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voyages

voyages Sentence Examples

  • Ussher, Napoleon's Last Voyages (London, 1895; new ed., 1906); G.

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  • Soc.'s Recueil de Voyages, &c. (Paris, 1839); W.

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  • It was also in the reign of Justinian that Cosmas Indicopleustes, an Egyptian merchant, made several voyages, and afterwards composed his XpUTTcavuxr} Toaoypa(Pia (Christian Topography), containing, in addition to his absurd cosmogony, a tolerable description of India.

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  • He made similar voyages in later years in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the North Sea and Palestine.

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  • Fowler (1903); De Morgan, Companion to the Almanac (1845); De Moleon, Voyages liturgiques (Paris, 1718).

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  • Passing to Australia, we have the first good description of some of its birds in the several old voyages and in Latham's works before mentioned.

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  • Passing to Australia, we have the first good description of some of its birds in the several old voyages and in Latham's works before mentioned.

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  • Many English voyages were also made to Guinea and the West Indies, and twice English vessels followed in the track of Magellan, and circumnavigated the globe.

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  • British visits to Eastern countries, at this time, were not confined to the voyages of the company.

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  • The three voyages of Captain James Cook form an era in the history of geographical discovery.

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  • Nevertheless, of the death of a man, and of a maihem done in great ships, being and hovering in the main stream of great rivers, only beneath the [[[bridges]]] of the same rivers [nigh] to the sea, and in none other places of the same rivers, the admiral shall have cognizance, and also to arrest ships in the great flotes for the great voyages of the king and of the realm; saving always to the king all manner of forfeitures and profits thereof coming; and he shall have also jurisdiction upon the said flotes, during the said voyages only; saving always to the lords, cities, and boroughs, their liberties and franchises."

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  • The voyages of Columbus and of Vasco da Gama were so important that it is unnecessary to detail their results in this place.

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  • Laptyev, started from the Lena in 1739, but encountered masses of drift ice in Chatanga bay, and with this ended the voyages to the westward of the Lena.

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  • " A region more exposed to storms both in summer and winter it would be difficult to mention " (Fitzroy, Voyages of " Adventure " and" Beagle," ii.

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  • Somewhat later the Crusades kept up communication with the Levant, and established there the power of the Roman Church, somewhat to the detriment of oriental Christianity, but intercourse with farther Asia was limited to the voyages of a few travellers.

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  • Of still wider interest are the accounts of Cook's three famous voyages, though unhappily much of the information gained by the naturalists who accompanied him on one or more of them seems to be irretrievably lost: the original observations of the elder Forster were not printed till 1844, and the valuable collection of zoological drawings made by the younger Forster still remains unpublished in the British Museum.

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  • At fifteen he went to sea, and made several voyages to the Baltic and Mediterranean.

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  • des voyages (1857); D'Ohsson, Peuples du Caucase (Paris, 1828); S.

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  • des voyages (1857); D'Ohsson, Peuples du Caucase (Paris, 1828); S.

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  • The voyages of Columbus (1492-1498) resulted in the discovery of the West Indies and North America which barred the way to the Far East.

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  • The three voyages of Vasco da Gama (who died on the scene of his labours, at Cochin, in 1524) revolutionized the commerce of the East.

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  • The first of the Dutch Indian voyages was performed by ships which sailed in April 1595, and rounded the Cape of Good Hope.

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  • Between his first and second arctic voyages he made the acquaintance of the Fox family, the spiritualists.

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  • The Arctic voyages of Barents were quickly followed by the establishment of p u a Dutch East India Company; and the Dutch, ousting the Portuguese, not only established factories on the mainland of India and in Japan, but acquired a preponderating influence throughout the Malay Archipelago.

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  • They were preceded by the wonderful The and romantic voyages of the buccaneers.

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  • Storm, Studies on the " Vineland " Voyages (Copenhagen, 1889); Extraits des Memoires de la Societe Royale des Antiquaires du Nord (1888); K.

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  • The earliest Arabian traveller whose observations have come down to us is the merchant Sulaiman, who embarked in the Persian Gulf and made several voyages to India and China, in the middle of the 9th century.

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  • Thus he placed on record the voyages of the merchant Ulfsten in the Baltic, including particulars of the geography of Germany.

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  • In 1583 Jan Hugen van Linschoten made a voyage to India with a Portuguese fleet, and his full and graphic descriptions of India, Africa, China and the Malay Archipelago must have been of no small use to his countrymen in their distant voyages.

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  • Yet another outcome of Captain Cook's work was the voyage of George Vancouver, who had served as a midshipman in Cook's second and third voyages.

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  • on his voyages.

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  • See Captain Cook's Voyages and other early narratives; Martin, Mariner's account of the Tonga Islands (Edinburgh, 1827); Vason, Four Years in Tongatabu (London, 1815); A.

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  • coast of the Persian Gulf, but as the early navigators pushed their voyages further, the ships rounded the coast of Arabia, and came into the Red Sea, and the names of Magan and the neighbouring Melukhkha gradually extended westward, with the result that in late times to the Assyrians Melukhkha meant Ethiopia.

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  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

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  • He made several voyages to the White Sea and to places in northern Russia, and in 1621 entered the service of the Danish Icelandic Company, then in its prime.

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  • During his northern voyages he had learnt Russian, and was employed as interpreter at court whenever Muscovite embassies visited Copenhagen.

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  • Cordier, Les Voyages.

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  • Hecker took the opportunity of a voyage from Hamburg to La Plata, and in 1904 and 1905 of voyages in the Indian and Pacific Oceans to determine the local attraction over the ocean by comparing the atmospheric pressure measured by means of a mercurial barometer and a boiling-point thermometer, and obtained results similar to Scott Hansen's.

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  • energy and skill required and the length (three to five years when sailing vessels were employed) of the ever-widening voyages which finally took the fishermen into every quarter of the globe, contributes the most romantic chapters in the history of American commerce.

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  • Between 1500 and 03 a Portuguese family of the name of Cortereal carried out voyages of exploration on the eastern coast of North America, with the consent of their government, and with little regard for the treaty of Tordesillas.

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  • King Francis encouraged the ill-recorded and disputed voyages of the Florentine Giovanni da Verrazano in 1524, and the undoubted explorations of Jacques Cartier.

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  • The claims of France to the possession of a great part of the northern half of America were based on the voyages of Verrazano and Cartier.

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  • The English retaliated by armed smuggling voyages.

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  • The stories that he had heard in Egypt of Sesostris may then have stimulated him to make voyages from Samos to Colchis, Scythia and Thrace.

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  • of Mauretania with the accounts of coasting voyages by Nearchus and other geographers, and circulated by him under the name of Onesicritus, was largely used by Pliny.

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  • The tithes vowed to him by Romans and men of Sora and Reate, for safety on journeys and voyages, furnished sacrifices and (in Rome) public entertainment (polluctum).

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  • Polynesian canoe-men had reached its northern shores in successive voyages.

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  • In 1908 three lines of ocean-going steamers were making regular voyages up the Amazon to Iquitos (about 2500 m.).

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  • There is a careful translation of Champlain's Voyages, by Professor and Mrs E.

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  • These, which are described in separate articles, helped to maintain the tradition of an earthly paradise which had become associated with the myth of Atlantis; and all except Avalon were marked in maps of the 14th and 15th centuries, and formed the object of voyages of discovery, in one case (St Brendan's island) until the 18th century.

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  • In1522-1524various voyages of discovery were made on the west coast of America, partly in the hope of finding a strait connecting the two oceans to the region of the central isthmus.

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  • Fuller knowledge of this coast was acquired by Alvaro de Saavedra (1527-1529), and among later voyages those of Ruy Lopez de Villalobos (1542-1545) and Miguel Lopez de Legaspi (1564-1565) should be mentioned.

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  • William Dampier, however, making various voyages in 1690-1705, explored the coasts of Australia and New Guinea, and at the opening of the century both the French and the Dutch showed some activity.

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  • The next voyages in chronological .order are those of the celebrated Captain James Cook.

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  • Denham, and several important voyages for scientific research were made in the second half of the 19th century, including one from Austria under Captain Wiillerstorf Urbair (1858), and one from Italy in the vessel "Magenta" (1865-1868), which was accompanied by the scientist Dr Enrico Giglioli.

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  • - For the results of the various voyages of explorers see their narratives, especially those of Captain Cook, and among the earlier Collections of voyages see especially Captain James Burney, Chronological History of the Discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean - from the earliest navigators to 1764 - (London, 1803-1817).

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  • Moerenhout, Voyages aux Iles du Grand Ocean (1837); W.

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  • - Third Historic Period Beginning with the publication of Darwin's great works, " Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of H.M.S.

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  • Thorfinn belonged to a leading Icelandic family and had great success in trading voyages.

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  • On Flatey Book, Red Eric Saga and the whole bibliography for the Vinland voyages, including that of Thorfinn, see Leif Ericsson and Vinland.

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  • The six Vinland voyages of Flatey, we may repeat, Red Eric reduces to three, wholly omitting the alleged voyage of Biarni Heriulfsson, and grouping those of Thorvald Ericsson and Freydis with Thorfinn Karlsefni's in one great colonizing venture.

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  • See Gustav Storm, "Studies on the Vineland Voyages," in the Memoires de la Societe royale des Antiquaires du Nord (Copenhagen, 1888); and Eiriks Saga Raudha (Copenhagen, 1891); A.

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  • Slafter, Voyages of the Northmen (Boston, 1877) B.

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  • Cervelli, in Recueil de voyages, pub.

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  • As clerk (1795) and then as supercargo (1796, 1798, 1799) he made four long voyages; and, being an excellent navigator, he afterwards (1802) commanded a vessel, instructing his crews in lunar and other observations.

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  • Renan, in Melanges d'histoire et des voyages, 169-195.

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  • We have already seen that the Chinese as late as the end of the 8th century made voyages with compasses on which but little reliance could be placed; and it may perhaps be assumed that the compasses early used in the East were mostly too imperfect to be of much assistance to navigators, and were therefore often dispensed with on customary routes.

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  • Columbus also in 1492 had landed on San Salvador, and the voyages of the Venetian Cabot along the coast of North America opened up a new world to missionary enterprise.

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  • in his instructions to the navigators in Sir Hugh Willoughby's fleet, Sebastian Cabot in those for the direction of the intended voyage to Cathay, and Richard Hakluyt, who promoted many voyages of discovery in addition to writing their history, agree with Sir Humphrey Gilbert's chronicler that " the sowing of Christianity must be the chief intent of such as shall make any attempt at foreign discovery, or else whatever is builded upon other foundation shall never obtain happy success or continuance."

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  • 9 Hakluyt, Voyages, iii.

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  • But although the personality of Odysseus may have had its origin in some primitive religious myth, chief interest attaches to him as the typical representative of the old sailor-race whose adventurous voyages educated and moulded the Hellenic race.

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  • Dentan, Relation de differents voyages dans les Alpes du Faucigny (1776); E.

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  • de Saussure, Voyages dans les Alpes (4 vols., 1779-1796); A.

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  • TOpffer, Voyages en zigzag (2 series, 1844 and 1853); Aegid.

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  • See Marquette's Journal, first published in Melchissedech Thevenot's Recueil de Voyages (Paris, 1681), and fully given in Martin's Relations inedites, and in Shea's Discovery and Exploration of the Mississippi Valley (New York, 1852); cf.

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  • The romanticists were attacked in an amusing satire, Les Voyages et aventures de M.

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  • This passage offers important corroboration of the Icelandic accounts of the Vinland voyages, and is, furthermore, interesting "as the only undoubted reference to Vinland in a medieval book written beyond the limits of the Scandinavian world" (Fiske).

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  • The other saga, which by chance came to be looked upon as the chief repository of facts concerning the Vinland voyages, is found in a large Icelandic work known as the Flatey Book, as it was once owned by a man who lived on Flat Island (Flatey), on the north-western coast of Iceland.

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  • The only important phase of the Vinland voyages that has not been definitely settled is the identifications of the regions visited by Leif and Thorfinn.

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  • At any rate, the incontrovertible facts of the Vinland voyages are that Leif and Thorfinn were historical characters, that they visited, in the early part of the 11th century, some part of the American continent south-west of Greenland, that they found natives whose hostility prevented the founding of a permanent settlement, and that the sagas telling of these things are, on the whole, trustworthy descriptions of actual experience.

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  • - The bibliography of this subject is large, but adequate documents, accounts and discussions may be found in the following modern works: Gustav Storm, Studies on the Vineland Voyages (Copenhagen, 1889); Arthur M.

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  • In the narrowest portion of this gorge, not far from Bellegarde at its lower end, there formerly existed the famous (described by Saussure in his Voyages dans les Alpes, chapter xvii.), where for a certain distance the river disappeared in a subterranean channel; but this natural phenomenon has been destroyed, partly by blasting, and partly by the diversion of the water for the use of the factories of Bellegarde.

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  • The use of tea in China in the middle of the 9th century is known from Arab sources (Reinaud, Relation des Voyages, 1845, p. 40).

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  • Danoise, 1889, p. 67; (16) Voyages.

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  • Most of Ray's minor works were the outcome of his faculty for carefully amassing facts; for instance, his Collection of English Proverbs (1670), his Collection of Out-of-the-way English Words (1674), his Collection of Curious Travels and Voyages (1693), and his Dictionariolum trilingue (1675, 5th edition as Nomenclator classicus, 1706).

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  • Eastward, roads led through the Arabian mountains to the Red Sea, whence ships made voyages to the incense-bearing land of Puoni (Punt) on the Somali coast of Africa, rich also in gold and ivory.

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  • The large canoes in which they formerly made long voyages are no longer built, but various kinds of smaller canoes are made, from the commonest, which is simply a hollowed-out tree cut into form, to the finely shaped one built upon a keel, the joints of the various pieces being nicely fitted, and the whole stitched together with cord made from the husk of coconuts.

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  • But where cannibalism was practised as a means of subsistence, it probably originated in times of actual want, such as may have occurred during the long voyages of the people.

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  • Moerenhout, Voyages aux Iles du Grand Ocean, &c. (Paris, 1837); Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race (1878).

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  • Their structure is adapted to short voyages in a sea well studded with harbours, not exposed to the most violent storms or most dangerous tides.

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  • This last sentence has led some modern writers to suppose that he made two different voyages; but this is improbable; the expressions of Polybius imply that his explorations in both directions, first towards the north and afterwards towards the east, formed part of the same voyage.

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  • Between 1600 and 1612 there were twelve separate voyages, but in the latter year a joint-stock system began involving continual communication with the Indies.

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  • Leguat, Voyages et aventures en deux isles desertes des Indes orientales (Eng.

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  • The Marshall Islanders are the boldest and most skilful navigators in the Pacific. Their voyages of many months' duration, in great canoes sailing with outrigger to windward, well-provisioned, and depending on the skies for fresh water, help to show how the Pacific was colonized.

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  • Thevenot's Relation des voyages in 1673).

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  • Dampier in his voyage to New Holland in 1699 particularly described and figured the sooty tern (Voyages, iii.

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  • A former activity in shipbuilding is of interest through the recollection that here were constructed the ships for Captain Cook's voyages.

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  • To the latter (the coast of New England), the Northmen during the same period made " temporary visits for timber and peltries, or missionary voyages to evangelize for a season the natives."

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  • Out of the breeding-season it shows itself in most parts of the North Atlantic, but never seems to stray farther south than Gibraltar or Morocco, and it is therefore a matter of much interest to find the Southern Ocean inhabited by a bird - the "Port Egmont Hen" of Cook's Voyages - which so closely resembles the Skua as to have been for a long while regarded as specifically identical with it, but is now usually recognized as distinct under the name of S.

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  • The voyages of Columbus and Vespucci of to America, the rounding of the Cape by Diaz and the discovery of the sea road to India by Vasco da Gama, Cortes's conquest of Mexico and Pizarro's conquest of Peru, marked a new era for the human race and inaugurated the modern age more decisively than any other series of events has done.

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  • The most interesting travels may be found under the names of Felix Faber, Evagatorium (Stuttgart, 1843); de Villamont, Voyages (Arras, 1598); van Kootwyck, Cotovici itinerarium (Antwerp, 1619); R.

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  • iii.) and Hakluyt's Voyages (vol.

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  • Ternaux-Compans, Voyages (vol.

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  • Admirable descriptions of this inhospitable region, the farthest south of the inhabited parts of the globe, may be found in the Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty's Ships "Adventure" and " Beagle" between the years 1826 and 1836 (3 vols., 1839).

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  • A chief argument in favour of this view is the length of the voyages of Solomon's vessels (three years were occupied in the double voyage, going and returning, r Kings x.

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  • It is nowhere said that these various imports all came from one place; and the voyages must have been somewhat analogous to those of modern " coasting tramps," which would necessarily consume a considerable time over comparatively short journeys.

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  • During the heat of summer voyages to the North Cape are suitable, and during the spring and autumn to the Mediterranean, but in the colder months of the year the West Indies, India, Cape Town, Australia or New Zealand forms the best objective.

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  • Heriot (De Bry's Collection of Voyages), in his report on Virginia, describes a plant under the same name "with roots as large as a walnut and others much larger; they grow in damp soil, many hanging together as if fixed on ropes; they are good food either boiled or roasted."

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  • It had become clear that, apart from their religious and scientific aspects, these voyages of discovery were highly profitable.

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  • In the North Atlantic Gaspar and Miguel Corte-Real penetrated as far as Greenland (their " Labrador ") in 1500-1501; but these voyages were politically and commercially unimportant.

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  • Up to 1505 the Portuguese voyages to the East were little more than trading ventures or plundering raids, although a few " factories " for the exchange of goods were and Alba= founded in Malabar.

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  • Their origin is to be sought not so much in the Revival of Learning as in the fact that the Portuguese had learned, on their voyages of discovery, to see and think for themselves.

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  • Francisco Alexandre Lobo, bishop of Vizeu, whose essays on Camoens and other authors show sound critical sense and a correct style, Cardinal Saraiva, an expert on ancient and modern history and the voyages of his countrymen, and Frei Fortunato de S.

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  • These explorations led the way for the famous voyages of Baron Nordenskidld (1875-1878), which included investigations in Novaya Zemlya.

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  • Ballivian and Eduardo Idiaquez, Diccionario Geogrdfico de la Republica de Bolivia (La Paz, 1999); Andre Bresson, Sept annees d'explorations, de voyages et de sejours dans l'Amirique australe (Paris, 1886); Enrique Bolland, Exploraciones practicadas en el Alto Paraguay y en la Laguna Gaiba (Buenos Aires, 1901); G.

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  • Petrocokino, Along the Andes, in Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador (London, 1903); Comte C. d'Ursel, Sud Amerique: Seiours et voyages au Bresil, en Bolivie, &c. (Paris, 1879); Charles Wiener, Perou et Bolivie (Paris, 1880); Bolivia, Geographical Sketch, Natural Resources, 'c., Intern.

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  • After two successful voyages, Eudoxus left the Egyptian service, and proceeded to Cadiz with the object of fitting out an expedition for the purpose of African discovery; and we learn from Strabo, who utilized the results of his observations, that the veteran explorer made at least two voyages southward along the coast of Africa.

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  • He was invalided out of the navy and made several voyages in merchant ships.

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  • In 1876 Clifford, a man of high-strung and athletic, but not robust, physique, began to fall into ill-health, and after two voyages to the South, died during the third of pulmonary consumption at Madeira, on the 3rd of March 1879, leaving his widow with two daughters.

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  • Nothing is known of his personal history excepting such as falls within the period of the four voyages on which his fame rests.

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  • Although it is certain that the four great geographical landmarks which to-day serve to keep Hudson's memory alive, namely the Hudson Bay, Strait, Territory and River, had repeatedly been visited and even drawn on maps and charts before he set out on his voyages, yet he deserves to take a very high rank among northern navigators for the mere extent of his discoveries and the success with which he pushed them beyond the limits of his predecessors.

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  • Voyages to this region for exploration, trade and settlement, however, may be said to have really begun with the year 1609, when Henry Hudson explored the region between Sandy Hook and Raritan Bay and sailed up the river which now bears his name.

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  • His remaining publications were the Recollections of Paris in the years 1802-3-4-5 (1806); a very useful General Collection of Voyages and Travels (1808-1814); a New Modern Atlas (1808-1819); and his Petralogy (1811)

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  • Zichy, Voyages au Caucase (2 vols., Budapest, 1897).

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  • Further proof may be found in many of her titles - avaSvop vat (" rising from the sea "), e157rXota (" giver of prosperous voyages "), yaXrpala (" goddess of fair weather "), Karao r K07rc'a (" she who keeps a look-out from the heights ") - in the attribute of the dolphin, and the veneration in which she was held by seafarers.

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  • Burney, History of Voyages and Discoveries in the South Sea (London, 1803-1817); J.

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  • In1906-1907there was a notable agitation for improvement, following trial voyages that proved the navigability of the Missouri up to Kansas City.

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  • Other works are Raynal's History of the Settlements and Trade of the Europeans in the East and West Indies, book x., English translation 1782; Dampier's Voyages; Geo.

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  • Originally, the name was given to the stalked barnacles (Lepadidae of C. Darwin), which attach themselves in great numbers to drift-wood and other objects floating in the sea and are one of the chief agents in the fouling of ships' bottoms during long voyages.

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  • At first the navigation was principally confined to the main river; and even in 1857 a modification of the government contract only obliged the company to a monthly service between Path and Manaos, with steamers of 200 tons cargo capacity, a second line to make six round voyages a year between Manaos and Tabatinga, and a third, two trips a month between Path and Cameta.

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  • It probably accounts for her appearance as a goddess of seafarers, the bestower of fair weather and prosperous voyages.

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  • of the Collection of Voyages and Travels of A.

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  • Oxford, 1674); Regnard, Voyage de Laponie, English version in Pinkerton's Voyages, vol.

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  • Slaveraiding continued ceaselessly; by 1446 the Portuguese had carried off nearly a thousand captives from the newly surveyed coasts; but between this time and the voyages of Cadamosto in 1455-1456, the prince altered his policy, forbade the kidnapping of the natives (which had brought about fierce reprisals, causing the death of Nuno Tristam in 1446, and of other pioneers in 1445, 1448, &c.), and endeavoured to promote their peaceful intercourse with his men.

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  • Of these the former, in his two voyages of 1455 and 1456, explored part of the courses of the Senegal and the Gambia, discovered the Cape Verde Islands (1456), named and mapped more carefully than before a considerable section of the African littoral beyond Cape Verde, and gave much new information on the trade-routes of north-west Africa and on the native races; while Gomez, in his first important venture (after 1448 and before 1458), though not accomplishing the full Indian purpose of his voyage (he took a native interpreter with him for use "in the event of reaching India"), explored and observed in the Gambia valley and along the adjacent coasts with fully as much care and profit.

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  • General: Etienne de Flacourt, Histoire de la grande isle Madagascar (Paris, 1658); Madagascar, or Robert Drury's Journal during Fifteen Years' Captivity on that Island (London, 1729; new ed., 1890); Voyages et memoires de Maurice Auguste, Comte de Benyowski (Paris, 1791); Froberville, Histoire de Madagascar (Isle de France, 1809); Ellis, History of Madagascar (London, 1838); Guillain, Documents sur.

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  • of Thomas Astley's New General Collection of Voyages and Travels (London, 1745-1747).

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  • a Voyages, p. 159.4 South African Folk-Lore Journal (May 1880).

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  • Hawkesworth, Voyages, iii.

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  • FoulchDelbosc, Bibliographie des voyages en Espagne (Paris, 1896); H.

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  • Bayldon, R.N.R., who made many observations while on voyages through the Pacific Ocean between Australia and the west coast of North America.

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  • From Gosnold's voyages onward the extraordinary abundance of cod about Cape Ann was well known, and though the first ' According to some authorities (e.g.

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  • The active pursuit of fishing as an industry may be dated as beginning about 1700, for then began voyages beyond Cape Sable.

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  • Voyages to the Grand Banks began about 1741.

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  • Although the rest of his career proved somewhat anticlimactic, the reputation of his Voyages has never faded.

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  • eighteenth century, known for his voyages to the Pacific Ocean.

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  • Voyages last between 2 and 7 days aboard our 76 foot gaff rigged ketch, Greater Manchester Challenge.

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  • Voyages last between 2 and 7 days aboard our 76 foot gaff rigged ketch, Greater Manchester Challenge.

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  • Voyages are especially native americans offering if you wish travel uniworld cruises.

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  • northbound voyages.

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  • sailors on long voyages.

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  • scurvy on long sea voyages.

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  • Newton made a series of six voyages under his father's tutelage between 1736 and 1742.

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  • vellum bound volume describing fourteen voyages to India, Malaya and the East Indies in several ships.

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  • For long voyages the sailing vessel replaced the medieval galley rowed by oars.

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  • voyages of discovery, or relaxed ' Gardens & Golf ' holidays.

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  • voyages of exploration.

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  • They offer six-day voyages from April to October at only £ 60 per person.

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  • (Paris, 1905); marquis de la Jonquiere, Le Cardinal du Bellay (Alencon, 1887); Heulhard, Rabelais, ses voyages en Italie (Paris, 1891); Chamard, Joachim du Bellay (Lille, 1900); V.

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  • During the interval elapsing between Dampier's two voyages, an accident led to the closer examination of the coasts of Western Australia by the Dutch.

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  • During the next two or three years public attention was occupied with Captain King's maritime explorations of the north-west coast in three successive voyages, and by explorations of Western Australia in 1821.

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  • According to Herodotus the Phocaeans were the first of all the Greeks to undertake distant voyages, and made known the coasts of the Adriatic, Tyrrhenia and Spain.

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  • 550) to explain the phenomena of the apparent movements of the sun by means of an earth modelled on the plan of the Jewish Tabernacle gave place ultimately to the wheel-maps - the T in an 0 - which reverted to the primitive ignorance of the times of Homer and Hecataeus.2 The journey of Marco Polo, the increasing trade to the East and the voyages of the Arabs in the Indian Ocean prepared the way for the reacceptance of Ptolemy's ideas when the sealed books of the Greek original were translated into Latin by Angelus in 1410.

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  • The impulse given to the study of natural history by the example of Linnaeus; the results brought back by Sir Joseph Banks, Dr Solander and the two Forsters, who accompanied Cook in his voyages of discovery; the studies of De Saussure in the Alps, and the lists of desiderata in physical geography drawn up by that investigator, combined to ' Printed in Schriften zur physischen Geographie, vol.

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  • After two successful voyages, Eudoxus, impressed with the idea that Africa was surrounded by ocean on the south, left the Egyptian service, and proceeded to Cadiz and other Mediterranean centres of trade seeking a patron who would finance an expedition for the purpose of African discovery; and we learn from Strabo that the veteran explorer made at least two voyages southward along the coast of Africa.

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  • It was also in the reign of Justinian that Cosmas Indicopleustes, an Egyptian merchant, made several voyages, and afterwards composed his XpUTTcavuxr} Toaoypa(Pia (Christian Topography), containing, in addition to his absurd cosmogony, a tolerable description of India.

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  • The earliest Arabian traveller whose observations have come down to us is the merchant Sulaiman, who embarked in the Persian Gulf and made several voyages to India and China, in the middle of the 9th century.

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  • Thus he placed on record the voyages of the merchant Ulfsten in the Baltic, including particulars of the geography of Germany.

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  • The story of two Venetians, Nicolo and Antonio Zeno, who gave a vague account of voyages in the northern seas in the end of the 13th century, is no longer to be accepted as history.

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  • The voyages of Columbus (1492-1498) resulted in the discovery of the West Indies and North America which barred the way to the Far East.

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  • The voyages of Columbus and of Vasco da Gama were so important that it is unnecessary to detail their results in this place.

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  • The three voyages of Vasco da Gama (who died on the scene of his labours, at Cochin, in 1524) revolutionized the commerce of the East.

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  • Vespucci afterwards made three voyages to the Brazilian coast; and in 1504 he wrote an account of his four voyages, which was widely circulated, and became the means of procuring for its author at the hands of the cartographer Waldseemi ller in 1507 the disproportionate distinction of giving his name to the whole continent.

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  • This was unquestionably the greatest of the voyages which followed from the impulse of Prince Henry, and it was rendered possible only by the magnificent courage of the commander in spite of rebellion, mutiny and starvation.

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  • On a second voyage, in 1556, Chancellor was drowned; and three subsequent voyages, led by Stephen Burrough, Arthur Pet and Charles Jackman, in small craft of 50 tons and under, carried on an examination of the straits which lead into the Kara sea.

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  • The great and splendidly illustrated collections of voyages and travels of Theodorus de Bry and Hulsius served a similar useful purpose on the continent of Europe.

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  • Many English voyages were also made to Guinea and the West Indies, and twice English vessels followed in the track of Magellan, and circumnavigated the globe.

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  • British visits to Eastern countries, at this time, were not confined to the voyages of the company.

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  • The Arctic voyages of Barents were quickly followed by the establishment of p u a Dutch East India Company; and the Dutch, ousting the Portuguese, not only established factories on the mainland of India and in Japan, but acquired a preponderating influence throughout the Malay Archipelago.

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  • In 1583 Jan Hugen van Linschoten made a voyage to India with a Portuguese fleet, and his full and graphic descriptions of India, Africa, China and the Malay Archipelago must have been of no small use to his countrymen in their distant voyages.

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  • The first of the Dutch Indian voyages was performed by ships which sailed in April 1595, and rounded the Cape of Good Hope.

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  • They were preceded by the wonderful The and romantic voyages of the buccaneers.

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  • The three voyages of Captain James Cook form an era in the history of geographical discovery.

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  • Yet another outcome of Captain Cook's work was the voyage of George Vancouver, who had served as a midshipman in Cook's second and third voyages.

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  • Laptyev, started from the Lena in 1739, but encountered masses of drift ice in Chatanga bay, and with this ended the voyages to the westward of the Lena.

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  • on his voyages.

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  • " A region more exposed to storms both in summer and winter it would be difficult to mention " (Fitzroy, Voyages of " Adventure " and" Beagle," ii.

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  • See Captain Cook's Voyages and other early narratives; Martin, Mariner's account of the Tonga Islands (Edinburgh, 1827); Vason, Four Years in Tongatabu (London, 1815); A.

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  • Fowler (1903); De Morgan, Companion to the Almanac (1845); De Moleon, Voyages liturgiques (Paris, 1718).

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  • Somewhat later the Crusades kept up communication with the Levant, and established there the power of the Roman Church, somewhat to the detriment of oriental Christianity, but intercourse with farther Asia was limited to the voyages of a few travellers.

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  • Ussher, Napoleon's Last Voyages (London, 1895; new ed., 1906); G.

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  • Of still wider interest are the accounts of Cook's three famous voyages, though unhappily much of the information gained by the naturalists who accompanied him on one or more of them seems to be irretrievably lost: the original observations of the elder Forster were not printed till 1844, and the valuable collection of zoological drawings made by the younger Forster still remains unpublished in the British Museum.

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  • We only know of Andrew through references in other writers: see especially William of Rubruquis in Recueil de voyages, iv.

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  • Between his first and second arctic voyages he made the acquaintance of the Fox family, the spiritualists.

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  • Nevertheless, of the death of a man, and of a maihem done in great ships, being and hovering in the main stream of great rivers, only beneath the [[[bridges]]] of the same rivers [nigh] to the sea, and in none other places of the same rivers, the admiral shall have cognizance, and also to arrest ships in the great flotes for the great voyages of the king and of the realm; saving always to the king all manner of forfeitures and profits thereof coming; and he shall have also jurisdiction upon the said flotes, during the said voyages only; saving always to the lords, cities, and boroughs, their liberties and franchises."

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  • i.; Churchill's Collection of Voyages (1744) Robert Swinhoe, Notes on the Island of Formosa, read before the British Association (1863); W.

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  • He made similar voyages in later years in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the North Sea and Palestine.

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  • coast of the Persian Gulf, but as the early navigators pushed their voyages further, the ships rounded the coast of Arabia, and came into the Red Sea, and the names of Magan and the neighbouring Melukhkha gradually extended westward, with the result that in late times to the Assyrians Melukhkha meant Ethiopia.

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  • On the Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery: Washington Irving, Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828), several times reprinted; Arthur Helps, Life of Las Casas (1868); Bryan Edwards, History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies (1793; 5th ed.

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  • Thwaites (Cleveland, 1896 ff.); and on early voyages in Pierre Margry, Decouvertes et etablissements des Francais (6 vols., Paris, 1879-1888).

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  • Storm, Studies on the " Vineland " Voyages (Copenhagen, 1889); Extraits des Memoires de la Societe Royale des Antiquaires du Nord (1888); K.

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  • Soc.'s Recueil de Voyages, &c. (Paris, 1839); W.

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  • At fifteen he went to sea, and made several voyages to the Baltic and Mediterranean.

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  • He made several voyages to the White Sea and to places in northern Russia, and in 1621 entered the service of the Danish Icelandic Company, then in its prime.

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  • During his northern voyages he had learnt Russian, and was employed as interpreter at court whenever Muscovite embassies visited Copenhagen.

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  • Cordier, Les Voyages.

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  • It is full of his peculiar verisimilitude and has all the interest of Anson's or Dampier's voyages, with a charm of style superior even to that of the latter.

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  • Thus it was that a great South Land appeared on the maps, the belief in the prodigious extension of which certainly received a severe shock by Abel Tasman's voyage of circumnavigation, but was only overthrown after Cook's great voyages had proved that any southern land which existed could not extend appreciably beyond the polar circle.

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  • Hecker took the opportunity of a voyage from Hamburg to La Plata, and in 1904 and 1905 of voyages in the Indian and Pacific Oceans to determine the local attraction over the ocean by comparing the atmospheric pressure measured by means of a mercurial barometer and a boiling-point thermometer, and obtained results similar to Scott Hansen's.

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  • energy and skill required and the length (three to five years when sailing vessels were employed) of the ever-widening voyages which finally took the fishermen into every quarter of the globe, contributes the most romantic chapters in the history of American commerce.

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  • (285-247 B.C.) in order to shorten the dangerous Red Sea voyages, and was named in honour of his mother.

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  • Between 1500 and 03 a Portuguese family of the name of Cortereal carried out voyages of exploration on the eastern coast of North America, with the consent of their government, and with little regard for the treaty of Tordesillas.

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  • King Francis encouraged the ill-recorded and disputed voyages of the Florentine Giovanni da Verrazano in 1524, and the undoubted explorations of Jacques Cartier.

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  • The claims of France to the possession of a great part of the northern half of America were based on the voyages of Verrazano and Cartier.

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  • The English retaliated by armed smuggling voyages.

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  • The stories that he had heard in Egypt of Sesostris may then have stimulated him to make voyages from Samos to Colchis, Scythia and Thrace.

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  • of Mauretania with the accounts of coasting voyages by Nearchus and other geographers, and circulated by him under the name of Onesicritus, was largely used by Pliny.

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  • de Kerguelen-Tremarec, Relation de deux voyages dans les mers australes (Paris, 1782); Narratives of the Voyages of Captain Cook and the "Challenger" Expedition; Phil.

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  • The tithes vowed to him by Romans and men of Sora and Reate, for safety on journeys and voyages, furnished sacrifices and (in Rome) public entertainment (polluctum).

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  • Polynesian canoe-men had reached its northern shores in successive voyages.

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  • In 1908 three lines of ocean-going steamers were making regular voyages up the Amazon to Iquitos (about 2500 m.).

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  • There is a careful translation of Champlain's Voyages, by Professor and Mrs E.

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  • These, which are described in separate articles, helped to maintain the tradition of an earthly paradise which had become associated with the myth of Atlantis; and all except Avalon were marked in maps of the 14th and 15th centuries, and formed the object of voyages of discovery, in one case (St Brendan's island) until the 18th century.

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  • In1522-1524various voyages of discovery were made on the west coast of America, partly in the hope of finding a strait connecting the two oceans to the region of the central isthmus.

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  • Fuller knowledge of this coast was acquired by Alvaro de Saavedra (1527-1529), and among later voyages those of Ruy Lopez de Villalobos (1542-1545) and Miguel Lopez de Legaspi (1564-1565) should be mentioned.

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  • William Dampier, however, making various voyages in 1690-1705, explored the coasts of Australia and New Guinea, and at the opening of the century both the French and the Dutch showed some activity.

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  • The next voyages in chronological .order are those of the celebrated Captain James Cook.

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  • Denham, and several important voyages for scientific research were made in the second half of the 19th century, including one from Austria under Captain Wiillerstorf Urbair (1858), and one from Italy in the vessel "Magenta" (1865-1868), which was accompanied by the scientist Dr Enrico Giglioli.

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  • - For the results of the various voyages of explorers see their narratives, especially those of Captain Cook, and among the earlier Collections of voyages see especially Captain James Burney, Chronological History of the Discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean - from the earliest navigators to 1764 - (London, 1803-1817).

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  • Moerenhout, Voyages aux Iles du Grand Ocean (1837); W.

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  • - Third Historic Period Beginning with the publication of Darwin's great works, " Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of H.M.S.

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  • Thorfinn belonged to a leading Icelandic family and had great success in trading voyages.

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  • On Flatey Book, Red Eric Saga and the whole bibliography for the Vinland voyages, including that of Thorfinn, see Leif Ericsson and Vinland.

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  • The six Vinland voyages of Flatey, we may repeat, Red Eric reduces to three, wholly omitting the alleged voyage of Biarni Heriulfsson, and grouping those of Thorvald Ericsson and Freydis with Thorfinn Karlsefni's in one great colonizing venture.

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  • See Gustav Storm, "Studies on the Vineland Voyages," in the Memoires de la Societe royale des Antiquaires du Nord (Copenhagen, 1888); and Eiriks Saga Raudha (Copenhagen, 1891); A.

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  • Slafter, Voyages of the Northmen (Boston, 1877) B.

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  • Cervelli, in Recueil de voyages, pub.

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  • As clerk (1795) and then as supercargo (1796, 1798, 1799) he made four long voyages; and, being an excellent navigator, he afterwards (1802) commanded a vessel, instructing his crews in lunar and other observations.

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  • Renan, in Melanges d'histoire et des voyages, 169-195.

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  • Davis informs us, once navigated as far as India, but their most distant voyages at present extend not farther than Java and the Malay Islands to the south (The Chinese, vol.

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  • (See The Three Voyages of Vasco da Gama, Hakluyt Soc., 1869; note to chap. xv.

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  • We have already seen that the Chinese as late as the end of the 8th century made voyages with compasses on which but little reliance could be placed; and it may perhaps be assumed that the compasses early used in the East were mostly too imperfect to be of much assistance to navigators, and were therefore often dispensed with on customary routes.

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  • From Ordaz up to recent times the Orinoco has been the scene of many voyages of discovery, including those in quest of El Dorado, and some scientific surveys have been made, especially among its upper waters, by Jose Solano and Diaz de la Fuente of the Spanish boundary line commission of Yturriaga and Solano (1757-1763), Humboldt (1800) and Michelena y Rojas (1855-1857).

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  • Estancelin, Recherches sur les voyages et decouvertes des navigateurs normands en Afrique (Paris, 1832); Villault de Bellefond, Relation des costes d'Afrique appellees Guinee (Paris, 1669); Pere Labat, Nouvelle Relation de l'Afrique occidentale (Paris, 1728); Desmarquets, Mem.

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  • Columbus also in 1492 had landed on San Salvador, and the voyages of the Venetian Cabot along the coast of North America opened up a new world to missionary enterprise.

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  • in his instructions to the navigators in Sir Hugh Willoughby's fleet, Sebastian Cabot in those for the direction of the intended voyage to Cathay, and Richard Hakluyt, who promoted many voyages of discovery in addition to writing their history, agree with Sir Humphrey Gilbert's chronicler that " the sowing of Christianity must be the chief intent of such as shall make any attempt at foreign discovery, or else whatever is builded upon other foundation shall never obtain happy success or continuance."

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  • 9 Hakluyt, Voyages, iii.

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  • But although the personality of Odysseus may have had its origin in some primitive religious myth, chief interest attaches to him as the typical representative of the old sailor-race whose adventurous voyages educated and moulded the Hellenic race.

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  • Dentan, Relation de differents voyages dans les Alpes du Faucigny (1776); E.

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  • de Saussure, Voyages dans les Alpes (4 vols., 1779-1796); A.

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