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vulgar-latin

vulgar-latin

vulgar-latin Sentence Examples

  • exhibit Jordanis or Jordannis; but these are only Vulgar-Latin spellings of Jordanes.

  • Thus the name which once denoted the good genius who bestowed the precious gift of water upon man was adopted to this use in vulgar Latin under the form Catamitus.

  • The special development of the vulgar Latin tongue in Spain, and the formation of the three linguistic types just enumerated, were promoted by political circumstances.

  • It is agreed on all hands that Castilian is one of the two branches of the vulgar Latin.

  • Some nominative formsDis (anciently Dios, and in the Castilian of the Jews Dlo), Cdrias, Mdrcos, sastre (s a r t 0 r) have been adopted instead of forms derived from the accusative, but the vulgar Latin of the Peninsula in no instance presents two forms (subjective and objective case) of the same substantIve.

  • The vulgar Latin of Spain has kept the pluperfect indicative, still in current use vs a secondary form of the conditional (cantdra, yendira, pariiira), and, what is more remarkable still, as not occurring anywhere elle, the future perfect (canidre, vendiire, pcriiire, formerly canliro, vendilro, partiro).

  • The vulgar Latin of the Peninsula, moreover, has preserved the 2nd pars.

  • exhibit Jordanis or Jordannis; but these are only Vulgar-Latin spellings of Jordanes.

  • Thus the name which once denoted the good genius who bestowed the precious gift of water upon man was adopted to this use in vulgar Latin under the form Catamitus.

  • The special development of the vulgar Latin tongue in Spain, and the formation of the three linguistic types just enumerated, were promoted by political circumstances.

  • It is agreed on all hands that Castilian is one of the two branches of the vulgar Latin.

  • Some nominative formsDis (anciently Dios, and in the Castilian of the Jews Dlo), Cdrias, Mdrcos, sastre (s a r t 0 r) have been adopted instead of forms derived from the accusative, but the vulgar Latin of the Peninsula in no instance presents two forms (subjective and objective case) of the same substantIve.

  • The vulgar Latin of Spain has kept the pluperfect indicative, still in current use vs a secondary form of the conditional (cantdra, yendira, pariiira), and, what is more remarkable still, as not occurring anywhere elle, the future perfect (canidre, vendiire, pcriiire, formerly canliro, vendilro, partiro).

  • The vulgar Latin of the Peninsula, moreover, has preserved the 2nd pars.

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