This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

vowel

vowel

vowel Sentence Examples

  • Rawlinson, and independently of him, the ancient Persian vowel system.

    105
    62
  • Rawlinson, and independently of him, the ancient Persian vowel system.

    103
    62
  • He paid especial attention to orthography, and sought to differentiate the meanings of cases of like ending by distinctive marks (the apex to indicate a long vowel is attributed to him).

    46
    48
  • Properly triliterals, but, with the 2nd or 3rd radical alike, these coalesced in many forms where no vowel intervened, and gave the word the appearance of a biliteraL

    29
    30
  • from Corinth, an ancient inscription written 1 30vvrpoc 66v has recently been discovered, which shows that though Cleonae for B wrote E {, like the Corinthian ?j, and, as at Corinth, wrote for a vowel sound, the vowel thus represented was not short and long e and n) as at Corinth, but Il only, as in Xp g A, (X p i i a 1 Here 'a represents and the spurious diphthong is represented by a, as in (dycv, Doric infinitive -= a form which shows that c has at Cleonae the more modern form I as distinguished from the Corinthian Regarding three other questions controversy still rages.

    23
    21
  • 2 The actual date of the introduction of vowel points is not known,, but it must in any case have been later than the time of Jerome, and is probably to be assigned to the 7th century.

    21
    22
  • Originally Siamese was purely monosyllabic, that is, each true word consisted of a single vowel sound preceded by, or followed by, a consonant.

    21
    23
  • These conclusions were hotly contested by Johannes Buxtorf, being in conflict with the views of his father, Johannes Buxtorf senior, notwithstanding the fact that Elias Levita had already disputed the antiquity of the vowel points and that neither Jerome nor the Talmud shows any acquaintance with them.

    18
    19
  • 'To this end they provided the text with a complete system of vowel points and accents.

    18
    19
  • Every syllable is open, ending in a vowel sound, and short sentences may be constructed wholly of vocalic sounds.

    17
    18
  • The Siamese alphabet consists of 44 consonants, in each of which the vowel sound" aw "is inherent, and of 32 vowels all marked not by individual letters, but by signs written above, below, before or after the consonant in connexion with which they are to be pronounced.

    17
    20
  • The earliest form of the name of the symbol which we can reach is the Hebrew beth, to which the Phoenician must have been closely akin, as is shown by the Greek Oiira, which is borrowed from it with a vowel affixed.

    16
    18
  • The earliest form of the name of the symbol which we can reach is the Hebrew beth, to which the Phoenician must have been closely akin, as is shown by the Greek Oiira, which is borrowed from it with a vowel affixed.

    16
    18
  • the glide between i and another vowel as in bcch=diya - is never represented, there was no occasion to use the Phoenician Jod in a double function.

    15
    16
  • According to Florio (i 6 i 1) V is "sometimes a vowel, and sometimes a consonant."

    15
    18
  • This change consisted in the insertion into the original text of certain consonants which had come to be also used to express vowel sounds: e.g.

    14
    17
  • It will be seen that they contain three vowel and six consonant elements, and these formed the foundation for her first real lesson in speaking.

    13
    13
  • A hard-and-fast rule of pronunciation is that only vowel or diphthong sounds, or the letters" m," n," ng," k," t "and" p "are permissible at the end of words, and hence the final letter of all words ending in anything else is simply suppressed or is pronounced as though it were a letter naturally producing one or other of those sounds.

    13
    15
  • A hard-and-fast rule of pronunciation is that only vowel or diphthong sounds, or the letters" m," n," ng," k," t "and" p "are permissible at the end of words, and hence the final letter of all words ending in anything else is simply suppressed or is pronounced as though it were a letter naturally producing one or other of those sounds.

    13
    15
  • In the case of the latter, the survival of the syllable "man" in Le Mans is due to the stress laid on the vowel; had the vowel been short and unaccented, it would have disappeared.

    12
    5
  • The orthography and the quantity of the penultimate vowel of Cenomani have given rise to discussion.

    11
    12
  • In the Dvenos inscription the perfect of facio is _feted; here it is a reduplicated form with the same vowel as the present.

    10
    10
  • On the other hand, Professor Spiegelberg, 3 writing soon after Professor Breasted, says that investigation has not as yet furnished proof that the Phoenician alphabet is of Egyptian origin, though he admits that in some respects the development of the two alphabets, both without vowel signs, is curiously parallel.

    9
    9
  • Add to this the insertion of vowel sounds where they are lacking in the Arabic and you derive from the real word Khmir the modern French term of Kroumir.

    8
    9
  • its paucity of vowels: for where Hebrew has two full vowels - a long and a short - in gatal, and Arabic has three short vowels in qatala, Aramaic has only one short vowel, the sound `` between q and t being merely a half vowel which is not indicated in Syriac writing.

    8
    10
  • The grammatical forms are expressed, as in Turkish, by means of affixes modulated according to the high or low vowel power of the root or chief syllables of the word to which they are appended-the former being represented by e, o, S, ii, i l l, the latter by a, d, o, 6, u, it; the sounds e, i, i are regarded as neutral.

    8
    10
  • The Phoenician symbol having been adopted for the vowel sound, whence came the new symbol or [for the digamma?

    7
    7
  • Sumerian has a system of vowel harmony strikingly like that seen in all modern agglutinative languages, and it has also vocalic dissimilation similar to that found in modern Finnish and Esthonian.

    7
    8
  • The point is not clear, but probably the Greeks acted here as they did in the case of the vowel i and the consonant y, adopting the consonant symbol for the vowel sound.

    7
    9
  • Probably the idea of providing vowel points was borrowed from the Syrians.

    6
    7
  • the Hebrew consonant corresponding to w also expressed the vowel o or u, the consonant h the vowel a, and so forth.

    6
    7
  • For example, an indeterminative vowel, a, e, i or u, may be prefixed to any root to form an abstract; thus, from me, " speak," we get e-me, " speech"; from ra, " to go," we get a-ra, " the act of going," &c. In connexion with the very complicated Sumerian verbal system 2 it will be sufficient to note here the practice of infixing the verbal object which is, of course, absolutely alien to Semitic. This phenomenon appears also in Basque and in many North American languages.

    6
    7
  • In these cases the vowel points attached to the written word (Kethibh) belong to the word which is to be substituted for it, the latter being placed in the margin with the initial letter of Qere (= to be read) prefixed to it.

    6
    9
  • The point is not clear, but probably the Greeks acted here as they did in the case of the vowel i and the consonant y, adopting the consonant symbol for the vowel sound.

    6
    9
  • For reasons suggested partly by the study of Semitic inscriptions, partly by comparison of passages occurring twice within the Old Testament, and partly by a comparison of the Hebrew text with the Septuagint, it is clear that the authors of the Old Testament (or at least most of them) themselves made some use of these vowel consonants, but that in a great number of cases the vowel consonants that stand in our present text were inserted by transcribers and editors of the texts.

    5
    6
  • the Attic a, which does not represent an IndoEuropean a, but arises by contraction, as in OtXe77-m, or through the lengthening of the vowel sound as the result of the loss of a consonant, as in Eiprt j Avos for FEFpn Avos) the short sound is represented by B; c is found at Corinth in its oldest form, and also as I, while in Thera it is In Thera the w sound of digamma (F) was entirely lost, and therefore is not represented.

    5
    8
  • And as in Hebrew, the six letters b g d k p t are aspirated when immediately preceded by any vowel sound.

    4
    10
  • It therefore made the aspirates A, E, Q and the semi-vowel I into vowels, and apparently converted the semi-vowel Y = w into the vowel which it placed at the end of the alphabet and substituted for it as the sixth symbol of the alphabet the letter F with the old value of w.

    3
    3
  • It therefore made the aspirates A, E, Q and the semi-vowel I into vowels, and apparently converted the semi-vowel Y = w into the vowel which it placed at the end of the alphabet and substituted for it as the sixth symbol of the alphabet the letter F with the old value of w.

    3
    3
  • As Latin, however, made the symbol V indicate not only the vowel sound u, but also the consonant sound v (i.e.

    3
    4
  • As Latin, however, made the symbol V indicate not only the vowel sound u, but also the consonant sound v (i.e.

    3
    4
  • Simon, its reputed author, and exalts him above Moses; (2) it mystically explains the Hebrew vowel points, which did not obtain till 570; (3) the compiler borrows two verses from the celebrated hymn called " The Royal Diadem," written by Ibn Gabirol, who was born about 1021; (4) it mentions the capture of Jerusalem by the crusaders and the re-taking of the Holy City by the Saracens; (5) it speaks of the comet which appeared at Rome, 15th July 1264, under the pontificate of Urban IV.; (6) by a slip the Zohar assigns a reason why its contents were not revealed before5060-5066A.M., i.e.1300-1306A.D., (7) the doctrine of the En Soph and the Sephiroth was not known before the 13th century; and (8) the very existence of the Zohar itself was not known prior 1 See, e.g., G.

    3
    7
  • In English, moreover, the vowel sounds tend to become diphthongs, so that the symbol for the simple sound tends to become the symbol for that combination which we call a diphthong.

    2
    3
  • The vowel signs have no sound by themselves, but act upon the vowel sound" aw "inherent in the consonants, converting it into" a," i," o," ee," ow,"&c. Each of the signs has a name, and some of them produce modulations so closely resembling those made by another that at the present day they are scarcely to be distinguished apart.

    2
    13
  • The vowel i could become e as de = di, &c. Consonantal variation is most common.

    2
    13
  • The vowel i could become e as de = di, &c. Consonantal variation is most common.

    2
    13
  • PRATINAS (the quantity of the second vowel is doubtful), one of the oldest tragic poets of Athens, was a native of Phlius in Peloponnesus.

    1
    2
  • PRATINAS (the quantity of the second vowel is doubtful), one of the oldest tragic poets of Athens, was a native of Phlius in Peloponnesus.

    1
    4
  • In the New English Dictionary no fewer than thirteen different nuances of vowel sound are distinguished under the symbol A alone.

    1
    7
  • In the New English Dictionary no fewer than thirteen different nuances of vowel sound are distinguished under the symbol A alone.

    1
    7
  • The vowel sounds ai, oi, ui have become e, o, u; and a, o, u before the finals d and n are now et, o, ii.

    1
    9
  • As a Hebrew scholar he made a special study of the history of the Hebrew text, which led him to the conclusion that the vowel points and accents are not an original part of the Hebrew language, but were inserted by the Massorete Jews of Tiberias, not earlier than the 5th century A.D., and that the primitive Hebrew characters are those now known as the Samaritan, while the square characters are Aramaic and were substituted for the more ancient at the time of the captivity.

    1
    11
  • Eirra, "seven"); (4) in Zend there are many vowel changes which it does not share with Old Persian.

    0
    0
  • They are as follows: (a) while the Servians pronounce the Old Slavonic yach as ye or e or ee, the Croats pronounce it always as ee (Servian beeyelo or belo, Croatian beelo); (b) the Servians have the sound gye (softened d or g), the Croats are without it, but have instead ya or ye (Servian gospogya, Croatian gospoya); (c) the Servians let the vowel i transform the preceding consonant into a soft consonant, whereas the Croats pronounce the consonant unaffected by the softening influence of i (Servian bratya, Croatian bratia); (d) the Servians change the letter l at the end of a word into o whereas the Croats always pronounce it as 1.

    0
    0
  • Further, the only post-tonic Latin vowel preserved ~y the Catalan is, as in Gallo-Roman, a: mare gives mar, gratu (s) gives grat, but anima gives arma; and, when the word terminates in a group of consonants requiring a supporting vowel, that vowel is represented by an e:

    0
    0
  • peuple, but Cast, pueblo); sometimes, when it is inserted between the two consonants instead of being made to follow them, the supporting vowel is represented by an o: escdndol (scndalum), frvol (frivolus), circol (circulus).

    0
    0
  • As for features common to C~talan and Hispanic (Castilian and Portuguese) Romance, on the other hand, and which are unknown to French Romance, only one is of importance; the conservation, namely, of the Latin u with its original sound, while the same vowel has assumed in French and ProvencaI~

    0
    0
  • I tonic long and i short, when in hiatus with another vowel, produce i (amich, a in i c u 1; via, vi a).

    0
    0
  • Just as e before a syllable in ivhich an i occurs is changed into I, so in the same circumstances o becomes u (full, folium;vuil, volio forvoleo)andalsowhentheaccented vowel precedes a group of consonants like ci, p1, and the like (ull, o c 1 u s; escull, Sd 0 p I u s).

    0
    0
  • In the same way the supporting vowel, which is regularly an e in CataIan, is often written a, especially after r (abra, ar bore m; astra, a s t r u m; para, p a t r e in); one may say that in the actual state of the language post-tonic e and a become indistinguishable in a surd sound intermediate between the French a and mute e.

    0
    0
  • ConsonantsFinal I readily disappears after nor 1 (tan, t a n t U In; aman, venin, pantin, for amant, venint, &c.; mai, rn u I t u in; ocul, o.c u 1 t u m); the reappears in composition before a vowel (Jon, assimilation to past participles in it.

    0
    0
  • Final d after a vowel has produced u (pea, p e d e in; niu, n i d u m; mou, to o d u m); buf when the d, in consequence of the disappearance of the preceding vowel, rests upon a consonant, it remains and passes into the corresponding surd; f r I g i d u s gives fred (pronounced fret).

    0
    0
  • The group di, when produced by the disappearance of the intermediate vowel, becomes ur (creure, c red crc; ociure, 0 c c i d e r e; veure, v i d b r e; seure, s e d C r e).

    0
    0
  • Old Portuguese the nasal vowel or diphthon~ was not as now marked by the lii (__), but was expressed indifferently and without regard to the etymology by m or n: bern (b e n e), tan (t a n t u m), disserom (dixerunt), sermom (sermonem).

    0
    0
  • Again, Portuguese alone has preserved the pluperfect in its original meaning, so that, for example, amara (a m a v e r a hi) signifies not merely as elsewhere I would love, but also I had Loved, The future perfect, retained as in Castilian, has lost its vowel of inflexion in the 1st and 3rd pers.

    0
    0
  • In many varieties of the Greek alphabet this symbol was used, as it always was in Latin, for the long as well as the short o-sound and also for the long vowel (in the Ionic alphabet written ov) which arose from contraction of two vowels or the loss of a consonant (57jXoUTE=677XOere, o'lxovs = oircovs).

    0
    0
  • The most important feature of this vowel is the rounding of the lips in its production, which, according to its degree, modifies the nature of the vowel considerably, as can be observed in the pronunciation of the increasingly rounded series saw, no, who.

    0
    0
  • Though short o changed in the Latin of the last age of the Roman republic to u in unaccented syllables always (except after u whether vowel or consonant), and sometimes also in accented syllables, this was not equally true of vulgar Latin, as is shown by the Romance languages.

    0
    0
  • The long vowel becomes more rounded as it is being pronounced, so that it ends in a u-sound, though this is not so noticeable in weak syllables like the final syllable of follow.

    0
    0
  • A mid-front-narrow-round vowel is found short in French words like peu, long in jeune and in endings like that of honteuse.

    0
    0
  • The fact that the Arabic name is Ruha supports the hint of the Graeco-Latin forms that there was a vowel between the R and the H.

    0
    0
  • It may have been the impulse given by the final supremacy of the caliphate to the long process which eventually substituted a new branch of Semitic speech for the Aramaic (which had now prevailed for a millennium and a half), that led Jacob to adopt the Greek vowel signs for use in Syriac. A century later Theophilus of Edessa (d.

    0
    0
  • Those of us who have always made the standard vowel alternation will have no such trouble.

    0
    0
  • basilar membrane motion in response to this vowel.

    0
    0
  • Both languages have an assimilation process which spreads nasality from a nasal consonant to the preceding vowel.

    0
    0
  • consonantal sounds and 18 representing vowel sounds.

    0
    0
  • Magic e - an exercise to use a split vowel digraph to change the meaning of a word.

    0
    0
  • Lyapunov exponents for the same vowel shown as a function of embedding dimension.

    0
    0
  • Different pitches are derived by shifting the fundamental and overtones while leaving the vowel formants relatively untouched.

    0
    0
  • Finally, we offer a critique of the practice of vowel formant analysis, suggesting a new means of data normalization.

    0
    0
  • The vowel [I] is becoming less frequent in weak syllables.

    0
    0
  • It does include a box on present tense verb conjugation (taking vowel harmony into account!

    0
    0
  • In addition, the data indicate that the neural mechanisms involved in vowel identification receive an input from those responsible for the continuity illusion.

    0
    0
  • We were told to teach first initial then final sounds and then medial vowel sounds.

    0
    0
  • We were told to teach first initial then final sounds and then medial vowel sounds.

    0
    0
  • Metzger also considers the possibility that " the final nu came into the text in order to avoid hiatus with the following vowel " .

    0
    0
  • The nasal percept does not depend on continuity between the formants of the vowel and nasal consonant.

    0
    0
  • Other lists focus on common vowel phonemes or a mixture of phonemes.

    0
    0
  • After the voiceless alveolar plosive comes a mid back rounded vowel, and after that a rather long uvular nasal.

    0
    0
  • Speech will sound like a series of vowel sounds; word endings, which indicate plurals and tenses, will be missing.

    0
    0
  • pronunciation of a vowel, then stammer when these come up.

    0
    0
  • The assessment carried out by experienced listeners consisted in marking the sounds heard on the vowel quadrilateral.

    0
    0
  • We were told to teach first initial then final sounds and then medial vowel sounds.

    0
    0
  • Variation: if you want to focus attention on the pronunciation of a vowel, then stammer when these come up.

    0
    0
  • A " nonsense syllable " is a syllable formed by placing a vowel between two consonants (e.g.

    0
    0
  • The experiments examined cases where the residue was either a CV syllable with a lax vowel, or a CVC syllable with a lax vowel, or a CVC syllable with a schwa.

    0
    0
  • voiceless alveolar plosive comes a mid back rounded vowel, and after that a rather long uvular nasal.

    0
    0
  • The formant structure of the nasal prototype has little effect on the nasal percept when it is preceded by a vowel.

    0
    0
  • Actually, " w " can represent either a vowel or a consonant in Welsh spelling.

    0
    0
  • Lesson 2 e at the end of a word sometimes makes the preceding vowel ' hard ' .

    0
    0
  • After the voiceless alveolar plosive comes a mid back rounded vowel, and after that a rather long uvular nasal.

    0
    0
  • In Bengali, however, nasality is initially interpreted as an underlying nasal vowel.

    0
    0
  • To them we must add schwa (right ), the weak vowel of a go, b a nan a.

    0
    0
  • vowel phonemes or a mixture of phonemes.

    0
    0
  • David Smith and Roy Patterson An analysis of Peterson and Barney's vowel formant data to investigate the evidence for scaling in human vowel formant data to investigate the evidence for scaling in human vowels.

    0
    0
  • vowel digraph to change the meaning of a word.

    0
    0
  • vowel diagraphs and triagraphs.

    0
    0
  • vowel harmony thing.

    0
    0
  • vowel sounds: the Mother Sounds of language.

    0
    0
  • He paid especial attention to orthography, and sought to differentiate the meanings of cases of like ending by distinctive marks (the apex to indicate a long vowel is attributed to him).

    0
    0
  • its paucity of vowels: for where Hebrew has two full vowels - a long and a short - in gatal, and Arabic has three short vowels in qatala, Aramaic has only one short vowel, the sound `` between q and t being merely a half vowel which is not indicated in Syriac writing.

    0
    0
  • And as in Hebrew, the six letters b g d k p t are aspirated when immediately preceded by any vowel sound.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the guttural letters affect the vowels much less than in Hebrew: their chief effect is when final to change the preceding vowel, if other than a or a, into a, but even this is not always the case.

    0
    0
  • For these Syriac has substituted middle or reflexive forms with prefixed eth and a change in the last vowel.

    0
    0
  • Simon, its reputed author, and exalts him above Moses; (2) it mystically explains the Hebrew vowel points, which did not obtain till 570; (3) the compiler borrows two verses from the celebrated hymn called " The Royal Diadem," written by Ibn Gabirol, who was born about 1021; (4) it mentions the capture of Jerusalem by the crusaders and the re-taking of the Holy City by the Saracens; (5) it speaks of the comet which appeared at Rome, 15th July 1264, under the pontificate of Urban IV.; (6) by a slip the Zohar assigns a reason why its contents were not revealed before5060-5066A.M., i.e.1300-1306A.D., (7) the doctrine of the En Soph and the Sephiroth was not known before the 13th century; and (8) the very existence of the Zohar itself was not known prior 1 See, e.g., G.

    0
    0
  • The grammatical forms are expressed, as in Turkish, by means of affixes modulated according to the high or low vowel power of the root or chief syllables of the word to which they are appended-the former being represented by e, o, S, ii, i l l, the latter by a, d, o, 6, u, it; the sounds e, i, i are regarded as neutral.

    0
    0
  • According to Florio (i 6 i 1) V is "sometimes a vowel, and sometimes a consonant."

    0
    0
  • Add to this the insertion of vowel sounds where they are lacking in the Arabic and you derive from the real word Khmir the modern French term of Kroumir.

    0
    0
  • As a Hebrew scholar he made a special study of the history of the Hebrew text, which led him to the conclusion that the vowel points and accents are not an original part of the Hebrew language, but were inserted by the Massorete Jews of Tiberias, not earlier than the 5th century A.D., and that the primitive Hebrew characters are those now known as the Samaritan, while the square characters are Aramaic and were substituted for the more ancient at the time of the captivity.

    0
    0
  • These conclusions were hotly contested by Johannes Buxtorf, being in conflict with the views of his father, Johannes Buxtorf senior, notwithstanding the fact that Elias Levita had already disputed the antiquity of the vowel points and that neither Jerome nor the Talmud shows any acquaintance with them.

    0
    0
  • The Swahili followers of the first explorers always pronounced the territorial prefix, Bu, as a simple vowel, U; hence the incorrect rendering " Uganda " of the more primitive Bantu designation.

    0
    0
  • Originally Siamese was purely monosyllabic, that is, each true word consisted of a single vowel sound preceded by, or followed by, a consonant.

    0
    0
  • The Siamese alphabet consists of 44 consonants, in each of which the vowel sound" aw "is inherent, and of 32 vowels all marked not by individual letters, but by signs written above, below, before or after the consonant in connexion with which they are to be pronounced.

    0
    0
  • The vowel signs have no sound by themselves, but act upon the vowel sound" aw "inherent in the consonants, converting it into" a," i," o," ee," ow,"&c. Each of the signs has a name, and some of them produce modulations so closely resembling those made by another that at the present day they are scarcely to be distinguished apart.

    0
    0
  • 'To this end they provided the text with a complete system of vowel points and accents.

    0
    0
  • In these cases the vowel points attached to the written word (Kethibh) belong to the word which is to be substituted for it, the latter being placed in the margin with the initial letter of Qere (= to be read) prefixed to it.

    0
    0
  • 2 The actual date of the introduction of vowel points is not known,, but it must in any case have been later than the time of Jerome, and is probably to be assigned to the 7th century.

    0
    0
  • Probably the idea of providing vowel points was borrowed from the Syrians.

    0
    0
  • The text of the Old 'Testament consists of consonants only, for the alphabet of the ancient Hebrews, like that of their Moabite, Aramaean and Phoenician neighbours, contained no vowels; the text of the interpretation consists of vowels and accents only - for vowel signs and accents had been invented by Jewish scholars between the 5th and 9th centuries A.D.; the text of the Old Testament -is complete in itself and intelligible, though ambiguous; but the text of the interpretation read by itself is unintelligible, and only becomes intelligible when read with the consonants (under, over, or in which they are inserted) of the text of the Old Testament.

    0
    0
  • This change consisted in the insertion into the original text of certain consonants which had come to be also used to express vowel sounds: e.g.

    0
    0
  • the Hebrew consonant corresponding to w also expressed the vowel o or u, the consonant h the vowel a, and so forth.

    0
    0
  • For reasons suggested partly by the study of Semitic inscriptions, partly by comparison of passages occurring twice within the Old Testament, and partly by a comparison of the Hebrew text with the Septuagint, it is clear that the authors of the Old Testament (or at least most of them) themselves made some use of these vowel consonants, but that in a great number of cases the vowel consonants that stand in our present text were inserted by transcribers and editors of the texts.

    0
    0
  • Every syllable is open, ending in a vowel sound, and short sentences may be constructed wholly of vocalic sounds.

    0
    0
  • to the internal vowel, a or e in the present tends to become o in the imperative, the e changing to a in the past and future; i and u are less liable to change.

    0
    0
  • The vowel sounds ai, oi, ui have become e, o, u; and a, o, u before the finals d and n are now et, o, ii.

    0
    0
  • Sumerian has a system of vowel harmony strikingly like that seen in all modern agglutinative languages, and it has also vocalic dissimilation similar to that found in modern Finnish and Esthonian.

    0
    0
  • Vocalic harmony is the internal bringing together of vowels of the same class for the sake of greater euphony, while vocalic dissimilation is the deliberate insertion of another class of vowels, in order to prevent the disagreeable monotony arising from too prolonged a vowel harmony.

    0
    0
  • For example, an indeterminative vowel, a, e, i or u, may be prefixed to any root to form an abstract; thus, from me, " speak," we get e-me, " speech"; from ra, " to go," we get a-ra, " the act of going," &c. In connexion with the very complicated Sumerian verbal system 2 it will be sufficient to note here the practice of infixing the verbal object which is, of course, absolutely alien to Semitic. This phenomenon appears also in Basque and in many North American languages.

    0
    0
  • The name Paezigni may belong to the NO-class of Ethnica (see Sabini), but the difference that it has no vowel before the suffix suggests that it may rather be parallel with the suffix of Lat.

    0
    0
  • =1; so conventionally transcribed since it unites two values, being sometimes y but often s (especially at the beginning of words), and from the earliest times used in a manner corresponding to the Arabic hamza, to indicate a prosthetic vowel.

    0
    0
  • Properly triliterals, but, with the 2nd or 3rd radical alike, these coalesced in many forms where no vowel intervened, and gave the word the appearance of a biliteraL

    0
    0
  • The orthography and the quantity of the penultimate vowel of Cenomani have given rise to discussion.

    0
    0
  • In the case of the latter, the survival of the syllable "man" in Le Mans is due to the stress laid on the vowel; had the vowel been short and unaccented, it would have disappeared.

    0
    0
  • Eriu was itself almost certainly a contraction from a still more primitive form Iberiu or Iveriu; for when the name of the island was written in ancient Greek it appeared as Iovcpvia (Ivernia), and in Latin as Iberio, Hiberio or Hibernia, the first syllable of the word Eriu being thus represented in the classical languages by two distinct vowel sounds separated by b or v.

    0
    0
  • In English, moreover, the vowel sounds tend to become diphthongs, so that the symbol for the simple sound tends to become the symbol for that combination which we call a diphthong.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Professor Spiegelberg, 3 writing soon after Professor Breasted, says that investigation has not as yet furnished proof that the Phoenician alphabet is of Egyptian origin, though he admits that in some respects the development of the two alphabets, both without vowel signs, is curiously parallel.

    0
    0
  • the Attic a, which does not represent an IndoEuropean a, but arises by contraction, as in OtXe77-m, or through the lengthening of the vowel sound as the result of the loss of a consonant, as in Eiprt j Avos for FEFpn Avos) the short sound is represented by B; c is found at Corinth in its oldest form, and also as I, while in Thera it is In Thera the w sound of digamma (F) was entirely lost, and therefore is not represented.

    0
    0
  • from Corinth, an ancient inscription written 1 30vvrpoc 66v has recently been discovered, which shows that though Cleonae for B wrote E {, like the Corinthian ?j, and, as at Corinth, wrote for a vowel sound, the vowel thus represented was not short and long e and n) as at Corinth, but Il only, as in Xp g A, (X p i i a 1 Here 'a represents and the spurious diphthong is represented by a, as in (dycv, Doric infinitive -= a form which shows that c has at Cleonae the more modern form I as distinguished from the Corinthian Regarding three other questions controversy still rages.

    0
    0
  • the glide between i and another vowel as in bcch=diya - is never represented, there was no occasion to use the Phoenician Jod in a double function.

    0
    0
  • The Phoenician symbol having been adopted for the vowel sound, whence came the new symbol or [for the digamma?

    0
    0
  • In the Dvenos inscription the perfect of facio is _feted; here it is a reduplicated form with the same vowel as the present.

    0
    0
  • Of the existence of the vowel 0 there is no evidence.

    0
    0
  • But a syllabary where each syllable is made by the combinations of a symbol for a consonant with that for a vowel can furnish no proof of the existence of a syllabary in the strict sense, where each symbol represents a syllable; it is rather evidence against the existence of such writing.

    0
    0
  • This is done by varying the form of the consonant according to the vowel which follows it.

    0
    0
  • The fact that the Phoenician Vau was retained in the Greek alphabets, and the vowel v added, shows that when the alphabet was introduced the sound denoted by was still in full vigour.

    0
    0
  • Otherwise would have been used for the vowel v, just as the Phoenician consonant Yod became the vowel L.

    0
    0
  • It had long been known that the subjunctive in Homer often takes a short vowel (e.g.

    0
    0
  • It will be evident that under this rule the perfect and first aorist subjunctive should always take a short vowel; and this accordingly is the case, with very few exceptions.

    0
    0
  • In classical Latin its use is confined to the cases where, as in English quill, &c., the u is pronounced as w before a following vowel, but in old Latin it is found also in other combinations.

    0
    0
  • In Greek this is common when the combination is followed by the vowel o, as in irW.

    0
    0
  • In other languages, like Oscan and Umbrian which are closely akin to Latin, or the Welsh branch of the Celtic languages, p occurs regularly without regard to the nature of the vowel following.

    0
    0
  • Vowels: a, e, i, o have the same values as in Italian; w as a vowel = north Eng.

    0
    0
  • - (1) Between two vowels, or a vowel and a liquid, the seven consonants p, t, c, b, d, g, in, became respectively b, d, g, f, dd, -, f, where "-" represents the lost voiced spirant y.

    0
    0
  • Thus the second element of a compound word, even though written and accented as a separate word, has a soft initial, because in Brythonic the first element of a compound generally ended in a vowel, as in the name Maglo-cunos.

    0
    0
  • Vowel Changes.-(I) Long a, whether from Aryan a or o or from Latin a, becomes aw in monosyllables, as in brawd, " brother " from *brater; in the penult it is o, as in broder, " brothers," in the ultima aw, later o, as in pechawd, now pechod, from peccatum.

    0
    0
  • A long vowel when unaccented counts short, thus peccatorem treated as *peccatorem, gave pechadur.

    0
    0
  • (3) In the modern language other vowel changes occur by a change of position; thus ai, au, aw in the ultima become ei, eu, o respectively in the penult, as dail, " leaves," deilen, " leaf "; haul, " sun," heulog, " sunny "; brawd, " brother," pl.

    0
    0
  • Accidence.-Welsh has a definite article yr, " the," which becomes r after a vowel, and y before a consonant unless already reduced to r.

    0
    0
  • ffenestri, with any consequent vowel change, as brawd, " brother," pl.

    0
    0
  • He may also be said to be the founder of the fixed-pitch theory of vowel tones, according to which it is asserted that the pitch of a vowel depends on the resonance of the mouth, according to the form of the cavity while singing it, and this independently of the pitch of the note on which the vowel is sung.

    0
    0
  • The predominance of the long vowels is a marked characteristic, the constant appearance of a long final vowel contrasting with the preference for a final short in the later speech.

    0
    0
  • It yielded no materials of value for the emendation of the received text, and by disregarding the vowel points overlooked the one thing in which some result (grammatical if not critical) might have been derived from collation of Massoretic MSS.

    0
    0
  • A similar tone of exaggerated depreciation of the Massoretic Hebrew text, coloured by polemical bias against Protestantism, mars his greatest work, the posthumous Exercitationes biblicae de hebraeici graecique textus sinceritate (1660), in which, following in the footsteps of Cappellus, but with incomparably greater learning, he brings irrefragable arguments against the then current theory of the absolute integrity of the Hebrew text and the antiquity of the vowel points.

    0
    0
  • For the sake of euphony, a vowel is frequently interpolated between two consonants; e.g.

    0
    0
  • The epithet Maleatas, which, as the quantity of the first vowel (a) shows,' cannot mean god of "sheep" or "the apple-tree," is probably a local adjective derived from Malea (perhaps Cape Malea), and may refer to an originally distinct personality, subsequently merged in that of Apollo (see below).

    0
    0
  • (1) By the confusion of original e and o, both long and short, with the original long and short a sound; (2) the short schwa-sound a is represented here, and in this group only, by i (pita, " father," as compared with 1raT;jp, &c.); (3) original s after i, u and some consonants becomes s; (4) the genitive plural of stems ending in a vowel has a suffix-nam borrowed by analogy from the stems ending in -n (Skt.

    0
    0
  • Eirra, "seven"); (4) in Zend there are many vowel changes which it does not share with Old Persian.

    0
    0
  • The Old Slavonic words lyepo, byelo, are pronounced by the Servians of Herzegovina, Bosnia, Montenegro, Dalmatia, Croatia and south-western Servia as leeyepo, beeyelo; by the Servians of Syrmia the same vowel is pronounced sometimes as e (lepo, belo), sometimes as ee (videeti, leteeti); by the Servians of the Morava valley and its accessory Ressava valley, always only as e (lepo, belo, videti, leteti).

    0
    0
  • They are as follows: (a) while the Servians pronounce the Old Slavonic yach as ye or e or ee, the Croats pronounce it always as ee (Servian beeyelo or belo, Croatian beelo); (b) the Servians have the sound gye (softened d or g), the Croats are without it, but have instead ya or ye (Servian gospogya, Croatian gospoya); (c) the Servians let the vowel i transform the preceding consonant into a soft consonant, whereas the Croats pronounce the consonant unaffected by the softening influence of i (Servian bratya, Croatian bratia); (d) the Servians change the letter l at the end of a word into o whereas the Croats always pronounce it as 1.

    0
    0
  • Further, the only post-tonic Latin vowel preserved ~y the Catalan is, as in Gallo-Roman, a: mare gives mar, gratu (s) gives grat, but anima gives arma; and, when the word terminates in a group of consonants requiring a supporting vowel, that vowel is represented by an e:

    0
    0
  • peuple, but Cast, pueblo); sometimes, when it is inserted between the two consonants instead of being made to follow them, the supporting vowel is represented by an o: escdndol (scndalum), frvol (frivolus), circol (circulus).

    0
    0
  • In some cases a post-tonic vowel other than a is preserved in Catalan, as, for example, when that vowel forms a diphthong with the tonic (Deft, D e us; Ebriu, He bred s); or, again, it sometimes happens, when the tonic is followed by an i in hiatus, that the i persists (diliivi, dilfivium; servici, servicium; lbi, lbium; ciri, cereus); but in many cases these ought to be regarded as learned forms, as is shown by the existence of parallel ones, such as servey, where the atonic i has been attracted by the tonic and forms a diphthong with it (servIci, scrvii, serve)?).

    0
    0
  • As for features common to C~talan and Hispanic (Castilian and Portuguese) Romance, on the other hand, and which are unknown to French Romance, only one is of importance; the conservation, namely, of the Latin u with its original sound, while the same vowel has assumed in French and ProvencaI~

    0
    0
  • I tonic long and i short, when in hiatus with another vowel, produce i (amich, a in i c u 1; via, vi a).

    0
    0
  • Just as e before a syllable in ivhich an i occurs is changed into I, so in the same circumstances o becomes u (full, folium;vuil, volio forvoleo)andalsowhentheaccented vowel precedes a group of consonants like ci, p1, and the like (ull, o c 1 u s; escull, Sd 0 p I u s).

    0
    0
  • In the same way the supporting vowel, which is regularly an e in CataIan, is often written a, especially after r (abra, ar bore m; astra, a s t r u m; para, p a t r e in); one may say that in the actual state of the language post-tonic e and a become indistinguishable in a surd sound intermediate between the French a and mute e.

    0
    0
  • ConsonantsFinal I readily disappears after nor 1 (tan, t a n t U In; aman, venin, pantin, for amant, venint, &c.; mai, rn u I t u in; ocul, o.c u 1 t u m); the reappears in composition before a vowel (Jon, assimilation to past participles in it.

    0
    0
  • Final d after a vowel has produced u (pea, p e d e in; niu, n i d u m; mou, to o d u m); buf when the d, in consequence of the disappearance of the preceding vowel, rests upon a consonant, it remains and passes into the corresponding surd; f r I g i d u s gives fred (pronounced fret).

    0
    0
  • The group di, when produced by the disappearance of the intermediate vowel, becomes ur (creure, c red crc; ociure, 0 c c i d e r e; veure, v i d b r e; seure, s e d C r e).

    0
    0
  • Lingual r at the end of a word has a tendency to disappear when preceded by a vowel: thus the infinitives amare,temere, *legire are pronounced amd, tem, ilegi.

    0
    0
  • These nasal vowels enter into combination with a final atonic vowel: irrno (g e r m anu s); also amo (a man t), sermo (sermon em), where the o is a degenerated representative of the Latin final vowel.

    0
    0
  • Old Portuguese the nasal vowel or diphthon~ was not as now marked by the lii (__), but was expressed indifferently and without regard to the etymology by m or n: bern (b e n e), tan (t a n t u m), disserom (dixerunt), sermom (sermonem).

    0
    0
  • With regard to the atonic vowels, there is a tendency to reduce a into a vowel resembling the Fr.

    0
    0
  • Again, Portuguese alone has preserved the pluperfect in its original meaning, so that, for example, amara (a m a v e r a hi) signifies not merely as elsewhere I would love, but also I had Loved, The future perfect, retained as in Castilian, has lost its vowel of inflexion in the 1st and 3rd pers.

    0
    0
  • In many varieties of the Greek alphabet this symbol was used, as it always was in Latin, for the long as well as the short o-sound and also for the long vowel (in the Ionic alphabet written ov) which arose from contraction of two vowels or the loss of a consonant (57jXoUTE=677XOere, o'lxovs = oircovs).

    0
    0
  • The most important feature of this vowel is the rounding of the lips in its production, which, according to its degree, modifies the nature of the vowel considerably, as can be observed in the pronunciation of the increasingly rounded series saw, no, who.

    0
    0
  • Though short o changed in the Latin of the last age of the Roman republic to u in unaccented syllables always (except after u whether vowel or consonant), and sometimes also in accented syllables, this was not equally true of vulgar Latin, as is shown by the Romance languages.

    0
    0
  • The long vowel becomes more rounded as it is being pronounced, so that it ends in a u-sound, though this is not so noticeable in weak syllables like the final syllable of follow.

    0
    0
  • A mid-front-narrow-round vowel is found short in French words like peu, long in jeune and in endings like that of honteuse.

    0
    0
  • The fact that the Arabic name is Ruha supports the hint of the Graeco-Latin forms that there was a vowel between the R and the H.

    0
    0
  • It may have been the impulse given by the final supremacy of the caliphate to the long process which eventually substituted a new branch of Semitic speech for the Aramaic (which had now prevailed for a millennium and a half), that led Jacob to adopt the Greek vowel signs for use in Syriac. A century later Theophilus of Edessa (d.

    0
    0
  • The assessment carried out by experienced listeners consisted in marking the sounds heard on the vowel quadrilateral.

    0
    0
  • A " nonsense syllable " is a syllable formed by placing a vowel between two consonants (e.g.

    0
    0
  • The experiments examined cases where the residue was either a CV syllable with a lax vowel, or a CVC syllable with a schwa.

    0
    0
  • The formant structure of the nasal prototype has little effect on the nasal percept when it is preceded by a vowel.

    0
    0
  • Actually, " w " can represent either a vowel or a consonant in Welsh spelling.

    0
    0
  • Lesson 2 e at the end of a word sometimes makes the preceding vowel ' hard '.

    0
    0
  • In Bengali, however, nasality is initially interpreted as an underlying nasal vowel.

    0
    0
  • To them we must add schwa (right), the weak vowel of a go, b a nan a.

    0
    0
  • David Smith and Roy Patterson An analysis of Peterson and Barney 's vowel formant data to investigate the evidence for scaling in human vowels.

    0
    0
  • W2 to blend to read words containing the same vowel diagraphs and triagraphs.

    0
    0
  • I have n't yet figured the vowel harmony thing.

    0
    0
  • I was taught a chant at the birth group we went to which uses the five vowel sounds: the Mother Sounds of language.

    0
    0
  • Vowel sounds are the direct form of communication a cat may have with its own species.

    0
    0
  • Vowel sounds include some of the most familiar cat sounds such as the meow and its endless variations.

    0
    0
  • You can spin the wheel or buy a vowel with over 2,000 unique Wheel of Fortune puzzles.

    0
    0
  • In Hebrew, a vowel always follows a consonant, unlike English where you can have double consonants or double vowels together in a word.

    0
    0
  • Do Throat Exercises: Try things such as repeating vowel sounds (a, e, i, o, u), moving your jaw back and forth with your mouth open, sliding your tongue backwards starting at behind your front teeth and going backward.

    0
    0
  • Short Vowels-Pick the correct short vowel of a word.

    0
    0
  • Long Vowels-Pick the correct long vowel of a word.

    0
    0
  • As you know, every word in the English language requires at least one vowel.

    0
    0
  • They are not necessarily hard to come by when you replenish your set of seven, but at the same time, you don't want to have a set of tiles in front of you that lacks a vowel.

    0
    0
  • Just like the TV game show, you get to spin the wheel, pick a vowel and attempt to solve the mystery phrase.

    0
    0
  • Starfall is an interactive website that teaches children to learn basic computer controls while learning their ABC's and vowel sounds.

    0
    0
  • Vary this by asking the student to write the consonant or vowel that he hears in each word.

    0
    0
  • The term "hard" pertains to words that have hard consonants and vowel sounds.

    0
    0
  • Listening to and practicing the pronunciation of vowel sounds in particular can make speaking easier, and daily pronunciation practice is recommended.

    0
    0
  • Many websites, such as Jump Gate.com's French Pronunciation include audio clips of vowel sounds, vowel combinations, and lists or words these vowels commonly appear in.

    0
    0
  • Tu is shortened to t' because in French, when two words come together with the first ending in a vowel and the second beginning with a vowel, a contraction is used.

    0
    0
  • For these Syriac has substituted middle or reflexive forms with prefixed eth and a change in the last vowel.

    0
    1
  • Vocalic harmony is the internal bringing together of vowels of the same class for the sake of greater euphony, while vocalic dissimilation is the deliberate insertion of another class of vowels, in order to prevent the disagreeable monotony arising from too prolonged a vowel harmony.

    0
    1
  • =1; so conventionally transcribed since it unites two values, being sometimes y but often s (especially at the beginning of words), and from the earliest times used in a manner corresponding to the Arabic hamza, to indicate a prosthetic vowel.

    0
    1
  • But a syllabary where each syllable is made by the combinations of a symbol for a consonant with that for a vowel can furnish no proof of the existence of a syllabary in the strict sense, where each symbol represents a syllable; it is rather evidence against the existence of such writing.

    0
    1
  • This is done by varying the form of the consonant according to the vowel which follows it.

    0
    1
  • The fact that the Phoenician Vau was retained in the Greek alphabets, and the vowel v added, shows that when the alphabet was introduced the sound denoted by was still in full vigour.

    0
    1
  • Otherwise would have been used for the vowel v, just as the Phoenician consonant Yod became the vowel L.

    0
    1
  • It will be evident that under this rule the perfect and first aorist subjunctive should always take a short vowel; and this accordingly is the case, with very few exceptions.

    0
    1
  • In classical Latin its use is confined to the cases where, as in English quill, &c., the u is pronounced as w before a following vowel, but in old Latin it is found also in other combinations.

    0
    1
  • In Greek this is common when the combination is followed by the vowel o, as in irW.

    0
    1
  • In other languages, like Oscan and Umbrian which are closely akin to Latin, or the Welsh branch of the Celtic languages, p occurs regularly without regard to the nature of the vowel following.

    0
    1
  • Vowels: a, e, i, o have the same values as in Italian; w as a vowel = north Eng.

    0
    1
  • - (1) Between two vowels, or a vowel and a liquid, the seven consonants p, t, c, b, d, g, in, became respectively b, d, g, f, dd, -, f, where "-" represents the lost voiced spirant y.

    0
    1
  • Thus the second element of a compound word, even though written and accented as a separate word, has a soft initial, because in Brythonic the first element of a compound generally ended in a vowel, as in the name Maglo-cunos.

    0
    1
  • Vowel Changes.-(I) Long a, whether from Aryan a or o or from Latin a, becomes aw in monosyllables, as in brawd, " brother " from *brater; in the penult it is o, as in broder, " brothers," in the ultima aw, later o, as in pechawd, now pechod, from peccatum.

    0
    1
  • A long vowel when unaccented counts short, thus peccatorem treated as *peccatorem, gave pechadur.

    0
    1
  • (3) In the modern language other vowel changes occur by a change of position; thus ai, au, aw in the ultima become ei, eu, o respectively in the penult, as dail, " leaves," deilen, " leaf "; haul, " sun," heulog, " sunny "; brawd, " brother," pl.

    0
    1
  • Accidence.-Welsh has a definite article yr, " the," which becomes r after a vowel, and y before a consonant unless already reduced to r.

    0
    1
  • ffenestri, with any consequent vowel change, as brawd, " brother," pl.

    0
    1
  • The pitch of a vowel for a singer depends on the resonance of the mouth which the singer has formed using the cavity of their mouth while they are singing.

    0
    1
  • The predominance of the long vowels is a marked characteristic, the constant appearance of a long final vowel contrasting with the preference for a final short in the later speech.

    0
    1
  • It yielded no materials of value for the emendation of the received text, and by disregarding the vowel points overlooked the one thing in which some result (grammatical if not critical) might have been derived from collation of Massoretic MSS.

    0
    1
  • A similar tone of exaggerated depreciation of the Massoretic Hebrew text, coloured by polemical bias against Protestantism, mars his greatest work, the posthumous Exercitationes biblicae de hebraeici graecique textus sinceritate (1660), in which, following in the footsteps of Cappellus, but with incomparably greater learning, he brings irrefragable arguments against the then current theory of the absolute integrity of the Hebrew text and the antiquity of the vowel points.

    0
    1
  • For the sake of euphony, a vowel is frequently interpolated between two consonants; e.g.

    0
    1
  • (1) By the confusion of original e and o, both long and short, with the original long and short a sound; (2) the short schwa-sound a is represented here, and in this group only, by i (pita, " father," as compared with 1raT;jp, &c.); (3) original s after i, u and some consonants becomes s; (4) the genitive plural of stems ending in a vowel has a suffix-nam borrowed by analogy from the stems ending in -n (Skt.

    0
    1
  • In French, 'n' and 'm' sounds that are attached to a preceding vowel make the vowels into nasal vowels instead of being pronounced the way they are pronounced in English.

    0
    1
  • This would produce the phrase: "Je tu aime," but there is another problem with this phrase, which is that because the pronoun tu ends with a vowel and the verb aimer starts with a vowel, the pronoun tu elides with the verb.

    0
    1
  • Instead, when they appear alone (such as at the beginning of a sentence), they require a holder that the vowel can rest on top of.

    0
    1
  • Eriu was itself almost certainly a contraction from a still more primitive form Iberiu or Iveriu; for when the name of the island was written in ancient Greek it appeared as Iovcpvia (Ivernia), and in Latin as Iberio, Hiberio or Hibernia, the first syllable of the word Eriu being thus represented in the classical languages by two distinct vowel sounds separated by b or v.

    0
    7
Browse other sentences examples →