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walpole

walpole

walpole Sentence Examples

  • Howie surprised us all by buying a fairly large home north west of town on the Old Walpole Road.

  • I drove south toward town on the West Surry Road but instead of following Court Street, turned back north west on the Old Walpole to Howie's home.

  • Horace Walpole, who gives an unfavourable picture of his private character, acknowledges that Stone possessed "abilities seldom to be matched"; and he had the distinction of being mentioned by David Hume as one of the only two men of mark who had perceived merit in that author's History of England on its first appearance.

  • 1898), home secretary, and their son Sir Spencer Walpole, the well-known historian, published an excellent biography of Perceval in 1874.

  • See Holliday's Life (1797); Campbell's Chief Justices; Foss's Judges; Greville's Memoirs, passim; Horace Walpole's Letters; and other memoirs and works on the period.

  • Walpole, History of England (1890), vol.

  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.

  • If so, revenge, as usual, was blind; for Walpole had sought rather to moderate than to inflame public feeling against the projectors.

  • He has recorded one or two interesting notes on Turin, Genoa, Florence and other towns at which halt was made on his route; but Rome was the great object of his pilgrimage, and the words in which he has alluded to the feelings with which he Her letters to Walpole about Gibbon contain some interesting remarks by this ' ` aveugle clairvoyante," as Voltaire calls her; but they belong to a later period (1777).

  • It is interesting, however, to know, that in the first volume is a review by Gibbon of Lord Lyttelton's History of Henry II., and that the second volume contains a contribution by Hume on Walpole's Historic Doubts.

  • In a similar manner, while he abhorred the French Revolution when it came, he seems to have had no apprehension, like Chesterfield, Burke, or even Horace Walpole, of its approach; nor does he appear to have at all suspected that it had had anything to do with the speculations of the philosophic coteries in which he had taken such delight.

  • See also the essay on Gibbon in Sir Spencer Walpole's Essays and Biographies (1907).

  • After a marriage between the prince and Lady Diana Spencer, afterwards the wife of John, 4th duke of Bedford, had been frustrated by Walpole, Frederick was married in April 1736 to 1 Frederick was never actually created duke of Gloucester, and when he was raised to the peerage in 1736 it was as duke of Edinburgh only.

  • Croker (London, 1884); Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George II.

  • Walpole's Royal and Noble Authors (1806), iii.

  • Charlotte Walpole (c. 1785-1836), an English actress who married in 1779 Sir Edward Atkyns, and spent most of her life in France.

  • Henry Seymour Conway's elder brother, Francis, 2nd Baron Conway, was created marquess of Hertford in 1793; his mother was a sister of Sir Robert Walpole's wife, and he was therefore first cousin to Horace Walpole, with whom he was on terms of intimate friendship throughout his life.

  • His dismissal along with other officers was the occasion of another paper controversy in which Conway was defended by Horace Walpole, and gave rise to much constitutional dispute as to the right of the king to remove military officers for their conduct in parliament - a right that was tacitly abandoned by the Crown when the Rockingham ministry of 1765 reinstated the officers who had been removed.

  • He had one daughter, Anne, who married John Damer, son of Lord Milton, and who inherited a life interest in Strawberry Hill under the will of Horace Walpole.

  • See Horace Walpole, Letters, edited by P. Cunningham (9 vols., London, 1857), many of the letters being addressed to Conway; Memoirs of the Last Ten Years of the Reign of George II.

  • Reeve (London, 1888); Spencer Walpole, History of England (London, 1878-1886), and Life of Lord John Russell (London, 1889); A.

  • The poet Thomas Gray, who stayed frequently at Stoke Poges in the vicinity, is enthusiastic concerning the beauty of the Beeches in a letter to Horace Walpole in 1737.

  • Named secretary of state for the southern department on his return home, he soon became helplessly in conflict with the intrigues of Townshend and Sir Robert Walpole.

  • To Walpole, who looked upon every able colleague, or subordinate, as an enemy to be removed, Carteret was exceptionally odious.

  • When he returned to London in 1730, Walpole was firmly established as master of the House of Commons, and as the trusted minister of King George II.

  • Till the fall of Walpole in 1742, Carteret could take no share in public affairs except as a leader of opposition of the Lords.

  • Carteret took the popular side in the outcry against Walpole for not making war on Spain.

  • "The nuptials of our great Quixote and the fair Sophia," and Granville's ostentatious performance of the part of lover, were ridiculed by Horace Walpole.

  • His Memoirs of Sir Robert Walpole (London, 1798), Memoirs of Horatio, Lord Walpole (London, 1802), Memoirs of John, duke of Marlborough (London, 1818-1819), Private and Original Correspondence of Charles Talbot, duke of Shrewsbury (London, 1821), Memoirs of the Administrations of Henry Pelham (London, 182 9), are very valuable for the history of the 18th century.

  • In parliament he was a member of the "Boy Patriot" party which opposed Sir Robert Walpole.

  • Walpole's Memoirs of the Reign of George II.

  • determination to revoke the asiento, and Sir Robert Walpole was forced by popular feeling into war with Spain.

  • In this place his tact and temper, his dexterity and discrimination, enabled him to do good service, and he was rewarded with Walpole's friendship, a Garter and the place of lord high steward.

  • He supported the ministry, but his allegiance was not the blind fealty Walpole exacted of his followers.

  • Walpole bent before the storm and abandoned the measure; but Chesterfield was summarily dismissed from his stewardship. For the next two years he led the opposition in the Upper House, leaving no stone unturned to effect Walpole's downfall.

  • In 1741 he signed the protest for Walpole's dismissal and went abroad on account of his health.

  • In 1742 Walpole fell, and Carteret was his real, though not his nominal successor.

  • Although Walpole's administration had been overthrown largely by Chesterfield's efforts the new ministry did not count Chesterfield either in its ranks or among its supporters.

  • His anxiety and the pains he took to become an orator have been already noticed, and Horace Walpole, who had heard all the great orators, preferred a speech of Chesterfield's to any other; yet the earl's eloquence is not to be compared with that of Pitt.

  • Samuel Johnson, who was not perhaps the best judge in the world, pronounced his manners to have been " exquisitely elegant "; yet as a courtier he was utterly worsted by Robert Walpole, whose manners were anything but refined, and even by Newcastle.

  • Horatio Walpole >>

  • In 1752 the company had a pathway blazed between the small fortified posts at Will's Creek (Cumberland), Maryland, and at Redstone Creek (Brownsville), Pennsylvania, which it had established in 1750; but it was finally merged in the Walpole Company (an organization in which Benjamin Franklin was interested), which in 1772 had received from the British government a grant of a large tract lying along the southern bank of the Ohio as far west as the mouth of the Scioto river.

  • Walpole (4 vols.

  • Horace Walpole has drawn a picture of him at that time which Lord Holland, Fox's beloved and admiring nephew, speaking from his early recollections of his uncle, confesses has "some justification."

  • Coming from such an authority the certificate may be held to confirm the substantial accuracy of Walpole.

  • He declared himself a Tory, attached himself to Harley (afterwards Lord Oxford), then speaker, whom he now addressed as "dear master," and distinguished himself by his eloquence in debate, eclipsing his schoolfellow, Walpole, and gaining an extraordinary ascendancy over the House of Commons.

  • In March 1715 he in vain attempted to defend the late ministry in the new parliament; and on the announcement of Walpole's intended attack upon the authors of the treaty of Utrecht he fled in disguise (March 28, 1715) to Paris, where he was well received, after having addressed a letter to Lord Lansdowne from Dover protesting his innocence 2 Hist.

  • In 1723, through the medium of the king's mistress, the duchess of Kendal, he at last received his pardon, returned to London in June or July, and placed his services at the disposal of Walpole, by whom, however, his offers to procure the accession of several Tories to the administration were received very coldly.

  • But this had been effected in consequence of a peremptory order of the king, against Walpole's wishes, who succeeded in maintaining his exclusion from the House of Lords.

  • On the first occasion which offered itself, that of Pulteney's rupture with Walpole in 1726, he endeavoured to organize an opposition in conjunction with the former and Windham; and in 1727 began his celebrated series of letters to the Craftsman, attacking the Walpoles, signed an "Occasional Writer."

  • In Walpole's own words, "as St John had the duchess entirely on his side I need not add what must or might in time have been the consequence," and he prepared for his dismissal.

  • 2 Coxe's Walpole, i.

  • Walpole in Letters (ed.

  • The Excise Bill in 1733 and the Septennial Bill in the following year offered opportunities for further attacks on the government, which Bolingbroke supported by a new series of papers in the Craftsman styled "A Dissertation on Parties"; but the whole movement collapsed after the new elections, which returned Walpole to power in 1735 with a large majority.

  • Coxe's Walpole; Phillimore's Life of Lyttelton; Hardwick State Papers, vol.

  • For his attempts at verse see Walpole's Royal and Noble Authors (1806), iv.

  • He was one of the earliest of English parliamentary orators; his speeches greatly impressed his contemporaries, and in a later generation, as Macaulay observes, they were "a favourite theme of old men who lived to see the conflicts of Walpole and Pulteney."

  • Horace Walpole has attempted to cast doubts upon the murder of the princes, and Sir C. R.

  • Lumby (Cambridge, 1883); Horace Walpole, Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of Richard III.

  • The town, as Gray (who, like Horace Walpole, at first held out against the furore) declared, was " horn-mad " about him.

  • " There was a dozen dukes of a night at Goodman's Fields," writes Horace Walpole.

  • The publication of a spiteful letter (really by Horace Walpole, one of whose worst deeds it was) in the name of the king of Prussia made Rousseau believe that plots of the most terrible kind were on foot against him.

  • The conduct of Grimm to him was certainly bad; and, though Walpole was not his personal friend, a worse action than his famous letter, considering the well-known idiosyncrasy of the subject, would be difficult to find.

  • In foreign affairs his chief preoccupation was the maintenance of peace, which was shared by Sir Robert Walpole, and therefore led to a continuance of the good understanding between France and England.

  • In 1736 there were under 10,000 inhabitants in the former city; in 1760 when Horace Walpole passed through it, buying for two guineas a pair of candlesticks of the local plate, which he thought "quite pretty," and pronouncing it to be "one of the foulest towns in England," there were two-and-twenty thousand who remitted eleven thousand pounds a week to London.

  • Nor is this eminence merely due to his great opportunity in 1870; for Guizot might under Louis Philippe have almost made himself a French Walpole, at least a French Palmerston, and Lamartine's opportunities after 1848 were, for a man of political genius, illimitable.

  • Horn in many respects greatly resembled his contemporary Walpole.

  • He wrote pamphlets in support of the opposition to Sir Robert Walpole, and was secretary of a committee appointed by the House of Commons to inquire into the conduct of that minister.

  • This pamphlet excited considerable controversy, and is supposed to have influenced Pitt in re-establishing the sinking fund for the extinction of the national debt, which had been created by Walpole in 1716 and abolished in 1733.

  • Resisting Pitt's attempt to draw him into alliance against the ministry he had quitted, Yorke maintained, in a speech that extorted the highest eulogy from Walpole, that parliamentary privilege did not extend to cases of libel; though he agreed with Pitt in condemning the principle of general warrants.

  • See Rhode, Res Lemnicae; Conze, Reise auf den Inseln des Thrakischen Meeres (from which the above-mentioned facts about the present state of the island are taken); also Hunt in Walpole's Travels; Belon du Mans, Observations de plusieurs singularitez, &c.; Finlay, Greece under the Romans; von Hammer, Gesch.

  • Through strong family influence and the recommendation of Walpole he was chosen in 1721 a lord of the Treasury.

  • He made himself conspicuous by his support of Walpole on the question of the excise, and in 1 743 a union of parties resulted in the formation of an administration in which Pelham was prime minister, with the office of chancellor of the exchequer; but rank and influence made his brother, the duke of Newcastle, very powerful in the cabinet, and, in spite of a genuine attachment, there were occasional disputes between them, which led to difficulties.

  • (London, 1891); The Times, June 4, 1869; Spencer Walpole, History of England (London, 1890).

  • Originally the South or Second Precinct of Dedham, Norwood was incorporated as a township (with the addition of a part of Walpole) under its present name in 1872.

  • In 1891 he made some brief continental visits, one to Madrid, and in October he saw through the press his little monograph upon William Pitt, in the Twelve English Statesmen Series, of which it may be said that it competes in interest with Viscount Morley's Walpole.

  • In 1738 the waning power of Walpole and the approaching war with Spain caused Forbes of Culloden to propose the raising of four or five highland regiments for foreign service.

  • Walpole, urged by Lord Islay, brother of Argyll, is said to have approved, but nothing was done.

  • Walpole entered into communication with James, who saw through the manoeuvre, and in 1741 a Jacobite association was formed, which included Lovat and Lochiel.

  • See Tournefort, Relation d'un voyage du Levant (Lyons, 1717); Walpole, Memoirs (relating to Turkey) (London, 1820); Ross, Reisen auf den griechischen Inseln (Stuttgart and Halle, 1840-1852); Guerin, Description de file de Patmos (Paris, 1856); H.

  • For some time he edited the Hyp Doctor, a weekly paper established in opposition to the Craftsman, and for this service he enjoyed a pension of 100 a year from Sir Robert Walpole.

  • spent some time in active religious, reformatory and political (Democratic) work in the interior of New York state, and at Walpole, New Hampshire, and Canton, Massachusetts, Brownson removed in 1839 to Chelsea, Mass.

  • Lecky, History of England (1892); and Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George III., edited by G.

  • In spite of their dulness many of his works are of considerable value, although Horace Walpole questioned his "parts, taste and judgment."

  • Kippis, Biographia Britannica (London, 1778-1793); Horace Walpole, Letters (London, 1891).

  • Walpole, 2 vols., London, 1892).

  • The club originally consisted of thirty-nine, afterwards of forty-eight members, and included among others the duke of Marlborough, Lords Halifax and Somers, Sir Robert Walpole, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Steele and Addison.

  • The severe but dignified letter to Walpole, in which Butler accepted the preferment, showed that the slight was felt and resented.

  • Walpole, History of England (1878-1886).

  • A commemorative inscription on the cross was written by Horace Walpole.

  • Attaching himself at once to the formidable band of discontented Whigs known as the Patriots, whom Walpole's love of exclusive power had forced into opposition under Pulteney, he became in a very short time one of its most prominent members.

  • So obnoxious did he become as a critic of the government, that Walpole thought fit to punish him by procuring his dismissal from the army.

  • It was natural, therefore, that in the series of stormy debates, protracted through several years, that ended in the downfall of Walpole, his eloquence should have been one of the strongest of the forces that combined to bring about the final result.

  • Specially effective, according to contemporary testimony, were his speeches against the Hanoverian subsidies, against the Spanish convention in 1739, and in favour of the motion in 17 4 2 for an investigation into the last ten years of Walpole's administration.

  • The best-known specimen of Pitt's eloquence, his reply to the sneers of Horatio Walpole at his youth and declamatory manner,which has found a place in somanyhandbooks of elocution, is evidently, in form at least, the work, not of Pitt, but of Dr Johnson, who furnished the report to the Gentleman's Magazine.

  • In 1742 Walpole was at last forced to succumb to the longcontinued attacks of opposition, and was succeeded as prime minister by the earl of Wilmington, though the real power in the new government was divided between Carteret and the Pelhams. Pitt's conduct on the change of administration was open to grave censure.

  • As her hatred was known to be at least as strong as her love, the legacy was probably as much a mark of her detestation of Walpole as of her admiration of Pitt.

  • To Pitt the change brought no advancement, and he had thus an opportunity of testing the truth of the description of his chief given by Sir Robert Walpole, "His name is treason."

  • Dr Johnson is reported to have said that "Walpole was a minister given by the king to the people, but Pitt was a minister given by the people to the king," and the remark correctly indicates Chatham's distinctive place among English statesmen.

  • Strawberry Hill, the residence of Horace Walpole, was built to his taste in a medley of Gothic styles.

  • Anciently it was called Twittenham or Twicanham, and the first form, or a variation of it, is used by both Pope and Walpole.

  • Sir Robert Walpole's residence was extant till 1810; and till 1824 the bishops of Winchester had a palace in Cheyne Walk.

  • Sunderland was especially interested in the proposed peerage bill, a measure designed to limit the number of members of the House of Lords, but this was defeated owing partly to the opposition of Sir Robert Walpole.

  • He had taken some part in launching the scheme of 1720, but he had not profited financially by it; however, public opinion was roused against him and it was only through the efforts of Sir Robert Walpole that he was acquitted by the House of Commons, when the matter was investigated.

  • So late as 1726 he was in England making overtures to Walpole, but he had no claim on ministerial goodwill, and as an opponent he had by that time done his worst.

  • Every effort was used to discover, or rather to obtain legal evidence against, the author, whom, Walpole was assured, it would then have taken ten thousand men to apprehend.

  • The excitement following on the bursting of the South Sea Bubble (q.v.), and the death or ruin of the leading ministers, brought Sir Robert Walpole to the front (1721).

  • Walpole perceived that there was another world which understood none of these things.

  • But with Walpole it reached its height.

  • Walpole took good care never to repeat the mistake of the Sacheverell trial.

  • (1727), Walpole remained in power.

  • In the reign of George III., even North and Addington were universally acknowledged by that title, though they had little claim to the independence of action of a Walpole or a Pitt.

  • The growing opposition which finally drove Walpole from power was not entirely without a nobler element than could be furnished by personal rivalry, or ignorant aistrust of Th ~ commercial and financial success.

  • It was well that ~ complaints that a great country ought not to be governed by patronage and bribery should be raised, although, as subsequent experience showed, the causes which rendered corruption inevitable were not to be removed by the expulsion of Walpole from office.

  • Walpole believed that war Lo be certainly unjust, and likely to be disastrous.

  • AJ1 the ordinary arts of corruption which Walpole had practised were continued, and to them were added arts of corruntioil which Walpole had disdained to practise.

  • He had at least some share in the financial ability of Walpole, and it was not till he died in 1754 that the real difficulties of a system which was based on the avoidance of difficulties had fairly to be faced.

  • He perceived instinctively that a large number, even of those who took greedily the bribes of Walpole and the Peihams, took them, not because they loved money better than their country, but because they had no conception that their country had any need of them at all.

  • Burke carried into the world of theory those politics of expediency of which Walpole had been the practical originator.

  • But there was now, what there had not been in the time of Walpole and the Pelhams, a public opinion ready to throw its weieht on one side or the other.

  • Two members of the governmentSpencer Walpole and Henleydeclined to be responsible for its provisions, and placed their resignations in Lord lYerbys hands.

  • The Craftsman provided a vehicle for Bolingbrokes attacks on Walpole, while the Gentlemans Magazine and Annual Register begin a more serious and prolonged career.

  • Spencer Walpole deals with the period from 1815 to 1880, and Herbert Paul with the years 1846-1895.

  • C. Lewis, Essays on the Administrations of Great Britain (London, 1864); Spencer Walpole, History of England (London, 1878-1886).

  • Flamsteed denounced the production as surreptitious; he committed to the flames three hundred copies, of which he obtained possession through the favour of Sir Robert Walpole; and, in defiance of bodily infirmities, vigorously prosecuted his designs for the entire and adequate publication of the materials he continued to accumulate.

  • Edgecumbe was a faithful follower of Sir Robert Walpole, in whose interests he managed the elections for the Cornish boroughs, and his elevation to the peerage, which took place in 1742, was designed to prevent him from giving evidence about Walpole's expenditure of the secret service money.

  • The sneers of Horace Walpole, and the savage attack of Smollett in The Adventures of an Atom, are animated by personal or political spite.

  • A feeble attempt to regain Gibraltar was made in 1733, and a serious war was only averted by the resolute peace policy of Sir Robert Walpole.

  • See Memoirs of the Marquis of Rockingham and his Contemj,oraries, by George Thomas, earl of Albemarle (2 vols., 1852); Horace Walpole's Memoirs of the reign of George III., edited by G.

  • Howie surprised us all by buying a fairly large home north west of town on the Old Walpole Road.

  • I drove south toward town on the West Surry Road but instead of following Court Street, turned back north west on the Old Walpole to Howie's home.

  • Naturally, as a Hampton resident Garrick was noticed by Walpole who rather disparaged his social standing as a wine merchant turned actor.

  • How much did Walpole's long tenure of office contribute to the stability of the Hanoverian dynasty?

  • As a scholar fascinated by medieval life, Walpole greatly influenced the Gothic revival of the late 1700's.

  • This introduces the problem of the position of British Freemasons within the political context of the century governed by Walpole.

  • But again high eighteenth-century oligarchical politics, Walpole and after, was rather sterile: factions rather than parties.

  • treetop walk ' near Walpole.

  • Horace Walpole, who gives an unfavourable picture of his private character, acknowledges that Stone possessed "abilities seldom to be matched"; and he had the distinction of being mentioned by David Hume as one of the only two men of mark who had perceived merit in that author's History of England on its first appearance.

  • ed., London, 1812); Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George II.

  • He married in 1790 and had six sons and six daughters; one of the latter married Spencer Horatio Walpole (d.

  • 1898), home secretary, and their son Sir Spencer Walpole, the well-known historian, published an excellent biography of Perceval in 1874.

  • See Holliday's Life (1797); Campbell's Chief Justices; Foss's Judges; Greville's Memoirs, passim; Horace Walpole's Letters; and other memoirs and works on the period.

  • Walpole, History of England (1890), vol.

  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.

  • If so, revenge, as usual, was blind; for Walpole had sought rather to moderate than to inflame public feeling against the projectors.

  • He has recorded one or two interesting notes on Turin, Genoa, Florence and other towns at which halt was made on his route; but Rome was the great object of his pilgrimage, and the words in which he has alluded to the feelings with which he Her letters to Walpole about Gibbon contain some interesting remarks by this ' ` aveugle clairvoyante," as Voltaire calls her; but they belong to a later period (1777).

  • It is interesting, however, to know, that in the first volume is a review by Gibbon of Lord Lyttelton's History of Henry II., and that the second volume contains a contribution by Hume on Walpole's Historic Doubts.

  • In a similar manner, while he abhorred the French Revolution when it came, he seems to have had no apprehension, like Chesterfield, Burke, or even Horace Walpole, of its approach; nor does he appear to have at all suspected that it had had anything to do with the speculations of the philosophic coteries in which he had taken such delight.

  • See also the essay on Gibbon in Sir Spencer Walpole's Essays and Biographies (1907).

  • In 1735 Frederick wrote, or inspired the writing of, the Histoire du prince Titi, a book containing offensive caricatures of both king and queen; and losing no opportunity of irritating his father, "he made," says Lecky, "his court the special centre of opposition to the government, and he exerted all his influence for the ruin of Walpole."

  • After a marriage between the prince and Lady Diana Spencer, afterwards the wife of John, 4th duke of Bedford, had been frustrated by Walpole, Frederick was married in April 1736 to 1 Frederick was never actually created duke of Gloucester, and when he was raised to the peerage in 1736 it was as duke of Edinburgh only.

  • Croker (London, 1884); Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George II.

  • Walpole's Royal and Noble Authors (1806), iii.

  • Charlotte Walpole (c. 1785-1836), an English actress who married in 1779 Sir Edward Atkyns, and spent most of her life in France.

  • Henry Seymour Conway's elder brother, Francis, 2nd Baron Conway, was created marquess of Hertford in 1793; his mother was a sister of Sir Robert Walpole's wife, and he was therefore first cousin to Horace Walpole, with whom he was on terms of intimate friendship throughout his life.

  • His dismissal along with other officers was the occasion of another paper controversy in which Conway was defended by Horace Walpole, and gave rise to much constitutional dispute as to the right of the king to remove military officers for their conduct in parliament - a right that was tacitly abandoned by the Crown when the Rockingham ministry of 1765 reinstated the officers who had been removed.

  • He had one daughter, Anne, who married John Damer, son of Lord Milton, and who inherited a life interest in Strawberry Hill under the will of Horace Walpole.

  • See Horace Walpole, Letters, edited by P. Cunningham (9 vols., London, 1857), many of the letters being addressed to Conway; Memoirs of the Last Ten Years of the Reign of George II.

  • Reeve (London, 1888); Spencer Walpole, History of England (London, 1878-1886), and Life of Lord John Russell (London, 1889); A.

  • The poet Thomas Gray, who stayed frequently at Stoke Poges in the vicinity, is enthusiastic concerning the beauty of the Beeches in a letter to Horace Walpole in 1737.

  • Named secretary of state for the southern department on his return home, he soon became helplessly in conflict with the intrigues of Townshend and Sir Robert Walpole.

  • To Walpole, who looked upon every able colleague, or subordinate, as an enemy to be removed, Carteret was exceptionally odious.

  • When he returned to London in 1730, Walpole was firmly established as master of the House of Commons, and as the trusted minister of King George II.

  • Till the fall of Walpole in 1742, Carteret could take no share in public affairs except as a leader of opposition of the Lords.

  • Carteret took the popular side in the outcry against Walpole for not making war on Spain.

  • But the defects which had rendered him unable to baffle the intrigues of Walpole made him equally unable to contend with the Pelhams. His support of the king's policy was denounced as subservience to Hanover.

  • "The nuptials of our great Quixote and the fair Sophia," and Granville's ostentatious performance of the part of lover, were ridiculed by Horace Walpole.

  • His Memoirs of Sir Robert Walpole (London, 1798), Memoirs of Horatio, Lord Walpole (London, 1802), Memoirs of John, duke of Marlborough (London, 1818-1819), Private and Original Correspondence of Charles Talbot, duke of Shrewsbury (London, 1821), Memoirs of the Administrations of Henry Pelham (London, 182 9), are very valuable for the history of the 18th century.

  • In parliament he was a member of the "Boy Patriot" party which opposed Sir Robert Walpole.

  • Walpole's Memoirs of the Reign of George II.

  • determination to revoke the asiento, and Sir Robert Walpole was forced by popular feeling into war with Spain.

  • Gray, writing to Horace Walpole (August, 1757), said that the author "seemed to have retrieved the true language of the stage, which has been lost for these hundred years," but Samuel Johnson held aloof from the general enthusiasm, and averred that there were not ten good lines in the whole play (Boswell, Life, ed.

  • In this place his tact and temper, his dexterity and discrimination, enabled him to do good service, and he was rewarded with Walpole's friendship, a Garter and the place of lord high steward.

  • He supported the ministry, but his allegiance was not the blind fealty Walpole exacted of his followers.

  • Walpole bent before the storm and abandoned the measure; but Chesterfield was summarily dismissed from his stewardship. For the next two years he led the opposition in the Upper House, leaving no stone unturned to effect Walpole's downfall.

  • In 1741 he signed the protest for Walpole's dismissal and went abroad on account of his health.

  • In 1742 Walpole fell, and Carteret was his real, though not his nominal successor.

  • Although Walpole's administration had been overthrown largely by Chesterfield's efforts the new ministry did not count Chesterfield either in its ranks or among its supporters.

  • His anxiety and the pains he took to become an orator have been already noticed, and Horace Walpole, who had heard all the great orators, preferred a speech of Chesterfield's to any other; yet the earl's eloquence is not to be compared with that of Pitt.

  • Samuel Johnson, who was not perhaps the best judge in the world, pronounced his manners to have been " exquisitely elegant "; yet as a courtier he was utterly worsted by Robert Walpole, whose manners were anything but refined, and even by Newcastle.

  • In 1765 Horace Walpole said that "Jacobitism, the concealed mother of the latter (i.e.

  • Horatio Walpole >>

  • 'Morgan, Sketches of Celebrated Canadians (Quebec, 1862); Rose's Cyclopaedia of Canadian Biography Annual Register, 1836-1837; Sir Spencer Walpole, History of England (5 vols., London, 1878-1886), vol.

  • In 1752 the company had a pathway blazed between the small fortified posts at Will's Creek (Cumberland), Maryland, and at Redstone Creek (Brownsville), Pennsylvania, which it had established in 1750; but it was finally merged in the Walpole Company (an organization in which Benjamin Franklin was interested), which in 1772 had received from the British government a grant of a large tract lying along the southern bank of the Ohio as far west as the mouth of the Scioto river.

  • Walpole (4 vols.

  • Horace Walpole has drawn a picture of him at that time which Lord Holland, Fox's beloved and admiring nephew, speaking from his early recollections of his uncle, confesses has "some justification."

  • Coming from such an authority the certificate may be held to confirm the substantial accuracy of Walpole.

  • He declared himself a Tory, attached himself to Harley (afterwards Lord Oxford), then speaker, whom he now addressed as "dear master," and distinguished himself by his eloquence in debate, eclipsing his schoolfellow, Walpole, and gaining an extraordinary ascendancy over the House of Commons.

  • In March 1715 he in vain attempted to defend the late ministry in the new parliament; and on the announcement of Walpole's intended attack upon the authors of the treaty of Utrecht he fled in disguise (March 28, 1715) to Paris, where he was well received, after having addressed a letter to Lord Lansdowne from Dover protesting his innocence 2 Hist.

  • In 1723, through the medium of the king's mistress, the duchess of Kendal, he at last received his pardon, returned to London in June or July, and placed his services at the disposal of Walpole, by whom, however, his offers to procure the accession of several Tories to the administration were received very coldly.

  • But this had been effected in consequence of a peremptory order of the king, against Walpole's wishes, who succeeded in maintaining his exclusion from the House of Lords.

  • On the first occasion which offered itself, that of Pulteney's rupture with Walpole in 1726, he endeavoured to organize an opposition in conjunction with the former and Windham; and in 1727 began his celebrated series of letters to the Craftsman, attacking the Walpoles, signed an "Occasional Writer."

  • He gained over the duchess of Kendal with a bribe of £i i,000 from his wife's estates, and with Walpole's approval obtained an audience with George.

  • In Walpole's own words, "as St John had the duchess entirely on his side I need not add what must or might in time have been the consequence," and he prepared for his dismissal.

  • 2 Coxe's Walpole, i.

  • Walpole in Letters (ed.

  • The Excise Bill in 1733 and the Septennial Bill in the following year offered opportunities for further attacks on the government, which Bolingbroke supported by a new series of papers in the Craftsman styled "A Dissertation on Parties"; but the whole movement collapsed after the new elections, which returned Walpole to power in 1735 with a large majority.

  • Coxe's Walpole; Phillimore's Life of Lyttelton; Hardwick State Papers, vol.

  • For his attempts at verse see Walpole's Royal and Noble Authors (1806), iv.

  • He was one of the earliest of English parliamentary orators; his speeches greatly impressed his contemporaries, and in a later generation, as Macaulay observes, they were "a favourite theme of old men who lived to see the conflicts of Walpole and Pulteney."

  • Horace Walpole has attempted to cast doubts upon the murder of the princes, and Sir C. R.

  • Lumby (Cambridge, 1883); Horace Walpole, Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of Richard III.

  • The town, as Gray (who, like Horace Walpole, at first held out against the furore) declared, was " horn-mad " about him.

  • " There was a dozen dukes of a night at Goodman's Fields," writes Horace Walpole.

  • The publication of a spiteful letter (really by Horace Walpole, one of whose worst deeds it was) in the name of the king of Prussia made Rousseau believe that plots of the most terrible kind were on foot against him.

  • The conduct of Grimm to him was certainly bad; and, though Walpole was not his personal friend, a worse action than his famous letter, considering the well-known idiosyncrasy of the subject, would be difficult to find.

  • In foreign affairs his chief preoccupation was the maintenance of peace, which was shared by Sir Robert Walpole, and therefore led to a continuance of the good understanding between France and England.

  • In 1736 there were under 10,000 inhabitants in the former city; in 1760 when Horace Walpole passed through it, buying for two guineas a pair of candlesticks of the local plate, which he thought "quite pretty," and pronouncing it to be "one of the foulest towns in England," there were two-and-twenty thousand who remitted eleven thousand pounds a week to London.

  • Nor is this eminence merely due to his great opportunity in 1870; for Guizot might under Louis Philippe have almost made himself a French Walpole, at least a French Palmerston, and Lamartine's opportunities after 1848 were, for a man of political genius, illimitable.

  • Horn in many respects greatly resembled his contemporary Walpole.

  • He wrote pamphlets in support of the opposition to Sir Robert Walpole, and was secretary of a committee appointed by the House of Commons to inquire into the conduct of that minister.

  • This pamphlet excited considerable controversy, and is supposed to have influenced Pitt in re-establishing the sinking fund for the extinction of the national debt, which had been created by Walpole in 1716 and abolished in 1733.

  • Resisting Pitt's attempt to draw him into alliance against the ministry he had quitted, Yorke maintained, in a speech that extorted the highest eulogy from Walpole, that parliamentary privilege did not extend to cases of libel; though he agreed with Pitt in condemning the principle of general warrants.

  • See Rhode, Res Lemnicae; Conze, Reise auf den Inseln des Thrakischen Meeres (from which the above-mentioned facts about the present state of the island are taken); also Hunt in Walpole's Travels; Belon du Mans, Observations de plusieurs singularitez, &c.; Finlay, Greece under the Romans; von Hammer, Gesch.

  • O'Neill Daunt, Ireland and her Agitators; Lord Mountmorres, History of the Irish Parliament (2 vols., London, 1792) Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George III.

  • Through strong family influence and the recommendation of Walpole he was chosen in 1721 a lord of the Treasury.

  • He made himself conspicuous by his support of Walpole on the question of the excise, and in 1 743 a union of parties resulted in the formation of an administration in which Pelham was prime minister, with the office of chancellor of the exchequer; but rank and influence made his brother, the duke of Newcastle, very powerful in the cabinet, and, in spite of a genuine attachment, there were occasional disputes between them, which led to difficulties.

  • (London, 1891); The Times, June 4, 1869; Spencer Walpole, History of England (London, 1890).

  • Originally the South or Second Precinct of Dedham, Norwood was incorporated as a township (with the addition of a part of Walpole) under its present name in 1872.

  • In 1891 he made some brief continental visits, one to Madrid, and in October he saw through the press his little monograph upon William Pitt, in the Twelve English Statesmen Series, of which it may be said that it competes in interest with Viscount Morley's Walpole.

  • In 1738 the waning power of Walpole and the approaching war with Spain caused Forbes of Culloden to propose the raising of four or five highland regiments for foreign service.

  • Walpole, urged by Lord Islay, brother of Argyll, is said to have approved, but nothing was done.

  • Walpole entered into communication with James, who saw through the manoeuvre, and in 1741 a Jacobite association was formed, which included Lovat and Lochiel.

  • See Tournefort, Relation d'un voyage du Levant (Lyons, 1717); Walpole, Memoirs (relating to Turkey) (London, 1820); Ross, Reisen auf den griechischen Inseln (Stuttgart and Halle, 1840-1852); Guerin, Description de file de Patmos (Paris, 1856); H.

  • For some time he edited the Hyp Doctor, a weekly paper established in opposition to the Craftsman, and for this service he enjoyed a pension of 100 a year from Sir Robert Walpole.

  • spent some time in active religious, reformatory and political (Democratic) work in the interior of New York state, and at Walpole, New Hampshire, and Canton, Massachusetts, Brownson removed in 1839 to Chelsea, Mass.

  • Lecky, History of England (1892); and Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of George III., edited by G.

  • In spite of their dulness many of his works are of considerable value, although Horace Walpole questioned his "parts, taste and judgment."

  • Kippis, Biographia Britannica (London, 1778-1793); Horace Walpole, Letters (London, 1891).

  • Walpole, 2 vols., London, 1892).

  • The club originally consisted of thirty-nine, afterwards of forty-eight members, and included among others the duke of Marlborough, Lords Halifax and Somers, Sir Robert Walpole, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Steele and Addison.

  • The severe but dignified letter to Walpole, in which Butler accepted the preferment, showed that the slight was felt and resented.

  • Walpole, History of England (1878-1886).

  • A commemorative inscription on the cross was written by Horace Walpole.

  • Attaching himself at once to the formidable band of discontented Whigs known as the Patriots, whom Walpole's love of exclusive power had forced into opposition under Pulteney, he became in a very short time one of its most prominent members.

  • So obnoxious did he become as a critic of the government, that Walpole thought fit to punish him by procuring his dismissal from the army.

  • It was natural, therefore, that in the series of stormy debates, protracted through several years, that ended in the downfall of Walpole, his eloquence should have been one of the strongest of the forces that combined to bring about the final result.

  • Specially effective, according to contemporary testimony, were his speeches against the Hanoverian subsidies, against the Spanish convention in 1739, and in favour of the motion in 17 4 2 for an investigation into the last ten years of Walpole's administration.

  • The best-known specimen of Pitt's eloquence, his reply to the sneers of Horatio Walpole at his youth and declamatory manner,which has found a place in somanyhandbooks of elocution, is evidently, in form at least, the work, not of Pitt, but of Dr Johnson, who furnished the report to the Gentleman's Magazine.

  • In 1742 Walpole was at last forced to succumb to the longcontinued attacks of opposition, and was succeeded as prime minister by the earl of Wilmington, though the real power in the new government was divided between Carteret and the Pelhams. Pitt's conduct on the change of administration was open to grave censure.

  • The relentless vindictiveness with which he insisted on the prosecution of Walpole, and supported the bill of indemnity to witnesses against the fallen minister, was in itself not magnanimous; but it appears positively un worthy when it is known that a short time before Pitt had offered, on certain conditions, to use all his influence in the other direction.

  • As her hatred was known to be at least as strong as her love, the legacy was probably as much a mark of her detestation of Walpole as of her admiration of Pitt.

  • To Pitt the change brought no advancement, and he had thus an opportunity of testing the truth of the description of his chief given by Sir Robert Walpole, "His name is treason."

  • Dr Johnson is reported to have said that "Walpole was a minister given by the king to the people, but Pitt was a minister given by the people to the king," and the remark correctly indicates Chatham's distinctive place among English statesmen.

  • Strawberry Hill, the residence of Horace Walpole, was built to his taste in a medley of Gothic styles.

  • Anciently it was called Twittenham or Twicanham, and the first form, or a variation of it, is used by both Pope and Walpole.

  • Sir Robert Walpole's residence was extant till 1810; and till 1824 the bishops of Winchester had a palace in Cheyne Walk.

  • Sunderland was especially interested in the proposed peerage bill, a measure designed to limit the number of members of the House of Lords, but this was defeated owing partly to the opposition of Sir Robert Walpole.

  • He had taken some part in launching the scheme of 1720, but he had not profited financially by it; however, public opinion was roused against him and it was only through the efforts of Sir Robert Walpole that he was acquitted by the House of Commons, when the matter was investigated.

  • So late as 1726 he was in England making overtures to Walpole, but he had no claim on ministerial goodwill, and as an opponent he had by that time done his worst.

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