Wace sentence example

wace
  • In the pseudo-chronicles, the Historia of Geoffrey and the translations by Wace and Layamon, Lancelot does not appear at all; the queen's lover, whose guilty passion is fully returned, is Mordred.
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  • In the later Historia of Goeffrey of Monmouth, and its French translation by Wace, Gawain plays an important and "pseudo-historic" role.
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  • First Principles of the Reformation, the Three Primary Works of Dr Martin Luther, edited by Wace and Buchheim, - an English translation of the famous pamphlets of 1520.
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  • From this point he follows closely the Brut of Wace.
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  • He loved stories for their own sake, and found fault with Wace for questioning the miraculous elements in the legend of Arthur.
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  • Geoffrey of Monmouth makes no mention of it, and the earliest record is that of Wace, much expanded by his translator, Layamon, who gives a picturesque detailed description of the fight for precedence which took place at Arthur's board on a certain Yuletide day, and the slaughter which ensued.
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  • Wace does not mention the number of knights.
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  • This would make the Round Table analogous to the turning castles which we frequently meet with in romances; and while explaining the peculiarities of Layamon's text, would make it additionally probable that he was dealing with an earlier tradition of folklore character, a tradition which was probably also familiar to Wace, whose version, though much more condensed than Layamon's, is yet in substantial harmony with this latter.
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  • See Wace, Le Roman de Brut, ed.
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  • The words of Wace, the Norman poet who translated the Historia into verse, are here admirably to the point.
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  • We find that at Arthur's birth (according to Layamon, who here differs from Wace), three ladies appeared and prophesied his future greatness.
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  • Wace and Benoit de Sainte-More compiled their histories at his bidding, and it was in his reign that Marie de France composed her poems. An event with which he was closely connected, viz.
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  • The History of the Dukes of Normandy by Benoit de SainteMore is based on the work of Wace.
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  • Wace, who, while translating Geoffrey, evidently knew, and used, popular tradition, combines these two, asserting that she was of Roman parentage on the mother's side, but cousin to Cador of Cornwall by whom she was brought up. The tradition relating to Guenevere is decidedly confused and demands further study.
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  • Wace says emphatically Ne fu oie ne veue, Ne fu trovee, ne seue Por la vergogne del mesfait Et del pecie qu ele avoit fait (11.13627-30).
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  • Layamon, who in his translation of Wace treats his original much as Wace treated Geoffrey, says that there was a tradition that she had drowned herself, and that her memory and that of Mordred were hateful in every land, so that none would offer prayer for their souls.
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  • Halos was added to the number of Early Iron Age sites in Thessaly in 1912 (Wace and Thompson).
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  • Wace's second work, the Roman de Rou, written between 1160 and 1174, has a less fabulous character than the Brut, being a chronicle of the Norman dukes from Rollo to Robert Curthose.
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  • There is also reason for thinking that Wace used the Gesta regum of William of Malmesbury.
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  • Where Wace follows no ascertainable source he must be used with caution.
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  • Like Wace, she used a literary dialect which probably differed very widely from common Norman speech.
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  • Since the revival of learning books on the fathers have been numerous; among the more recent and most accessible of these we may mention Smith and Wace's Dictionary of Christian Biography, Hauck-Herzog's Realencyklopcidie, Bardenhewer's Patrologie and Geschichte der altkirchlichen Litteratur, Harnack's Geschichte der altchristlichen Litteratur bei Eusebius and Ehrard's Die altchristliche Litteratur and ihre Erforschung.
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  • The list of imitators begins with Geoffrey Gaimar, the author of the Estorie des Engles (c. '11' 4 7), and Wace, whose Roman de Brut (1155) is partly a translation and partly a free paraphrase of the Historia.
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  • "Wace," says Gaston Paris, speaking of the Roman de Rou, " traduit en les abregeant des historiens latins que nous possedons; mais qa et la it ajoute soit des contes populaires, par exemple sur Richard I er, sur Robert I er, soit des particularites qu'il savait par tradition (sur ce meme Robert le magnifique, sur l'expedition de Guillaume, &c.) et qui donnent a son oeuvre un reel interet historique.
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  • In its literary form the cycle falls into three groups: - pseudohistoric: the Histories of Nennius and Geoffrey, the Brut of Wace and Layamon (see Arthur); poetic: the works of Chretien de Troyes, Thomas, Raoul de Houdenc and others (see Gawain, Perceval, Tristan, and the writers named above); prose: the largest and most important group (see Grail, Lancelot, Merlin, Tristan).
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