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waged

waged Sentence Examples

  • They waged a silent battle, and Bianca opened her eyes, praying with everything she was worth that the small woman-- whoever she was-- would win.

  • The battle waged just past the next range.

  • While kissing her neck, he realized the fangs had not waged their war.

  • The struggle is waged by two sets of men who equally love their city, but who would fain rule it upon diametrically opposite principles, and who fight to the death for its possession.

  • In this way the Italians lost their military vigour, and wars were waged by despots from their cabinets, who pulled the strings of puppet captains in their pay.

  • Although an, active guerrilla warfare was waged against the Dutch during a large part of that period, they did much to promote the agricultural and commercial interests of the colony, especially under the wise administration of Maurice of Nassau.

  • Their influence was extended by the results of the war which they waged with the natives about 1847-49.

  • The warfare which followed was like that which Saul and David waged against the Philistines.

  • Most notable of all perhaps was the shepherd Athronges, who assumed the pomp of royalty and employed his four brothers as captains and satraps in the war which he waged upon Romans and king's men alike - not even Jews escaped him unless they brought him contributions.

  • David's hurried flight, attended only by his bodyguard, indicates that his position was not a very strong one, and it is difficult to connect this with the fact that he had already waged the wars mentioned in 2 Sam.

  • The controversy on this question was waged with spirit on both sides; but in the end Pasteur came off victorious, and in a series of the most delicate and most intricate experimental researches he proved that when the atmospheric germs are absolutely excluded no changes take place.

  • He added, however, that if France waged a successful war, he would remain in the East, and do more damage to England there than by mere demonstrations in the English Channel.

  • He might, in the first place, have frankly admitted that the crusaders were independent allies, and treating them as equals, he might have waged war in concert with them, and divided the conquests achieved in the war.

  • Greeks; lastly, there are the Crusades waged by the papacy against revolted Christians - John of England and Frederick II.

  • As emperor, Henry was eager to resume the imperial Crusade which had been stopped by his father's death; while both as Frederick's successor and as heir to the Norman kings of Sicily, who had again and again waged war against the Eastern empire, he had an account to settle with the rulers of Constantinople.

  • Charles of Anjou had succeeded, as a result of the long "crusade" waged by the papacy against the Hohenstaufen from the council of Lyons to the battle of Tagliacozzo (1245-1268), in establishing himself in the kingdom of Sicily.

  • The Franks evacuated Syria altogether, leaving behind them only the ruins of their castles to bear witness, to this very day, of the Crusades they had waged and the kingdom they had founded and lost.

  • Having been fortified the town stood several sieges, specially during the wars of freedom waged by the Dutch, the most celebrated fight under its walls being the one in September 1586 when Sir Philip Sidney was mortally wounded.

  • Among those who waged the war were men who fought to compel reforms, others who fought for annexation to the United States, others who fought for independence.

  • Some of the most daring spirits waged war on their conquerors from Clissa in Dalmatia, and afterwards from Zengg in maritime Croatia, where they formed the notorious pirate community of the Uskoks.

  • These conditions lasted until the 19th century, and meanwhile the country was involved in the series of wars waged by the Turks against Austria, Hungary and Venice.

  • Even when peace was nominally in existence, war in its most horrible forms was actually being waged.

  • The war, which broke out in 1743, was waged with varying fortunes, and the peace by which it was concluded on the 5th of September 1746, beyond stipulating for a few privileges for Persian pilgrims to the holy places, altered nothing in the settlement arranged ten years before with Murad IV.

  • The connexion became closer at the time when the schism with its violent controversies between the rival pontiffs, waged with the coarse invective customary to medieval theologians, had brought great discredit on the papacy.

  • He was with Napoleon through the greater part of that campaign; and after its disastrous conclusion helped to prepare the new forces with which Napoleon waged the equally disastrous campaign of 1813.

  • The second difficulty was the war waged by religious fanatics under the leadership of Antonio Maciel, known as " Conselheiro," against the constituted authorities of Brazil.

  • Three times he waged war on the emperor, twice he was proclaimed king of Hungary, and by the peace of Nikolsburg (Dec. 31, 1621) he obtained for the Protestants a confirmation of the treaty of Vienna, and for himself seven additional counties in northern Hungary besides other substantial advantages.

  • Between 1678 and 1682 Tokoli waged three wars with Leopold, and, in September 1682, was acknowledged both by the emperor and the sultan as prince of North Hungary as far as the river Garam, to the great relief of the Magyar Protestants.

  • In the Epicurean system of philosophy he believed that he had found the weapons by which this war of liberation could be most effectually waged.

  • His war with the popular beliefs of his time is waged, not in the interests of licence, but in vindication of the sanctity of human feeling.

  • About this time Dingiswayo was captured and put to death by Zwide, chief of the Undwandwe clan, with whom he had waged constant war.

  • No tribe against which he waged war was able successfully to oppose the Zulu arms. At first Chaka turned his attention northward.

  • (1100-1123), in alliance with the Christian princes of Syria, waged successful war against Byzantines and Seljuks.

  • fought the battle of Kadesh with Rameses II., on at least equal terms. Both now and previously the diplomatic correspondence of the Hatti monarchs shows that they treated on terms of practical equality with both the Babylonian and the Egyptian courts; and that they waged constant wars in Syria, mainly with the Amorite tribes.

  • Florence frequently waged war with these nobles and with other cities on its own account, although in the name of the countess, and the citizens began to form themselves into groups and associations which were the germs of the arti or gilds.

  • In 1222 Florence waged war successfully on Pisa, Lucca and Pistoia, and during the next few years against the Sienese with varying results; although the emperor supported the latter as Ghibellines, on his departure for Germany in 1235 they were forced to accept peace on onerous terms. During the interregnum (1241-1243) following on the death of Pope Gregory IX.

  • He was excommunicated by Sixtus, who, together with King Ferdinand of Naples, waged war against him; no great successes were registered on either side at first, but eventually the Florentines were defeated at Poggio Imperiale (near Poggibonsi) and the city itself was in danger.

  • Pulpit warfare was waged between Savdnarola and his opponents, and the matter ended in his being forbidden to preach and in a proposed ordeal by fire, which, however, never came off.

  • In 1003 we find records of a war between Pisa and Lucca, which, according to Muratori, was the first waged between Italian cities in the middle ages.

  • 1156), elected doge in 1148, waged war with success against the Dalmatian corsairs, recapturing Pola and other Istrian towns from them.

  • The new magazine closely copied Cave's title, plan and aspect, and bitter war was long waged between the two.

  • This problem interested the East for the most part; in the West there was waged a theological warfare around the nature of man and the work of Christ.

  • A fresh volume of evidence required to be gathered, and a new controversy to be waged, before the old data for the creation of man could be abandoned.

  • During the period which had elapsed since the diet of Worms the emperor had resided in Spain, busy with a series of wars, waged mainly with the king of France.'

  • When the fighting was over, at ro P.M., Ney wrote a short and somewhat one-sided account of the action to Soult On the other flank there had meanwhile been waged the bitterly fought battle of Ligny.

  • the Great (223-187 B.C.) who sheltered Hannibal and waged war with Rome, and his son Antiochus IV.

  • Besides the general indication that the Empire was passing through a military crisis, which points to the long struggle waged by Marcus Aurelius against the Marcomanni and other Germanic tribes, there is a reference (Contra Celsum, viii.

  • Through his generals Ardoburius and Aspar he waged two fairly successful wars against the Persians (421 and 441), and after the failure of one expedition (431) by means of a gigantic fleet put an end to the piracies of the Vandal Genseric. A Hunnish invasion in 408 was skilfully repelled, but from 441 the Balkan country was repeatedly overrun by the armies of Attila, whose incursions Theodosius feebly attempted to buy off with everincreasing payments of tribute.

  • He waged war, not only against the clergy, but against the church and its sovereigns.

  • The peace of St Julien (2 ist of July 1603) marked the final defeat of the duke of Savoy in the long struggle waged (since 1290) by his house against thecity of Geneva.

  • Casimir's few wars were waged entirely for profit, not glory.

  • In a war which the Parian colonists waged with the Saians, a Thracian tribe, the poet Archilochus threw away his shield.

  • Entirely dependent on Edward, he again sought refuge in England, and took a very slight part in the war waged on his behalf.

  • With kindred peoples they were often in conflict with the Roman Empire, and gave their name to the Marcomannic War, a struggle waged by the emperor Marcus Aurelius against them and the Quadi.

  • Fra Diavolo was made leader of one of them, and waged untiring war against the French troops, cutting off isolated detachments and murdering stragglers and couriers.

  • Though he waged war all through his reign he very rarely appeared in the field, but directed the generals, whom he never trusted, from his "lair" in the fortified palace, the Alcazar of Seville.

  • of France to Italy, and he waged war against Sicily once more from 1325 to 1341, but failed to drive out the Aragonese.

  • had interests in the preservation of the status quo, and wars were waged and treaties concluded to adjust the strength of states in the common interest of preventing any one of them from obtaining undue predominance.

  • For some five years a contest was waged between Amalric and Shirguh (Shirkuh), the lieutenant of Nureddin, for the possession of Egypt.

  • and John he had exceptionally authoritative adversaries; but after one of the fiercest wars ever waged by the civil power against the Church, Innocent at length gained over John the most complete victory that has ever been won by a religious potentate over a temporal sovereign, and constrained him to make complete submission.

  • The struggle, which still further aggravated the dependence of the pope on France, was waged on both sides with the utmost bitterness, and the end was not in sight when John XXII.

  • In educational matters he waged a long and successful struggle on behalf of undenominational schools and for the establishment of the intermediate school system.

  • Chivalry again in its military aspect not only encourages the love of war for its own sake without regard to the cause for which war is waged, it encourages also an extravagant regard for a fantastic show of personal daring which cannot in any way advance the objects of the siege or campaign which is going on.

  • Part of the trade of Ashanti had been diverted to the French port of Assini in consequence of the wars waged between England and the Ashanti, but on the suppression of the revolt of 1900 measures were taken to improve trade between Kumasi and Cape Coast.

  • Two special kinds of orders arose out of the religious wars waged by Christendom against the Mahommedans in the Holy Land and in Spain: (r) the Military orders: the Knights Hospitallers of St John and the Knights Templars, both at the beginning of the 12th century, and the Teutonic Knights at its close; (2) the orders of Ransom, whose object was to free Christian prisoners and slaves from captivity under the Mahommedans, the members being bound by vow even to offer themselves in exchange; such orders were the Trinitarians founded in 1198, and the order of Our Lady of Ransom (de Mercede), founded by St Peter Nolasco in 1223; both were under the Augustinian rule.

  • Athanaric waged, from 367 to 369, an unsuccessful war with the emperor Valens, and the peace by which the war was ended was ratified by the Roman and Gothic rulers meeting on a barge in mid-stream of the Danube.

  • The twenty years' war waged round this city, and its siege and destruction by Scipio the Younger (133 B.C.) form only the most famous episode in the long struggle, which has left its mark in entrenchments near Numantia excavated in 1906-1907 by German archaeologists.

  • In 1030 Conrad bouring waged a short war against Hungary, but here also countries, he was obliged to assent to a cession of territory.

  • During this period it had waged war upon the emperor himself.

  • Without any inte1ference from the central authority wars were Germany waged in every part of the country, and disputes of ~~ick.

  • The war, thus revived, was waged principally in the valleys of the Danube and the Rhine, the Swedes, seizing Alsace while, Bernhard captured Regensburg.

  • But between Moslem dissension and Christian valour the struggle had still to be waged for eighty-seven years.

  • Hitherto the war had been waged on the mainland; now it was transferred to Sicily.

  • Of martial disposition, the people often waged war with their neighbours, and also amongst themselves until the pacification of the hinterland by Germany at the beginning of the 10th century.

  • The later religious literature is much taken up with the mythical and semi-mythical dynasties of kings, and the priests compiled, with many newly-invented details, the chronicles of the wars they were supposed to have waged.

  • The most illustrious m~narchs prided themselves no less on the buildings they raised in honor of the gods than on the successful wars they waged: indeed the wars won a religious significance through the gradual elevation of the god of the capital to god of the nation, and a large part of the spoils was considered the rightful perquisite of the latter.

  • The Thirty Years' War Urban professed to regard as waged for political, not for religious, ends.

  • The Germans waged war for saline streams, and believed that the presence of salt in the soil invested a district with peculiar sanctity and made it a place where prayers were most readily heard (Tac. ut sup.).

  • A body of these Uskoks, as they were called, from a Serbo-Croatian word meaning "refugee," established itself in the Dalmatian fortress of Clissa, near Spalato, and thence waged continual war upon the Turks.

  • Palaeologus, but most of the feudal Latin states continued to exist till the Turkish conquest; the Venetians retained their possessions for several centuries later and waged continual wars with the Turks.

  • 6 ff.) narrates a war waged by Ninus and Semiram, against the king of Bactria (whom some later authors, e.g.

  • (1336) again waged a victorious summer campaign, from Perth as his base, and again found Scottish resistance revive in winter.

  • On his death in 1443, his son, William, a lad of eighteen, became earl, and waged private war on Crichton, while he allied himself with Livingstone.

  • above the ferry at Kilif, a very successful war has been waged by the agricultural Turkman (of the Ersari tribes) against the encroaching sand-waves of the desert; and a strip of riverain soil averaging about a mile in width has been reclaimed and cultivated by irrigation.

  • The Dutch, who had played no part in expelling the Portuguese, now became increasingly predominant, and the wars that were waged in Europe between England and Holland had their counterpart in the Persian Gulf.

  • With the last of these Pushyamitra Sunga waged successful war, driving him from the Gangetic valley and confining him to his conquests in the west.

  • loo there appeared in the west three foreign tribes from the north, who conquered the native population and established themselves in Malwa, Gujarat and Kathia waged by his father and brother against the Huns on the northwestern frontier.

  • For at least two centuries its sway over the south was undisputed, and its rajas waged wars and concluded treaties of peace with the sultans of the Deccan on equal terms.

  • This league was joined by a powerful group of princes and nobles and found recognition by the prince-electors of the Empire; but for want of leadership it did not stand the test, when Richard of Cornwall and Alphonso of Castile were elected rival kings in 1257.2 In the following centuries the imperial cities in south Germany, where most of them were situated, repeatedly formed leagues to protect their interests against the power of the princes and the nobles, and destructive wars were waged; but no great political issue found solution, the relative position of the parties after each war remaining much what it had been before.

  • Pisa, however, together with Genoa, all through the iith century distinguished itself by war waged in the western Mediterranean and its isles against the Saracens.

  • The warfare waged by these Filipinos against the United States, while having for the most part a desultory and guerilla character, was of a very protracted and troublesome nature.

  • On Napoleon's escape from Elba (1815) Murat, after some hesitation, placed himself on the emperor's side and waged war against the Austrians, with Pepe on his staff.

  • It continued to suffer, sometimes deplorably, in most of the wars waged by Sweden, especially with Russia and Denmark.

  • He waged continual warfare against the English in Maine until the advent of Joan of Arc. He fought at Jargeau, at Meung-sur-Loire and at Patay (1429).

  • But the attempt to maintain the empire in its unity proved impracticable; and almost immediately there began the embittered war, waged for several decades by the generals (diadochi), for the inheritance of the great king.2 It was soon obvious that the eastern rulers, at all events, could not dispense with the native element.

  • After him Abu Said, grandson of Miran Shah, and once governor of Fars, became a candidate for empire, and allied himself with the Uzbeg Tatars, seized Bokhara, entered Khorasan, and waged war upon the Turkoman tribe aforesaid, which, since the invasion of Azerbaijan, had, under Jahan Shah, overrun Irak, Fars and Kermgn, and pillaged Herat.

  • The Chouans then waged a guerrilla warfare against therepublicans and, sustained by the royalists and from abroad, carried on their assassinations and brigandage with success.

  • Against the Romanticists he waged untiring war.

  • Animated by an intense love of truth and devotion to public duty, he waged war on such ecclesiastical systems as seemed to him to favour obscurantism, and to put the claims of sect above those of human society.

  • "This is the showing forth of the Inquiry of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, to the end that neither the deeds of men maybe forgotten by lapse of time, nor the works, great and marvellous, which have been produced, some by Hellenes, some by Barbarians, may lose their renown, and especially that the causes may be remembered for which these waged war with one another" (i.e.

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