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ward

ward

ward Sentence Examples

  • He sensed the ward he triggered and waited.

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  • He reached for her and she stumbled back, holding up her hand to ward him off.

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  • If he bought property belonging to a feudal holding, or to a ward in chancery, he had to return it and forfeit what he gave for it as well.

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  • He was on Catherine's side during the revolution of 1762, but his jealousy of the influence which the Orlovs seemed likely to obtain ovlr the new empress predisposed him to favour the proclamation of his ward the grand duke Paul as emperor, with Catherine as regent only.

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  • He was on Catherine's side during the revolution of 1762, but his jealousy of the influence which the Orlovs seemed likely to obtain ovlr the new empress predisposed him to favour the proclamation of his ward the grand duke Paul as emperor, with Catherine as regent only.

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  • A little girl—a sort-of ward of ours—had an interest in the Lucky Pup Mine.

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  • Actually, Gerald's intent was probably to ward off an attack, rather than chastise Alex.

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  • Indeed, the bulk of the reign of Aurelius was spent in efforts to ward off the attacks of the barbarians.

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  • Ward left the Church of England in September 1845, and was followed by many others, including Newman himself.

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  • Ward Hill (742 ft.) is the sailors' landmark for Lerwick harbour.

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  • The adjutant by his elaborate courtesy appeared to wish to ward off any attempt at familiarity on the part of the Russian messenger.

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  • Ward, made vigorous contributions to natural theology.

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  • Ward is described by his son and biographer as somewhat unequally gifted by nature.

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  • Ward, Lord Dudley.

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  • While the western mountains keep out the moisture, they do not ward off the winds which pour down the steep slopes in the winter and spring and raise clouds of dust.

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  • WILLIAM GEORGE WARD (1812-1882), English Roman Catholic theologian, was born on the 21st of March 1812.

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  • In 1839 Ward became the editor of the British Critic, the organ of the Tractarian party, and he excited suspicion among the adherents of the Tractarians themselves by his violent denunciations of the Church to which he still belonged.

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  • From that period Ward and his associates worked undisguisedly for union with the Church of Rome, and in 1844 he published his Ideal of a Christian Church, in which he openly contended that the only hope for the Church of England lay in submission to the Church of Rome.

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  • After his reception into the Church of Rome, Ward gave himself up to ethics, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

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  • The city council appoints an attorney for the corporation, a city engineer, a city clerk, a police justice, a board of fire commissioners and a board of police commissioners, one from each ward, who have control of the fire and police departments, respectively, and a number of other officers.

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  • ward), distinguished by white hair on the forehand; and it is suggested that the one from Grinnell Land forms a third race.

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  • Benrath, Lokalfiihrer durch Hamburg and Umgebungen (1904); and the consular reports by Sir William Ward, H.B.M.'s consul-general at Hamburg, to whom the author is indebted for great assistance in compiling this article.

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  • The city council appoints an attorney for the corporation, a city engineer, a city clerk, a police justice, a board of fire commissioners and a board of police commissioners, one from each ward, who have control of the fire and police departments, respectively, and a number of other officers.

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  • ward), distinguished by white hair on the forehand; and it is suggested that the one from Grinnell Land forms a third race.

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  • They advanced the few hundred paces that separated the bridge from the Kaluga road, taking more than an hour to do so, and came out upon the square where the streets of the Transmoskva ward and the Kaluga road converge, and the prisoners jammed close together had to stand for some hours at that crossway.

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  • Three justices of the peace are elected from each ward for a term of two years.

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  • Wagner foresaw the use that would be made of this discovery by the adherents of the new philosophy, and, in the usual language of its opponents at the time, strove to ward off the " misinterpretations " that they would put upon it.

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  • Peekskill was the country home of Henry Ward Beecher.

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  • No sustained effort was made to ward off the inroads of the Danes and others, who were constantly attacking the borders of the Empire.

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  • She breathed deeply, struggling to remain in control when all she wanted to do was run for the nearest psych ward and check herself in.

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  • observer that such perceptions exist, and that they are followed by certain purposeful changes in the plant, sometimes mechanical, sometimes chemical, the object being evidently to secure some advantage for the plant, to ward off some danger, or to extricate it from some difficulty.

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  • With planning and diligence, his business would be on its feet in a few years and she would be working in the pediatric ward at the hospital.

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  • She sent to Bartlesville for information on the pediatrics ward and hinted at interest in a job there.

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  • The city council is composed of a common council (five members from each ward, elected for two years) and of a board of aldermen (three members from each ward to be elected for four years).

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  • It forms the Pater Ward of Pembroke, from which it is distant 2 m.

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  • ii.; Marshall Ward, Timber and some of its Diseases (London, 1889); Massart and Bordet, " Irritability of Leucocytes," Journ.

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  • The city council is composed of a common council (five members from each ward, elected for two years) and of a board of aldermen (three members from each ward to be elected for four years).

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  • Ward was drawn for a time in the direction of High Anglicanism; but a stronger and more lasting influence was that of the Arnold school, represented by A.

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  • Ward, then began to work on commissions, and at the age of twenty-three received from the town of Concord, Massachusetts, an order for his well-known statue "The Minute Man," which was unveiled (April 19, 1875) on the centenary of the battle of Concord.

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  • The subscriber pays a fixed annual rent which covers a certain number of free out - ward calls, say boo; additional calls he purchases in advance in blocks of several hundred at so much per hundred, the price being reduced as the number increases.

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  • The charter of that year placed the balance of power in a council composed of three members chosen from each ward and as many aldermen as there were wards, elected on a general ticket.

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  • "If it kept your hands off the women in court and the merchants' sons out of the Healer's ward, yes," Darian replied.

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  • of tke Fungi, &c. (1887); Frank, Die Krankh-eiten der Fflanzen (1895-1896); Sorauer, Handbuch der Pflanzenkrankheiten (i9o6); Ward, Disease in Plants (1901).

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  • Rainy nodded, a look of relief crossing his features, and Damian saw his mind was on his Natural ward, Traci.

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  • New ward schools of modern construction were established.

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  • ADOLPHUS WILLIAM WARD (1837-), English historian and man of letters, was born at Hampstead, London, on the 2nd of December 1837, and was educated in Germany and at the university of Cambridge.

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  • AuTH0RITIE5.Sachs, Lectures on the Physiology of Plants, translated by Marshall Ward; Vines, Lectures on the Physiology of Plants; Pfeffer, The Physiology of Plants, trans.

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  • Wounds, &c.Marshall Ward, Timber and some of its Diseases, p. 210; Hartig, Diseases of Trees (London, 1894).

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  • The first person Rostov met in the officers' ward was a thin little man with one arm, who was walking about the first room in a nightcap and hospital dressing gown, with a pipe between his teeth.

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  • Money must not be extorted from a ward when he receives his inheritance.

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  • A ward must be allowed a reasonable liberty in the matter of marriage.

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  • Stilicho and Serena were named guardians of the youthful Honorius when the latter was created joint emperor in 394 with special jurisdiction over Italy, Gaul, Britain, Spain and Africa, and Stilicho was even more closely allied to the imperial family in the following year by betrothing his daughter Maria to his ward and by receiving the dying injunctions of Theodosius to care for his children.

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  • It was bold policy to confide Frederick to his greatest enemy and rival; but the pope honorably discharged his duty, until his ward outgrew the years of tutelage, and became a fair mark for ecclesiastical hostility.

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  • The establishment of The Atlantic Monthly in 1857 gave her a constant vehicle for her writings, as did also The Independent of New York, and later The Christian Union, of each of which papers successively her brother, Henry Ward Beecher, was one of the editors.

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  • The area between the northern border of the Persian high lands and the Caspian and Aral Seas is a nearly desert low-lying plain, extending to the foot of the north - western extremity of the great Tibeto-Himalayan mountains, and prolonged east- Trans- ward up the valleys of the Oxus (Amu-Darya) and Caspian Jaxartes (Syr-Darya), and northward across the country re ior, and of the Kirghiz to the south-western border of Siberia.

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  • Regulating works have been undertaken to ward off the dangers of periodical inundations, which occur in the valley of the Danube and of the other great rivers, as the Theiss, the Drave and the Save.

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  • Her eyes were large and imploring as she was wheeled down the hall to a room in the pediatric ward.

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  • Any issues with your ward?

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  • Move them closer to their ward.

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  • He accordingly declined to take any action, meanwhile indicating the direction of his sympathies by making Mortara his ward.

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  • Artemus Ward >>

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  • Lotze; more drastic in Ward's Naturalism and Agnosticism).

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  • Ward's expression, see his Gifford Lecture).

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  • James Ward's masterly criticism of Herbert Spencer (Naturalism and Agnosticism) has been mentioned above.

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  • The guardian or his servant must not take from the ward's property more than a reasonable amount for his expenses and the like; on the contrary he must maintain the houses, estates and other belongings in a proper state of efficiency.

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  • Ward.

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  • In the previous year the Tractarian movement had commenced, and Ward's relations with that movement were as original as the rest of his life.

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  • Ward >>

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  • M1loura - pa Ward ?

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  • It was formerly in the ancient parish of Eglwysilan, but from that and Bedwas (Mon.) an ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1850, while the whole of the parishes of Eglwysilan and Llanfabon, with a total acreage of 14,426, were in 1893 constituted into an urban district; its population in 1901 was 15,385, of which 4343 were in the "town" ward.

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  • Its name is kept in a wharf and a ward of the City.

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  • For the speedy removal of burning houses each ward was to provide a strong iron hook, with a wooden handle, two chains and two strong cords, which were to be left in the charge of the bedel of the ward, who was also provided with a good horn, " loudly sounding."

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  • The Greyfriars, Minorites or Franciscans, first settled in Cornhill, and in 1224 John Ewin made over to them an estate situated in the ward of Farringdon Within and in the parish of St Nicholas in the Shambles, where their friary was built.

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  • The house of the Austin Friars or Friars Eremites was founded in Broad Street Ward in 1253.

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  • In 1377 it was ordered that aldermen could be elected annually, but in 1384 the rule was modified so as to allow an alderman to be reelected for his ward at the expiration of his year of office without any interval.

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  • Ward, 1868-1873).

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  • The archers fixed the pointed stakes, which they carried to ward off cavalry charges, and opened the engagement with flights of arrows.

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  • Next followed the contest with Elam, in spite of the efforts of Assurbani-pal to ward it off.

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  • Layard in the palace of Assur-bani-pal at Kuyunjik (Nineveh), as long ago as 1851 and noticed then as in a " doubtful character," were compared by Hayes Ward and found to be of the Hamathite class.

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  • Meanwhile Wright, Ward and Sayce had all suggested " Hittite " as a substitute for " Hamathite," because no other N.

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  • At first the consules, of whom there seem to have been twelve, two for each sestiere or ward, were chosen by the men of the towers, and assisted by a council of loo boni homines, in which the arti were predominant; the government thus came to be in the hands of a few powerful families.

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  • Ward in his Catalogue of Romances (i.

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  • Ward, Our Sudan, its Pyramids and Progress (London, 1905); E.

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  • There is in the British Museum a copy with notes by John Ward (c. 1679-1758), biographer of the Gresham professors.

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  • He was also, as he tells us himself, alderman of a London ward and an active partisan in municipal politics.

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  • The name of the firm was Grant and Ward.

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  • Amendments to the constitution must be passed by both houses of the General Assembly at two consecutive sessions, and must then be ratified by three-fifths of the electors of the state present and voting thereon in town and ward meetings.

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  • Richard Ward.

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  • Stephen Hopkins Samuel Ward.

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  • His forefathers were Gledstanes of Gledstanes, in the upper ward of Lanarkshire; or in Scottish phrase, Gledstanes of that Ilk.

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  • Coleridge, Robert and Elizabeth Browning, Coventry Patmore, Henry Ward Beecher and Thomas Carlyle.

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  • Upon his resignation from Lane Theological Seminary he lived in Boston for a short time, devoting himself to literature; but he broke down, and the last ten years of his life were spent at the home of his son, Henry Ward Beecher, in Brooklyn, New York, where he died on the 10th of January 1863.

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  • Channing, Henry Ward Beecher, Horace Bushnell, Phillips Brooks, to mention only a few.

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  • virorum and Ward's Gresham Professors.

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  • He married in 1904 Janet Penrose, elder daughter of Mrs. Humphry Ward.

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  • Ward in the Dictionary of National Biography.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • It centralizes power in a council of five (mayor and four councilmen), nominated at a non-partisan primary and voted for on a non-partisan ticket by the electors of the entire city, ward divisions having been abolished.

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  • Ward's article in the Dict.

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  • To ward off these attacks Charles took a warm interest in the building of a fleet, which he reviewed in 811; but by this time Gudrod had been killed, and his successor Hemming made peace with the emperor.

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  • Ward, Catalogue of Romances in the Dept.

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  • The same general line of thought underlies James Ward's Naturalism and Agnosticism (2nd ed., 1903), and A.

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  • The country towns now poured their militia into Cambridge, opposite Boston; troops came from neighbouring colonies, and Artemas Ward, a Massachusetts general, was placed in command of the irregular force, which with superior numbers at once shut the royal army up in Boston.

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  • Ward, Dawn of the Catholic Revival (London, 1909); Handecoeur, Hist.

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  • The state is divided into sixty-one counties, each (unless wholly included in a city) having a county board of supervisors elected for two years, one from every town or city ward.

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  • In 1910 there were fourteen state hospitals (corresponding to fourteen state hospital districts) for the poor and indigent insane; these were at Utica, Willard, Poughkeepsie, Buffalo, Middletown (homoeopathic), Binghamton, Rochester, Ogdensburg, Gowanda (homoeopathic), Flatbush, Ward's Island, King's Park, Central Islip and Yorktown.

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  • The cabinets which administered the affairs of the colony during these years were those of Sir Frederick Whitaker, Sir Harry Atkinson (3), Sir Robert Stout (2), Mr Ballance, Mr Seddon, Mr Hall-Jones and Sir Joseph Ward.

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  • Mr Hall-Jones's short premiership was an interregnum made necessary by the absence of Sir Joseph Ward in England at the moment of Mr Seddon's death.

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  • The party headed by Ballance, Seddon and Ward held office without a break for more than seventeen years, a result mainly due to the general support given to its agrarian and labour policy by the smaller farmers and the working classes.

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  • Suffrage is conferred upon all adult citizens of the United States (including women, 1910) who have lived in the state one year, in the county ninety days, and in the city, town, ward or precinct thirty days immediately preceding the election, and are able to read and speak the English language; Indians who are not taxed, idiots, insane persons and convicts are debarred.

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  • In a city of the first class, a mayor, two aldermen from each ward, a police judge, and a treasurer who may be ex officio tax-collector are elected, and an attorney, a clerk, a chief of police, an assessor, a street commissioner, a jailer, a surveyor, and, where there is a paid fire department, a chief engineer with one or more assistants, may be appointed by the mayor with the consent of the council.

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  • And Yahweh-Elohim planted a garden s in Eden, east ward; and there he put the man whom he had formed."

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  • In addition to the statues in Juneau Park there is a statue of Kosciusko in the park of that name; one of Washington and a soldiers' monument on Grand Avenue; a statue of Henry Bergh in front of the city hall; one of Robert Burns in the First Ward Park, and, in Washington Park, a replica of Ernst Rietschel's Schiller-Goethe monument in Jena, given to the city in 1908 by the Germans of Milwaukee.

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  • Walker's Point, the south side, was annexed as a third ward in 1845, and in 1846 the three wards were incorporated as the city of Milwaukee, of which Solomon Juneau was elected first mayor.

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  • See John Ward, The Borough of Stoke-upon-Trent (London, 1843)

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  • from 1227 to 1238 and in 1241 succeeded his former ward as landgrave.

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  • Ward, 1887).

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  • Ward in chs.

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  • Ward, of General Israel Putnam; one, by Truman H.

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  • Haverhill was settled in June 1640 by a small colony from Newbury and Ipswich, and its Indian name, Pentucket, was replaced by that of Haverhill in compliment to the first minister, Rev. John Ward, who was born at Haverhill, England.

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  • by Miss Janet Ward, 1904).

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  • But neither his devotion to civic duty nor to the administration of the affairs of the Grand Army could ward off disaster.

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  • For more detailed information relating to Napier, Briggs and Vlacq, and the invention of logarithms, the reader is referred to the life of Briggs in Ward's Lives of the Professors of Gresham College (London, 1740); Thomas Smith's Vitae quorundam eruditissimorum et illustrium virorum (Vita Henrici Briggii) (London, 1707); Mark Napier's Memoirs of John Napier already referred to, and the same author's Naperi libri qui supersunt (1839); Hutton's History; de Morgan's article already referred to; Delambre's Histoire de l'Astronomie moderne; the report on mathematical tables in the Report of the British Association for 1873; and the Philosophical Magazine for October and December 1872 and May 1873.

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  • Dr Samuel Ward, afterwards master of Sid.

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  • Mr Robert Ward, fellow of King's Coll.

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  • In the House of Representatives, which has the large membership of 390, representation is on the basis of population, but is so arranged as to favour the rural districts; thus every town or ward of a city having 600 inhabitants is allowed one representative, but, although for every additional representative 1200 additional inhabitants are required, any town having less than 600 inhabitants is allowed a representative for such proportionate part of the time the legislature is in session as the number of its inhabitants bears to 600.

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  • A representative must have been an inhabitant of the state for at least two years next preceding his election, and must be an inhabitant of the town, parish or ward he is chosen to represent; a senator must be at least thirty years of age, must have been an inhabitant of the state for at least seven years next preceding his election, and must be an inhabitant of the district by which he is chosen.

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  • In accordance with the general laws each city elects a mayor, a board of aldermen, and a common council in whom is vested the administration of its " fiscal, prudential and municipal affairs "; the mayor presides at the meetings of the board of aldermen, and has a veto on any measure of this body, and no measure can be passed over his veto except by an affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of all the aldermen; each ward elects three selectmen, a moderator and a clerk in whom is vested the charge of elections; the city marshal and assistant marshals are appointed by the mayor and aldermen, but the city clerk and city treasurer are elected by the aldermen and common council in joint session.

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  • Ward, " The New Hampshire Constitution," in The New England Magazine, N.S., vol.

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  • off, formed a ward of the borough.

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  • Litchfield was the birthplace of Ethan Allen; of Henry Ward Beecher; of Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose novel, Poganuc People, presents a picture of social conditions in Litchfield during her girlhood; of Oliver Wolcott, Jr. (1760-1833); of John Pierpont (1785-1866), the poet, preacher and lecturer; and of Charles Loring Brace, the philanthropist.

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  • General McCarver's original plat included what is now the first ward of the city, and is called the Old Town.

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  • is as yet hardly trenched by the Rio Grande, which escapes through an impassable canyon south-, ward on its way to the Gulf of Mexico.

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  • In the smallest areas, such as the township or city ward, the meeting is composed of all the recognized members of the party who are entitled to vote, and it is then called a primary.

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  • Ward, one of William Lloyd Garrison by D.

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  • to S., into an outer and inner ward, - the former containing the menial, the latter the monastic buildings.

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  • The precincts are entered by a gateway (P), at the extreme western extremity, giving admission to the lower ward.

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  • outer and inner ward, and the gatehouse (D) affording communication between the two.

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  • On passing through the gateway, the outer court of the inner ward was entered, with the western fa�e of the monastic church in front.

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  • It is uncertain whether the conventional fleur-de-lis was originally meant to represent the lily or white iris - the flower-de-luce of Shakespeare - or an arrow-head, a spear-head, an amulet fastened on date-palms to ward off the evil eye, &c. In Roman and early Gothic architecture the fleur-de-lis is a frequent sculptured ornament.

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  • The only other islands containing heights of any importance are Pomona, with Ward Hill (880 ft.), and Wideford (740 ft.) and Rousay.

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  • Under the charter of 1903, as amended in 1907, the municipal government consists of a city council, composed of the mayor, four aldermen, elected at large, and eight ward aldermen, all elected for a term of two years, as are the other elective officers; a city attorney, an assessor, a collector, a treasurer, an auditor and judge of the Corporation Court.

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  • Ward, Cat.

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  • The petition may allege that the election was avoided as to the borough or ward on the ground of general bribery, &c., or that the election of the person petitioned against was avoided by corrupt practices, or by personal disqualification, or that he had not the majority of lawful votes.

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  • In Great Britain Mach's scepticism was welcomed by Karl Pearson to support an idealistic phenomenalism derived from Hume, and by Ward to support a noumenal idealism derived from Lotze.

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  • James Ward, in Naturalism and Agnosticism (1899), starts from the same phenomenalistic views of Mach and Kirchhoff about mechanics; he proceeds to the hypothesis of duality within experience, which we have traced in James Ward.

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  • the phenomenalisms of Schuppe, Avenarius and Wundt, and to the hypothesis of one consciousness, which appears variously in the German idealisms, not of Kant, as Ward thinks, but of Fichte, Hegel and Schuppe; and somehow he manages to end with the noumenalistic conclusion that Nature is God's Spirit.

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  • Ward on the whole follows this triple scheme, but modifies it by new arguments founded on later German phenomenalism.

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  • Under the second head, according to Ward, as according to Wundt, knowledge is experience; we must start with the duality of subject and object, or perpetual reality, phenomenon, in the unity of experience, and not believe, as realists do, that either subject or object is distinct from this unity; moreover, experience requires " conation," because it is to interesting objects that the subject attends; conation is required for all synthesis, associative and intellective; thinking is doing; presentation, feeling, conation are one inseparable whole; and the unity of the subject is due to activity and not to a substratum.

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  • Not so Ward, who proceeds to a Natural Theology, on the ground that " from a world of spirits to a Supreme Spirit is a possible step."

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  • One cannot but feel regret at seeing the Reformed Churches blown about by every wind of doctrine, and catching at straws now from Kant, now from Hegel, and now from Lotze, or at home from Green, Caird, Martineau, Balfour and Ward in succession, without ever having considered the basis of their faith; while the Roman Catholics are making every effort to ground a Universal Church on a sane system of metaphysics.

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  • Ward was a philosophical critic of Mill.

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  • Ward, Roman Fort of Gellygaer (London, 1903).

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  • Sarong, the Malay ward for a garment wrapped round the lower part of the body and used by both men and women, is now applied to plain or printed cloths exported to the Indian or Eastern Archipelago for this purpose.

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  • In the interior, Ward Hill (1564 ft.) is the loftiest summit in either the Orkneys or Shetlands.

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  • In the valley between Ward Hill and the ridge of the Hamars to the south-east is situated the famous Dwarfie Stone, an enormous block of sandstone measuring 28 ft.

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  • When Carey died in 1834 he and his colleagues Marshman and Ward had translated the Bible into seven languages, and the New Testament into 23 more, besides rendering services of the highest kind to literature, science and general progress.

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  • Anthony Babington, in his boyhood a ward of Shrewsbury, resident in the household at Sheffield Castle, and thus subjected to the charm before which so many victims had already fallen, was now induced to undertake the deliverance of the queen of Scots by the murder of the queen of England.

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  • wide, and should be put on during spring before the blossom buds begin to expand; they should have attached to them scrim cloth (a sort of thin canvas), which admits light pretty freely, yet is sufficient to ward off ordinary frosts; this canvas is to be let down towards evening and drawn up again in the morning.

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  • Upon quitting his professorship Barrow was only a fellow of Trinity College; but his uncle gave him a small sinecure in Wtles, and Dr Seth Ward, bishop of Salisbury, conferred upon him a prebend in that church.

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  • See Ward, Lives of the Gresham Professors, and Whewell's biography prefixed to the 9th volume of Napier's edition of Barrow's Sermons.

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  • Marshall Ward showed that the hyphae of Botrytis pierce the cell-walls of a lily by secreting a cytase and dissolving a hole through the membrane.

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  • A similar specialization has been observed by Marshall Ward in the Puccinia parasitic on species of Bromus, and by Neger, Marchal and especially Salmon in the Erysiphaceae.

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  • 12 (1883); Ward, "Onygena equina, a horn-destroying fungus," Phil.

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  • 20 (1906); Ward, "The Brooms and their Rust Fungus," Ann.

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  • 2 (1888); Eriksson & Hennings, Die Getreideroste (vide supra); Ward, "On the Question of Predisposition and Immunity in Plants," Proc. Cambridge Phil.

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  • brought from above G to C, Pusher, for forcing billets forbetween N by a flue not ward.

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  • The pelt or skin is requisite to keep out the piercing wind and driving storm, while the fur and overhair ward off the cold; and "furs" are as much a necessity to-day among more northern peoples as they ever were in the days of barbarism.

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  • It is significant that olive and willow should have been chosen for benediction together with, or as substitutes for palm, and that an exorcizing power should have been ascribed to the consecrated branches: they were to heal disease, ward off devils, protect the houses where they were set up against lightning and fire, and the fields where they were planted against hail and storms. But healing power had been ascribed to the olive in pagan antiquity, and in the same way the willow had from time immemorial been credited by the Teutonic peoples with the possession of protective qualities.

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  • The borough lies in the valley of the Lehigh river, along which runs one of its few streets and in another deeply cut valley at right angles to the river; through this second valley east and west runs the main street, on which is an electric railway; parallel to it on the south is High Street, formerly an Irish settlement; half way up the steep hill, and on the north at the top of the opposite hill is the ward of Upper Mauch Chunk, reached by the electric railway.

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  • In 1609 an English lady, Mary Ward, founded at Munich the " Institute of Mary," the nuns of which were not bound to enclosure.

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  • In 1654 Seth Ward (1617-1689), the Savilian professor of astronomy, replying in his Vindiciae academiarum to some other assaults (especially against John Webster's Examen of Academies) on the academic system, retorted upon Hobbes that, so far from the universities being now what he had known them in his youth, he would find his geometrical pieces, when they appeared, better understood there than he should like.

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  • In the chapter (xx.) of that work where Hobbes dealt with the famous problem whose solution he thought he had found, there were left expressions against Vindex (Ward) at a time when the solutions still seemed to him good; but the solutions themselves, as printed, were allowed to be all in different ways halting, as he naively confessed he had discovered only when he had been driven by the insults of malevolent men to examine them more closely with the help of his friends.

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  • Ward's colleague, the more famous John Wallis, Savilian professor of geometry from 1649, had been privy to the challenge thrown out in 1654, and it was arranged that they should critically dispose of the De corpore between them.

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  • Ward was to occupy himself with the philosophical and physical sections, which he did in leisurely fashion, bringing out his criticism in the course of next year (In Th.

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  • Obtaining also a copy of the work as it had been printed before Hobbes had any doubt of the validity of his solutions, Wallis was able to track his whole course front the time of Ward's provocation - his passage from exultation to doubt, from doubt to confessed impotence, yet still without abandoning the old assumption of confident strength; and all his turnings and windings were now laid bare in one of the most trenchant pieces of controversial writing ever penned.

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  • But the most remarkable of the persons with whom at this time Johnson consorted was Richard Savage, an earl's son, a shoemaker's apprentice, who had seen life in all its forms, who had feasted among blue ribands in St James's Square, and had lain with fifty pounds weight of irons on his legs in the condemned ward of Newgate.

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  • Ward, in Lincoln Park, Washington.

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  • Tarbell, The Early Life of Lincoln (New York, 1896) and Life of Abraham Lincoln (2 vols., New York, 1900), containing new material to which too great prominence and credence is sometimes given; Carl Schurz, Abraham Lincoln: An Essay (Boston, 1891), a remarkably able estimate; Ward H.

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  • To punish him the pope put forward his own ward, Henry VI.s son Frederick, who was living in Sicily, as a rival king.

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  • The nephew also defended his uncle in An Appendix to the Life of Bishop Seth Ward, 1697, 8vo.

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  • Action by a Ward against a Guardian (S ..71crpoiii).

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  • (1887-1890); Ward, Bull.

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  • The charter, as amended, provides for a mayor elected for two years and a common council of two members from each ward elected for two years.

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  • The members of the lower house are elected, one by each ward, in the spring of each even numbered year.

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  • Ward, Pyramids and Progress (1900); A.

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  • Ward) and in Collins's Peerage, and the Correspondence of Lord Clarendon with James, earl of Abingdon,1683-1685(Clarendon Press, 1896).

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  • In 1906 the question of uniting Allegheny with Pittsburg under one municipal government was submitted to a joint vote of the electorate of the two cities, in accordance with an act of the state legislature, which had been passed in February of that year, and a large majority voted for the union; but there was determined opposition in Allegheny, every ward of the city voting in the negative; the constitutionality of the act was challenged; the supreme court of the state on the 11th of March 1907 declared the act valid, and on the 18th of November 1907 this decision was affirmed by the Supreme Court of the United States.

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  • the "superior steadiness" (Ward) of impressions; while looking at any set of surroundings, images of many different scenes may pass through the mind, each one of which is immediately distinguished from the impression of the actual scene before the eyes.

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  • In July he mastered Edinburgh, and bade Angus and his brother, Sir George Douglas, place themselves in ward north of Tay.

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  • Murray arrested VI.: Lethington, as accused of Darnley's murder, and Lethington was now lodged under ward in Edinburgh, Conte "- but Kirkcaldy of Grange released him and gave him shelter in Edinburgh castle, which he commanded (2 3 rd of October).

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  • Ward, Timber and some of its Diseases; R.

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  • The story of the estrangement, which was largely a matter of temperament, is fully told in Ward's biography.

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  • See the biography by Wilfrid Ward, The Life and Times of Cardinal Wiseman (2 vols., 1897; fifth and cheaper edition, 1900).

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  • from the centre of Laconia is Lakeport (pop. 1900, 2137), which, like The Weirs, is a summer resort and a ward in the city of Laconia.

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  • Ward, Bull.

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  • 30 be rendered: " I was at his side as a master-workman "; but the Hebrew word (amon) rendered " master-workman " is of doubtful meaning, and the connexion rather calls for some such sense as " nursling, ward "; Yahweh himself is represented as the architect, and wisdom, the first of his works, is his companion, sporting in his presence like a beloved child.

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  • Among the numerous charitable institutions the most important hospital is the Casa de Beneficencia y Maternidad (Charity and Maternity Asylum), opened in 1794, and containing an orphan asylum, a maternity ward, a home for vagrants, a lunatic asylum and an infirmary.

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  • Julia Ward Howe >>

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  • All these troops are intended to ward off a first attack, so as to allow time for the arrival of reinforcements from Italy.

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  • Facing the South Common were the homes of Rev. Nathaniel Ward (1578-1652), principal author of the Massachusetts "Body of Liberties" (1641); the first code of laws in New England, and author of The Simple Cobler of Aggawam in America, Willing to help mend his Native Country, lamentably tattered, both in the upper-Leather and the Sole (1647), published under the pseudonym, "Theodore de la Guard," one of the most curious and interesting books of the colonial period; of Richard Saltonstall (1610-1694), who wrote against the life tenure of magistrates, and although himself an Assistant espoused the more liberal principles of the Deputies; and of Ezekiel Cheever (1614-1708), a famous schoolmaster, who had charge of the grammar school in 1650-1660.

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  • In 46, his patience giving way, he divorced Terentia, and married his young and wealthy ward Publilia.

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  • The ward into which she penetrated was like a den of wild beasts; it was filled with women unsexed, fighting, swearing, dancing, gaming, yelling and justly deserved its name of "hell above ground."

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  • Morse, Elias Howe, De Witt Clinton (colossal bronze statue by Henry Kirke Brown), Henry Ward Beecher, Peter Cooper, Horace Greeley, Henry Bergh, Henry George and James Gordon Bennett.

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  • Ward) of Henry Ward Beecher, mounted on a granite pedestal with a figure at each side to commemorate Beecher's sympathy for the slave.

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  • Among them were Henry Ward Beecher, pastor of Plymouth church (Congregational) from 1847 to 1887; Lyman Abbott, pastor of the same church from 1887 to 1898; Thomas De Witt Talmage, pastor of the Brooklyn Tabernacle (Presbyterian) from 1869 to 1894; Richard Salter Storrs (1821-1900), pastor of the church of the Pilgrims (Congregational) from 1846 to 1899; and Theodore L.

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  • At an interview at Le Goulet on the 25th of March, Philip demanded the cession of Anjou, Poitou and Normandy to his ward, Arthur.

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  • There was also an executive council of six, one from each ward.

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  • trans., 1907); William Ward, The Ideal of a Christian Church (1844).

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  • Ward, Naturalism and Agnosticism (1899).

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  • On the 17th of January 1711, in spite of Marlborough's efforts to ward off the blow, the duchess was compelled to give up her key of office.

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  • Ward); A.

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  • Under the empire various special functions were assigned to certain praetors, such as the two treasury praetors (praetores aerarii),3 appointed by Augustus in 23; the spear praetor (praetor haslarius), who presided over the court of the Hundred Men, which dealt especially with cases of inheritance; the two trust praetors (praetores fideicommissarii), appointed by Claudius to look after cases of trust estates, but reduced by Titus to one; the ward praetor (praetor tutelaris), appointed by Marcus Aurelius to deal with the affairs of minors; and the liberation praetor (praetor de liberalibus causis), who tried cases turning on the liberation of slaves.'

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  • Ward), erected by the Society of the Army.

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  • Those traditions or doctrines which were most uncongenial to the modern world were placed in strong relief; and the disparagement of the individual intellect was extended to the disparagement of scientific research itself " (Wilfrid Ward, Life of W.

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  • Ward, vol.

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  • C. Husenbeth, Life of John [Bishop]Milner (Dublin, 1862);Wilfrid Ward, Life and Times of Cardinal Wiseman (2 vols., London, 1897); E.

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  • Purcell, Life of Cardinal Manning (2 vols., London, 1895); Bernard Ward, Dawn of the Catholic Revival in England, 1781-1803 (2 vols., 2909).

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  • JULIA WARD HOWE (1819-1910), American author and reformer, was born in New York City on the 27th of May 1819.

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  • Her father, Samuel Ward, was a banker; her mother, Julia Rush [Cutler] (1796-1824), a poet of some ability.

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  • He became a ward and disciple of the famous Jacob - the same who attended the Council of Nicaea as bishop of Nisibis, and died in 338.

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  • Such deposition of sacredness is but an aspect of the wider method that causes a ring-fence to be erected round the sacred to ward off casual trespassers at once in their own interest and to prevent contamination.

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  • In the course of the following year Carey sailed for India, where he was joined a few years later by Marshman and Ward, and the mission was established at Serampore.

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  • The king went to Metz in 1744, and his presence there did something to ward off the danger.

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  • has a mayor, or chief magistrate, called beglerbegi, lord of lords, kalantar, the greater, and sometimes darogha, overseer, or chief of police; every ward or parish, niahalleh, of a town and every village has a head-man called ked khoda, house-lord.

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  • Yet as far back as the 13th century a statute, known as that of "Watch and Ward," was passed in the 13th year of Edward I.

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  • Ward (1887), with authorities there given; Charles II., by O.

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  • The latest recorded instance of its use is Trebilcock's case (1736), in which a ward sought to free himself from the custody of his guardian.

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  • According to the version which appears to be the earliest: " Juvenal was the son or ward of a wealthy freedman; he practised declamation till middle age, not as a professional teacher, but as an amateur, and made his first essay in satire by writing the lines on Paris, the actor and favourite of Domitian, now found in the seventh satire (lines 90 seq.).

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  • - Plan and Description of the Great and Wonderful Cave in Kentucky, by Dr Nahum Ward (1816); Notes on the Mammoth Cave, with a Map, by Edmund F.

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  • All that was built during the five years, 1356 to 1361, when Wykeham was clerk of the works, were the new royal apartments, two long halls and some chambers in the upper ward, quite unconnected with and east of the Round Tower, and a gateway or two leading to them, the order for building which was given on the 1st of August 1351 (Pipe Roll 30 Ed.

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  • Ward in Smithsonian Institution Annual Rep., 1899; for the rest of the area, various reports in the U.S. Geological Survey publications, bibliography in Bulletin Nos.

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  • The occurrence of a starch-like substance which stains deep blue with iodine has been clearly shown in some forms even where the bacterium is growing on a medium containing no starch, as shown by Ward and others.

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  • W.) which Arloing, Buchner, Chmelewski, and others took part, have led to the proof that rays of light alone are quite capable of killing these organisms. The principal questions were satisfactorily settled by Marshall Ward's experiments in 1892-1893, when he showed that even the spores of B.

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  • Bacteria in Water: Frankland and Marshall Ward.

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  • p. i; Marshall Ward, " On the Biology of B.

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  • Spores, &c.: Marshall Ward, " On the Biology of B.

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  • Classification: Marshall Ward, " On the Characters or Marks employed for classifying the Schizomycetes," Ann.

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  • Growth: Marshall Ward, " On the Biology of B.

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  • (1904), p. 681; Marshall Ward, " On the Tubercular Swellings on the Roots of Vicia Faba," Phil.

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  • Action of Light, &c.: Marshall Ward, " The Action of Light on Bacteria," Phil.

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  • Symbiosis: Marshall Ward, " Symbiosis," Ann.

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  • three delegates chosen by manhood suffrage for each ward of the city; but the election is subject to the veto of the king without reason given.

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  • In its present form the constitution confers suffrage upon every male citizen of the United States who is twenty-one years of age or over and has resided in the state six months and in his township or ward twenty days immediately preceding an election; and any woman may vote in an election involving the direct expenditure of public money or the issue of bonds if she have the qualifications of male electors and if she have property assessed for taxes in any part of the district or territory affected by the election in question.

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  • Adolphus William Ward >>

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  • While at supper about 6 o'clock an anonymous letter was brought by an unknown messenger which, having glanced at, he handed to Ward, a gentleman of his service and an intimate friend of Winter, the conspirator, to be read aloud.

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  • Meanwhile Ward, on the 27th of October, as had evidently been intended, informed Winter that the plot was known, and on the 28th Winter informed Catesby and begged him to give up the whole project.

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  • Joel Parker Marcus Lawrence Ward Theodore Frelinghuysen Randolph Joel Parker .

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  • - a, b, quill feathers; c, the air, in such a manner as cork; d, e, f, g, downward and for- to produce a horizontal ward curved trajectory made by the feathers and cork before reaching the transference.

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  • boundaries of the wards (if any), and assigns the number of councillors to each ward, and provides generally for the time and manner in which the act of 1882 is first to come into operation.

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