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wabash

wabash

wabash Sentence Examples

  • It was under his control that the Wabash system became transcontinental and secured an Atlantic port at Baltimore; and it was he who brought about a friendly alliance between the Gould and the Rockefeller interests.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • The Wabash and the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis railways have large repair shops here.

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  • Huntington is served by three railways - the Wabash, the Erie (which has car shops and division headquarters here) and the Cincinnati, Bluffton & Chicago (which has machine shops here), and by the Fort Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction Company, whose car and repair shops and power station are in Huntington.

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  • It was incorporated as a town in 1855, was entered by the Wabash road in 1858 and by the Alton in 1872, and was first chartered as a city in 1874.

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  • It is served by the Wabash, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the St Louis & Hannibal railways, and by boat lines to Saint Louis, Saint Paul and intermediate points.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & Eastern Illinois, the Louisville & Nashville, the Wabash, Chester & Western, and the Southern railways.

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  • It is served by five branches of the Lake Shore railway system, and by the Wabash, the Toledo and Western, and the [[Toledo (disambiguation)|Toledo, ]] and Ironton railways.

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  • Des Moines is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Wabash, the Minneapolis & St Louis, and the Des Moines, Iowa Falls & Northern railways; also by several interurban electric lines.

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  • It is served by the Wabash and the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railways.

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  • It is served by the Erie, the Wabash, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore, and the New York Central & Hudson River railways, by three interurban electric lines and by the Erie Canal.

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  • Edwardsville is served by the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, the Litchfield & Madison, and the Illinois Terminal railways, and is connected with St Louis by three electric lines.

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  • The city is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Wabash, the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore and the Michigan Central railways, and by the International Electric railway and the Niagara, St Catharines & Toronto (electric) railway.

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  • bank of the Wabash river, about 117 m.

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  • in length, prevent the overflow of the Wabash river, which for nine months in the year is navigable from this point to the Ohio.

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  • Toledo is served by the Ann Arbor, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Hocking Valley, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Michigan Central, the Pennsylvania, the Pere Marquette, the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways, by a "belt line" (30 m.

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  • long), the Toledo Railway & Terminal Company, by ten interurban electric railways (about 585 m.), and by the Wabash & Erie and the Miami & Erie canals.

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  • It is pre-eminently a railway centre, being served by the Union Pacific, of which it is the principal eastern terminus, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Chicago Great-Western, the Illinois Central, and the Wabash, which together have given it considerable commercialimportance.

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  • along the Mississippi to the mouth of the Illinois there is a slight elevation and there is another elevation of minor importance along the Wabash.

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  • There are more than 275 streams in the state, grouped in two river systems, one having the Mississippi, which receives three-fourths of the waters of Illinois, as outlet, the other being tributary to the Wabash or Ohio rivers.

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  • of Indianapolis, on the Wabash River.

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  • Peru is served by the Chicago Cincinnati & Louisville, the Lake Erie & Western and the Wabash railways (each of which maintains shops here), and by electric lines to Indianapolis, Warsaw and other cities.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library, a railway Young Men's Christian Association, and a hospital for the employes of the Wabash railroad.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Wabash, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • It is served by the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash system), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), and the Pennsylvania railways, and by inter-urban electric railways.

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  • He took up legal practice in Cincinnati, became president in 1873, and until 1877 was receiver, of the Toledo & Wabash & Western.

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  • TERRE HAUTE, a city and the county-seat of Vigo county, Indiana, U.S.A., on the eastern bank of the Wabash river, about x86 m.

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  • After the close of the War of 1812 the town grew rapidly and became an important commercial centre, owing to its river connexions and to the fact that the National (or Cumberland) Road crossed the Wabash here.

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  • The Indian cessions of 1809, along the Wabash river, aroused the hostility of Tecumseh (q.v.) and his brother, familiarly known as " The Prophet," who were attempting to combine the tribes between the Ohio and the Great Lakes in opposition to the encroachment of the whites.

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  • He worked with Jay Gould for the completion of the Wabash line, and at the time of his greatest stock activity bought The New York Evening Express and The Mail and combined them as The Mail and Express, which he controlled for six years.

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  • to Pittsburg Junction, Ohio; controlled by the Wabash railway), and the Pittsburg Terminal (also controlled by the Wabash and operating the 1 " Pittsburgh " is the official spelling of the charter and seal; but " Pittsburg " is the spelling adopted by the U.S. Geographic Board and is in more general use.

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  • In allusion to his unusual stature he was called "the Tall Sycamore of the Wabash."

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  • It is served by several railways, including the Pennsylvania, the Wabash, the Chicago Terminal Transfer (whose shops are here), the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Chicago, Indiana & Southern, and the Indiana Harbor railways.

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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Cleveland & Pittsburg Division), the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash System) railways, and by several steamboat lines.

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  • The larger streams flow in a general south-westerly direction, and the greater part of the state is drained into the Ohio through the Wabash river and its tributaries.

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  • The Wabash, which has a total length of more than 500 m., has its headwaters in the western part of Ohio, and flows in a north-west, south-west, and south direction across the state, emptying into the Ohio river and forming for a considerable distance the boundary between Indiana and Illinois.

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  • Of these the White river is by far the most important, being second only to the Wabash itself in extent of territory drained.

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  • above its entrance into the Wabash, which it joins about 100 m.

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  • The most fertile part of the state is the Wabash valley; the least fertile the sandy region, of small extent, immediately south of Lake Michigan.

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  • The Wabash and Erie canal (1843), which connected Lake Erie with the Ohio river, entering the state in Allen county, east of Fort Wayne, and following the Wabash river to Terre Haute and the western fork of the White river from Worthington, Greene county, to Petersburg, Pike county, whence it ran south-south-west to Evansville; and the White Water canal from Hagerstown, Wayne county, mostly along the course of the White Water river, to Lawrenceburg, on the Ohio River, in the south-eastern corner of the state, although now abandoned, served an important purpose in their day.

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  • The deepening of the channel of the Wabash river was begun in 1872.

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  • or less, there was practically no traffic up to 1909 on the White, because there was no outlet for it by the Wabash river.

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  • Other educational institutions of college rank include Vincennes University (non-sectarian), at Vincennes; Hanover College (1833, Presbyterian), at Hanover; Wabash College (1832, non-sectarian), at Crawfordsville; Franklin College (1837, Baptist), at Franklin; De Pauw University (1837, Methodist Episcopal), at Greencastle; Butler University (1855, Christian), at Indianapolis; Earlham College (1847, Friends), at Richmond; Notre Dame University (1842, Roman Catholic), at Notre Dame; Moore's Hill College (r856, Methodist Episcopal), at Moore's Hill; the University of Indianapolis (nonsectarian), a loosely affiliated series of schools at Indianapolis, centring around Butler University; and Rose Polytechnic Institute (1883, non-sectarian), at Terre Haute.

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  • When, a few years later, this portage came to be generally used by traders, the necessity of establishing a base on the upper Wabash as a defence against the Carolina and Pennsylvania traders, who had already reached the lower Wabash and incited the Indians to hostility against the French, became evident; but it was not, apparently, until the second decade of the 18th century that any permanent settlement was made.

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  • of the present city of Lafayette), the headquarters of the Wea branch of the Miami, on the upper Wabash.

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  • This canal was completed from the St Joseph river to the Wabash in 1835, opened in 1843, and later abandoned.

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  • Columbia is served by the Wabash and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • The completion of the Wabash & Erie Canal, in 1853, from Evansville to Toledo, Ohio, a distance of 400 m., greatly accelerated the city's growth.

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  • Detroit is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Wabash, the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton and the Canadian Pacific railways.

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  • Its principal importance is as a railway and manufacturing centre; it is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Litchfield & Madison railways, and by electric lines connecting with St Louis and the neighbouring towns.

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  • Quincy is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City, and the Wabash railways, and by lines of river steamers, which find an excellent harbour in Quincy Bay, an arm of the Mississippi.

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  • It was under his control that the Wabash system became transcontinental and secured an Atlantic port at Baltimore; and it was he who brought about a friendly alliance between the Gould and the Rockefeller interests.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Indiana & Southern and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • The Wabash and the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis railways have large repair shops here.

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  • Huntington is served by three railways - the Wabash, the Erie (which has car shops and division headquarters here) and the Cincinnati, Bluffton & Chicago (which has machine shops here), and by the Fort Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction Company, whose car and repair shops and power station are in Huntington.

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  • It was incorporated as a town in 1855, was entered by the Wabash road in 1858 and by the Alton in 1872, and was first chartered as a city in 1874.

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  • It is served by the Wabash, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the St Louis & Hannibal railways, and by boat lines to Saint Louis, Saint Paul and intermediate points.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & Eastern Illinois, the Louisville & Nashville, the Wabash, Chester & Western, and the Southern railways.

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  • It is served by five branches of the Lake Shore railway system, and by the Wabash, the Toledo and Western, and the [[Toledo (disambiguation)|Toledo, ]] and Ironton railways.

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  • Des Moines is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-Western, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Wabash, the Minneapolis & St Louis, and the Des Moines, Iowa Falls & Northern railways; also by several interurban electric lines.

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  • It is served by the Wabash and the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railways.

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  • It is served by the Erie, the Wabash, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore, and the New York Central & Hudson River railways, by three interurban electric lines and by the Erie Canal.

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  • He was educated at Wabash College (A.B.

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  • Edwardsville is served by the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, the Litchfield & Madison, and the Illinois Terminal railways, and is connected with St Louis by three electric lines.

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  • It is served by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Wabash (at Lexington Junction, 4 m.

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  • The city is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Wabash, the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore and the Michigan Central railways, and by the International Electric railway and the Niagara, St Catharines & Toronto (electric) railway.

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  • bank of the Wabash river, about 117 m.

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  • in length, prevent the overflow of the Wabash river, which for nine months in the year is navigable from this point to the Ohio.

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  • Toledo is served by the Ann Arbor, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Hocking Valley, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Michigan Central, the Pennsylvania, the Pere Marquette, the Toledo, St Louis & Western, the Wabash, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways, by a "belt line" (30 m.

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  • long), the Toledo Railway & Terminal Company, by ten interurban electric railways (about 585 m.), and by the Wabash & Erie and the Miami & Erie canals.

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  • It is served by the Union Pacific, the Missouri Pacific, the 'Frisco System, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, the Chicago Great Western, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Chicago & Alton, the Wabash, the Kansas City Southern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Leavenworth, Kansas & Western, the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient, the St Louis, Kansas City & Colorado, the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City, and the St Joseph & Grand Island railways, and by steamboat lines to numerous river ports.

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  • It is pre-eminently a railway centre, being served by the Union Pacific, of which it is the principal eastern terminus, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Chicago Great-Western, the Illinois Central, and the Wabash, which together have given it considerable commercialimportance.

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  • along the Mississippi to the mouth of the Illinois there is a slight elevation and there is another elevation of minor importance along the Wabash.

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  • There are more than 275 streams in the state, grouped in two river systems, one having the Mississippi, which receives three-fourths of the waters of Illinois, as outlet, the other being tributary to the Wabash or Ohio rivers.

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  • The Kaskaskia, in the S., notable for its variations in volume, and the Rock, in the N., are the other important rivers emptying into the Mississippi; the Embarrass and Little Wabash, the Saline and Cache in the E., are the important tributaries of the Wabash and Ohio rivers.

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  • lat., as well as the country between the Rocky Mountains and the Mississippi; but in 1723 the region around the Wabash river was formed into a separate district.

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  • of Indianapolis, on the Wabash River.

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  • Peru is served by the Chicago Cincinnati & Louisville, the Lake Erie & Western and the Wabash railways (each of which maintains shops here), and by electric lines to Indianapolis, Warsaw and other cities.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library, a railway Young Men's Christian Association, and a hospital for the employes of the Wabash railroad.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Saint Paul, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Wabash railways.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul, the Wabash, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railways.

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  • It is served by the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash system), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), and the Pennsylvania railways, and by inter-urban electric railways.

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  • He took up legal practice in Cincinnati, became president in 1873, and until 1877 was receiver, of the Toledo & Wabash & Western.

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  • TERRE HAUTE, a city and the county-seat of Vigo county, Indiana, U.S.A., on the eastern bank of the Wabash river, about x86 m.

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  • After the close of the War of 1812 the town grew rapidly and became an important commercial centre, owing to its river connexions and to the fact that the National (or Cumberland) Road crossed the Wabash here.

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  • The Indian cessions of 1809, along the Wabash river, aroused the hostility of Tecumseh (q.v.) and his brother, familiarly known as " The Prophet," who were attempting to combine the tribes between the Ohio and the Great Lakes in opposition to the encroachment of the whites.

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  • He worked with Jay Gould for the completion of the Wabash line, and at the time of his greatest stock activity bought The New York Evening Express and The Mail and combined them as The Mail and Express, which he controlled for six years.

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  • to Pittsburg Junction, Ohio; controlled by the Wabash railway), and the Pittsburg Terminal (also controlled by the Wabash and operating the 1 " Pittsburgh " is the official spelling of the charter and seal; but " Pittsburg " is the spelling adopted by the U.S. Geographic Board and is in more general use.

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  • In allusion to his unusual stature he was called "the Tall Sycamore of the Wabash."

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  • It is served by several railways, including the Pennsylvania, the Wabash, the Chicago Terminal Transfer (whose shops are here), the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Chicago, Indiana & Southern, and the Indiana Harbor railways.

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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania (Cleveland & Pittsburg Division), the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash System) railways, and by several steamboat lines.

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  • The larger streams flow in a general south-westerly direction, and the greater part of the state is drained into the Ohio through the Wabash river and its tributaries.

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  • The Wabash, which has a total length of more than 500 m., has its headwaters in the western part of Ohio, and flows in a north-west, south-west, and south direction across the state, emptying into the Ohio river and forming for a considerable distance the boundary between Indiana and Illinois.

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  • Of these the White river is by far the most important, being second only to the Wabash itself in extent of territory drained.

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  • above its entrance into the Wabash, which it joins about 100 m.

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  • The most fertile part of the state is the Wabash valley; the least fertile the sandy region, of small extent, immediately south of Lake Michigan.

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  • The Wabash and Erie canal (1843), which connected Lake Erie with the Ohio river, entering the state in Allen county, east of Fort Wayne, and following the Wabash river to Terre Haute and the western fork of the White river from Worthington, Greene county, to Petersburg, Pike county, whence it ran south-south-west to Evansville; and the White Water canal from Hagerstown, Wayne county, mostly along the course of the White Water river, to Lawrenceburg, on the Ohio River, in the south-eastern corner of the state, although now abandoned, served an important purpose in their day.

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  • The deepening of the channel of the Wabash river was begun in 1872.

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  • or less, there was practically no traffic up to 1909 on the White, because there was no outlet for it by the Wabash river.

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  • Other educational institutions of college rank include Vincennes University (non-sectarian), at Vincennes; Hanover College (1833, Presbyterian), at Hanover; Wabash College (1832, non-sectarian), at Crawfordsville; Franklin College (1837, Baptist), at Franklin; De Pauw University (1837, Methodist Episcopal), at Greencastle; Butler University (1855, Christian), at Indianapolis; Earlham College (1847, Friends), at Richmond; Notre Dame University (1842, Roman Catholic), at Notre Dame; Moore's Hill College (r856, Methodist Episcopal), at Moore's Hill; the University of Indianapolis (nonsectarian), a loosely affiliated series of schools at Indianapolis, centring around Butler University; and Rose Polytechnic Institute (1883, non-sectarian), at Terre Haute.

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  • When, a few years later, this portage came to be generally used by traders, the necessity of establishing a base on the upper Wabash as a defence against the Carolina and Pennsylvania traders, who had already reached the lower Wabash and incited the Indians to hostility against the French, became evident; but it was not, apparently, until the second decade of the 18th century that any permanent settlement was made.

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  • of the present city of Lafayette), the headquarters of the Wea branch of the Miami, on the upper Wabash.

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  • This canal was completed from the St Joseph river to the Wabash in 1835, opened in 1843, and later abandoned.

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  • Columbia is served by the Wabash and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • The completion of the Wabash & Erie Canal, in 1853, from Evansville to Toledo, Ohio, a distance of 400 m., greatly accelerated the city's growth.

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  • Detroit is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Wabash, the Grand Trunk, the Pere Marquette, the Detroit & Toledo Shore Line, the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton and the Canadian Pacific railways.

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  • Its principal importance is as a railway and manufacturing centre; it is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Litchfield & Madison railways, and by electric lines connecting with St Louis and the neighbouring towns.

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  • Quincy is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City, and the Wabash railways, and by lines of river steamers, which find an excellent harbour in Quincy Bay, an arm of the Mississippi.

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