This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

wagons

wagons Sentence Examples

  • When all the wagons were ready, she snapped the whip over the back of the mules.

    9
    5
  • It would be nice to get away from the wagons for a while.

    8
    3
  • After the camp was cleaned and the wagons were ready to roll, she smiled up at Bordeaux.

    5
    2
  • She waited until the others were in their wagons and then slapped the lines to the backs of the mules.

    4
    1
  • The four freight wagons pulled into a single line behind her.

    3
    2
  • The artillery and baggage wagons moved noiselessly through the deep dust that rose to the very hubs of the wheels, and the infantry sank ankle-deep in that soft, choking, hot dust that never cooled even at night.

    3
    3
  • The heavy wagons pushed on.

    2
    1
  • The wheels of the Conestoga wagons had been modified with wide rims to even the load on the sand.

    2
    1
  • At A therefore it becomes necessary to disentangle and group together all the wagons that are intended for B, all that are intended for C, and all that are intended for D.

    2
    1
  • At A therefore it becomes necessary to disentangle and group together all the wagons that are intended for B, all that are intended for C, and all that are intended for D.

    2
    1
  • Each day they changed positions in line so that no one ate the dust from all the wagons every day.

    1
    1
  • The railroad is close enough now that wagons can reach it from Ashley faster than we can cross the desert.

    1
    1
  • The city's principal manufactures are beet sugar, barrels and other cooperage products, wagons, carriages, sleighs and agricultural implements.

    1
    1
  • But the iron sheathing was not strong enough to resist buckling under the passage of the loaded wagons, and to remedy this defect the plan, was tried of making the rails wholly of iron.

    1
    1
  • But the iron sheathing was not strong enough to resist buckling under the passage of the loaded wagons, and to remedy this defect the plan, was tried of making the rails wholly of iron.

    1
    1
  • In the wood, wagons and horses were standing.

    1
    1
  • As the teams came to a halt, the rasp of leather against sandy wheels assured her that the other wagons were following suit.

    1
    2
  • All that churning of sand and dust disguised their trail to some degree, but nothing could hide the trail of five heavy wagons.

    0
    0
  • You don't be wandering away from the wagons.

    0
    0
  • A horse and rider could cover more distance in a day that the mules could pulling the heavy freight wagons.

    0
    0
  • It must be fun to be able to ride all around freely while we're stuck in our wagons.

    0
    0
  • He told me to stay close to the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Fritz, Royce and Davis wandered back to their wagons.

    0
    0
  • She packed all the dishes and stashed them in the back of one of the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Without another word he road away from the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Good, now stick close to the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Get those mules inside the circle of wagons and be ready for trouble.

    0
    0
  • They circled the wagons and made camp.

    0
    0
  • Fritz and Royce were watching the mules in a makeshift corral outside the wagons.

    0
    0
  • The muffled sound of hooves on sand approached the opening between two wagons.

    0
    0
  • The space inside the wagons was a din of screaming mules and men.

    0
    0
  • The Indians were stealing the mules left outside the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Barely enough for two wagons.

    0
    0
  • We could take two wagons, but that would mean we'd have to travel slow, and there wouldn't be any animals for riding except Bordeaux's horse.

    0
    0
  • If you leave the wagons behind, you'll be rewarding the Indians.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, if you abandoned the wagons and rode the mules, you might be able to keep ahead of the Indians.

    0
    0
  • One and a half or two if you leave the wagons - and leave tonight.

    0
    0
  • But what if we buried the supplies under the wagons and then burned the wagons?

    0
    0
  • By the time the wagons were fully engulfed in flames, they had traveled far enough to be out of the firelight.

    0
    0
  • The flames threw eerie lights into the sand around the wagons, but nothing moved.

    0
    0
  • The Indians must know they had abandoned the wagons, and their tracks would be illuminated by the firelight.

    0
    0
  • But were the Indians interested in the people, or the food the wagons contained?

    0
    0
  • By dawn they had left the wagons far behind.

    0
    0
  • He stopped, watching a group of freight wagons.

    0
    0
  • The two men talked for a few minutes and then one rider turned his bay horse toward the wagons.

    0
    0
  • In some cases the material traverses the chamber from the coolest to the hottest part on a conveyer or in wagons.

    0
    0
  • Malt, tinware, flour and grist-mill products, boilers, stoves and ranges, optical supplies, wall-paper, cereals, canned goods, cutlery, tin cans and wagons are manufactured, and there are also extensive nurseries.

    0
    0
  • The insufficiency of rolling stock, and especially of goods wagons, is mainly caused by delays in handling traffic consequent on this or other causes, among which may be mentioned the great length ofthe single lines south of Rome.

    0
    0
  • Among Kenosha's manufactures are brass and iron beds (the Simmons Manufacturing Co.), mattresses, typewriters, leather and brass goods, wagons, and automobiles - the "Rambler" automobile being made at Kenosha by Thomas B.

    0
    0
  • Columbus is near the Ohio coal and iron-fields, and has an extensive trade in coal, but its largest industrial interests are in manufactures, among which the more important are foundry and machine-shop products (1905 value, $6,259,579); boots and shoes (1905 value, $5,425,087, being more than one-sixtieth of the total product value of the boot and shoe industry in the United States, and being an increase from $359,000 in 1890); patent medicines and compounds (1905 value, $3,214,096); carriages and wagons (1905 value, $2,197,960); malt liquors (1905 value, $2,133,955); iron and steel; regalia and society emblems; steam-railway cars, construction and repairing; and oleo-margarine.

    0
    0
  • The city is a trade centre for a rich farming district, has car-shops (of the Pere Marquette railway) and iron foundries, and manufactures wagons, pottery, furniture and clothing.

    0
    0
  • In time it became a common practice to cover them with a thin sheathing or plating of iron, in order to add to their life; this expedient caused more wear on the wooden rollers of the wagons, and, apparently towards the middle of the 18th century, led to the introduction of iron wheels, the use of which is recorded on a wooden railway near Bath in 1734.

    0
    0
  • When getting on or off, or falling off engines, wagons, &c..

    0
    0
  • While loading, unloading or sheeting wagons, trucks and horseboxes 8 2.

    0
    0
  • In cases where the route of a line runs across a river or other piece of water so wide that the construction of a bridge is either impossible or would be more costly than is warranted by the volume of traffic, the expedient is sometimes adopted of carrying the wagons and carriages across bodily with their loads on train ferries, so as to avoid the inconvenience and delay of transshipment.

    0
    0
  • Of these there are two main systems: (1) a continuous cable is carried over two main drums at each end of the line, and the motion is derived either (a) from the weight of the descending load or (b) from a motor acting on one of the main drums; (2) each end of the cable is attached to wagons, one set of which accordingly ascends as the other descends.

    0
    0
  • Goods stations vary in size from those which consist of perhaps a single siding, to those which have accommodation for thousands of wagons.

    0
    0
  • The shed may have a single pair of rails for wagons running through it along one side of a raised platform, there being a roadway for carts on the other side; or if more accommodation is required there may be two tracks, one on each side of the platform, which is then approached by carts at the end.

    0
    0
  • In either case the platform is fitted with a crane or cranes for lifting merchandise into and out of the wagons, and doors enable the shed to be used as a lock-up warehouse.

    0
    0
  • It is generally convenient to keep the inwards and the outwards traffic distinct and to deal with the two classes separately; at junction stations it may also be necessary to provide for the transfer of freight from one wagon to another, though the bulk of goods traffic is conveyed through to its destination in the wagons into which it was originally loaded.

    0
    0
  • The increased loading space required in the sheds is obtained by multiplying the number and the length of lines and platforms; sometimes also there are short sidings, cut into the platforms at right angles to the lines, in which wagons are placed by the aid of wagon turn-tables, and sometimes the wagons are dealt with on two floors, being raised or lowered bodily from the ground level by lifts.

    0
    0
  • British railways also undertake the collection and delivery of freight, in addition to transporting it, and thus an extensive range of vans and wagons, whether drawn by horses or mechanically propelled, must be provided in connexion with an important station.

    0
    0
  • Though a busy colliery may send off its product by the train-load to an important town, the wagons will usually be addressed to a number of different consignees at different depots in different parts of the town, and therefore the train will have to be broken up somewhere short of its destination and its trucks rearranged, together with those of other trains similarly constituted, into fresh trains for conveyance to the various depots.

    0
    0
  • A station of moderate size may collect goods destined for a great variety of places but not in sufficient quantities to compose a full train-load for any of them, and then it becomes impossible to avoid despatching trains which contain wagons intended for many diverse destinations.

    0
    0
  • For some distance these wagons will all travel over the same line, but sooner or later they will reach a junction-point where their ways will diverge and where they must be separated.

    0
    0
  • At this point trains of wagons similarly destined for different places will be arriving from other lines, and hence the necessity will arise of collecting together from all the trains all the wagons which are travelling to the same place.

    0
    0
  • A train from a will contain some wagons for B,, some for C and some for D, as will also the trains from a, b, c and d.

    0
    0
  • Between A and B, A and C, and A and D, there may be a string of stations, p, q, r, s, &c., all receiving goods from a, b, c and d, and it would manifestly be inconvenient and wasteful of time and trouble if the trains serving those intermediate stations were made up with, say, six wagons from a to p next the engine, five from b to p at the middle, and four from c to p near the end.

    0
    0
  • Conversely, trains arriving at A from B, C and D must be broken up. and remade in order to distribute their wagons to the different, dock branches.

    0
    0
  • To enable the wagons to be shunted into the desired order yards containing a large number of sidings are constructed at important junction points like A.

    0
    0
  • An engine coupled to a batch of wagons runs one or more of them down one siding, leaves them there, then returns back with the remainder clear of the points where the sidings diverge, runs one or more others down another siding, and so on till they are all disposed of.

    0
    0
  • The same operation is repeated with fresh batches of wagons, until the sidings contain a number of trains, each intended, it may be supposed, for a particular town or district.

    0
    0
  • 27 a the wagons is necessary to get them into station order this is effected on the same principle.

    0
    0
  • The method of working is for the pole to be swung out behind a number of wagons; one engine is then started and with its pole pushes the wagons in front of it until their speed is sufficient to carry them over the points, where they are diverted into any desired siding.

    0
    0
  • The wagons are pushed by an engine at their rear up one slope of an artificial mound, and as they run down the other slope by gravity are switched into the desired siding.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a site can be found for the sorting sidings where the natural slope of the ground is sufficiently steep to make the wagons run down of themselves.

    0
    0
  • The resistance of goods wagons has not been so systematically investigated.

    0
    0
  • In the paper above quoted Aspinall cites a case where the resistance of a train of empty wagons 1830 ft.

    0
    0
  • per hour, and a train of full wagons 1045 ft.

    0
    0
  • The vehicles used for the transportation of goods are known as goods wagons or trucks in Great Britain, and as freight cars in America.

    0
    0
  • The principal types to be found in the United Kingdom and on the continent of Europe are open wagons (the lading often protected from the weather by tarpaulin sheets), mineral wagons, covered or box wagons for cotton, grain, &c., sheep and cattle trucks, &c. The principal types of American freight cars are box cars, gondola cars, coal cars, stock cars, tank cars and refrigerator cars, with, as in other countries, various special cars for special purposes.

    0
    0
  • The gondola or flat car corresponds to the European open wagons and is used to carry goods not liable to be injured by the weather; but in the United States the practice of covering the load with tarpaulins is unknown, and therefore the proportion of box cars is much greater than in Europe.

    0
    0
  • and the goods wagons of Europe and other lands is in carrying capacity.

    0
    0
  • In Great Britain the mineral trucks can ordinarily hold from 8 to io tons (long tons, 2240 lb), and the goods trucks rather less, though there are wagons in use holding 12 or 15 tons, and the specifications agreed to by the railway companies associated in the Railway Clearing House permit private wagon owners (who own about 45% of the wagon stock run on the railways of the United Kingdom) to build also wagons holding 20, 30, 40 and 56 tons.

    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe the average carrying capacity is rather higher; though wagons of less than io tons capacity are in use, many of those originally rated at io tons have been rebuilt to hold 15, and the tendency is towards wagons of 15-20 tons as a standard, with others for special purposes holding 40 or 45 tons.

    0
    0
  • The majority of the wagons referred to above are comparatively short, are carried on four wheels, and are often made of wood.

    0
    0
  • About 1875 their average capacity differed little from that of British wagons of the present day, but by 1885 it had grown to zo or 22 short tons (z000 ib) and now it is probably at least three times that of European wagons.

    0
    0
  • in numerous wagons, each of which goes right through to its destination, with the consequence that, so far as general merchandise is concerned, the weight carried in each is a quarter - or less of its capacity.

    0
    0
  • The common form of non-automatic coupler, used in Great Britain for goods wagons, consists of a chain and hook; the chain hangs loosely from a slot in the draw-bar, which terminates in a hook, and coupling is effected by slipping the =chain of one vehicle over the hook of the next.

    0
    0
  • This coupling gear is placed centrally between a pair of buffers; formerly these were often left " dead " - that is, consisted of solid prolongations of the frame of the vehicle, but now they are made to work against springs which take up the shocks that occur when the wagons are thrown violently .against one another in shunting.

    0
    0
  • In British practice the chains consist of three links, and are of such a length that when fully extended there is a space of a few inches between opposing buffers; this slack facilitates the starting of a heavy train, since the engine is able to start the wagons one by one and the weight of the train is not thrown on it all at once.

    0
    0
  • The city's manufactures include glass, brick, tile, carriages and wagons, agricultural implements, pianos and organs and cigars.

    0
    0
  • A still more serious blow was the destruction of the relief army which Levenhaupt was bringing to Charles from Livonia, and which, hampered by hundreds of loaded wagons, was overtaken and almost destroyed by Peter at Lyesna after a two days' battle against fourfold odds (October).

    0
    0
  • Other leading manufactures are malt liquors ($21,620,794 in 1905), railway rolling-stock consisting largely of cars ($21,428,227), men's clothing ($18,496,173), planing mill products ($17,725,711), carriages and wagons ($16,096,125), distilled liquors ($15,976,523), rubber and elastic goods ($15,963,603), furniture ($13,322,608), cigars and cigarettes ($13,241,230), agricultural implements ($12,891,197), women's clothing ($12,803582), lumber and timber products ($12,567,992), soap and candles.

    0
    0
  • The principal manufactures are hardware, foundry and machine shop products, ammunition and fire-arms (the Winchester Company), carriages and wagons, malt liquors, paper boxes and corsets.

    0
    0
  • Several creeks and the upper Cape Fear river furnish considerable waterpower, and in or near Fayetteville are manufactories of cotton goods, silk, lumber, wooden-ware, turpentine, carriages, wagons, ploughs, edge tools and flour.

    0
    0
  • On war-footing each field battery has 4 officers, 100-120 N.C. officers and men, 100-125 horses and draught animals, 3-9 ammunition wagons; each horse battery, 4 officers, 120 N.C. officers and men, 100 horses, &c., 3 ammunition wagons; each mountain battery, 3 officers, 100 N.C. officers and men, 87 horses, &c.; each howitzer battery, 4 officers, 120 N.C. officers and men, Poo horses, &c., 3 ammunition wagons.

    0
    0
  • The ammunition train counts 1254 wagons.

    0
    0
  • Experience only can teach the art of packing wagons and the care of draught animals, and throughout the campaign the small ponies of Poland and East Prussia broke down by thousands from over loading and unskilful packing.

    0
    0
  • Though clad, armed and organized in European fashion, the soldiers retained in a marked degree the traditions of their Mongolian forerunners, their transport wagons were in type the survival of ages of experience, and their care for their animals equally the result of hereditary habit.

    0
    0
  • On his return from Spain, seeing war imminent, he issued a series of march orders (which deserve the closest study in detail) by which on the 15th of April his whole army was to be concentrated for manoeuvres between Regensburg, Landshut, Augsburg and Donauwbrth, and sending on the Guard in wagons to Strassburg, he despatched Berthier to act as commander-in-chief until his own arrival.

    0
    0
  • To do this the city maintained (1906) 24 flushing wagons working 2 shifts of 8 hours each per day.

    0
    0
  • Coal was brought down from the hills on the backs of mules, and iron carried in two-ton wagons.

    0
    0
  • This stream furnishes good water power, and the village has manufactories of cotton and woollen goods, lumber, woodenware, gold and silver plated ware, carriages, wagons and screens.

    0
    0
  • Flint has important manufacturing interests, its chief manufactures being automobiles, wagons, carriages - Flint is called "the vehicle city," - flour, woollen goods, iron goods, cigars, beer, and bricks and tiles; and its grain trade is of considerable importance.

    0
    0
  • In outlying districts post carts and ox wagons are the usual means of conveyance.

    0
    0
  • Stinkwood is largely employed in the making of wagons, and is also used for making furniture.

    0
    0
  • Black ironwood is likewise used in building wagons, while sneezewood is largely utilized for supports for piers and other marine structures, being impervious to the attacks of the Teredo navalis.

    0
    0
  • Among the city's manufactures are agricultural implements, iron bridges and other structural iron work, watches and watch-cases, steel, engines, safes, locks, cutlery, hardware, wagons, carriages, paving-bricks, furniture, dental and surgical chairs, paint and varnish, clay-working machinery and saw-mill machinery.

    0
    0
  • The men journeyed on horseback, the women in wagons with felt tilts.

    0
    0
  • In November matters were brought to a head by the wagons of a farmer named Bezuidenhout being seized in respect of the non-payment of taxes, and promptly retaken from the sheriff by a party of Boers.

    0
    0
  • Kruger then closed the drifts (or fords) on the river by which the wagons crossed.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of November he was severely handled and his guns and wagons captured at Bothaville.

    0
    0
  • The city's chief interest is in the tobacco industry; it has also considerable trade in other agricultural products and in coal; and its manufactures include carriages and wagons, bricks, lime, flour and dressed lumber.

    0
    0
  • Among its manufactures are foundry and machineshop products, boilers, carriages and wagons, agricultural implements, pipe and fittings, working-men's gloves, &c. In 1905 the total factory product was valued at $6,729,381, or 61.5% more than in 1900.

    0
    0
  • When the mineral is transported by rail or water to concentration or metallurgical works for treatment, or to near or distant markets for sale, provision must be made for the economical loading of railway wagons or vessels, and for the temporary storage of the mineral product.

    0
    0
  • For short periods the mineral may remain in the mine cars, or may be loaded into railway wagons held at the mine for this purpose.

    0
    0
  • Cars, however, are too valuable to be used in this way for more than a few hours, and it is usual to erect large storage bins at the mine, at concentration works and metallurgical establishments, in which the mineral may be stored, permitting cars, wagons and vessels to be quickly emptied or loaded.

    0
    0
  • For coal, iron ore and other cheap minerals, mechanical handling by many different methods is used in loading and unloading railway wagons and vessels, and in forming the stock-piles and reloading the mineral therefrom.

    0
    0
  • When centrifugals were adopted for purging the whole crop (they had long been used for curing the second or third sugars), the system then obtaining of running the sugar into wagons or coolers, which was necessary for the second and third sugars' cooked only to string point, was continued, but latterly " crystallization in movement, a development of the system which forty years ago or more existed in refineries and in Cuba, has come into general use, and with great advantage, especially where proprietors have been able to erect appropriate buildings and machinery for carrying out the system efficiently.

    0
    0
  • On the 16th of the month Maimacterion, a long procession, headed by a trumpeter playing a warlike air, set out for the graves; wagons decked with myrtle and garlands of flowers followed, young men (who must be of free birth) carried jars of wine, milk, oil and perfumes; next came the black bull destined for the sacrifice, the rear being brought up by the archon, who wore the purple robe of the general, a naked sword in one hand, in the other an urn.

    0
    0
  • Among the other manufactures are food preparations, wooden ware, wagons and carriages, stoves and furnaces, boots and shoes, tobacco and cigars, flour, candy, gloves, bricks, tile and pottery, furniture, paper boxes and firearms. Utica is a shipping point for the products of a fertile agricultural region, from which are exported dairy products (especially cheese), nursery products, flowers (especially roses), small fruits and vegetables, honey and hops.

    0
    0
  • Its most distinctive manufactures are paper and wood pulp; more valuable are foundry and machine shop products; other manufactures are safes, malt liquors, flour, woollens, Corliss engines, carriages and wagons and agricultural implements.

    0
    0
  • They also construct carriages, wagons and locomotives, and they may therefore be said to have become entirely independent in the matter of railways, for a government iron-foundry at Wakamatsu in Kishifl is able to manufacture steel rails.

    0
    0
  • In addition to cash registers, the city's manufactured products include agricultural implements, clay-working machinery, cotton-seed and linseed oil machinery, filters, turbines, railway cars (the large Barney-Smith car works employed 1800 men in 1905), carriages and wagons, sewingmachines (the Davis Sewing Machine Co.), automobiles, clothing, flour, malt liquors, paper, furniture, tobacco and soap. The total value of the manufactured product, under the "factory system," was $31,015,293 in 1900 and $39,596,773 in 1905.

    0
    0
  • Albert Lea is a railway and manufacturing centre of considerable importance, has grain elevators and foundries and machine shops, and manufactures bricks, tiles, carriages, wagons, flour, corsets, refrigerators and woollen goods.

    0
    0
  • The liquors are run off from the vats to the electrolysing baths or precipitating tanks, and the leached ores are removed by means of doors in the sides of the vats into wagons.

    0
    0
  • o% over the value of the factory products in 1900; among its manufactures are tobacco, cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff (value in 1905, $2,879,217), patent medicines (value in 1905, $2,133,198), flour and grist mill products ($1,089,910), men's clothing ($ 8 33, 8 35), and, of less importance, commercial and computing scales and time recorders, chemicals, distilled liquor, beer, fire-alarm apparatus, overalls, agricultural implements, wagons, electrical apparatus, refined oil, sheet metal, paper bags and envelopes, tacks and nails, window glass, glass-ware, clocks, whips and furniture (especially Morris chairs).

    0
    0
  • Among the manufactures are beer, wagons, wool, and pearl buttons, and the city is a centre of the fresh-water pearl fisheries along the Mississippi.

    0
    0
  • Its manufactures are shoes, bricks, lumber, ice, agricultural implements, wagons and handles.

    0
    0
  • Among the manufactures of Oneida are wagons, cigars, furniture, caskets, silver-plated ware, engines and machinery, steel and wooden pulleys and chucks, steel grave vaults, hosiery, and milk bottle caps.

    0
    0
  • When the king went forth to war thirteen great crosses made of gold and jewels were carried in wagons before him as his standards, and each was followed by 10,000 knights and 100,000 footmen.

    0
    0
  • The junction of the levels with the pit is known as the " pit eye "; it is usually of an enlarged section, and lined with masonry or brick-work, so as to afford room for handling the wagons or trams of coal brought from the working faces.

    0
    0
  • generally it is done by horse or mechanical traction, ground upon railways, the " trams " or " tubs," as the pit convey= wagons are called, being where possible brought up to ante.

    0
    0
  • The wagons are attached at intervals by short lengths of chain lapped twice round the rope and hooked into one of the links, or in some cases the chains are hooked into hempen loops on the main rope.

    0
    0
  • At North Fond du Lac, just beyond the city limits, are car-shops of the two last-mentioned railways, and in the city are manufactories of machinery, automobiles, wagons and carriages, awnings, leather, beer, flour, refrigerators, agricultural implements, toys and furniture.

    0
    0
  • But in recent times the weight of traction engines and wagons which pass over bridges has increased, and this kind of load generally produces greater straining action than a crowd of people.

    0
    0
  • Trains of wagons did not weigh more than three-quarters of a ton per foot run when most heavily loaded.

    0
    0
  • The weights of engines and wagons are now greater, and in addition it is recognized that the concentration of the loading at the axles gives rise to greater straining action, especially in short bridges, than the same load uniformly distributed along the span.

    0
    0
  • Also long ore wagons are used which weigh loaded two tons per ft.

    0
    0
  • Wagons he assumes to weigh for the lightest class 1.3 tons per ft.

    0
    0
  • He takes as the live load for a bridge two such engines, followed by a train of wagons covering the span.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, by the compact of Rastawica, the sejm undertook to allow the Cossacks, partly as wages, partly as compensation, 40,000 (raised by the compact of Kurukow to 60,000) gulden and 170 wagons of cloth per annum.

    0
    0
  • Among the more important manufactures of the city in 1905 were the following, with the value of the product for that year: clothing ($16,972,484), slaughtering and meatpacking products ($13,446,202), foundry and machine-shop products ($11,528,768), boots and shoes ($10,596,928), distilled liquors ($9,609,826), malt liquors ($7,702,693), and carriages and wagons ($6,323,803).

    0
    0
  • Longstreet and Hill were thus opposed to five Federal divisions, while General McClellan was pushing his wagons forward to Malvern Hill, on which strong position the Army of the Potomac was concentrated at nightfall.

    0
    0
  • Other important manufactures, with their product values in 1900 and in 1905, are iron and steel ($5,004,572 in 1900; $6,167,542 in 1905); railway cars ($4,248,029 in 1900; $5,739,071 in 1905); packed meats ($5, 1 77, 16 7 in 1900; $5, 6 93,73 1 in 1905); foundry and machine shop products ($4,434,610 in 1900; $4, 6 99,559 in 1905); planing mill products, including sash, doors and blinds ($1,891,517 in 1900; $4,593, 2 5 1 in 1905-an increase already remarked); carriages and wagons ($2,849,713 in 1900; $4,059,438 in 1905); tanned and curried leather ($3,757,016 in 1900; $3,952,277 in 1905); and malt liquors ($3,186,627 in 1900; $3,673,678 in 1905).

    0
    0
  • The invasion was wonderfully accelerated through the I9th century, when the vast area of the treeless prairies beyond the Appalachians was offered to the settler, and when steam transportation on sea and land replaced sailing vessels and wagons.

    0
    0
  • Good horses suitable for general work on farms and for cabs, omnibuses, and grocery and delivery wagons, are plentiful for local markets and for export.

    0
    0
  • Among its manufactures are cotton goods, iron, lumber, nets and twine, bricks, and carriages and wagons.

    0
    0
  • Only two guns and such of Mercy's wagons that were unable to keep up fell into the hands of the French.

    0
    0
  • Other important manufactures in 1905 were petroleum products ($2,006,484); lumber and planing mill products ($1,604,274); women's clothing ($1,477,648); children's carriages and sleds ($ 1, 4 6 5,599); car-shop construction and repairs, by steam railway companies ($1,366,506); carriages and wagons ($ 1, 22 5,387); structural iron work ($1,102,035); agricultural implements, bicycles, automobiles (a recent and growing industry), plate and cut-glass (made largely from a fine quality of sand found near the city), tobacco, spices and malted liquors.

    0
    0
  • In 1858 it became the headquarters of a great freighting-firm that distributed supplies for the United States government among the army posts between the Missouri river and the Rocky Mountains; in seven months in 1859 this one firm employed 602 men, used 517 wagons, 5682 oxen, and 75 mules, and shipped 2,782,258 lb.

    0
    0
  • Among the manufactures are woollen goods, towels, canned fruit and vegetables, dairy products, beer, and circus wagons (the city is the headquarters of the Ringling and the Gollmar circuses).

    0
    0
  • The locomotives and wagons for theGerman railways are almost exclusively built in Germany; and Russia, as well as Austria, receives large supplies of railway plant from German works.

    0
    0
  • These and similar phrases, such as the excuse for withdrawing the Reform Bill in the year of the great budget of 1860 - "you cannot get twenty wagons at once through Temple Bar" - were in all men's mouths.

    0
    0
  • The straits between Fredericia and Middelfart and between Nyborg and Korsor are crossed by powerful steam-ferries which are generally capable of conveying a limited number of railway wagons.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of bricks and tiles, carriages and wagons, agricultural implements, and the products of its railway shops, its manufactures are relatively unimportant, the factory product in 1905 being valued at only $1,924,109.

    0
    0
  • Grand Rapids manufactures carpet sweepers - a large proportion of the whole world's product, - flour and grist mill products, foundry and machine-shop products, planing-mill products, school seats, wood-working tools, fly paper, calcined plaster, barrels, kegs, carriages, wagons, agricultural implements and bricks and tile.

    0
    0
  • The city lies in an agricultural and grape-growing; region, and has a fine harbour and an extensive lake trade; the: manufactures include locomotives, radiators, lumber, springs, shirts, axes, wagons, steel, silk gloves and concrete blocks.

    0
    0
  • Flour is the principal product; among others are woollen goods, foundry and machineshop products, wooden ware, sash, doors and blinds, caskets, shirts, wagons and packed meats.

    0
    0
  • \ wagons, similar to those which are employed for carrying sulphuric acid, holding ro tons each.

    0
    0
  • In 1872 "by walking, begging rides both in wagons, and in the cars" he travelled 500 m.

    0
    0
  • Four lines of rails on deck gave accommodation for 54 ten-ton wagons carrying an average load of 900 tons.

    0
    0
  • The invasion was wonderfully accelerated through the 19th century, when the vast area of the treeless prairies beyond the Appalachians was offered to the settler, and when steam transportation on sea and land replaced sailing vessels and wagons.

    0
    0
  • Ashley with a considerable party explored and trapped in the Sweetwater and Green river valleys, and in 1826 wagons were driven from St Louis to Wind river for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company.

    0
    0
  • Bonneville was the first to cross the Rockies with wagons (1832),' and two years later Fort Laramie, near the mouth of the Laramie river, was established to control the fur trade of the Arapahoes, Cheyennes and Sioux.

    0
    0
  • Among the city's manufactures are lumber, furniture, baskets, pearl buttons, cars, carriages and wagons, Corliss engines,waterworks pumps,metallic burial cases, desks, boxes, crackers, flour, pickles and beer.

    0
    0
  • Among the city's manufactures are cotton-seed oil, fertilizers, chemicals, iron, carriages and wagons and harness (especially horse collars).

    0
    0
  • The city also manufactures large quantities of cotton-seed oil and cake, lumber, flour and grist-mill products, foundry and machine-shop products, confectionery, carriages and wagons, paints, furniture, bricks, cigars, &c. The Illinois Central and the St Louis & San Francisco railways have workshops here.

    0
    0
  • On their return trip the wagons often brought loads of wool, fur and blankets.

    0
    0
  • The city has grain elevators, and manufactures of bricks and tiles, foundry and machine shop products, carriages and wagons and flour.

    0
    0
  • It was accessible from the mainland by a mole, which is still used as a track for wagons.

    0
    0
  • In 1860 the trade employed 3000 wagons and 7000 men, and amounted to millions of dollars in value.

    0
    0
  • The Pennsylvania railway has repair shops here, and among Columbia's manufactures are silk goods, embroidery and laces, iron and steel pipe, engines, laundry machinery, brushes, stoves, iron toys, umbrellas, flour, lumber and wagons; the city is also a busy shipping and trading centre.

    0
    0
  • In the field, armies lived as a rule in camp (q.v.), and when the provision of canvas shelter was impossible in bivouac. At the present time, however, it is unusual, in Europe at any rate, for troops on active service to hamper themselves with the enormous trains of tent wagons that would be required, and cantonments or bivouacs, or a combination of the two have therefore taken the place, in modern warfare, of the old long rectilinear lines of tents that marked the restingplace and generally, too, the order of battle of an 18th-century army.

    0
    0
  • Passing over the Cross Keys Wash, near Sutton Bridge, his baggage and treasure wagons were engulfed and he himself barely escaped with life.

    0
    0
  • Their goods were carried in Conestoga wagons to Shippensburg and Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and Hagerstown, Maryland, taken from there to Pittsburg on pack horses, and exchanged for Pittsburg products; these products were carried by boat to New Orleans, where they were exchanged for sugar, molasses, &c., and these were carried through the gulf and along the coast to Baltimore and Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • The iron trade in its different branches rivals the woollen trade in wealth, including the casting of metal, and the manufacture of steam engines, steam wagons, steam ploughs, machinery, tools, nails, &c. Leeds was formerly famed for the production of artistic pottery, and specimens of old Leeds ware are highly prized.

    0
    0
  • The Missouri river is often closed by ice, and the Mississippi at St Louis, partly because it is obstructed by bridges, sometimes freezes over so that for weeks together horses and wagons can cross on the ice.

    0
    0
  • In the latter year the trade employed 3000 wagons, 62,000 oxen and mules, and 7000 men.

    0
    0
  • above sea level, and has extensive railway shops (of the Erie railway) and manufactories of brick and tile machinery, carriages and wagons, and grain and seed cleaners.

    0
    0
  • Besides cloth, which forms its staple article of commerce, it has manufactories of various linen and woollen wares, machines, railway wagons, glass, sago, tobacco, leather, chemicals and tiles.

    0
    0
  • As a manufacturing centre Clinton has considerable importance; among its manufactures are furniture, blinds, wire-cloth, papier-mache goods, gas-engines, farm wagons, harness and saddlery, door locks, pressed brick, flour, and glucose products.

    0
    0
  • Other important manufactured products were: those of machine shops and foundries, the value of which increased from $17,228,096 in 1900 to $23,108,516 in 1905, or 34.1%; distilled liquors, the value of which had increased from $16,961,058 in 1900 to $20,520,261 in 1905, an increase of 21%; iron and steel, valued at $19,338,481 in 1900 and at $16,920,326 in 1905; carriages and wagons, valued at $12,661,217 in 1900 and at $15,228,337 in 1905; lumber and timber products, valued at $ 1 9,979,97 1 in 1900 and at $14,559,662 in 1905; and glass, valued at $14,757,883 in 1900 and at $14,706,929 in 1905 - this being 3.7% of the product value of all manufactures in the state in 1905, and 18.5% of the value of glass produced in the United States in that year.

    0
    0
  • As compared with the other states of the United States in value of manufactured products, Indiana ranked second in 1900 and in 1905 in carriages and wagons, glass and distilled liquors; was seventh in 1900 and fourth in 1905 in furniture; was fourth in 1900 and seventh in 1905 in wholesale slaughtering and meat-packing; was fifth in 1900 and sixth in 1905 in agricultural implements; and in iron and steel and flour and grist mill products was fifth in 1900 and eighth in 1905.

    0
    0
  • Among its manufactures in 1905 were flour and grist mill products (value, $2,638,914), furniture ($1,655,246), lumber and timber products ($1,229,533), railway cars ($1,118,376), packed meats ($99 8, 4 2 8), woollen and cotton goods, cigars and cigarettes, malt liquors, carriages and wagons, leather and canned goods.

    0
    0
  • Among the other important manufactures in 1905 were: malt liquors ($28,692,340) and malt ($8,740,103, being 113.7% more than in 1900); flour and grist-mill products ($28,352,237; about 60% was wheat flour); leather ($25,845,123); wholesale slaughtering and meat-packing ($16,060,423); agricultural implements ($10,076,760); carriages and wagons ($7,511,392); men's clothing ($6,525,276); boots and shoes ($6,513,563); steam railway cars, constructed and repaired ($6,511,731); hosiery and knit goods ($4,941,744); cigars ($4,37 2, 1 39); mattresses and spring beds ($3,5 2 7,5 8 7); and electrical machinery, apparatus and supplies ($3,194,132).

    0
    0
  • This period of Iceland's existence is eventless: she had got peace but with few of its blessings; all spirit seemed to have died with the commonwealth; even shepherding and such agriculture as there had been sank to a lower stage; wagons, ploughs and carts went out of use and knowledge; architecture in timber became a lost art, and the fine carved and painted halls of the heathen days were replaced by turfwalled barns half sunk in the earth; the large decked luggers of the old days gave way to small undecked fishing-boats.

    0
    0
  • Other important manufactures in 1905 were: packed meats, particularly pork; men's clothing, especially "Kentucky jeans"; flour and grist mill products; cotton-seed oil and cake; leather, especially sole leather; foundry and machine shop products; steam-railway cars; cooperage; malt liquors; carriages and wagons, especially farm wagons; and carriage and wagon materials; agricultural implements, especially ploughs; and plumbers' supplies, including cast-iron gas and water pipes.

    0
    0
  • Greenville's chief interest is in cotton, but it has various other manufactures, including carriages, wagons, iron and fertilizers.

    0
    0
  • Among its manufactures are lumber (especially yellow-pine), wood-alcohol, turpentine, paper and pulp, fertilizers, wagons, mattresses and machine-shop products.

    0
    0
  • Among other manufactures are hosiery and knit goods, overalls and suspenders, hardware, lumber, oils and varnishes, gasoline fire engines, mica insulators, agricultural implements, and wagons and carriages.

    0
    0
  • On these roads large use is made of bullock wagons, as well as carts drawn by men, and women also.

    0
    0
  • from 1 In 18 months of1849-1850it was officially reported that 8000 wagons, with 80,000 draught-animals and 30,000 people, passed Ft.

    0
    0
  • It has a good water-power, and among its manufactures are wagons and carriages, axles, furniture, flour and electric signs.

    0
    0
  • Among the city's manufactures are wagons and carriages, furniture, wooden-ware, veneering, sash and doors, ladders, lawn swings, rubber goods, flour, foundry products and agricultural machinery.

    0
    0
  • Petroleum, coal, and iron-ore abound in the neighbouring region, and the city has a considerable trade in these and in its manufactures of chairs, leather, flour, carriages, wagons, boats, boilers, bricks and glass.

    0
    0
  • Among the manufactures are stoves and furnaces, foundry and machine shop products, carriages and wagons, flour and grist mill products, malt liquors, dairymen's and poulterers' supplies, showcases, men's clothing, agricultural implements, saddlery and harness, and lumber.

    0
    0
  • When all the wagons were ready, she snapped the whip over the back of the mules.

    0
    0
  • The four freight wagons pulled into a single line behind her.

    0
    0
  • Each day they changed positions in line so that no one ate the dust from all the wagons every day.

    0
    0
  • The heavy wagons pushed on.

    0
    0
  • The wheels of the Conestoga wagons had been modified with wide rims to even the load on the sand.

    0
    0
  • All that churning of sand and dust disguised their trail to some degree, but nothing could hide the trail of five heavy wagons.

    0
    0
  • Their freight wagons used this route to deliver supplies to the tiny town of Ashley, but few people traveled the desert.

    0
    0
  • As the teams came to a halt, the rasp of leather against sandy wheels assured her that the other wagons were following suit.

    0
    0
  • You don't be wandering away from the wagons.

    0
    0
  • A horse and rider could cover more distance in a day that the mules could pulling the heavy freight wagons.

    0
    0
  • It would be nice to get away from the wagons for a while.

    0
    0
  • It must be fun to be able to ride all around freely while we're stuck in our wagons.

    0
    0
  • He told me to stay close to the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Why would they risk attacking the freight wagons, anyway?

    0
    0
  • After the camp was cleaned and the wagons were ready to roll, she smiled up at Bordeaux.

    0
    0
  • She waited until the others were in their wagons and then slapped the lines to the backs of the mules.

    0
    0
  • The railroad is close enough now that wagons can reach it from Ashley faster than we can cross the desert.

    0
    0
  • Fritz, Royce and Davis wandered back to their wagons.

    0
    0
  • She packed all the dishes and stashed them in the back of one of the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Without another word he road away from the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Good, now stick close to the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Get those mules inside the circle of wagons and be ready for trouble.

    0
    0
  • They circled the wagons and made camp.

    0
    0
  • Fritz and Royce were watching the mules in a makeshift corral outside the wagons.

    0
    0
  • The muffled sound of hooves on sand approached the opening between two wagons.

    0
    0
  • The space inside the wagons was a din of screaming mules and men.

    0
    0
  • The Indians were stealing the mules left outside the wagons.

    0
    0
  • Barely enough for two wagons.

    0
    0
  • We could take two wagons, but that would mean we'd have to travel slow, and there wouldn't be any animals for riding except Bordeaux's horse.

    0
    0
  • If you leave the wagons behind, you'll be rewarding the Indians.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, if you abandoned the wagons and rode the mules, you might be able to keep ahead of the Indians.

    0
    0
  • One and a half or two if you leave the wagons - and leave tonight.

    0
    0
  • But what if we buried the supplies under the wagons and then burned the wagons?

    0
    0
  • We douse the wagons with lamp oil and light them.

    0
    0
  • By the time the wagons were fully engulfed in flames, they had traveled far enough to be out of the firelight.

    0
    0
  • The flames threw eerie lights into the sand around the wagons, but nothing moved.

    0
    0
  • The Indians must know they had abandoned the wagons, and their tracks would be illuminated by the firelight.

    0
    0
  • But were the Indians interested in the people, or the food the wagons contained?

    0
    0
  • If the Indians were only interested in the food, torching the wagons would only insure they would follow the deep tracks of the pack mules.

    0
    0
  • By dawn they had left the wagons far behind.

    0
    0
  • He stopped, watching a group of freight wagons.

    0
    0
  • The two men talked for a few minutes and then one rider turned his bay horse toward the wagons.

    0
    0
  • ammunition wagons at a distance.

    0
    0
  • can anyone identify the builder of these wagons for me?

    0
    0
  • ballast hopper wagons from Romania allowed additional relaying to take place this year.

    0
    0
  • bogeynsport Solution Davis contracted to build and deliver to site in Ireland 146 rail wagons and spares including 108 bogies.

    0
    0
  • bogie wagons with sides, used by Arnold's for carrying dried sand in bags.

    0
    0
  • bogie hopper wagons that were being filled via tips from the narrow gage line above.

    0
    0
  • Most people must have used commodes or chamber pots, emptied down drain or onto night soil wagons.

    0
    0
  • The first three wagons of the freight train each had their leading pair of wheels derailed.

    0
    0
  • diesel locomotives hauling an enormous line of wagons to the East.

    0
    0
  • fetching away the wagons.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →