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votes

votes Sentence Examples

  • It was a fun dinner—he didn't even burn the buns—and he had at least three votes locked in place.

  • It would get you a few votes for sheriff, I bet.

  • "I thought you might be looking for a few votes," said Harold as Charlie slowly folded his newspaper and lifted his coffee cup.

  • Newly crowned heroine Lydia Larkin won the election by eight votes.

  • Though votes were often cast for ten names, there were but two real candidates before the convention, Grant and Blaine.

  • Between the casting of the first and the thirty-third ballot, Garfield, who was the leader of Sherman's adherents in the convention, had sometimes received one or two votes and at other times none.

  • That the charges against Garfield were not generally credited, however, is shown by the fact that he received 214 electoral votes to his opponent's 155.

  • A majority of the members elected to each house may submit the question of calling a convention to the people; and if a majority of the votes cast approve, an election for members of a convention shall be held, and all acts of the convention must be submitted to the people for ratification or rejection.

  • The conseil colonial, besides its advisory functions, discusses and votes the budget, determines the nature of the taxes, has supreme control over the tariffs, and extensive powers in the administration of colonial domains.

  • Under Henry II., being involved in the disgrace of all the servants of Francis I., he was sent to Rome (1547), and he obtained eight votes in the conclave which followed the death of Pope Paul III.

  • The resolutions on questions of marriage and divorce (37-43) reaffirm the traditional attitude of the Church; it is, however, interesting to note that the resolution (40) deprecating the remarriage in church of the innocent party to a divorce was carried only by eighty-seven votes to eighty-four.

  • Then there were the Scottish commissioners who, though without votes, took a leading part in the proceedings.

  • Hayes by a majority of less than 3000 votes; but the Democrats gained a majority in both branches of the state legislature, and Thurman was elected to the United States Senate, where he served from 1869 until 1881 - during the 46th Congress (1879-1881) as president pro tempore.

  • He may only stand for one, and all votes given for him in any other than that specified in the declaration are void.

  • To secure election a candidate must at the first voting poll an absolute majority and a number of votes equal to one-fourth of the number of electors.

  • 2 The province or provinces named are those out of which the de seven years, by a majority of votes, by the Senate and Chamber of Deputies sitting together as the National Assembly.

  • If a state has received an increase in the number of its representatives and its legislature does not pass an apportionment bill before the next congressional election, the votes of the whole state elect the additional members on a general ticket and they are called "congressmen-at-large."

  • The fear was as to whether the statutory number of 80,000 votes necessary for the acceptance of the bill would be reached.

  • Votes for the appropriation of the revenue shall not pass unless recommended by the governor-general.

  • The party is, however, formed on a broader basis than the state parties, the solidarity pledge extends only to votes upon which the fate of a government depends.

  • Two members only, Vargas and del Rio, both Spaniards, had votes.

  • If they are again approved by a majority of each house in the next General Assembly, they are submitted finally to a direct popular vote, a majority of the votes cast being decisive.

  • These votes, however, were cancelled later, on the 26th of July, under the pressure of the royalist city mob which invaded the two Houses; but the two speakers, with eight peers and fifty-seven members of the Commons, themselves joined the army, which now advanced to London, overawing all resistance, escorting the fugitive members in triumph to Westminster on the 6th of August, and obliging the parliament on the 10th to cancel the last votes, with the threat of a regiment of cavalry drawn up by Cromwell in Hyde Park.

  • No candidate can be returned unless he obtains more than half the votes given and more than one-sixth of the total number on the register; otherwise a second ballot must be 1898-1899.19021903.

  • On the 19th Leboeuf handed Venetia over to the Venetian representatives, and at the plebiscite held on the 21st and 22nd, 647,246 votes were returned in favor of union with Italy, only 69 against it.

  • It had been intended tc leave that part of Rome to the pope, but by the earnest desin of the inhabitants it too was included in the Italian kingdom At the plebiscite there were 133,681 votes for union and I 50~ against it.

  • In fact, the conventionf were only voted by a majority of twenty-three votes after the government had undertaken to increase the length of new statebuilt lines from 1500 to 2500 kilometres.

  • These attacks were, however, unavailing to shake Crispis position, and in the general election of May 1895 his government obtained a majority of nearly 200 votes.

  • At Chalcedon, on the other hand, the imperial commissioners decided points of order, kept the synod to the question, took the votes and adjourned the court.

  • But three earls of his own house - Carlisle, Suffolk and Berkshire - and the Lord Howard of Escrick, an ex-trooper of Cromwell's guard and an anabaptist sectary, gave their votes against him, his nephew Mowbray being the only peer of his name in the minority for acquittal.

  • He was minister to Great Britain in1796-1803and again in 1825-1826, and was the Federalist candidate for vicepresident in 1804 and 1808, and for president in 1816, when he received 34 electoral votes to 183 cast for Monroe.

  • He received nine electoral votes for the vice-presidency in 1808, and in 1812 was an elector on the Madison ticket.

  • The president of the senate, Juan Cuestas, in accordance with the constitution, assumed the duties of president of the republic. He arranged that hostilities should cease on the conditions that representation of the Blancos was allowed in Congress for certain districts where their votes were known to predominate; that a certain number of the jefes politicos should be nominated from the Blancos; that free pardon be extended to all who had taken part in the revolt; that a sufficient sum in money be advanced to allow the settlement of the expenses contracted by the insurgents; and that the electoral law be reformed on a basis allowing the people to take part freely in e1ctions.

  • In the college itself the voting - secret and by ballot throughout - is by majority; and since this majority consists, under the actual system, of very conservative elements (the landowners and urban delegates having 8ths of the votes), the progressive elements - however much they might preponderate in the country - would have no chance of representation at all save for the curious provision that one member at least in each government must be chosen from each of the five classes represented in the college.

  • These elect their delegates to the Duma direct, and though their votes are divided into two curias (on the basis of taxable property) in such a way as to give the advantage to wealth, each returning the same number of delegates, the democratic colleges can at least return members of their own complexion.'

  • 6 This was reversed, on the 8th of June, by 238 votes to 191, after a patient exposition by M.

  • On the Congo, if a man commits a murder, the community votes whether he shall die or be expelled; if the latter, a victim is killed, of which all must partake; but this is not, as might be imagined, a case of Robertson Smith's piaculum for the re-establishment of the tribal bond; for the criminal is driven out of the community.

  • Having failed to secure a re-election to the Senate in '887, Harrison was nominated by the Republican party for the presidency in 1888, and defeated Grover Cleveland, the candidate of the Democratic party, receiving 233 electoral votes to Cleveland's 168.

  • He did not like to depend on statesmen's promises, which are proverbially uncertain of fulfilment; he as little liked to retrench; and he was wearied of parliament, where he had never given any but silent votes.

  • His silent votes were all given on that hypothesis.

  • An unusual: provision in the constitution, a result of its adoption in the midst of the Civil War, gives soldiers and sailors in the service of the United States the right to vote; their votes to be applied to the township and county in which they were bona fide residents at the time of enlistment.'

  • It was discovered, however, that no statute had ever been passed to carry this provision into effect, and the votes were rejected.

  • At the election of 1904 an amendment was adopted which provides that whenever 10% of the voters of the state, as shown by the votes of the last preceding election, express a wish that any law or resolution of the legislature shall be submitted to the people, the Act or Resolve shall be voted on at the next election of the state or county officers, and if a majority of the voters approve the measure it shall stand; otherwise, it shall become void.

  • Early in 1864, when it became evident that two more Republican votes might be needed in the United States Senate for reconstruction purposes, party leaders at Washington urged the people of Nevada to adopt a constitution and enter the Union as a patriotic duty, and on the 21st of March 1864 Congress passed an act to enable the people of the Territory to form a state government.

  • The Republicans, however, secured the electoral votes of Nevada in 1872 and in 1876, and in 1878 were again in full control, only to suffer defeat in 1880.

  • At the national election in this year the Silver ticket received in Nevada 7264 votes; the Republican 2811; the Democrat 714; and the Prohibitionist 86.

  • The results vindicated the governor's action; he obtained a majority of 114,000 votes (out of a total of 510,000).

  • At the Republican National Convention in 1920 he received a few votes on all ten ballots for president.

  • At the Republican convention held in Chicago, in June, Mr Taft was nominated on the first ballot, receiving 702 out of 980 votes cast.

  • In the campaign Mr Taft boldly defended his course from the platform, and apparently lost few votes on account of this opposition.

  • At the ensuing election in November, Taft and Sherman received 321 electoral votes against 162 cast for William Jennings Bryan and John W.

  • When peace was concluded fresh elections were held on the new franchise law introduced by the Cabinet, which raised the electorate from 3,000,000 to 8,000,000 votes (Oct.

  • During the sitting of this Assembly it was carried by a majority of seventy-five votes that Henderson should be transferred to Edinburgh.

  • Each county or legislative district casts as many electoral votes as it has members in the state house of representatives, and a majority of both the electoral and the popular vote is required.

  • If no one has such a majority, the house of representatives chooses one of the two who have received the highest number of popular votes; but this is really a provision never executed, as the Democratic nominees are always elected without any serious opposition.

  • Although the state of North Carolina owns 70.3% of the stock (besides this Craven county holds 7.7%; Lenoir, 2.8%; and Pamlico county, 1.13%), the state casts only 35 o votes to the 700 of the private stockholders.

  • Ten years later, however, at the election of assemblymen, 33 of the western counties polled an extra-legal vote on the question of calling a constitutional convention, and 30,000 votes were cast for it to only l000 against it.

  • 25 a favourable to the East, voted strongly for it and carried the election with a total majority in the state of 5856 votes.

  • Violently attacked by the Boulangist organs, L'Intransigeant and La France, he won a suit against them for libel, and in 1889 he contested the 18th arrondissement of Paris with General Boulanger, who obtained a majority of over 2000 votes, but was declared ineligible.

  • His suggestion of a plurality of votes, proportioned to the elector's degree of education, was avowedly put forward only as an ideal; he admitted that no authentic test of education could for the present be found.

  • The bill passed there by 71 votes to 25; and in the Corps Legislatif by 217 to 68.

  • France responded by an overwhelming affirmative, 3,568,885 votes being cast for the proposal and only 8374 against it.

  • In a plebiscite taken on the subject of the imperial title and the law of succession, there were 3,5 72, 3 2 9 affirmative votes and only 2569 negatives.

  • Its incompleteness displeased the liberals; only 1,532,527 votes were given for it in the plebiscite, a total less than half of those of the plebiscites of the Consulate.

  • In 1796, on the refusal of Washington to accept another election, Adams was chosen president, defeating Thomas Jefferson; though Alexander Hamilton and other Federalists had asked that an equal vote should be cast for Adams and Thomas Pinckney, the other Federalist in the contest, partly in order that Jefferson, who was elected vice-president, might be excluded altogether, and partly, it seems, in the hope that Pinckney should in fact receive more votes than Adams, and thus, in accordance with the system then obtaining, be elected president, though he was intended for the second place on the Federalist ticket.

  • Those who received twelve favourable votes became members of the great council.

  • The power as conferred at that time, however, is broader than usual, for it extends not only to items in appropriation bills, but to separate sections in other measures, and, in addition to the customary provision for passing a bill over the governor's veto by a two-thirds vote of each house it is required that the votes for repassage in each house must not be less than those given on the original passage.

  • Victory was with the Democrats in 1848 and 1852, but since the organization of the Republican party in 1854 the state has uniformly given to the Republican presidential candidates its electoral votes.

  • The people met, not as usual in the Pnyx, but in the Agora, in the presence of the Archons, and recorded their votes by placing in urns small fragments of pottery (which in the ancient world served the purpose of waste-paper) (ostraca) on which they wrote the name of the person whom they wished to banish.

  • As in the case of other privilegia, ostracism did not take effect unless six thousand votes in all were recorded.

  • The view maintained in the text as to the number of votes necessary is supported by Duruy (H.

  • But the average of two presi dential votes was 85.37%; and the maxima, minima and means for mayors and governors were respectively 83.86, 74.99, 78.36 and 8 4.73, 61.7 8, 75.7 2.

  • Thus their influence at Delphi was restricted to the possession of two votes in the Amphictyonic Council.

  • Under the dominion of the Roman republic its national league was dissolved, but was revived by Augustus, who also restored to Phocis the votes in the Delphic Amphictyony which it had lost in 346 and enrolled it in the new Achaean synod.

  • signed the famous decree of Kuttenberg, by which the Bohemian nation was given three votes in the elections to the faculty of Prague University as against one for the three other "nations."

  • On the first ballot he received 651 votes (493 being necessary for choice), 39 of these being from his own state.

  • On the eighth ballot he received 1331 votes, on the ninth 3742 votes, and on the tenth he secured the nomination with 6922 votes, the result being due largely to the support of certain influential U.S. Senators, delegates to the convention, who hoped that as president he would be amenable to the Senate.

  • The Canvassing Board, which published the election returns, cast out some votes, did not wait for the returns from Dade county, and declared the Republican ticket elected.

  • In 1793 he was chosen United States senator from Pennsylvania by the votes of both political parties.

  • In September 1831 the party at a national convention in Baltimore nominated as its candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency William Wirt of Maryland and Amos Ellmaker (1787-1851) of Pennsylvania; and in the election of the following year it secured the seven electoral votes of the state of Vermont.

  • Both in 1876 and 1884, after his failure to receive the nomination for the presidency, he was nominated by the Democratic National Convention for vice-president, his nomination in each of these conventions being made partly, it seems, with the hope of gaining "greenback" votes - Hendricks had opposed the immediate resumption of specie payments.

  • the three likely candidates for the Holy See were Cardinals Borgia, Ascanio Sforza and Giuliano della Rovere; at no previous or subsequent election were such immense sums of money spent on bribery, and Borgia by his great wealth succeeded in buying the largest number of votes, including that of Sforza, and to his intense joy he was elected on the Loth of August 1492, assuming the name of Alexander VI.

  • Brisson, who had had a majority of votes on the first ballot, but had failed to obtain an absolute majority.

  • died (7th February 1878) Cardinal Pecci was elected pope at the subsequent conclave with comparative unanimity, obtaining at the third scrutiny (loth February) forty-four out of sixty-one votes, or more than the requisite two-thirds majority.

  • Opinion had been prejudiced by the insurrections in St Domingo and Martinique, and in the British island of Dominica; and the motion was defeated by 163 votes against 88.

  • The constitution of 1812 allowed the General Assembly to name the governor from the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes; gave the governor large powers of appointment, even of local functionaries; and required a property qualification for various offices, and even for voters.

  • But in 1864 the opposition of Congress to presidential reconstruction had clearly developed, so that the electoral votes of Louisiana (like those of Tennessee) for president were not counted.

  • It will be seen that the net result of Lassalle's life was to produce a European scandal, and to originate a socialistic movement in Germany, which, at the election of 1903, returned to the Reichstag eighty-one members and polled 3,010,771 votes, and at the election of 1907 returned forty-three members and polled 3,258,968 votes.

  • The assessors vote equally with the judges, and three votes decide the verdict.

  • For all these reasons it is difficult to find out the number of deputies .,present at any given date, for votes by roll-call were rare.

  • In the election he received 189 electoral votes, while Jackson received 219 for President.

  • In the election Van Buren received 170 electoral votes against 73 for William Henry Harrison, his principal opponent; but the popular vote showed a plurality of less than 25,000 in a total vote of about 1,500,000.

  • In the Democratic convention, though he had a majority of the votes, he did not have the twothirds which the rule of the convention required, and after eight ballots his name was withdrawn.

  • The Democratic party was even more radically divided on the question of monetary policy than the Republican; and President Cleveland, by securing the repeal of the silver purchase clause in the Sherman Act by Republican votes, had alienated a great majority of his party.

  • In the election, however, he was defeated by William McKinley, the Republican candidate, receiving 176 electoral votes to 271.

  • In the November election after a canvass that almost equalled in activity that of 1896 he was again defeated, receiving only 155 electoral votes to 292.

  • After a heated contest Mr Bryan again suffered a decisive defeat, President Taft securing 321 electoral votes to Mr Bryan's 162.

  • The earlier centuries were called sex suiragia (" the six votes"); and at first consisted exclusively of patricians, while those of Servius Tullius were entirely or far the most part plebeian.

  • If the votes are equally divided the selection of the chief arbitrator is to be entrusted to a third power to be named by the parties.

  • A referendum act was passed in April 1909, and in June following the electors by 11,121 votes to 3701 decided to join the Union.

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