Wales sentence example

wales
  • Maize and sugar-cane are grown in New South Wales and Queensland..
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  • Climatically, New South Wales is divided into three marked divisions.
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  • The Snowy river has the greater part of its course in New South Wales, but its mouth and the last 120 m.
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  • The Bowling Associations of Victoria and New South Wales were established in 1880, and it was not until 1892 that the Scottish Bowling Association was founded.
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  • The rainfall of New South Wales ranges from an annual average of 64 in.
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  • Edward, prince of Wales, was born on the 13th of October 1453 and baptized by Waynflete the next day.
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  • In 1864 the two associations or synods of North and South Wales were united in a general assembly.
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  • On the 10th of June 1688 she was present at the birth of the prince of Wales and gave evidence before the council in favour of the genuineness of the child.
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  • Walmer Castle was for long the official residence of the lord warden, but has, since the resignation of Lord Curzon in 1903, ceased to be so used, and those portions of it which are of historic interest are now open to the public. George, prince of Wales (lord warden, 1903-1907), was the first lord warden of royal blood since the office was held by George, prince of Denmark, consort of Queen Anne.
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  • Brighton refused a charter offered by George, prince of Wales, but was incorporated in 1854.
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  • It consists in the main of an Archean block or " coign,"which still occupies nearly the whole of the western half of the continent, outcrops in north-eastern Queensland, forms the foundation of southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria, and is exposed in western Victoria, in Tasmania, and in the western flank of the Southern Alps of New Zealand.
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  • But they have been separated by the foundering of the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea, which divided the continent of Australia from the islands of the Australasian festoon; and the foundering of the band across Australia, from the Gulf of Carpentaria, through western Queensland and western New South Wales, to the lower basin of the Murray, has separated the Archean areas of eastern and western Australia.
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  • This Silurian sea was less extensive than the Ordovician in Victoria; but it appears to have been wider in New South Wales and in Queensland.
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  • The mountains both in Victoria and New South Wales were snow-capped, and glaciers flowed down their flanks and laid down Carboniferous glacial deposits, which are still preserved in basins that flank the mountain ranges, such as the famous conglomerates of Bacchus Marsh, Heathcote and the Loddon valley in Victoria, and cf Branxton and other localities in New South Wales.
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  • The Permian deposits are best developed in New South Wales and Tasmania, where their characters show the continuation of the Carboniferous conditions.
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  • Chinese, numbering about 30,000, are chiefly found in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, and the Northern Territory.
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  • The distribution of population at the close of 1906 (4,118,000) was New South Wales 1,530,000, Victoria 1,223,000, Queensland 534,000, South Australia 381,000, Western Australia 270,000, Tasmania 180,000.
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  • The rate of increase since the previous census was 1.5% per annum, varying from 0.31 in Victoria to 2 06 in New South Wales and 6.9 in Western Australia.
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  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.
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  • In New South Wales the greatest production was in 1852, soon after the first discovery of the precious metal, when the output was valued at £2,660,946; the production in 1905 was about 270,000 oz., valued at £1,150,000.
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  • So far this form of winning is chiefly carried on in New South Wales, where there are about fifty gold-dredging plants in successful operation.
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  • On the 30th of November 1411 Chicheley, with two other bishops and three earls and the -4 prince of Wales, knelt to the king to receive public thanks for their administration.
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  • The Troy-book, undertaken at the command of Henry V., then prince of Wales, dates from 1412-1420; the Story of Thebes from 1420-1422; and the Falls of Princes towards 1430.
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  • The best Silurian sequence is in New South Wales.
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  • The Cretaceous period was initiated by the subsidence of a large area to the south of the Gulf of Carpentaria, whereby a Lower Cretaceous sea spread southward, across western Queensland, western New South Wales and the north-eastern districts of South Australia.
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  • At Brisbane the fall is 50 in., and portions of the New South Wales coast receive a like quantity, but speaking generally the fall is from 30 in.
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  • This element was introduced via Torres Strait, and spread down the Queensland coast to portions of the New South Wales littoral, and also round the Gulf of Carpentaria, but has never been able to obtain a hold in the more arid interior.
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  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.
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  • The statutory ages differ in the various states; in New South Wales and Western Australia it is from 6 to 13 years inclusive, in Victoria 6 to 12 years, in Queensland 6 to II years, and in South Australia 7 to 12 years inclusive.
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  • The chief wheat lands are in Victoria, South Australia and New South Wales; the yield averages about 9 bushels to the acre; this low average is due to the endeavour of settlers on new lands to cultivate larger areas than their resources can effectively deal with; the introduction of scientific farming should almost double the yield.
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  • In Western Australia, New South Wales, Tasmania and Queensland there are many hundreds of well-equipped saw-mills affording employment to about 5000 men.
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  • The leading silver mines are in New South Wales, the returns from the other states being comparatively insignificant.
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  • The fields of New South Wales have proved to be of immense value, the yield of silver and lead during 1905 being £2,500,000, and the total output to the end of the year named over £40,000,000.
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  • A village in 1850, Llandudno is to-day one of the most flourishing watering-places in North Wales.
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  • Nevertheless Peckham's relations with the king were often cordial, and Edward called on him for help in bringing order into conquered Wales.
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  • In 1863 the prince of Wales married the princess Alexandra of Denmark.
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  • We were presented corn production figures from Columbia or hafnium levels from New South Wales.
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  • With a salary granted to him by parliament he resumed his itinerant preaching in Wales.
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  • Kitson's work in Tasmania shows that there also the glacial beds may be correlated with the lower or Greta Coal Measures of New South Wales.
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  • The sea extended up the Murray basin into the western plains of New South Wales.
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  • Taking the district generally, the difference between the mean Wales.
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  • The climate of Victoria does not differ greatly from that of New South Wales.
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  • The vine is cultivated in all the states, but chiefly in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales.
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  • It is situated beyond the river Darling, and close to the boundary between New South Wales and South Australia.
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  • Copper is known to exist in all the states, and has been mined extensively in South Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and.
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  • The principal deposits of copper in New South Wales are found in the central part of the state between the Macquarie, Darling and Bogan rivers.
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  • The total value of copper produced in Australia up to the end of 1905 was £42,500,000 sterling, £24,500,000 having been obtained in South Australia, £7,500,000 in New South Wales, £6,400,000 in Tasmania and over £3,500,000 in Queensland.
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  • The most important tin-mines in Queensland are in the Herberton district, south-west of Cairns; at Cooktown, on the Annan and Bloomfield rivers; and at Stanthorpe, on the border of New South Wales.
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  • In New South Wales lode tin occurs principally in the granite and stream tin under the basaltic country in the extreme north of the state, at Tenterfield, Emmaville, Tingha, and in other districts of New England.
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  • The total value of tin produced in Australia is nearly a million sterling per annum, and the total production to the end of 1905 was £22,500,000, of which Tasmania produced about 40%, New South Wales one-third, Queensland a little more than a fourth.
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  • In New South Wales there are, together with coal and limestone Iron.
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  • Magnetite, or magnetic iron, the richest of all iron ores, is found in abundance near Wallerawang in New South Wales.
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  • Goethite, limonite and haematite are found in New South Wales, at the junction of the Hawkesbury sandstone formation and the Wianamatta shale, near Nattai, and are enhanced in their value by their proximity to coal-beds.
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  • In New South Wales the principal centre of this industry is Hillgrove, near Armidale, where Other the Eleanora Mine, one of the richest in the state, is minerals.
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  • The principal mine in New South Wales is situated at Kingsgate, in the New England district, where the mineral is generally associated with molybdenum and gold.
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  • Manganese probably exists in all the states, deposits having been found in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia, the richest specimens being found in New South Wales.
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  • Platinum and the allied compound metal iridosmine have been found in New South Wales, but so far in inconsiderable quantities.
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  • The rare element tellurium has been discovered in New South Wales at Bingara and other parts of the northern districts, as well as at Tarana, on the western line, though at present in such minute quantities as would not repay the cost of working.
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  • The association of this metal with silver in the Broken Hill mines of New South Wales adds very greatly to the value of the product.
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  • Mercury is found in New South Wales and Queensland.
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  • In New South Wales, in the form of cinnabar, it has been discovered on the Cudgegong river, near Rylstone, and it also occurs at Bingara, Solferino, Yulgilbar and Cooma.
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  • Wolfram (tungstate of iron and manganese) occurs in some of the states, notably in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and Queensland.
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  • Molybdenum, in the form of molybdenite (sulphide of molybdenum), is found in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, associated in the parent state with tin and bismuth in quartz reefs.
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  • Zinc ores, in the several varieties of carbonates, silicates, oxide, sulphide and sulphate of zinc, have been found in several of the Australian states, but have attracted little attention except in New South Wales, where special efforts are being made successfully to produce a high-grade zinc concentrate from the sulphide ores.
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  • Cobalt occurs in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia, and efforts have been made in the former state to treat the ore, the metal having a high commercial value; but the market is small, and no attempt has been made up to 1907 to produce it on any large scale.
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  • The manganese ores of the Bathurst district of New South Wales often contain a small percentage of cobalt - sufficient, indeed, to warrant further attempts to work them.
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  • In New South Wales chromium is found in the northern portion of the state, in the Clarence and Tamworth districts and also near Gundagai.
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  • Arsenic, in its well-known and beautiful forms, orpiment and realgar, is found in New South Wales and Victoria.
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  • Black coal forms one of the principal resources of New South Wales; and in the other states the deposits of this valuable mineral are being rapidly developed.
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  • The coal-fields of New South Wales are situated in three distinct regions - the northern, southern and western districts.
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  • The coal mines of New South Wales give employment to 14,000 persons, and the annual production is over 6,600,000 tons.
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  • Kerosene shale (torbanite) is found in several parts of New South Wales.
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  • Marble is found in many parts of New South Wales and South Australia.
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  • Kaolin, or porcelain clay, although capable of application to commercial purposes, has not as yet been utilized to any extent, although found in several places in New South Wales and in Western Australia.
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  • Asbestos has been found in New South Wales in the Gundagai Bathurst and Broken Hill districts - in the last-mentioned district in considerable quantities.
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  • Diamonds are found in all the states; but only in New South Wales have any attempts been made to work the diamond drifts.
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  • The best of the New South Wales diamonds are harder and much whiter than the South African diamonds, and are classified as on a par with the best Brazilian gems, but no large specimens have yet been found.
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  • The finest opal known is obtained in the Upper Cretaceous formation at White Cliffs, near Wilcannia, New South Wales, and at these mines about 700 men find constant employment.
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  • The oriental topaz has been found in New South Wales.
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  • Oriental amethysts also have been found in that state, and the ruby has been found in Queensland, as well as in New South Wales.
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  • Chrysoberyls have been found in New South Wales; spinel rubies in New South Wales and Victoria; and white topaz in all the states.
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  • Chalcedony, carnelian, onyx and cat's eyes are found in New South Wales; and it is probable that they are also to be met with in the other states, particularly in Queensland.
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  • In several of the states, New South Wales and South Australia proper, the railways yield more than the interest paid by the government on the money borrowed for their construction.
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  • In New South Wales the body is often burned and the ashes buried.
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  • In 1827 and the two following years, Cunningham prosecuted instructive explorations on both sides of the Liverpool range, between the upper waters of the Hunter and those of the Peel and other tributaries of the Brisbane north of New South Wales.
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  • A military station having been fixed by the British government at Port Victoria, on the coast of Arnheim Land, for the protection of shipwrecked mariners on the north coast, it was thought desirable to find an overland route between this settlement and Moreton Bay, in what then was the northern portion of New South Wales, now called Queensland.
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  • The interior of New South Wales and Queensland, all that lies east of the r40th degree of longitude, was examined.
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  • Of the six Australian states, New South Wales is the oldest.
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  • From this island, ten years later, parties crossed Bass Strait to Port Phillip, where a new settlement was shortly established, forming till 1851 a part of New South Wales, but now the state of Victoria.
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  • The early history, therefore, of New South Wales is peculiar to itself.
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  • When that system was abolished, the social conditions of New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia became more equal.
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  • A population of 30,000, three- New fourths of them convicts, formed the infant common- South wealth, whose attention was soon directed to the profit- wales.
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  • New South Wales became prosperous and attractive to emigrants with capital.
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  • Victoria produced already more wool than New South Wales,the aggregate produce of Australia in 1852 being 45,000,000 lb; and South Australia, between 1842 and this date, had opened most valuable mines of copper.
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  • The population of New South Wales in 1851 was 190,000; that of Victoria, 77,000; and that of South Australia about the same.
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  • Since 1870 there have been five radical changes made in New South Wales.
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  • As early as 1860 there had been disturbances of a serious character, and the Chinese were chased off the goldfields of New South Wales, serious riots occurring at Lambing Flat, on the Burrangong goldfield.
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  • The effects of the crisis were mainly felt in the three eastern states, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia being affected chiefly by reason of the fact of their intimate financial connexion with the eastern states.
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  • The question of federation was not lost sight of by the framers of the original constitution which was bestowed upon New South Wales.
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  • During the year 1896 Enabling Acts were passed by New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia, and delegates were elected by popular vote in all the colonies named except Western Australia, where the delegates were chosen by parliament.
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  • The constitution was accepted by Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania by popular acclamation, but in New South Wales very great opposition was shown, the main points of objection being the financial provisions, equal representation in the Senate, and the difficulty in the way of the larger states securing an amendment of the constitution in the event of a conflict with the smaller states.
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  • As far as the other colonies were concerned, it was evident that the bill was safe, and public attention throughout Australia was fixed on New South Wales, where a fierce political contest was raging, which it was recognized would decide the fate of the measure for the time being.
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  • Western Australia did not put it to the vote, as the Enabling Act of that colony only provided for joining a federation of which New South Wales should form a part.
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  • At this conference a compromise was effected, something was conceded to the claims of New South Wales, but the main principles of the bill remained intact.
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  • In New South Wales and Queensland there were still a large number of persons opposed to the measure, which was nevertheless carried in both colonies.
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  • New South Wales having decided in favour of federation, the way was clear for a decision on the part of Western Australia.
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  • Under this act, which was dated the 9th of July 1900, a proclamation was issued on the 17th of September of the same year, declaring that, on and after the 1st of January 1901, the people of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia should be united in a federal commonwealth under the name of the Commonwealth of Australia.
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  • The seat of government was to be within New South Wales, not less than 100 m.
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  • The first parliament under the constitution was elected on the 29th and 30th of March 1901, and was opened by the prince of Wales on the 9th of May following.
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  • After the year 1884 Labour troubles became very frequent, the New South Wales coal miners in particular being at war with the colliery owners during the greater part of the six years intervening between then and what is called the Great Strike.
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  • New South Wales was the first country which endeavoured to settle its labour grievances through the ballot-box and to send a great party to parliament as the direct representation of Labour, pledged to obtain through legislation what it was unable to obtain by strikes and physical force.
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  • Several attempts had been made by individuals belonging to the Labour party to enter the New South Wales parliament, but it was not until 1891 that the occurrence of a general election gave the party the looked-for opportunity for concerted action.
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  • The two features of the Labour party in New South Wales are its detachment from other parties and the control of the caucus.
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  • The experience of the party was also much the same as in New South Wales, but its greatest triumphs were achieved in party.
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  • The one ideal which has just been described represents the Labour party from the New South Wales standpoint.
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  • In New South Wales, whose example was followed by Western Australia, the machinery adopted for fixing the statutory rate of wages was of a somewhat different type.
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  • Wise, was carried after much opposition in New South Wales in 1901, to remain in force till the 30th of June 1908.
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  • In the years 1900 and 1902 acts were passed in Western Australia still more closely modelled on the New Zealand act than was the above-mentioned statute in New South Wales.
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  • This power Ad was given to the tribunal in New South Wales, but was 1904.
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  • In 1843 he was nominated by Sir George Gipps, the governor, to a seat in the New South Wales Legislative Council; owing to a difference with Gipps he resigned his seat, but was elected shortly afterwards for Sydney.
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  • Its castle, built probably in Newmarch's time, or shortly after, was the most advanced outpost of the invaders in a wild part of Wales where the tendency to revolt was always strong.
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  • It was destroyed in 1260 by Llewellyn ab Gruffydd, prince of Wales, with the supposed connivance df Mortimer, but its site was reoccupied by the earl of Lincoln in 277, and a new castle at once erected.
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  • This alliance, though the exact terms were not known to Cromwell - "the attempt to vassalize us to a foreign nation," to use his own words - convinced him of the uselessness of any plan for maintaining Charles on the throne; though he still appears to have clung to monarchy, proposing in January 1648 the transference of the crown to the prince of Wales.
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  • Cromwell left London in May to suppress the royalists in Wales, and took Pembroke Castle on the 11th of July.
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  • The actual taxation to which this fragment refers was not the tenth collected by Boiamund but the tenth of all ecclesiastical property in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland granted by Pope Nicholas IV.
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  • Becoming more violent Thistlewood formed other plots, talked of murdering the prince of Wales, and was sentenced to a year's imprisonment for challenging the home secretary, Lord Sidmouth, to a duel.
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  • But before this event John had instituted a great inquiry, the inquest of service of June 1212, for the purpose of finding out how much he could exact from each of his vassals, a measure which naturally excited some alarm; and then, fearing a baronial rising, he had abandoned his proposed expedition into Wales, had taken hostages from the most prominent of his foes, and had sought safety in London.
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  • Welsh law is to be used in Wales, and in the marches the law of the marches is to be employed.
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  • In February 1770 he set out again from Fort Prince of Wales; but, after great hardships, he was again forced to return to the fort.
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  • From England, moreover, he spread into Scotland, Wales and Ireland, and in each land his settlement put on a somewhat different character, according to the circumstances of the land.
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  • In Wales the Norman came as a conqueror, more strictly a conqueror than in England; he could not claim Welsh crowns or Welsh estates under any fiction of Welsh law.
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  • The Norman settler in Wales, therefore, did not to any perceptible extent become a Welshman; the existing relations of England and Wales were such that he in the end became an Englishman, but he seems not unnaturally to have been somewhat slower in so doing in Wales than he was in England.
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  • The town owed its origin and growth to its position on the shores of the Bristol Channel, and its good harbour developed an oversea trade with Bristol, South Wales and the Irish ports.
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  • In 1400 and again in each of the two following autumns Henry invaded Wales in vain.
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  • Beaufort and his brother Henry, bishop of Winchester, were opposed to Arundel and supported by the prince of Wales.
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  • In South Wales again, where in 1811 the railways in connexion with canals, collieries and iron and copper works had a total length of nearly 150 miles, the plate-way was almost universal.
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  • The total paid-up railway capital of the United Kingdom amounted, in 1908, to £1,310,533,212, or an average capitalization of £56,476 per route mile, though it should be noted that this total included £196,364,618 of nominal additions through " stock-splitting," &c. Per mile of single track, the capitalization in England and Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the United Kingdom, is shown in Table VIII.
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  • Just as the German reaper leaves the last ears of corn as an offering to Wodan, so the Australian black offers a portion of a find of honey; in New South Wales a pebble is said to have been offered or a number of spears, in Queensland the skin removed in forming the body-scars.
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  • It is common in woods and hedges in parts of Wales and of the south of England.
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  • To judge by the osteological remains which the researches of geologists have brought to light, there was perhaps scarcely a county in England or Wales in which, at one time or another, wolves did not abound, while in Scotland and Ireland they must have been still more numerous.
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  • As is well known, great efforts were made by King Edgar to reduce the number of wolves in the country, but, notwithstanding the annual tribute of 300 skins paid to him during several years by the king of Wales, he was not altogether so successful as has been commonly imagined.
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  • Among other occurrences of the name of Avon in Great Britain there may be noted - in England, a stream flowing south-east from Dartmoor in Devonshire to the English Channel; in South Wales, the stream which has its mouth at Aberavon in Glamorganshire; in Scotland, tributaries of the Clyde, the Spey and the Forth.
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  • Soon after his father became king in 1727 Frederick took up his residence in England and in 1729 was created prince of Wales; but the relations between George II.
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  • He was one of the delegates in 1789 from the Irish parliament to George, prince of Wales, requesting him to assume the regency as a matter of right.
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  • In 1920, after the disestablishment of the Welsh Church, of which measure he had been one of the most active opponents, he was created Archbishop of Wales, and was enthroned by the Archbishop of Canterbury at St.
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  • Amongst his publications may be mentioned The Church in Wales (1888); Common-Sense Patriotism (1894); and Landmarks Welsh Church History (1912).
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  • The sister of the new sovereign, Princess Alexandra, had a few months before (loth March) married the prince of Wales, afterwards King Edward VII., and his father succeeded to the crown of Denmark in the following November.
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  • He fought in Wales, was on the side of John during his struggle with the barons over Magna Carta, and was one of this king's.
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  • Since 1399 the earls of Chester have been also princes of Wales, although the act of Richard II.
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  • On the outbreak of the war he was appointed lieutenant-general of Shropshire, Cheshire and North Wales, where he rendered useful military services, and later was made one of the prince of Wales's councillors, and a commissioner at the negotiations at Uxbridge in 1645.
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  • He probably left Wales in 1657, and his immediate connexion with Golden Grove seems to have ceased two years earlier.
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  • In 1229 the Order began the conquest of Prussia, founding fortresses at each step to rivet its conquests (for instance, at Thorn, named after Toron in Palestine), much as the AngloNormans had done in their conquest of Wales.
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  • In the subsequent years the principle, which had already made great progress in Ireland, began to obtain a hold in England and Wales, where, in 1906, there were 145 local co-operative societies with a turn-over of £350,000.
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  • The extent of this decline is seen in Table II., wherein are given the annual average prices from 1875 to 1905, calculated upon returns from the 190 statutory markets of England and Wales (Corn Returns Act 1882).
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  • Ireland, she possessed six times as many sheep. The cattle population of England alone slightly exceeded that of Ireland, but cattle are more at home on the broad plains of England than amongst the hills and mountains of Wales and Scotland, which are suitable for sheep. Hence, whilst in England sheep were not three times as numerous as cattle, in Wales they were nearly five times, and in Scotland nearly six times as many.
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  • English and Irish, and England possessed more than six times as many pigs as Wales and Scotland together, the number in the last-named country being particularly small.
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  • For its size and in relation to its sheep population Wales harbours the disease to a far greater extent than the other divisions of Great Britain.
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  • The entire revocation of the muzzling order, which accordingly followed, proved, however, to be premature, and it became necessary to reimpose it in the districts where it had last been operative, namely, certain parts of South Wales.
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  • The trouble with this disease has been mainly in England, the outbreaks in Wales and Scotland being comparatively few.
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  • Average Weekly Cash Wages of ordinary Agricultural Labourers employed on certain Farms in England and Wales.
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  • Many other papers and reports are being issued from Australia, notably by Froggatt in New South Wales.
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  • A parliament in London in September 1305 to which Scottish representatives were summoned, agreed to an ordinance for the government of Scotland, which, though on the model of those for Wales and Ireland, treating Scotland as a third subject province under an English lieutenant, was in other respects not severe.
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  • Milford Haven is the terminus of a branch-line of the South Wales section of the Great Western railway.
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  • In 1485 Henry, earl of Richmond, disembarked here on his return from France, and was welcomed on landing by Sir Rhys ap Thomas and much of the chivalry of Wales.
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  • Pembroke is a station on the South Wales system of the Great Western railway.
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  • But he reluctantly, and most unwisely, allowed himself to be entangled in the scandalous family quarrel between Frederick, prince of Wales, and his parents.
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  • The several accounts by John White, Collins, Phillips, Hunter and others of the colonization of New South Wales at the end of the last century ought not to be overlooked by any Australian ornithologist.
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  • Sailing in 1838 for New South Wales, on his return in 1840 he at once commenced the greatest of all his works, The Birds of Australia, which was finished in 1848 in seven volumes, to which several supplementary parts, forming another volume, were subsequently added.
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  • Lewin s Natural History of the Birds of New South Wales (4to, 1822), which reached a third edition in 1838.
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  • Some notices of Australian birds by Mr Ramsay and others are to be found in the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales and of the Royal Society of Tasmania.
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  • After his marriage in 1766 with Caroline Matilda (1751-1 775), daughter of Frederick, prince of Wales, he abandoned himself to the worst excesses.
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  • From Prince Cadell's days to the death of the Lord Rhys, last reigning prince of South Wales, in 1196, Dinefawr continued to be the recognized abode of South Welsh royalty.
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  • A powerful stimulus was thus given to the growth of cotton in all directions; a degree of activity and enterprise never witnessed before was seen in India, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Italy, Africa, the West Indies, Queensland, New South Wales, Peru, Brazil, and in short wherever cotton could be produced; and there seemed no room to doubt that in a short time there would be abundant supplies independently of America.
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  • Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia possess suitable climatic conditions, and in the first-named state the cotton has been grown on a commercial scale in past years, the crop in 1897 being about 450 bales.
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  • When we turn to the British Islands we find, as we should expect, no traces of the Druids in England and Wales after the conquest of Anglesea mentioned above, except in the story of Vortigern as recounted by Nennius.
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  • They are important ores of silver (the pure chloride contains 75.3% of silver), and have been extensively mined at several places in Chile, also in Mexico, and at Broken Hill in New South Wales.
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  • Robert Parys, chamberlain of North Wales under Henry IV., is often given as their godfather.
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  • It was only the alliance of Montfort with Llewelyn of North Wales that brought the earl of Hereford back to his allegiance.
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  • The bishop also influenced the king's policy with regard to France, Scotland and Wales; was frequently employed on business of the highest moment; and was the royal mouthpiece on several important occasions.
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  • In 78 Agricola went to Britain, and both extended and consolidated the Roman dominion in that province, pushing his arms into North Wales and the Isle of Anglesey.
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  • For two years the movement spread rapidly throughout the north of England, and in 1654 more than sixty ministers went to Norwich, London, Bristol, the Midlands, Wales and other parts.
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  • He received the earldom of Hereford with the special duty of pushing into Wales.
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  • About 1408 a marriage was suggested between the princess and Henry, prince of Wales, afterwards Henry V., who renewed this proposal after he became king in March 1413.
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  • But he never left Sparkford, though the contrary has been maintained, until he resigned all his curacies in June 1783, and returned to Wales, marrying (on August loth) Sarah Jones of Bala, the orphan of a flourishing shopkeeper.
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  • He had early fallen under the influence of the great revival movement in Wales, and at the age of seventeen had been "converted" by a sermon of Daniel Rowland's.
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  • Wilberforce, Charles Grant, John Thornton and his son Henry, were among the philanthropists who contributed to his funds; in 1798 the Sunday School Society (established 1785) extended its operations to Wales, making him its agent, and Sunday Schools grew rapidly in number and favour.
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  • In_November 1802 he went to London, and on the 7th of December he sat at a committee meeting of the Religious Tract Society, as a country member, when his friend, Joseph Tarn - a member of the Spa Fields and Religious Tract Society committees - introduced the subject of a regular supply of bibles for Wales.
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  • Charles returned to Wales on the 30th of January 1804, and the British and Foreign Bible Society was formally and publicly inaugurated on March the 7th.
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  • For his conspicuous services he was given the Kaisar-i-Hind medal of the first class, made an honorary major in the Indian army, a G.C.I.E., a K.C.S.I., and A.D.C. to the prince of Wales.
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  • Carne, in Cathays Park, where the registry of the university of Wales (of which the college is a constituent) is also situated.
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  • Its library includes the Salesbury collection of books relating to Wales.
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  • The chief features of the museum are collections of the fossils, birds and flora of Wales and of obsolete Welsh domestic appliances, casts of the pre-Norman monuments of Wales, and reproductions of metal and ivory work illustrating various periods of art and civilization.
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  • The fine arts department contains twenty-seven oil paintings by modern English and continental artists bequeathed by William Menelaus of Dowlais in 1883, the Pyke-Thompson collection of about roo water-colour paintings presented in 5899, and some 3000 prints and drawings relating to Wales.
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  • In 1905 Cardiff was selected by a privy council committee to be the site of a state-aided national museum for Wales, the whole contents of the museum and art gallery, together with a site in Cathays Park, having been offered by the corporation for the purpose.
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  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).
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  • The newspapers of Cardiff include two weeklies, the Cardiff Times and Weekly Mail, founded in 1857 and 1870 respectively, two morning dailies, the South Wales Daily News and Western Mail, established in 1872 and 1869 respectively, and two evening dailies.
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  • Wales Training Colleges.
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  • In 1758 Home became private secretary to Lord Bute, then secretary of state, and was appointed tutor to the prince of Wales; and in 1760 his patron's influence procured him a pension of 300 per annum and in 1763 a sinecure worth another f Soo.
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  • There is, comparatively speaking, no great distance of time between the leges barbarorum and the Laws of Wales, while the contents of the latter show a similar, nay almost the same, idea of law as the former; and, apart from the fact that Wales became permanently connected at the end of the 13th century with a Teutonic people, the English, it has been noticed that in Wales Roman and Germanic, but no traces of a specific Welsh, law are found.
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  • In the preface it is stated that Howel, "seeing the laws and customs of the country violated with impunity, summoned the archbishop of Menevia, other bishops and the chief of the clergy, the nobles of Wales, and six persons (four laymen and two clerks) from each comot, to meet at a place called Y Ty Gwyn ar Da y, or the white house on the river Tav, repaired thither in person, selected from the whole assembly twelve of the most experienced persons, added to their number a clerk or doctor of laws, named Bllgywryd, and to these thirteen confided the task of examining, retaining, expounding and abrogating.
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  • An English translation by the side of the Welsh text of the so-called triads of Dyvnwal Moel Mud is given by Owen, in the The Ancient Laws of Wales.
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  • All this could not have been effected before Howel had subjected Wales to his own rule, therefore not before 943.
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  • We have three different recensions of the code, one for Venedotia or North Wales, another for Dimetia or South Wales, a third for Gwent or North-east Wales.
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  • The whole body of Welsh laws was published in one volume by Aneurin Owen under the direction of the commissioners on the public records as Ancient Laws and Institutes of Wales (London, 1841).
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  • The basin thus presents interesting problems. The existence of wide valleys where the small upper waters of the Cherwell, Evenlode and Coln now flow, the occurrence of waterborne deposits in their beds from the northwest of England and from Wales, and the fact that the Thames, like its lower southern tributaries which pierce the North Downs, has been able to maintain a deep valley through the chalk elevation at Goring, are considered to point to the former existence of a much larger river, in the system of which were included the upper waters of the present Severn, Dee and other rivers of the west.
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  • It is widely distributed in the United States, and occurs in Mexico and Brazil; it is found in Tunisia and Algeria, in the Altai Mountains and India, and in New South Wales, Queensland, and in Tasmania.
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  • Deposits are also worked at Broken Hill, New South Wales.
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  • In Wales and the south of England the process is conducted in a reverberatory furnace, the sole of which is paved with slags from previous operations, and has a depression in the middle where the metal formed collects to be let off by a tap-hole.
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  • The first castellan of this new stronghold was Giraldus de Windsor, husband of the Princess Nest of South Wales and grandfather of Giraldus Cambrensis.
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  • With the passing of the Act of Union of Wales and England in 1536 however, the jura regalia of the county palatine of Pembroke were abolished, and the prosperity of the town began to decline.
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  • From the convenient and accessible position of the town, the gaol and lunatic asylum serving for the three south-western counties of Wales - Cardigan, Pembroke and Carmarthen - have been fixed here.
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  • Although historically one of the most important towns in South Wales, Carmarthen can boast of very few ancient buildings, and the general aspect of the town is modern.
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  • In any case, the antiquity of the town is undisputed, and it served as the seat of government for Ystrad Tywi until the year 877, when Prince Cadell of South Wales abandoned Carmarthen for Dinefawr, near Llandilo, probably on account of the maritime raids of the Danes and Saxons.
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  • Edward III., by the Statute Staple of 1353, declared Carmarthen the sole staple for Wales, ordering that every bale of Welsh wool should be sealed or "cocketed" here before it left the Principality.
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  • In 1684 the duke of Beaufort with a numerous train made his state entry into Carmarthen as lord-president of Wales and the Marches.
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  • Wales, situated on a height near the left bank of the Dee estuary, 196 m.
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  • St Winifred's holy well, one of the wonders of Wales, sends up water at the rate of 21 tons a minute, of an almost unvarying temperature, higher than that of ordinary spring water.
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  • The words "y coed" are added to distinguish this Bettws from several others in Wales, especially that near Llandeilo Fawr, Carmarthenshire, not far from the Bettws hills.
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  • In the early 10th century, Harlech castle was, apparently, repaired by Colwyn, lord of Ardudwy, founder of one of the fifteen North Wales tribes, and thence called Caer Colwyn.
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  • He was ordained priest in 1831, and in 1833 went to New South Wales, as vicar-general to Bishop William Morris (1794-1872), whose jurisdiction extended over the Australian missions.
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  • The place is chiefly noted for its sulphur and chalybeate springs, the former being the strongest of the kind in Wales.
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  • Its railway station, which is the chief terminus of the South Wales system of the Great Western railway, is at the hamlet of Goodwick across the bay, a mile distant to the south-west.
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  • His relative James Stanhope (afterwards first Earl Stanhope), the king's favourite minister, procured for him the place of gentleman of the bedchamber to the prince of Wales.
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  • He maintained a correspondence with this lady which won for him the hatred of the princess of Wales (afterwards Queen Caroline).
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  • Marlborough House, adjacent to the palace, was built by the first duke of Marlborough in 1710 from the designs of Wren, came into possession of the Crown in 1817, and has been occupied since 1863 by the prince of Wales.
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  • The Council had a scheme of bringing water to London from Wales, in view of increasing demands on a stationary supply.
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  • The Roman general Paulinus Suetonius, after marching rapidly from Wales to put down a serious insurrection, found Londinium unfitted for a base of military operations, and therefore left the place to the mercy of Boadicea, who entirely destroyed it, and killed the inhabitants.
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  • On the 8th February the body of Nelson was borne with great pomp from the Admiralty to St Paul's Cathedral, where it was interred in the presence of the prince of Wales and the royal dukes.
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  • Among other events which made the streets gay and centred in processions to St Paul's may be specially mentioned the Thanksgiving Day on the 27th of February 1872 for the recovery of the prince of Wales after his dangerous illness; and the rejoicings at the Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887, and the Diamond Jubilee in 1897.
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  • The bills were killed by the action of the Registration Act for England and Wales, which came into operation July 1, 1837.
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  • By the Lights on Vehicles Act 1907, all vehicles on highways in England and Wales must display to the front a white light during the period between one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise.
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  • North Wales was another Jacobite centre.
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  • England and Wales have a population more than twelve times as dense as that of Burma, so there is still room for expansion.
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  • Howel Dda, king of West Wales, Owen, king of Cumbria, Constantine, king of the Scots, and Ealdred of Bamburgh, and henceforth he calls himself "rex totius Britanniae."
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  • The scriptural name is due, as often in Wales, to the village or hamlet taking its title from the Nonconformist church.
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  • Indeed, experiments have been made in this direction near Cardiff in South Wales.
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  • The portcullis gate and a tower are all that remain of it; of the abbey which was at one time the finest in Wales, there still exist the external walls, with parts of the chapel, vaulted chapter-house, refectory and abbot's house.
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  • In addition to this "statute" or "imperial acre," other "acres" are still, though rarely, used in Scotland, Ireland, Wales and certain English counties.
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  • It ceased to be the official residence in 1905, when the prince of Wales (afterwards George V.) was appointed Lord Warden, and the public was given access to those rooms which possess historical associations with former holders of the office, such as the duke of Wellington, who died here in 1852, William Pitt and others.
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  • In 1201 he was the greatest prince in Wales.
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  • In the next year Llewelyn recovered all his losses in North Wales.
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  • But he never desisted from his wars with the Marchers of South Wales, and in the early years of Henry III.
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  • In Australia tobacco is produced on a small scale in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.
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  • It may also be accompanied by pyrites, galena, arsenides and antimonides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, &c. It is widely distributed, and is particularly abundant in Germany (the Harz, Silesia), Austro-Hungary, Belgium, the United States and in England (Cumberland, Derbyshire, Cornwall, North Wales).
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  • Telford's road, raised on the lower Berwyn range side and overlooking the Dee, opens up the picturesqueness of Corwen, historically interesting from the reminiscences of Wales's last struggle for independence under Owen Glendower.
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  • Leaving Hampton Roads on the 18th of August 1838, it Mopped at Madeira and Rio de Janeiro; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Paumotu group of the Low Archipelago, the Samoan islands and New South Wales; from Sydney sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny islands; visited the Fiji and the Hawaiian islands in 1840, explored the west coast of the United States, including the Columbia river, San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento river, in 1841, and returned by way of the Philippine islands, the Sulu archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, Polynesia and the Cape of Good Hope, reaching New York on the 10th of June 1842.
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  • During the first year of Henry's reign Hotspur further was appointed justiciar of North Wales and constable of the castles of Chester, Flint, Conway, Denbigh and Carnarvon.
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  • He had the same difficulty in obtaining money for his northern charge that he had experienced in Wales.'
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  • The district between Bizerta and the Gulf of Tunis is a most attractive country, resembling greatly the mountainous regions of South Wales.
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  • He was a fellow of All Souls' from 1870 until his death, which occurred at Crickhowell, South Wales, on the 4th of August 1907.
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  • It derived importance from its situation on the road to South Wales.
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  • This period of somewhat mysterious withdrawal from the world embraced a tour in Wales in 1857, a visit to Norway in 1858, and a journey through Portugal in 1859.
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  • He was appointed almoner to the princessdowager of Wales in 1750.
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  • It was introduced by two potters who had visited Kioto, and there observed the ornate methods so well illustrated in the wales of Awata and Kiyomizu.
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  • After conquering the Ordovices in North Wales and the island of Mona (Anglesey), during the next two years he carried his victorious arms to the Taiis (Tay; others read Tanaus, perhaps the north Tyne), and in his fourth campaign fortified the country between Clota and Bodotria (the firths of Clyde and Forth) as a protection against the attacks of the Caledonians.
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  • There are various unsatisfactory accounts of the early history of Oswestry (Blaneminster, or Album Monasterium), as that it was called Trer Cadeirau by the Britons and Osweiling after Cunelda Wledig, prince of North Wales, had granted it to his -son Osweil.
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  • In the 15th and 16th .centuries a weekly market was held at Oswestry for the sale of woollen goods manufactured in North Wales, but in the 17th century the drapers of Shrewsbury determined to get the trade into their own town, and although an Order in the Privy Council was passed to restrain it to Oswestry they agreed in 1621 to buy no more cloth there.
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  • Wilton, the New South Wales Magazine (1833), the New South Wales Literary, Political and Commercial Advertiser (1835), edited by the eccentric Dr Lhotsky, Tegg's Monthly Magazine (1836), the Australian Magazine (1838), the New South Wales Magazine (1843), the Australian Penny Journal (1848) and many others.
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  • Fox supported the claim of the prince of Wales to the regency as a right, a doctrine which provoked Pitt into declaring that he would "unwhig the gentleman for the rest of his life."
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    0
  • Subsequently he accompanied the prince of Wales in his attempts to prolong the war in the Scilly and Channel Islands.
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  • It is still found in the northern counties of England and North Wales, but in decreasing numbers.
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  • After some slight successes as a writer, a Salisbury publisher commissioned him to compile an account of Wiltshire and, in conjunction with his friend Edward Wedlake Brayley, Britton produced The Beauties of Wiltshire (1801; 2 vols., a third added in 1825), the first of the series The Beauties of England and Wales, nine volumes of which Britton and his friend wrote.
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  • The first mention of his name is in a passage of William of Malmesbury, recording the discovery of his tomb in the province of Ros in Wales.
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    0
  • Among objects used are a pool of ink in the hand (Egypt), the liver of an animal (tribes of the North-West Indian frontier), a hole filled with water (Polynesia), quartz crystals (the Apaches and the Euahlayi tribe of New South Wales), a smooth slab of polished black stone (the Huille-che of South America), water in a vessel (Zulus and Siberians), a crystal (the Incas), a mirror (classical Greece and the middle ages), the finger-nail, a swordblade, a ring-stone, a glass of sherry, in fact almost anything.
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  • In their train came the great field preachers of Wales, like John Elias and Christmas Evans, and later the Primitive Methodists, who by their camp meetings and itinerancies kept religious enthusiasm alive when Wesleyan Methodism was in peril of hardening.
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  • In the early 19th century the pulpit had a great power, especially in Wales, where it was the vehicle of almost every kind of knowledge.
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  • It is the terminus of the railway, and a coaching station on the famous "Prince of Wales" route (named after King Edward VII.) from Cork to Glengarriff and Killarney.
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  • In 1320 he was made earl of Chester, and in 1325 duke of Aquitaine, but he never received the title of prince of Wales.
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    0
  • A new phase of the French war begins when in July 1346 Edward landed in Normandy, accompanied by his eldest son, Edward, prince of Wales, a youth of sixteen.
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    0
  • Meanwhile Aquitaine was gradually lost; the defeat of Pembroke off La Rochelle deprived England of the command of the sea, and Sir Owen ap Thomas, a grand-nephew of Llewelyn ab Gruffyd, planned, with French help, an abortive invasion of Wales.
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  • The Copenhagen post gave him, as well as some other diplomats, an exceptional opportunity of watching the principal moving powers of European politics from a point of vantage, as the matrimonial alliances of the Danish royal family occasionally brought together in a friendly family circle the widow of Alexander III, Nicholas II and the Prince of Wales who was to become King Edward VII.
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  • When the war broke out afresh in 1648 Deane went with Cromwell to Wales.
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  • She communicated on one occasion subsequently and attended Anglican service occasionally; but she received consecrated objects from Pope Clement VIII., continued to hear mass, and, according to Galluzzi, supported the schemes for the conversion of the prince of Wales and of England, and for the prince's marriage with a Roman Catholic princess, which collapsed on his death in 1612.
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  • Besides several children who died in infancy she had Henry, prince of Wales, who died in 1612, Charles, afterwards King Charles anct Elizabeth, electress palatine and queen of Bohemia.
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  • The pest even crossed the oceans, and appeared in Australia, at Geelong, about 1880; it has since twice broken out in Victoria, and has ravaged the vineyards of South Australia and New South Wales.
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  • Richard, by the time he had recrossed the channel to Wales, discovered that his cause was lost.
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  • Coal is never definitely crystalline, the nearest approach to such a structure being a compound fibrous grouping resembling that of gypsum or arragonite, which occurs in some of the steam coals of South Wales, and is locally known as " cone in cone," but no definite form or arrangement can be made out of the fibres.
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  • Thus the semi 'anthracitic coals of South Wales are known as " dry " or " steam coals," being especially valuable for use in marine steam-boilers, as they burn more readily than anthracite and with a larger amount of flame, while giving out a great amount of heat, and practically without producing smoke.
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  • In some instances the coal seams may be changed as a whole, as for instance in South Wales, where the coking coals of the eastern side of the basin pass through the state of dry steam coal in the centre, and become anthracite in the western side.
    0
    0
  • Australia possesses fields of great value, principally in the south-east (New South Wales and Victoria), and in New Zealand considerable quantities of coal and lignite are raised, chiefly in South Island.
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  • In the former, which is also known as " post and stall" or "bord and pillar " in the north of England, " pillar and stall " in South Wales, and " stoop and room " in Scotland, the field is divided into strips by numerous openings driven parallel to the main rise headings, called " bords " or " bord gates," which are again divided by cutting through them at intervals, so as to leave a series of pillars arranged chequer-wise over the entire area.
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  • In the South Wales system of working, cross headings are driven from the main roads obliquely across the rise to get a sufficiently easy gradient for horse roads, and from these the stalls are opened out with a narrow entrance, in order to leave support on either side of the road, but afterwards widening to as great a breadth as the seam will allow, leaving pillars of a minimum thickness.
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  • They were formerly used on a very large scale in Belgium and South Wales, but the great weight of the moving parts makes it impossible to drive them at the high speed called for by modern requirements, so that centrifugal fans are now generally adopted instead.
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    0
  • Thomas, of the gases dissolved or occluded in coals from South Wales basin shows them to vary considerably with the class of coal.
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    0
  • The gases from the bituminous house coals of South Wales are comparatively free from marsh gas, as compared with those from the steam coal and anthracite pits.
    0
    0
  • One of the earliest examples was erected at Llanbradack in South Wales in 1894, and they have been somewhat extensively used in Westphalia and the north of France.
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    0
  • In South Wales a somewhat similar treatment is now adopted in the anthracite districts.
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  • In connexion with the re-survey in greater detail of the coalfields by the Geological Survey a series of descriptive memoirs were undertaken, those on the North Staffordshire and Leicestershire fields, and nine parts dealing with that of South Wales, having appeared by the beginning of 1908.
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  • In June 1471 he was created prince of Wales.
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  • It is the most popular watering-place on the west coast of Wales, and possesses a pier, and a fine sea-front which stretches from Constitution Hill at the north end of the Marine Terrace to the mouth of the harbour.
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  • The town is of modern appearance, and contains many public buildings, of which the most remarkable is the imposing but fantastic structure of the University College of Wales near the Castle Hill.
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    0
  • In modern times Aberystwyth has become a Welsh educational centre, owing to the erection here of one of the three colleges of the university of Wales (1872), and of a hostel for women in connexion with it.
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  • He had resided in England since the rebellion of 1745, and in 1747, a downpour of rain having prevented the departure of Frederick, prince of Wales, from the Egham races, Bute was summoned to his tent to make up a whist party; he immediately gained the favour of the prince and princess, became the leading personage at their court, and in 1750 was appointed by Frederick a lord of his bedchamber.
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  • Bute continued to visit the princess of Wales, but on the king's arrival always retired by a back staircase.
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    0
  • Political reasons dictated an alliance between the young widow and her brother-inlaw Henry, prince of Wales, nearly five years her junior; Julius II.
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    0
  • In the course of the debate in the House of Lords the duke of York disclaimed on behalf of the prince of Wales any right to assume the regency without the consent of parliament.
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    0
  • Evidence as to the affinity between these breeds is afforded by the fact that a breed of cattle very similar to that at Chillingham was found in Wales in the 10th century; these cattle being white with red ears.
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    0
  • A return was also prepared in 1891, for Wales, of those who could speak only Welsh, only English, and both languages, but, owing to the inclusion of infants, the results were of little value.
    0
    0
  • In the acts relating to the census from 1801 to 1851, provision for the enumeration of Scotland was made with that for England and Wales, allowance being made for the differences in procedure, which mainly concerned the agency to be employed.
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    0
  • In the report of 1901 for England and Wales (p. 170) a table is given showing, for the three divisions of the United Kingdom, the relative number of persons speaking the ancient languages either exclusively or in addition to English.
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  • By prearrangement, no doubt, uniformity may be obtained in regard to most of the main statistical facts ascertainable at a census, at all events in the more advanced units of the empire, and proposals to this effect were made by the registrar-general of England and Wales in his report upon the figures for 1901.
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  • Previous to that date, the only step towards compilation of the census results of the empire had been a bare statement of area and population, appended without analysis, comparison or comment, to the reports for England and Wales, from the year 1861 onwards.
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  • The scope of the inquiry in New South Wales was somewhat extended and made to include occupations other than agriculture and stock-breeding.
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  • The reports for New South Wales and Victoria are especially valuable in their statistical aspect from the analysis they contain of the vital conditions of a comparatively young community under modern conditions of progress.
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  • These in turn led on to the Congregational Union of England and Wales, formed in 1832, and consisting at first of " County and District Associations, together with any ministers and churches of the Congregational Order recognized by an Association."
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  • In Wales there are three (one partly Presbyterian), in Scotland one, and in the colonies three.
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  • Bands of black nodules, highly phosphatic, are found at the top of the Bala limestone in North Wales; beds of concretions occur in the Jurassic series; and important deposits are known in the Cretaceous strata, especially in the Lower Greensand and at the base of the Gault.
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  • On the outbreak of the Civil War, after visiting Conway in the Royalist interest, he joined the king at Oxford; he then returned to Wales, and finding that Sir John Owen, acting on Charles's orders, had seized certain property in Conway Castle that had been deposited with the archbishop for safe-keeping, he went over to the Parliamentary side and assisted in the recapture of Conway Castle in November 1646.
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  • In 1821 he went to New South Wales as astronomer at the observatory built at Parramatta by Sir Thomas Brisbane.
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  • The Maitai beds have generally been considered to be Carboniferous from the presence of species of Productus found in the Permo-Carboniferous of New South Wales.
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  • In 18 9 8 the divorce law was amended on the lines of the Stephen Act of New South Wales, a change which helped to treble the number of petitions for divorce in the next seven years.
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  • It was discovered in 1774 by Captain Cook, and was taken by Philip King of the "Stirling" and twenty-four convicts from New South Wales.
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  • This settlement was abandoned in 1805, but in 1826 the island was made a penal settlement from New South Wales.
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  • The island was brought under the immediate administration of New South Wales; a chief magistrate, appointed by the governor of New South Wales, took the place of the elected magistrate, and an elected council of twelve elders superseded the general gathering of the adult population.
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  • The official name of the island is Prince of Wales Island and that of the town is Georgetown; neither of these names, however, is in general use.
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  • In 1821 he was appointed governor of New South Wales.
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  • The queen's second child, the prince of Wales (see Edward Vii.), was born on the 9th of November 1841; and this event "filled the measure of the queen's domestic Birth of happiness," as she said in her speech from the throne the prince at the opening of the session of 1842.
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  • Meanwhile the year 1842 was ushered in by splendid fetes in honour of the king of Prussia, who held the prince of Wales at the font.
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  • In August 1849 the queen and Prince Albert, accompanied by the little princess royal and the prince of Wales, paid a visit to Ireland, landing at the Cove of Cork, which from /rash trip, that day was renamed Queenstown.
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  • The prince of Wales, in addition to the revenues of the duchy of Cornwall, had L40,000 a year, the princess £Io,000, and an addition of L36,000 a year for their children was granted by parliament in 1889.
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  • At the time of the prince consort's death the prince of Wales was in his twenty-first year.
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  • Wales, His marriage was solemnized at Windsor on the 10th of March 1863.
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  • The prince of Wales's voyage to India in the winter of 1875-76 had brought the heir to the throne into personal relationship with the great Indian vassals of the British crown, and it was felt that a further demonstration of the queen's interest in her magnificent dependency would confirm their loyalty.
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  • So far as public ceremonies were concerned, the prince and princess of Wales were now coming forward more and more to represent the royal family.
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  • On the 4th of July she laid the foundation stone of the Imperial Institute, the building at Kensington to which, at the instance of the prince of Wales, it had been determined to devote the large sum of money collected as a Jubilee offering, and which was opened by the queen in 1893.
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  • Smith on the 2nd of July, expressing, on the one hand, the queen's desire to provide for Prince Albert Victor of Wales, and, Mr Smith, seconded by Gladstone, a select committee was appointed to consider these messages and to to report to the house as to the existing practice and as to the principles to be adopted for the future.
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  • The of Wales's ' 'c i evidence laid before the committee explained to the country for the first time the actual state of the royal income, and on the proposal of Gladstone, amending the proposal of the government, it was proposed to grant a fixed addition of £36,000 per annum to the prince of Wales, out of which he should be expected to provide for his children without further application to the country.
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  • Effect was given to this proposal in a bill called "The Prince of Wales's Children's Bill," which was carried in spite of the persistent opposition of a small group of Radicals.
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  • At the beginning of 1892 a heavy blow fell upon the queen in the death of the prince of Wales's eldest son Albert Victor, duke of Clarence and Avondale.
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  • In 1895 the queen lost her faithful and most efficient private secretary, General Sir Henry Ponsonby, who for many years on the other, informing the house of the intended marriage of the prince of Wales's daughter, the Princess Louise, to the earl (afterwards duke) of Fife.
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  • The garden at Kew dates from about 1730, when Frederick, prince of Wales, obtained a long lease of Kew House and its gardens from the Capel family.
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  • Among the gifts sent by Menezes was a piece of tapestry representing the marriage of Catherine of Aragon to Arthur, prince of Wales.
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  • The king met the monk at Denu (probably East or West Dean, near Seaford in Sussex), but Asser did not at once accept the invitation of Alfred, and returned to Wales to consult his colleagues.
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  • He then agreed to spend six months of each year with the king and six months in his own land; but his first stay at the royal court extended to eight months, and it is probable that the annual visit to Wales was curtailed if not altogether discontinued.
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  • The old gentleman in his aristocratic imperiousness frequently reminds us of the amusing directions given by Sir John Wynne to his chaplain, quoted in Pennant's Tour in Wales.
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  • On Wednesday and Thursday, January 5th and 6th, 1 743, the friends of aggressive Christianity in Wales met at Wadford, near Caerphilly, Glam., in order to organize their societies.
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  • Llangeitho became the Jerusalem of Wales, and Rowland's popularity never waned until his physical powers gave way.
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  • A powerful revival broke out at Llangeitho in the spring of 1780, and spread to the south, but not to the north of Wales.
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  • Until 1811 the Calvinistic Methodists had no ministers ordained by themselves; their enormous growth in numbers and the scarcity of ministers to administer the Sacrament - only three in North Wales, two of whom had joined only at the dawn of the century - made the question of ordination a matter of urgency.
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  • The South Wales clergy who regularly itinerated were dying out; the majority of those remaining itinerated but irregularly, and were most of them against the change.
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  • In 1842, the South Wales Association opened a college at Trevecca, leaving Bala to the North; the Rev. David Charles became principal of the former, and the Rev. Lewis Edwards of the latter.
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  • The Calvinistic Methodists form in some respects the strongest church in Wales, and its forward movement, headed by Dr. John Pugh of Cardiff, has brought thousands into its fold since its establishment in 1891.
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  • When the first serious overtures for her hand were made on behalf of Charles, prince of Wales, in the spring of 1624, she was little more than fourteen years of age.
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  • Bathurst is the centre of the chief wheat-growing district of New South Wales, while gold, copper and silver are extensively mined in its vicinity.
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  • In 1785 the prince of Wales joined, and later his brothers the dukes of Clarence and Sussex became members.
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  • In the case of secondary schools in receipt of grants of public money (about 700 in England and too in Wales in 1907-1908), " the curriculum and time-table must be approved by the Board of Education."
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  • Meanwhile the labour traffic, which had been initiated, so far as the, Pacific islands were concerned, by an unsuccessful attempt in 1847 to employ New Hebridean labourers on a settlement near the present township of Eden in New South Wales, had attained considerable proportions, had been improperly exploited and, as already indicated, had led the natives to retaliation, sometimes without discernment, a notorious example of this (as was generally considered) being the murder of Bishop Patteson in 1871.
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  • Of the British possessions among the islands of the Pacific, Fiji is a colony, and its governor is also high commissioner for the western Pacific. In this capacity, assisted by deputies and resident commissioners, he exercises jurisdiction over all the islands except Fiji and those islands which are attached to New Zealand and New South Wales.
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  • The climate of Porthcawl is bracing, and the rainfall (averaging 25 in.) is about the lowest on the South Wales coast.
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  • It originated in a proposal made to the committee of the Religious Tract Society, by the Rev. Thomas Charles of Bala, who found that his evangelistic and philanthropic labours in Wales were sorely hindered by the dearth of Welsh Bibles.
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