like the Cantabri, they washed themselves with urine instead of water.

  • The adjustment of the water by means of the sluices is a delicate operation when there is little water and also when there is much; in the latter case the fine earth may be washed away from some parts of the meadow; in the former case, by attempting too much with a limited water current, one may permit the languid streams to deposit their valuable suspended matters instead of carrying them forward to enrich the soil.

  • This process is repeated several times, and the final precipitate is dissolved in hydrochloric acid and precipitated by ammonia, washed and dried.

  • A great difference, however, is to be remarked between the coasts of the North Sea and those of the Baltic. On the former, where the sea has broken up the ranges of dunes formed in bygone times, and divided them into separate islands, the mainland has to be protected by massive dikes, while the Frisian Islands are being gradually washed away by the waters.

  • mandatuna, commandment, in allusion to Christ's words: "A new commandment give I unto you," after he had washed the disciples' feet at the Last Supper), the Thursday before Easter.

  • In England the king washed the feet of as many poor men as he was years old, and then distributed to them meat, money and clothes.

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