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wampum

wampum

wampum Sentence Examples

  • Wampum was employed most in New England, but it was common elsewhere.

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  • Wampum was of two colours, dark purple and white, of cylindrical form, averaging a quarter of an inch in length, and about half that in diameter.

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  • wampum, " white"; peag, " bead"), the shell-money of the North American Indians.

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  • A strand of wampum, consisting of purple and white shell-beads or a belt woven with figures formed by beads of different colours, operated on the principle of associating a particular fact with a particular string or figure, thus giving a serial arrangement to the facts as well as fidelity to the memory.

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  • A strand of wampum, consisting of purple and white shell-beads or a belt woven with figures formed by beads of different colours, operated on the principle of associating a particular fact with a particular string or figure, thus giving a serial arrangement to the facts as well as fidelity to the memory.

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  • The term wampum or wampum-peage was apparently applied to the beads only when strung or woven together.

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  • WAMPUM, or Wampum-Peage (Amer.

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  • White wampum was made from the shell of whelks, either from the common whelk (Buccinum undatum), or from that of Pyrula canaliculata and Pyrula carica.

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  • Dark wampum, which was made from a "hard shell" clam (Venus mercenaria), popularly called quahang or quahog, a corruption of the Indian name, was the most valuable.

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  • Connecticut received wampum for taxes in 1637 at four a penny.

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  • Wampum was also used for personal adornment, and belts were made by embroidering wampum upon strips of deerskin.

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  • By the Dutch settlers of New York it was called seawan or zeewand, and roenoke in Virginia, and perhaps farther south, for shell-money was also known in the Carolinas, but whether the roenoke of the Virginian Indians was made from the same species of shell as wampum is not clear.

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  • Thus where six wampum went to the penny, the fathom consisted of 360 beads; but where four made a penny, as under the Massachusetts standard of 1640, then the fathom counted 240.

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  • The animals were decorated with wampum and strangled, and then the sins of the people were transferred to them; then the remains were burned and the ashes gathered up, taken through the village and sprinkled before every house.

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  • In the trading between whites and Indians, wampum so completely took the place of ordinary coin that its value was fixed by legal enactment, three to a penny and five shillings a fathom.

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  • There was no restriction on the manufacture of wampum, and it was made by the whites as well as the Indians.

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  • They bought practically all of what is now Essex county from the Indians for "fifty double hands of powder, one hundred bars of lead, twenty axes, twenty coats, ten guns, twenty pistols, ten kettles, ten swords, four blankets, four barrels of beer, ten pairs of breeches, fifty knives, twenty horses, eighteen hundred and fifty fathoms of wampum, six ankers of liquor (or something equivalent), and three troopers' coats."

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  • When discovered by Europeans Staten Island was occupied by the Aquehonga Indians, a branch of the Raritans, and several Indian burying-grounds, places where wampum was manufactured, and many Indian relics, including a stone head with human features, have been found here.

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  • Wampum also served a mnemonic use as a tribal history or record.

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  • Cylindrical shell-beads similar to the wampum of the Atlantic coast Indians were made to some extent by the Indians of the west coast.

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  • The market was soon flooded with carelessly made and inferior wampum, but it continued to be circulated in the remote districts of New England through the 17th century, and even into the beginning of the 18th.

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  • Norton, "The Last Wampum Coinage," in American Magazine for March 1888.

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  • The animals were decorated with wampum and strangled, and then the sins of the people were transferred to them; then the remains were burned and the ashes gathered up, taken through the village and sprinkled before every house.

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  • The site of the township was purchased from the Indians in 1640 by Roger Ludlow and Daniel Patrick, Ludlow giving six fathoms of wampum, six coats, ten hatchets, ten hoes, ten knives, ten scissors, ten jew's harps, ten fathoms of tobacco, three kettles of six hands, and about ten looking-glasses for all the land between the Norwalk and Saugatuck rivers and extending one day's walk N.

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  • They bought practically all of what is now Essex county from the Indians for "fifty double hands of powder, one hundred bars of lead, twenty axes, twenty coats, ten guns, twenty pistols, ten kettles, ten swords, four blankets, four barrels of beer, ten pairs of breeches, fifty knives, twenty horses, eighteen hundred and fifty fathoms of wampum, six ankers of liquor (or something equivalent), and three troopers' coats."

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  • When discovered by Europeans Staten Island was occupied by the Aquehonga Indians, a branch of the Raritans, and several Indian burying-grounds, places where wampum was manufactured, and many Indian relics, including a stone head with human features, have been found here.

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  • In 1630 the Dutch West India Company granted the island to Michael Pauw as a part of his patroonship of Pavonia, and it was bought at this time from the Indians for "some duffels, kettles, axes, hoes, wampum, drilling awls, jew's harps, and divers other small wares"; but before Pauw had established a settlement upon it he sold his title back to the company.

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  • WAMPUM, or Wampum-Peage (Amer.

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  • wampum, " white"; peag, " bead"), the shell-money of the North American Indians.

    0
    0
  • Wampum was of two colours, dark purple and white, of cylindrical form, averaging a quarter of an inch in length, and about half that in diameter.

    0
    0
  • The term wampum or wampum-peage was apparently applied to the beads only when strung or woven together.

    0
    0
  • Dark wampum, which was made from a "hard shell" clam (Venus mercenaria), popularly called quahang or quahog, a corruption of the Indian name, was the most valuable.

    0
    0
  • White wampum was made from the shell of whelks, either from the common whelk (Buccinum undatum), or from that of Pyrula canaliculata and Pyrula carica.

    0
    0
  • Wampum was employed most in New England, but it was common elsewhere.

    0
    0
  • By the Dutch settlers of New York it was called seawan or zeewand, and roenoke in Virginia, and perhaps farther south, for shell-money was also known in the Carolinas, but whether the roenoke of the Virginian Indians was made from the same species of shell as wampum is not clear.

    0
    0
  • Cylindrical shell-beads similar to the wampum of the Atlantic coast Indians were made to some extent by the Indians of the west coast.

    0
    0
  • In the trading between whites and Indians, wampum so completely took the place of ordinary coin that its value was fixed by legal enactment, three to a penny and five shillings a fathom.

    0
    0
  • Thus where six wampum went to the penny, the fathom consisted of 360 beads; but where four made a penny, as under the Massachusetts standard of 1640, then the fathom counted 240.

    0
    0
  • Connecticut received wampum for taxes in 1637 at four a penny.

    0
    0
  • There was no restriction on the manufacture of wampum, and it was made by the whites as well as the Indians.

    0
    0
  • The market was soon flooded with carelessly made and inferior wampum, but it continued to be circulated in the remote districts of New England through the 17th century, and even into the beginning of the 18th.

    0
    0
  • Wampum was also used for personal adornment, and belts were made by embroidering wampum upon strips of deerskin.

    0
    0
  • Wampum also served a mnemonic use as a tribal history or record.

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  • Ingersoll, "Wampum and its History," in American Naturalist, vol.

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  • (1883); Horatio Hale, "On the Origin and Nature of Wampum," in American Naturalist, vol.

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  • Norton, "The Last Wampum Coinage," in American Magazine for March 1888.

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