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voters

voters Sentence Examples

  • The character of the voters is not staked.

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  • It's a pain that I have to ask the voters for it, but I draw the line at the water fight.

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  • On the other hand, a two-thirds majority of each house of the legislature may submit an amendment or amendments to popular vote at the next general election, when the approval of a majority of the qualified voters is necessary for ratification.

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  • In that year the number of municipal voters was 23,338.

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  • On the other hand, a two-thirds majority of each house of the legislature may submit an amendment or amendments to popular vote at the next general election, when the approval of a majority of the qualified voters is necessary for ratification.

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  • A residence in the state of six months and in the district or county of thirty days preceding the election is required of all voters.

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  • For each township there is a justice of the peace, chosen biennially by its voters.

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  • The new constitution was promulgated on the 15th of December 1799 and in a plebiscite held during January 1800 it received the support of 3,011,007 voters, only 1562 persons voting against it.

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  • In 1908 a direct primary law was passed providing for party primaries, those of all parties in each district to be held at the same time (annually) and place, before the same election board, and at public expense, to nominate candidates for township and municipal offices and members of the school board; nominations to be by petition signed by at least 2% of the party voters of the political division, except that for United States senators a of 1% is the minimum.

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  • Excellent political training such a government unquestionably offered; but it became unworkable as disparities of social condition increased, as the number of legal voters (above 7000 in 1822) became greater, and as the population ceased to be homogeneous in blood.

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  • It provided for municipal elections in January; for the election of a mayor for four years; for his recall at the end of two years if a majority of the registered voters so vote in the state election in November in the second year of his term; for the summary removal for cause by the mayor of any department head or other of his appointees; for a city council of one chamber of nine members, elected at large each for three years; for nomination by petition; for a permanent finance commission appointed by the governor; for the confirmation of the mayor's appointments by the state civil service commission; for the mayor's preparation of the annual budget (in which items may be reduced but not increased by the council), and for his absolute veto of appropriations except for school use.

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  • On 21 referenda, io being questions of license, the ratio of actual to registered voters ranged on the latter from 57.00 to 75.38% (mean 67.15), and on other referenda from 75.6 3 t o 33.4 0 (mean 61.39), - the mean for all, 64.18.

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  • The constitution of 1812 allowed the General Assembly to name the governor from the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes; gave the governor large powers of appointment, even of local functionaries; and required a property qualification for various offices, and even for voters.

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  • before the adoption of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution); also the sons or grandsons of such voters, not under 21 years of age, on the 12th of May 1898; and males of foreign birth who have resided in the state for five years next preceding the date of application for registration and who were naturalized prior to 1898.

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  • A general primary election law for the selection, by the voters, of candidates for state office came into effect in 1906.

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  • These four groups, however, were of unequal importance, and thanks to this arrangement the English, although weakest in point of numbers, were able to exercise the same influence in the council as if they had formed a fourth of the voters.

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  • These parsissoks, elected at the rate of about one representative to 120 voters, wear a cap with a badge (a bear rampant), and aid the European members of the council in distributing the surplus profit apportioned to each district, and generally in advising as, to the welfare of that part of Greenland under their partial control.

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  • Expenditures from the fund known as " The Internal Improvement Land Fund," derived from the sale of state lands, can be made only after the enactment for that purpose has been approved by the voters of the state; in 1881 the legislature, and in 1884 the popular vote, pledged the proceeds of this fund to the payment of Minnesota state railway adjustment bonds.

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  • The sale of intoxicating liquors is for the most part regulated by licences, but the granting of licences may be prohibited within any town or incorporated village by its legal voters, and the question must be submitted to popular vote upon the request of ten legal voters.

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  • The Indians whose names were " rightly contained " in the voters' rolls at the date of the act retain the franchise.

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  • entrusted the management of affairs purely provincial consists of 25 members, elected by the parliamentary voters and each representing a separate constituency.

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  • On the dissolution which followed Lord Palmerston's defeat, Cobden became candidate for Huddersfield, but the voters of that town gave the preference to his opponent, who had supported the Russian War and approved of the proceedings at Canton.

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  • Voters are registered biennially, and every five years there is an automatic redistribution of seats on a voters' basis.

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  • The semi-military organization of these divisions, which existed under the South African republic, has been abolished, and field-cornets, who are nominated by the provincial government, are purely civil officials charged with the registration of voters, births and deaths, the maintenance of public roads, &c. The chief local authorities are the municipal bodies, many " municipalities " being rural areas centred round a small town.

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  • The parliamentary voters in 1910 numbered 1442.

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  • It is true that he was sometimes forced by conviction or fate or political necessity to be a revolutionist on a large scale; to destroy an established Church; to add two millions of voters to the electorate; to attack the parliamentary union of the kingdoms. But these changes were, in their inception, distasteful to their author.

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  • A powerful section contended that the basis should be the body of legal voters, on the ground that the South could not then secure an increment of political powet on account of the emancipated blacks unless these blacks were admitted to political rights.

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  • Blaine, on the other hand, contended that representation should be based on population instead of voters, as being fairer to the North, where the ratio of voters varied widely, and he insisted that it should be safeguarded by security for impartial suffrage.

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  • After petition signed by a number of voters not less than 25% of the number voting at the preceding municipal election, any member of the council may be removed by popular vote, to which all public franchises must be submitted, and by which the council may be compelled to pass any law or ordinance.

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  • The last of these provides that 25% of the voters choosing a municipal officer may, by signing a petition for his recall, force a new election during his term of office and thereby remove him if another candidate receives a greater number of votes.

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  • Real toleration in public opinion grew slowly through the 18th century, removing the religious tests of voters; and a constitutional amendment in 1821 explicitly forbade such tests in the case of office-holders.

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  • In the presidential election of 1896, when an unprecedentedly large vote was cast, the number of voters registered was nearly 20% of the population, and of these nearly 82% actually voted.

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  • The town hall is not large enough for an assemblage of all the voters, but actually the attendance is usually limited to about Zoo, and since 1901 there has been in force a kind of referendum, under which any measure passed by a town-meeting attended by 700 or more voters may be referred, upon petition of loo legal voters, to a regular vote at the polls.

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  • The charter gave the company control over the admission of " freemen " (co-partners in the enterprise, and voters), " full and absolute power and authority to correct, punish and rule " subjects settling in the territory comprised in their grant, and power to " resist.

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  • In 1832 there were ten resident legal voters within the borough and nine out-voters.

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  • The city government had been characterized by extravagance and maladministration, and a revolt of the independent voters at the polls overcame the usual Republican majority and Cleveland was elected.

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  • The second constitution, however, imposed a property qualification on coloured voters amounting to a freehold estate worth $250, and this restriction was not removed until 1874.

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  • Conviction for bribery or of an infamous crime disqualifies, and personal identification of voters is required in New York City.

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  • Stevens, of the United States Army, took charge on the 29th of September 1853, and a census indicated a population of 3965, of whom 1682 were voters.

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  • There is a biennial registration of voters, and every five years the electoral areas are to be redivided, with the object of giving to each constituency an approximately equal number of voters.

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  • The qualifications for membership of the assembly are the same as those for voters.

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  • The provincial council consists of 25 members (each representing a separate constituency) elected by the parliamentary voters and has a statutory existence of three years.

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  • 5, sec. i of the state constitution, authorized the initiative and referendum, but twofifths of the entire number of counties must each furnish for initiative petitions signatures amounting in number to 8% of the whole number of votes cast for governor at the election last preceding the filing of the petition; for referendum petitions two-fifths of the counties must each furnish as signers 5% of the legal voters; and any measure referred to the people shall be in full force unless the petition for the referendum be signed by 15% of the legal voters (whose number is that of the total votes cast for governor, &c., as above) of a majority of the whole number of counties, but that in such case the law to be referred shall be inoperative until it is passed at the popular election.

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  • only to reckon with the opposition of Hungary but also to pay particular attention to the peasant voters, in the question of buying meat abroad and importing frozen meat from the Argentine.

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  • Under a constitutional amendment, adopted by popular vote on the 8th of November 1898, 5% of the legal voters of the state may require the legislature to submit to popular vote at the next general election measures which they wish enacted into law, or measures already passed by the legislature which have not 'yet gone into force.

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  • The state is divided into five districts and one judge is chosen from each district, although the election is made by the voters of the state at large.

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  • The state is divided into ten circuits, and one judge is elected by the voters of each circuit for a period of four years.

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  • A village district is a portion of a town, including a village, which is set apart and organized for protection from fire, for lighting or sprinkling the streets, for providing a water-supply, for the construction and maintenance of sewers, and for police protection; to serve these interests three commissioners, a moderator, a clerk, a treasurer and such other officers as the voters of the district may deem necessary are chosen, each for a term of one year.

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  • Evening schools for the instruction of persons over fourteen years of age must be established in any city or town of more than 5000 inhabitants if 5% of its legal voters petition for them.

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  • They can have exercised their public rights but seldom, owing to their distance from Rome; but the consulships of C. Marius, a municeps of Arpinum (between 107 and 100 B.C.), and the strength of the support given to Tiberius Gracchus in the assembly by the voters from Italian towns (133 B.C.) show what an important influence the members of these municipia could occasionally exercise over Roman politics.

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  • Each has its own documentary constitution; its legislature of two elective houses; its executive, consisting of a governor and other officials; its judiciary, whose decisions are final, except in cases involving Federal law; its system of local government and local taxation; its revenue, system of taxation, and debts; its body of private civil and criminal law and procedure; its rules of citizenship, which may admit persons to be voters in state and national elections under conditions differing from those prevailing in other states.

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  • Some states have recently allowed a prescribed number of voters to propose, by what is called the Initiative, amendments which are submitted to the vote of all the citizens without the intervention of the legislature.

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  • Local judges are generally chosen by the voters of the district in which they hold court.

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  • Each town is governed by the town meeting, an assembly of all the qualified voters within the limits, which meets at least once a year in the spring, and also at other times when specially summoned.

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  • As a rule, one finds (I) a mayor, elected directly by the voters within the city, who is the head of the administration; (2) adminis- trative officers or boards, some directly elected by the city voters, others nominated by the mayor or chosen by the council; (3) a council or assembly, consisting sometimes of two, but more frequently of one chamber, elected directly by the city voters; and (4) judges, usually elected by the city voters, but sometimes appointed by the state.

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  • Several state InWailve, constitutions now contain provisions enabling a Referendum prescribed number (or proportion) of the voters in and Recall.

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  • a state or city to submit a proposition to all the registered voters of the state (or city) for their approval.

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  • These constitutions also allow a prescribed number of voters to demand that a law passed by the state legislature, or an ordinance passed by the municipal authority, be submitted to all the voters for their approval.

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  • Some cities also provide in their charters that an official, including the mayor or a member of the council, may be displaced from office if, at a special election held on the demand of a prescribed number of the city voters, he does not receive the largest number of votes cast.

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  • The ordinary duties of these committees are to raise and spend money for electioneering and otherwise in the interests of the party, to organize meetings, to look after the press, to attend to the admission of immigrants or new-comers as voters; and generally to attract and enrol recruits in the party forces.

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  • At election times they also direct and superintend the work of bringing up voters to the polls and of watching the taking and counting of the votes; but in this work they are often aided or superseded by specially appointed temporary bodies called campaign committees, These party committees are permanent, and though the membership is renewed every year, the same men usually continue to serve.

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  • In the larger election areas, such as a county or city, the number of voters who would be entitled to be present renders it impossible to admit all, so the nominating meetings in these areas are composed of delegates elected in the various primaries included in the area, and the meeting is called a nominating convention.

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  • This is the rule, but in some parts of the South and West nominations for members of the state legislature and county officials, and even for members of Congress, are made by primary assemblies meeting over the entire area, which all the party voters are entitled to attend.

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  • In rural districts little difficulty arises, because it is known what citizens belong to each party; but in cities, and especially in large cities, where men do not know their neighbors by sight, it becomes necessary to have regular lists of the party voters entitled to attend a primary; and these lists are either prepared and kept by the local party committee, or are settled by the votes of the persons previously on the party rolls.

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  • Accordingly, those who control the local organizations usually take pains to keep on the lists all the voters whom they can trust, and are apt to keep off those whom they think likely to show a dangerous independence.

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  • As the desire to dominate primaries was found to lead to many abuses, both in the way of manipulating the lists of party voters and in the unfair management of the primary meetings themselves, a movement was started for reforming the system, which, beginning soon after 1890, gathered so much support that now in the large majority of the states laws have been enacted for regulating the proceedings at primary nomination meetings.

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  • These laws vary greatly in their details from state to state, but they all aim at enabling the voters to exercise a free and unfettered voice in the selection of their candidates, and they have created a regular system of elections of candidates preliminary to the election of office-holders from among the candidates.

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  • The Reconstruction Acts of Congress required every new constitution to be ratified by a majority of the legal voters of the state.

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  • After the 1st of January 1915 no one may qualify as a voter under the first or second of these clauses (the " grandfather " and " understanding " clauses); but those who shall have registered under their requirements before the 1st of January 1915 thus become voters for life.

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  • The constitution, as amended in 1905, provides that elections on the question ‘ of local school taxes for counties or for school districts may be called upon a petition signed by one-fourth of the qualified voters of the county, or district, in question; under this provision several counties and a large number of school districts are supplementing the general fund.

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  • This latter qualification has been introduced into several of the Southern states, partly at least to disqualify the ignorant coloured voters.

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  • As a general rule, but subject to exceptions, the national elections call out the largest number, the state elections next, and the local elections the smallest number of voters.

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  • In an exciting national election between 80 and 90% of the qualified voters actually vote, a proportion considerably greater than in Great Britain or Germany.

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  • (3) Educational or other such test, more particularly in the Southern states, the object of which is to exclude the coloured, and especially the ignorant coloured, voters from the polls.

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  • The act of 1900 provides for the election of a delegate to Congress, and prescribes that the delegate shall have the qualifications necessary for membership in the Hawaiian Senate, and shall be elected by voters qualified to vote for members of the House of Representatives of Hawaii.

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  • The supreme court consists of seven judges elected by the voters of the state at large.

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  • the plan which provided that these states might be reorganized by as many as io% of the number of voters in 1860 who should ask for pardon and take the oath of allegiance to the United States), but he also refused to accept the Wade-Davis Bill as being far too moderate in character.

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  • They are elected for six years (one-third of the council retiring every two years) by the same voters as for the provincial states.

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  • This may be judged from the fact that in the year named there were only 137,772 voters out of a population of 6z millions.

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  • In 1904 there were 1,581,649 voters, possessing 2,467,966 votes.

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  • The number of seats to be filled is divided by the number of parties or candidates, and then they are distributed in the proportion of the total followers or voters of each.

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  • In 1902 there were 1,146,482 voters with 2,007,704 votes, the principles of multiple votes, with, however, a maximum of four votes and proportional representation, being in force for communal as for legislative elections.

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  • Both cham bers were elected by the same voters, but senators required a property qualification, - the payment of at least 2000 florins in taxes.

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  • But this personal rebuff could not alter the fact that in the country his was the name which was on the lips of the voters at the election.

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  • Thus beside many Latin programmata later than those just mentioned we have similar inscriptions in Oscan, addressed to Oscan-speaking voters, where Illlner.

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  • The charter provides for a referendum vote on franchises, which may be ordered by the council or by petition of the people, the signatures of 20% of the registered voters being sufficient to force such election.

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  • Of these deputies one-half are elected in the same way as members of the Folkething, without any property qualification for the voters; the other half of the deputy electors are chosen in the towns by those who during the last preceding year were assessed on a certain minimum of income, or paid at least a certain amount in rates and taxes.

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  • Conviction for bribery, perjury or other infamous crime, or failure (in the case of a collector or holder of public moneys) to account for and pay over all moneys due from him are disqualifications; and before entering upon the duties of his office each member of the legislature must take a prescribed oath that he has neither given nor promised anything to influence voters at the election, and that he will not accept, directly or indirectly, "money or other valuable thing from any corporation, company or person" for his vote or influence upon proposed legislation.

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  • A law of 1901 provided for a system of initiative whereby any question of public policy might be submitted to popular vote upon the signature of a written petition therefor by onetenth of the registered voters of the state; such a petition must be filed at least 60 days before the election day when it is to be voted upon, and not more than three questions by initiative may be voted on at the same election; to become operative a measure must receive a majority of all votes cast in the election.

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  • Under this act, in 1902, there was a favourable vote (451,319 to 76,975) for the adoption of measures requisite to securing the election of United States senators by popular and direct vote, and in 1903 the legislature of the state (which in 1891 had asked Congress to submit such an amendment) adopted a joint resolution asking Congress to call a convention to propose such an amendment to the Federal Constitution; in 1904 there was a majority of all the votes cast in the election for an amendment to the primary laws providing that voters may vote at state primaries under the Australian ballot.

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  • by appealing to the reason of voters; that by education their ignorance can be eliminated; that human nature is indefinitely perfectible; that majorities rule, therefore, not only by virtue of force (which was Locke's ultimate justification of them), but of right.

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  • The great mass of voters felt the issue as Jackson's managers stated it.

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  • A registration of voters, predominantly whites, was at once carried through, and delegates were chosen for another constitutional convention, which met at Little Rock in January 1868.

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  • Whenever Ion freeholders request it, the county commissioners must submit to the voters of a proposed high school district the question of establishing a high school district, and each precinct giving a majority vote for it constitutes a part of such a district for establishing and maintaining a high school.

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  • A bill to organize the Territory of Wyoming had been introduced into Congress in 1865, and in 1867 the voters of Laramie county had chosen a delegate to Congress.

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  • The legislature would be all-powerful, and yet representation was so distributed that about one-third of the voters living in the tide-water region would return nearly two-thirds of the members of the legislature.

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  • Under the short-lived Second Republic (1848-52) the position of the Church grew even stronger, for the introduction of universal suffrage brought to the polls great masses of new voters strongly clerical in sympathies.

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  • A declared intention to become a United States citizen ceased in 1902 to be sufficient qualification for voters, full citizenship (with residence qualifications) being made requisite.

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  • A majority of the voters approved of Jackson's fight against what Clay had once denounced as a dangerous and unconstitutional monopoly.

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  • The great majority of the voters, however, required no pressure to decide who was in their opinion the man most fitted to administer the affairs of the republic. For the first time in the history of Chile a perfectly free election was held, and Admiral Montt was duly chosen by a nearly unanimous vote to be chief magistrate for the constitutional term of five years.

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  • A large majority of the English members, 265 out of 400, were to be elected by the counties, where voters must possess land or personal property of the value of £ 200, while in the boroughs the franchise remained unaltered.

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  • The House of Assembly consists (as originally constituted) of 121 members, elected by single-membered constituencies, each constituency containing as nearly as possible the same number of voters.

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  • Members of the House of Assembly must, like senators, be British subjects of European descent, they must be qualified to be registered as voters and have lived for five years within the Union.

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  • The qualifications of parliamentary voters are those which existed in the several colonies at the establishment of the Union, save that " no member of His Majesty's regular forces on full pay " can be registered as a voter.

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  • As the franchise laws in the several colonies differed the qualifications of voters in the provinces differ also.

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  • Seats were to be allotted on a voters' (not population) basis, and there was to be an automatic redistribution of seats as voters increased or decreased " in given localities.

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  • To this the Progressive party would not agree, and they gained support from Botha, Smuts and other prominent Dutch delegates for their contention that " equal rights " could only be secured by making the basis of representation the number of voters as distinct from the number of European inhabitants of any given area.

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  • Among the other decisions of the convention were: the choice of Pretoria as the seat of administration anti of Cape Town as the seat of the legislature, the renaming the Orange River Colony, Orange Free State Province; the provision of three membered constituencies and of proportional representation and the safe-guarding of the smaller communities by giving Natal and the Orange River colonies more members of parliament than they were entitled to on the voters basis.

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  • The inclusion in the charter of the principle of the " initiative and referendum " enables a percentage of the voters to compel the submission of measures to public approval.

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  • largely to his clear, if non-committal, political record, rendered him the most " available " candidate for the Whig party for the campaign of 1840, and he was nominated by the Whig convention at Harrisburg, Pa., in December 1839, his most formidable opponent being Henry Clay, who, though generally regarded as the real leader of his party, was less " available " because as a mason he would alienate former members of the old Anti-Masonic party, and as an advocate of a protective tariff would repel many Southern voters.

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  • By determining to admit no new freemen the voters became reduced to between 30 and 60.

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  • Amendments to the constitution must first be passed by the legislature at two consecutive sessions (receiving a majority' vote of all members elected to each house), and then be ratified by the voters at a special election, and no amendment or amendments may be submitted by the legislature to the people oftener than once in five years.

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  • In 1903 a law (revised in 1908) was passed providing for the conduct at public cost of primary elections for the nomination of nearly all elective officers, and for the nomination of delegates to party nominating conventions; nominations for primary elections are made by petitions signed by at least ten voters (except in very small election districts) who make affidavit as to their party affiliations; the nominee thus indorsed must file a letter of acceptance.

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  • 1874), then a Republican member of the Assembly and in1906-1908a state senator, began in 1904; it did much to secure the passage of acts limiting public service franchises to 20 years (unless extended to 40 years by the voters of the municipality concerned), the increase of taxes on railways, the increase of franchise tax rates by 12% each year up to 5%, the adoption of direct primary elections, and the modification of the existing promoters' liability law.

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  • The lists are conclusive of the right to vote at an election, although on election petition involving a scrutiny the vote of a person disqualified by law may be struck off, notwithstanding the inclusion of his name in a list of voters.

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  • Any bill proposed in the legislature or passed by it must be referred to popular vote before becoming law, if there is a referendum petition therefor signed by 10,000 voters; and a petition signed by 12,000 voters initiates new legislation.

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  • An act for restricting the sale of such liquors was passed in 1846; the first prohibitory act was passed, largely through the influence of Neal Dow, in 1851; this was frequently amended; and in 1884 an amendment 1 An unincorporated township containing less than 200 inhabitants may, on the application of three resident voters, be organized as a plantation, but does not pay state or county taxes unless by special legislative order.

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  • By an amendment of 1900, the legislature was instructed to provide that a fixed fraction of the voters might cause any law to be submitted to the people, or that they might require any legislative act (except one passed by a two-thirds vote of each house) to be so submitted before going into effect, but up to 1910 no law had been passed putting the amendment into force.

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  • Initiative petitions, signed by at least 8% of the legal voters in each two-thirds (at least) of the congressional districts of the state, must be filed not later than four months before the election at which the measure is to be voted upon.

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  • The referendum may be ordered by the legislature or by a petition signed by at least 5% of the legal voters in each of two-thirds (at least) of the congressional districts of the state; such petition must be filed not more than 90 days after the final adjournment of the legislature; referred measures become law upon receiving a favourable majority of the popular vote.

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  • The convention of 1861, by maintaining continuous government, had saved the state from anarchy and from reconstruction by the national power; but an ironclad test oath (it required denial of forty-five distinct offences) was provided, to be taken by all voters, state, county and municipal officers, lawyers, jurors, teachers and clergymen.

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  • The qualifications of voters for the election of members of the House of Assembly are the same as those existing in Cape Colony at the establishment of the Union, and are as follows: Voters must be born or naturalized British subjects residing in the Cape province at least twelve months, must be males aged 21 (no distinction being made as to race or colour), must be in possession of property worth X75, or in receipt of salary or wages of not less than L50 a year.

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  • The qualifications of voters for the council are the same as for the House of Assembly.

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  • All voters, European and non-European, are eligible for seats on the council, but any councillor who becomes a member of parliament thereupon ceases to be a member of the provincial council.

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  • Members of the councils must be registered voters and owners of immovable property in the division valued at not less than £500.

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  • It was fought on a register purged of the rebel voters, many of whom, besides being disfranchised, were in prison.

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  • The issue was doubtful, and each side sought to secure the support of the native voters, who in several constituencies held the balance of power.

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  • In fact, the bill was called for by the glaring anomalies in the distribution of seats by which a minority of voters in the country districts returned a majority of members, and it left the towns still inadequately represented.

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  • (The registration of 1905 showed that there were over 23,000 coloured voters in the colony.) The commission proposed separate voting by natives only for a fixed number of members of the legislature - the plan adopted in New Zealand with the Maori voters.

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  • Until 1902 the legislature was the sole law-making body in the state, but on the 2nd of June of this year the voters adopted a constitutional amendment which declared that "the people reserve to themselves power to propose laws and amendments to the constitution, and to enact or reject the same at the polls, independent of the legislative assembly, and also reserve power at their own option to approve or reject at the polls any act of the legislative assembly."

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  • Eight per cent of the number of voters who at the last preceding election voted for a justice of the supreme court, by filing with the secretary of state a petition for the enactment of any law or constitutional amendment - the petition must contain the full text of the law and must be filed at least four months before the election at which it is to be voted upon - may secure a vote on the proposed measure at the next general election, and if it receives the approval of the voters it becomes a law without interposition of the legislature, and goes into effect from the day of the governor's proclamation announcing the result of the election.

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  • A referendum of legislative enactments may be ordered in two ways: the legislature itself may refer any of its acts to the people for approval or rejection at the next regular election, in which case the act may not be vetoed by the governor and does not go into effect until approved at the polls; or 5% of the number of voters at the last election for a supreme court justice may by petition order any act, except such as are "necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health or safety," to be referred to the voters for their approval or rejection.

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  • This "text-book" for the voters contained 60 pages in 1906 and 126 pages in 1908.

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    0
  • The measures to be voted on consisted of eleven laws or constitutional amendments proposed by initiative petition, four constitutional amendments referred to the people by the legislature, and four laws upon which the voters had ordered a referendum.

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  • representation for each political party in proportion to its numerical strength, by providing for first and second choice in voting - the system of preferential voting adopted in Idaho in 1909; and the "recall," by which the voters may remove from office after six months' service by a special election any local official.4 Judiciary.

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  • The initiative and the referendum are employed in municipal ordinances as well as in state laws; towns and cities make their own provisions as to "the manner of exercising the initiative and referendum powers as to their own municipal legislation"; but "not more than 10% of the legal voters may be required to order the referendum nor more than 15% to propose any measure by the initiative, in any city or town."

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  • Until 1908 the state had a prohibition law " by remonstrance," under which if a majority of the legal voters of a township or city ward remonstrated against the granting of licences for the sale of liquor, no licence could be granted by the county commissioners in that township or ward.

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  • The county voters were the freeholders; but in the towns, with some important exceptions, the electors were the richer inhabitants who formed the corporations of the boroughs, or a body of select householders more or less under the control of some neighboring landowner.

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    0
  • The merchant needed protection for his trade; the voters gladly welcomed election days as bringing guineas to their pockets.

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  • The judicial power of the state is vested: in a supreme court' of seven members (salary $6000 a year; elected for a term of ten years; the senior justice is chief justice) with appellate jurisdiction throughout the state, general superintendence over all inferior courts, power to issue, hear and determine writs of habeas corpus, mandamus, injunction, quo warranto, certiorari and other original and remedial writs; nineteen (only five under the constitution of 1848) circuit courts, of one judge each except in the second circuit (including Milwaukee) in which there are four judges, elected (at a spring election, and not at the general state election) by the voters of the circuit district; probate judges, one elected (for two years) in each county, except where the legislature confers probate powers on inferior courts; and in towns, cities and villages, justices of the peace, elected for two years.

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    0
  • An act of 1909 provides for the adoption of government by commission in any city of the second, third or fourth class which votes for this form of government at an election called by a petition signed by 25% of the voters at the preceding election for mayor.

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    0
  • As a result of the failure of "wildcat" banks during the Territorial period, a clause was inserted in the state constitution forbidding the legislature to charter a bank or pass a general banking law until the people had voted in favour of banks, and providing further that no bank charter or general banking law should be of any force until a majority of the voters at a general election had approved of it.

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  • Their ideal in fact was a combination of a king who frankly accepted the results of the Revolution, and who governed in a liberal spirit, with the advice of a chamber elected by a very limited constituency, in which men of property and education formed, if not the whole, at least the very great majority of the voters.

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  • The elections to the Convention were by almost universal suffrage, but indifference or intimidation reduced the voters to a The small number.

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  • The constitution reserves to the people the privilege of rejecting any act or any item of any act whenever 5% of the legal voters ask that the matter be voted upon at a general election; and the people may initiate legislation by a petition signed by 8% of the electorate.

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  • Cities or towns having a population of 2000 or more may become cities of the first class whenever a favourable majority vote is obtained at a general or special election held in that city or town, and this question must be submitted at such an election whenever 35% of the legal voters petition for it.

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  • The proposals of Sulpicius became law, and, with the assistance of the new voters, the command was bestowed upon Marius, then a mere privatus.

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    0
  • In Ireland there had been 66 elections contested, and out of 451,000 voters 93,000 were illiterates.

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  • In February 1902 Lord Rosebery definitely repudiated Home Rule, and steps to oppose his followers were at once taken among Irish voters in English constituencies.

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  • Up to the 1st of January 1898 all persons otherwise qualified could register, provided they could read any section of the constitution or understand and explain it when read to them by the registration officer, and all persons so registered were qualified voters for life.

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  • Other requirements for voters 2 According to previous censuses the population was as follows: are: residence in the state for two years (except that ministers in charge of organized churches and teachers of public schools need have a residence in the state of six months only), in the county for one year, and in the polling precinct for four months, and the payment six months before election-time of a poll-tax.

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  • The constitution also provides for the establishment of a new county, " whenever one-third of the qualified electors within the area of each section of an old county proposed to be cut off to form a new county shall petition the governor .for the creation of a new county," whereupon the governor " shall order an election within a reasonable time thereafter," and if two-thirds of the voters vote " yes," the General Assembly at the next session shall establish the new county, provided that no section of a county shall be cut off without the consent of two-thirds of those voting in such section; that no new county " shall contain less than one one hundred and twenty-fourth part of the whole number of inhabitants of the state, nor shall it have less assessed taxable property than one and one-half millions of dollars, nor shall it contain an area of less than four hundred square miles "; and that " no old county shall be reduced to less area than five hundred square miles, to less assessed taxable property than two million dollars, nor to a smaller population than fifteen thousand inhabitants."

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  • The General Assembly may alter county lines at any time, provided the proposed change is sanctioned by two-thirds of the voters in the section proposed to be cut off.

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    0
  • The General Assembly may also provide for the consolidation of two or more counties if a majority of the voters concerned approve, " but such election shall not be held oftener than once in four years in the same counties."

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    0
  • The legislature is forbidden to create any further debt except for the ordimary current business of the state, unless the proposition he submitted to the voters of the state and approved by a two-thirds majority.

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    0
  • Briefly, he proposed a governor and two chambers - an Assembly elected by the people for three years, and a Senate - the governor and senate holding office for life or during good behaviour, and chosen, through electors, by voters qualified by property; the governor to have an unqualified veto on federal legislation; state governors to have a similar veto on state legislation, and to be appointed by the federal government; the federal government to control all militia.

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  • The system of representation had sometimes put in power a political party representing a minority of the voters: in 1878, 1884, 1886, 1888 and 1890 the Democratic candidates for state executive offices received a plurality vote; but, as a majority was not obtained, these elections were referred to the general assembly, and the Republican party in control of the lower house secured the election of its candidates; in 1901 constitutional amendments were adopted making a plurality vote sufficient for election, increasing the number of senatorial districts, and stipulating that " in forming them regard shall be had " to population.

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    0
  • He took an arm of each of the fashionable ladies and paraded one block uptown to Main Street, nodding to potential voters and ignoring the comments Fred muttered behind him that he looked like the crinkled cousin from Hicksville.

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  • It's a pain that I have to ask the voters for it, but I draw the line at the water fight.

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    0
  • "The final decision of which candidate is best suited for the job rests with you, the voters," he added.

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  • For instance, what about the apparent apathy of many would-be voters?

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  • The voters decided to boycott the referendum, which needed a 50% turnout to be valid.

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    0
  • The decision caused consternation by the majority of voters.

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    0
  • absentee voters in 2003, do they still have to register again?

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    0
  • In some states, voters said they had never received absentee ballots they had requested.

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  • alienate voters from the political process.

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    0
  • Now the party is to broaden the base of voters who will choose the Tory challenger in the London mayoral election.

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    0
  • betray the trust voters have put in them.

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  • But while warring camps bicker and brief, this is not the message the voters are hearing.

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    0
  • bloc of voters in the boro are the progressive voters â voting for anti-war left of New Labor parties.

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    0
  • bribeone could accuse Mr Letwin of bribing voters, since his tax relief will not immediately benefit anyone.

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  • canvassing voters.

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    0
  • canvassing in the area found many white former Labor voters who were voting for Respect.

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  • cent of voters are going to back the British National Party.

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  • Voters were invited to select their top 10 favorite characters from a predetermined list.

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  • common sense of voters - the shock and awe campaign against us.

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  • A most free commonwealth of " voters; " but with Eternal Justice to preside over it, Eternal Justice enforced by Almighty Power!

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    0
  • Angus MacNeil (SNP) asked about voter confusion under the current system and said STV maximized power to voters.

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    0
  • The California State Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of Proposition 21, a juvenile crime initiative, passed by voters in 2000.

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  • The doc's office is warranted cutler d. Voters who already a sponsor of reforms with some they were asked.

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    0
  • Senior loyalists fear the threat to the party's survival is not the contempt of the voters but its own death wish.

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    0
  • defection of former SPD voters to the non-voting camp.

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    0
  • Taking the country as a whole, the number of voters disenfranchised is 0.11 per cent of the total.

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    0
  • I believe that many voters are feeling increasingly disenfranchised.

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    0
  • disfranchised voters.

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    0
  • disillusioned voters turned to Nick Griffin's party, believing they offered a realistic chance for change.

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  • Compilation and publishing of a list for all voters for the Council area by designated polling districts.

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    0
  • He said the Labor by-election loss last week showed that party disunity would not be tolerated by voters.

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  • eligible voters.

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  • In future both parties would need to have definite policies with which to appeal to the newly enfranchised voters.

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    0
  • exit polls conducted as people left the polling booths have traditionally been the most accurate estimate of voters ' intention.

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    0
  • exit polls conducted as people left the polling booths have traditionally been the most accurate estimate of voters ' intention.

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  • Many voters across the EU seem to have lost faith in the European project, " the joint report begins.

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    0
  • Republican efforts to win black voters have proven largely fruitless.

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    0
  • At London Chinatown's first elections hustings on 22 May 2001, Chinese voters from Westminster put the parties on the spot.

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    0
  • Voters will be asked to enter their security number and voting intention by pressing keys on their phone pad.

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  • intimidate voters to stay at home.

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  • That's the kind of insanity most Welsh voters find irresistible.

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    0
  • Later on, I hustled about gettin ' out voters who had jags on or who were too lazy to come to the polls.

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    0
  • Yet this isn't making many Labor voters feel jubilant.

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    0
  • But many of the voters came from outside, and identity checks on voters appeared lax.

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    0
  • Details of the voters roll may be held for much longer.

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    0
  • middle classthe young and ethnic minorities are all less likely to vote than older white middle-class voters.

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    0
  • minority of Asian voters, race is an issue.

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    0
  • Under the law, the AFL-CIO can only mobilize voters who are in member unions.

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    0
  • The second issue for Labor that electoral reform helps is the perceived neglect of our core voters.

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    0
  • They plant, maintain, and orchestrate coalitions of voters to exert pressure on elected officials.

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    0
  • Having once had lots of trust in the bank, the Prime Minister is now heavily overdrawn with the voters.

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  • persuade voters to register.

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  • See EU ' cherry picking ' from rules the voters rejected.

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    0
  • For 700 votes, a simple plurality should be enough to show the voters's preference.

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    0
  • In other EU countries, including those using proportional representation, voters can specify candidates at European elections.

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    0
  • Politicians and governments, however, believe it to be an important medium capable of influencing public opinion and swaying voters.

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    0
  • The Catholic bishops had urged voters to boycott the referendum, which needed a 50% turnout to be valid.

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    0
  • reluctance on the part of the Italian voters to swallow a bitter pill of economic reform.

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    0
  • searchlight newspaper to every home in the three wards did not deter enough voters from supporting the fascists.

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    0
  • This will not come easy to European leaders who share with their voters a deep skepticism toward using force for political ends.

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    0
  • There is no clarity as to the proportion between registered voters and people eligible for registration, which makes any judgment speculative.

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    0
  • Many politicians used the psychological fears of the West Coasters against the Japanese Americans to gain political stature among the voters.

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    0
  • sway voters we are seeing was being developed.

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    0
  • tug on the heartstrings of Labor voters.

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    0
  • turnout of voters, 85 per cent.

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    0
  • uncommitted voters.

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    0
  • undecided voters ' being the key to the US election.

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    0
  • unionist voters on the ground simply are not asking about the Agreement.

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    0
  • unpopular with Scottish voters.

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    0
  • We already have regional government by quango and civil servant - the point is to make regional viceroys answerable to local voters.

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    0
  • Shortly afterward, the voters in Holland expressed the same view by an even larger majority 58% to 42% .

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    0
  • Of all possible voting systems, the single transferable vote gives the maximum power to individual voters over the choice of their local representatives.

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    0
  • The government can also appeal to disillusioned heartland voters, by claiming to be improving inner-city schools.

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    0
  • The Chancellor must convince skeptical voters that the fruits of the strong economy have not been squandered.

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  • They will work in schools, markets and other places where people gather, to persuade voters to register.

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    0
  • I have a solid team of local activists who are out every day leafleting and canvassing the voters of Tyne Bridge.

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    0
  • A description such as " Save Kidderminster Hospital " or " No to George Bush " would remind voters of what you stand for.

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    0
  • voters in each constituency will elect a single person to represent them in the House of Commons.

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    0
  • voters in a referendum held on 22 May.

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    0
  • This whole thing about ' undecided voters ' being the key to the US election.

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    0
  • Many conservative voters either didn't turn out or voted for another party.

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    0
  • They see an issue that appeals to first-time voters who don't seem to care about anything else very much.

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    0
  • There is already enough such information displayed in the polling station, or included in the instructions sent to postal voters.

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    0
  • The second stage, an open primary for all eligible voters, was replaced by opinion polls.

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    0
  • Voters, meanwhile, are hoping the upcoming presidential elections will spell an end to the economic downturn and their pension woes.

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    0
  • woo back the female voters who have fallen out of love with him over Iraq.

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    0
  • woo disenchanted Tory voters.

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    0
  • The greenback issue, the troubles growing out of reconstruction in the South, the Credit Mobilier and the "Salary Grab," disgusted thousands of independent voters and sent a wave of Democracy over the country.

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    0
  • Many voters absent in the Confederate army when the vote was taken refused to acknowledge the transfer on their return.

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    0
  • The ratio of voters to qualified electors tends to increase; it is highest in Campania, Basilicata and in the south generally; the lowest percentages are given by Einilia and Liguria.

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    0
  • At the general elections of March I9o9, over a score of Clerical deputies were returned, Clericals of a very mild tone who had no thought of the temporal power and were supporters of the monarchy and anti-socialists; where no Clerical candidate was in the field the Catholic voters plumped for the constitutional candidate against all representatives of the Extreme Left.

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    0
  • A residence in the state of six months and in the district or county of thirty days preceding the election is required of all voters.

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    0
  • For each township there is a justice of the peace, chosen biennially by its voters.

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    0
  • At the election of 1904 an amendment was adopted which provides that whenever 10% of the voters of the state, as shown by the votes of the last preceding election, express a wish that any law or resolution of the legislature shall be submitted to the people, the Act or Resolve shall be voted on at the next election of the state or county officers, and if a majority of the voters approve the measure it shall stand; otherwise, it shall become void.

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    0
  • In 1909 the city adopted by popular vote government by commission under a state law of 1907 providing for a mayor and four commissioners, heads of the executive, finance, streets and public improvements, parks, public buildings and health, and water and lights departments, all elected for two years and nominated by primary election or by petition signed by at least 25 voters.

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    0
  • This exception remained in force until the ist of December 1908, after which time all who were on the list became (unless disqualified because convicted of felony) life voters, but new applicants had to stand the educational test.

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    0
  • The effect of this was that in January 1835 the legislature passed a bill for submitting the question legally to all the voters of the state, although this bill itself limited the proposed convention's power relating to representation by providing that it should so amend the constitution that senators be chosen by districts according to public taxes, and that commoners be apportioned by districts according to Federal representation, i.e.

    0
    0
  • The new constitution was promulgated on the 15th of December 1799 and in a plebiscite held during January 1800 it received the support of 3,011,007 voters, only 1562 persons voting against it.

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    0
  • In 1908 a direct primary law was passed providing for party primaries, those of all parties in each district to be held at the same time (annually) and place, before the same election board, and at public expense, to nominate candidates for township and municipal offices and members of the school board; nominations to be by petition signed by at least 2% of the party voters of the political division, except that for United States senators a of 1% is the minimum.

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    0
  • Excellent political training such a government unquestionably offered; but it became unworkable as disparities of social condition increased, as the number of legal voters (above 7000 in 1822) became greater, and as the population ceased to be homogeneous in blood.

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    0
  • All the citizens did not assemble; on the contrary ordinary business seldom drew out more than a hundred voters, and often a mere handful.

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    0
  • It provided for municipal elections in January; for the election of a mayor for four years; for his recall at the end of two years if a majority of the registered voters so vote in the state election in November in the second year of his term; for the summary removal for cause by the mayor of any department head or other of his appointees; for a city council of one chamber of nine members, elected at large each for three years; for nomination by petition; for a permanent finance commission appointed by the governor; for the confirmation of the mayor's appointments by the state civil service commission; for the mayor's preparation of the annual budget (in which items may be reduced but not increased by the council), and for his absolute veto of appropriations except for school use.

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    0
  • On 21 referenda, io being questions of license, the ratio of actual to registered voters ranged on the latter from 57.00 to 75.38% (mean 67.15), and on other referenda from 75.6 3 t o 33.4 0 (mean 61.39), - the mean for all, 64.18.

    0
    0
  • The constitution of 1812 allowed the General Assembly to name the governor from the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes; gave the governor large powers of appointment, even of local functionaries; and required a property qualification for various offices, and even for voters.

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    0
  • before the adoption of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution); also the sons or grandsons of such voters, not under 21 years of age, on the 12th of May 1898; and males of foreign birth who have resided in the state for five years next preceding the date of application for registration and who were naturalized prior to 1898.

    0
    0
  • A general primary election law for the selection, by the voters, of candidates for state office came into effect in 1906.

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    0
  • These four groups, however, were of unequal importance, and thanks to this arrangement the English, although weakest in point of numbers, were able to exercise the same influence in the council as if they had formed a fourth of the voters.

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    0
  • These parsissoks, elected at the rate of about one representative to 120 voters, wear a cap with a badge (a bear rampant), and aid the European members of the council in distributing the surplus profit apportioned to each district, and generally in advising as, to the welfare of that part of Greenland under their partial control.

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    0
  • By an amendment of 1898 an amendment may be suggested by a majority of both houses of the legislature and comes into effect if approved by a majority of all electors voting at the general election at which the amendment is voted upon; if two or more amendments are submitted at the same election voters shall vote for or against each amendment separately.

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    0
  • Expenditures from the fund known as " The Internal Improvement Land Fund," derived from the sale of state lands, can be made only after the enactment for that purpose has been approved by the voters of the state; in 1881 the legislature, and in 1884 the popular vote, pledged the proceeds of this fund to the payment of Minnesota state railway adjustment bonds.

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    0
  • The sale of intoxicating liquors is for the most part regulated by licences, but the granting of licences may be prohibited within any town or incorporated village by its legal voters, and the question must be submitted to popular vote upon the request of ten legal voters.

    0
    0
  • The Indians whose names were " rightly contained " in the voters' rolls at the date of the act retain the franchise.

    0
    0
  • entrusted the management of affairs purely provincial consists of 25 members, elected by the parliamentary voters and each representing a separate constituency.

    0
    0
  • On the dissolution which followed Lord Palmerston's defeat, Cobden became candidate for Huddersfield, but the voters of that town gave the preference to his opponent, who had supported the Russian War and approved of the proceedings at Canton.

    0
    0
  • Voters are registered biennially, and every five years there is an automatic redistribution of seats on a voters' basis.

    0
    0
  • The semi-military organization of these divisions, which existed under the South African republic, has been abolished, and field-cornets, who are nominated by the provincial government, are purely civil officials charged with the registration of voters, births and deaths, the maintenance of public roads, &c. The chief local authorities are the municipal bodies, many " municipalities " being rural areas centred round a small town.

    0
    0
  • The parliamentary voters in 1910 numbered 1442.

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    0
  • It is true that he was sometimes forced by conviction or fate or political necessity to be a revolutionist on a large scale; to destroy an established Church; to add two millions of voters to the electorate; to attack the parliamentary union of the kingdoms. But these changes were, in their inception, distasteful to their author.

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    0
  • A powerful section contended that the basis should be the body of legal voters, on the ground that the South could not then secure an increment of political powet on account of the emancipated blacks unless these blacks were admitted to political rights.

    0
    0
  • Blaine, on the other hand, contended that representation should be based on population instead of voters, as being fairer to the North, where the ratio of voters varied widely, and he insisted that it should be safeguarded by security for impartial suffrage.

    0
    0
  • In that year the number of municipal voters was 23,338.

    0
    0
  • After petition signed by a number of voters not less than 25% of the number voting at the preceding municipal election, any member of the council may be removed by popular vote, to which all public franchises must be submitted, and by which the council may be compelled to pass any law or ordinance.

    0
    0
  • The constitution originally forbade the registration of voters, but an amendment of 1891 permits it in cities having a population of ten thousand or more, and the Australian ballot system was adopted in such cities by an act of the twenty-second legislature in 1892.

    0
    0
  • The last of these provides that 25% of the voters choosing a municipal officer may, by signing a petition for his recall, force a new election during his term of office and thereby remove him if another candidate receives a greater number of votes.

    0
    0
  • Real toleration in public opinion grew slowly through the 18th century, removing the religious tests of voters; and a constitutional amendment in 1821 explicitly forbade such tests in the case of office-holders.

    0
    0
  • In the presidential election of 1896, when an unprecedentedly large vote was cast, the number of voters registered was nearly 20% of the population, and of these nearly 82% actually voted.

    0
    0
  • The town hall is not large enough for an assemblage of all the voters, but actually the attendance is usually limited to about Zoo, and since 1901 there has been in force a kind of referendum, under which any measure passed by a town-meeting attended by 700 or more voters may be referred, upon petition of loo legal voters, to a regular vote at the polls.

    0
    0
  • The charter gave the company control over the admission of " freemen " (co-partners in the enterprise, and voters), " full and absolute power and authority to correct, punish and rule " subjects settling in the territory comprised in their grant, and power to " resist.

    0
    0
  • In 1832 there were ten resident legal voters within the borough and nine out-voters.

    0
    0
  • The city government had been characterized by extravagance and maladministration, and a revolt of the independent voters at the polls overcame the usual Republican majority and Cleveland was elected.

    0
    0
  • The second constitution, however, imposed a property qualification on coloured voters amounting to a freehold estate worth $250, and this restriction was not removed until 1874.

    0
    0
  • Conviction for bribery or of an infamous crime disqualifies, and personal identification of voters is required in New York City.

    0
    0
  • Stevens, of the United States Army, took charge on the 29th of September 1853, and a census indicated a population of 3965, of whom 1682 were voters.

    0
    0
  • There is a biennial registration of voters, and every five years the electoral areas are to be redivided, with the object of giving to each constituency an approximately equal number of voters.

    0
    0
  • The qualifications for membership of the assembly are the same as those for voters.

    0
    0
  • The provincial council consists of 25 members (each representing a separate constituency) elected by the parliamentary voters and has a statutory existence of three years.

    0
    0
  • 5, sec. i of the state constitution, authorized the initiative and referendum, but twofifths of the entire number of counties must each furnish for initiative petitions signatures amounting in number to 8% of the whole number of votes cast for governor at the election last preceding the filing of the petition; for referendum petitions two-fifths of the counties must each furnish as signers 5% of the legal voters; and any measure referred to the people shall be in full force unless the petition for the referendum be signed by 15% of the legal voters (whose number is that of the total votes cast for governor, &c., as above) of a majority of the whole number of counties, but that in such case the law to be referred shall be inoperative until it is passed at the popular election.

    0
    0
  • only to reckon with the opposition of Hungary but also to pay particular attention to the peasant voters, in the question of buying meat abroad and importing frozen meat from the Argentine.

    0
    0
  • Under a constitutional amendment, adopted by popular vote on the 8th of November 1898, 5% of the legal voters of the state may require the legislature to submit to popular vote at the next general election measures which they wish enacted into law, or measures already passed by the legislature which have not 'yet gone into force.

    0
    0
  • The state is divided into five districts and one judge is chosen from each district, although the election is made by the voters of the state at large.

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  • The state is divided into ten circuits, and one judge is elected by the voters of each circuit for a period of four years.

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  • A village district is a portion of a town, including a village, which is set apart and organized for protection from fire, for lighting or sprinkling the streets, for providing a water-supply, for the construction and maintenance of sewers, and for police protection; to serve these interests three commissioners, a moderator, a clerk, a treasurer and such other officers as the voters of the district may deem necessary are chosen, each for a term of one year.

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  • Evening schools for the instruction of persons over fourteen years of age must be established in any city or town of more than 5000 inhabitants if 5% of its legal voters petition for them.

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  • They can have exercised their public rights but seldom, owing to their distance from Rome; but the consulships of C. Marius, a municeps of Arpinum (between 107 and 100 B.C.), and the strength of the support given to Tiberius Gracchus in the assembly by the voters from Italian towns (133 B.C.) show what an important influence the members of these municipia could occasionally exercise over Roman politics.

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  • Each has its own documentary constitution; its legislature of two elective houses; its executive, consisting of a governor and other officials; its judiciary, whose decisions are final, except in cases involving Federal law; its system of local government and local taxation; its revenue, system of taxation, and debts; its body of private civil and criminal law and procedure; its rules of citizenship, which may admit persons to be voters in state and national elections under conditions differing from those prevailing in other states.

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  • Some states have recently allowed a prescribed number of voters to propose, by what is called the Initiative, amendments which are submitted to the vote of all the citizens without the intervention of the legislature.

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  • Local judges are generally chosen by the voters of the district in which they hold court.

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  • Each town is governed by the town meeting, an assembly of all the qualified voters within the limits, which meets at least once a year in the spring, and also at other times when specially summoned.

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  • As a rule, one finds (I) a mayor, elected directly by the voters within the city, who is the head of the administration; (2) adminis- trative officers or boards, some directly elected by the city voters, others nominated by the mayor or chosen by the council; (3) a council or assembly, consisting sometimes of two, but more frequently of one chamber, elected directly by the city voters; and (4) judges, usually elected by the city voters, but sometimes appointed by the state.

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  • Several state InWailve, constitutions now contain provisions enabling a Referendum prescribed number (or proportion) of the voters in and Recall.

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  • a state or city to submit a proposition to all the registered voters of the state (or city) for their approval.

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  • These constitutions also allow a prescribed number of voters to demand that a law passed by the state legislature, or an ordinance passed by the municipal authority, be submitted to all the voters for their approval.

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  • Some cities also provide in their charters that an official, including the mayor or a member of the council, may be displaced from office if, at a special election held on the demand of a prescribed number of the city voters, he does not receive the largest number of votes cast.

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  • The ordinary duties of these committees are to raise and spend money for electioneering and otherwise in the interests of the party, to organize meetings, to look after the press, to attend to the admission of immigrants or new-comers as voters; and generally to attract and enrol recruits in the party forces.

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  • At election times they also direct and superintend the work of bringing up voters to the polls and of watching the taking and counting of the votes; but in this work they are often aided or superseded by specially appointed temporary bodies called campaign committees, These party committees are permanent, and though the membership is renewed every year, the same men usually continue to serve.

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  • In the larger election areas, such as a county or city, the number of voters who would be entitled to be present renders it impossible to admit all, so the nominating meetings in these areas are composed of delegates elected in the various primaries included in the area, and the meeting is called a nominating convention.

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  • This is the rule, but in some parts of the South and West nominations for members of the state legislature and county officials, and even for members of Congress, are made by primary assemblies meeting over the entire area, which all the party voters are entitled to attend.

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  • In rural districts little difficulty arises, because it is known what citizens belong to each party; but in cities, and especially in large cities, where men do not know their neighbors by sight, it becomes necessary to have regular lists of the party voters entitled to attend a primary; and these lists are either prepared and kept by the local party committee, or are settled by the votes of the persons previously on the party rolls.

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  • Accordingly, those who control the local organizations usually take pains to keep on the lists all the voters whom they can trust, and are apt to keep off those whom they think likely to show a dangerous independence.

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  • As the desire to dominate primaries was found to lead to many abuses, both in the way of manipulating the lists of party voters and in the unfair management of the primary meetings themselves, a movement was started for reforming the system, which, beginning soon after 1890, gathered so much support that now in the large majority of the states laws have been enacted for regulating the proceedings at primary nomination meetings.

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  • These laws vary greatly in their details from state to state, but they all aim at enabling the voters to exercise a free and unfettered voice in the selection of their candidates, and they have created a regular system of elections of candidates preliminary to the election of office-holders from among the candidates.

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  • The Reconstruction Acts of Congress required every new constitution to be ratified by a majority of the legal voters of the state.

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  • After the 1st of January 1915 no one may qualify as a voter under the first or second of these clauses (the " grandfather " and " understanding " clauses); but those who shall have registered under their requirements before the 1st of January 1915 thus become voters for life.

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  • The constitution, as amended in 1905, provides that elections on the question ‘ of local school taxes for counties or for school districts may be called upon a petition signed by one-fourth of the qualified voters of the county, or district, in question; under this provision several counties and a large number of school districts are supplementing the general fund.

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  • This latter qualification has been introduced into several of the Southern states, partly at least to disqualify the ignorant coloured voters.

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  • As a general rule, but subject to exceptions, the national elections call out the largest number, the state elections next, and the local elections the smallest number of voters.

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  • In an exciting national election between 80 and 90% of the qualified voters actually vote, a proportion considerably greater than in Great Britain or Germany.

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  • (3) Educational or other such test, more particularly in the Southern states, the object of which is to exclude the coloured, and especially the ignorant coloured, voters from the polls.

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  • The act of 1900 provides for the election of a delegate to Congress, and prescribes that the delegate shall have the qualifications necessary for membership in the Hawaiian Senate, and shall be elected by voters qualified to vote for members of the House of Representatives of Hawaii.

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  • The supreme court consists of seven judges elected by the voters of the state at large.

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  • the plan which provided that these states might be reorganized by as many as io% of the number of voters in 1860 who should ask for pardon and take the oath of allegiance to the United States), but he also refused to accept the Wade-Davis Bill as being far too moderate in character.

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  • They are elected for six years (one-third of the council retiring every two years) by the same voters as for the provincial states.

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  • This may be judged from the fact that in the year named there were only 137,772 voters out of a population of 6z millions.

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  • In 1904 there were 1,581,649 voters, possessing 2,467,966 votes.

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  • The number of seats to be filled is divided by the number of parties or candidates, and then they are distributed in the proportion of the total followers or voters of each.

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  • In 1902 there were 1,146,482 voters with 2,007,704 votes, the principles of multiple votes, with, however, a maximum of four votes and proportional representation, being in force for communal as for legislative elections.

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  • Both cham bers were elected by the same voters, but senators required a property qualification, - the payment of at least 2000 florins in taxes.

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  • But this personal rebuff could not alter the fact that in the country his was the name which was on the lips of the voters at the election.

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  • Thus beside many Latin programmata later than those just mentioned we have similar inscriptions in Oscan, addressed to Oscan-speaking voters, where Illlner.

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  • The charter provides for a referendum vote on franchises, which may be ordered by the council or by petition of the people, the signatures of 20% of the registered voters being sufficient to force such election.

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  • Of these deputies one-half are elected in the same way as members of the Folkething, without any property qualification for the voters; the other half of the deputy electors are chosen in the towns by those who during the last preceding year were assessed on a certain minimum of income, or paid at least a certain amount in rates and taxes.

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  • Conviction for bribery, perjury or other infamous crime, or failure (in the case of a collector or holder of public moneys) to account for and pay over all moneys due from him are disqualifications; and before entering upon the duties of his office each member of the legislature must take a prescribed oath that he has neither given nor promised anything to influence voters at the election, and that he will not accept, directly or indirectly, "money or other valuable thing from any corporation, company or person" for his vote or influence upon proposed legislation.

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  • A law of 1901 provided for a system of initiative whereby any question of public policy might be submitted to popular vote upon the signature of a written petition therefor by onetenth of the registered voters of the state; such a petition must be filed at least 60 days before the election day when it is to be voted upon, and not more than three questions by initiative may be voted on at the same election; to become operative a measure must receive a majority of all votes cast in the election.

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  • Under this act, in 1902, there was a favourable vote (451,319 to 76,975) for the adoption of measures requisite to securing the election of United States senators by popular and direct vote, and in 1903 the legislature of the state (which in 1891 had asked Congress to submit such an amendment) adopted a joint resolution asking Congress to call a convention to propose such an amendment to the Federal Constitution; in 1904 there was a majority of all the votes cast in the election for an amendment to the primary laws providing that voters may vote at state primaries under the Australian ballot.

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  • by appealing to the reason of voters; that by education their ignorance can be eliminated; that human nature is indefinitely perfectible; that majorities rule, therefore, not only by virtue of force (which was Locke's ultimate justification of them), but of right.

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  • The great mass of voters felt the issue as Jackson's managers stated it.

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  • A registration of voters, predominantly whites, was at once carried through, and delegates were chosen for another constitutional convention, which met at Little Rock in January 1868.

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  • Whenever Ion freeholders request it, the county commissioners must submit to the voters of a proposed high school district the question of establishing a high school district, and each precinct giving a majority vote for it constitutes a part of such a district for establishing and maintaining a high school.

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  • A bill to organize the Territory of Wyoming had been introduced into Congress in 1865, and in 1867 the voters of Laramie county had chosen a delegate to Congress.

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  • The legislature would be all-powerful, and yet representation was so distributed that about one-third of the voters living in the tide-water region would return nearly two-thirds of the members of the legislature.

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  • Under the short-lived Second Republic (1848-52) the position of the Church grew even stronger, for the introduction of universal suffrage brought to the polls great masses of new voters strongly clerical in sympathies.

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  • A declared intention to become a United States citizen ceased in 1902 to be sufficient qualification for voters, full citizenship (with residence qualifications) being made requisite.

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  • A majority of the voters approved of Jackson's fight against what Clay had once denounced as a dangerous and unconstitutional monopoly.

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  • The great majority of the voters, however, required no pressure to decide who was in their opinion the man most fitted to administer the affairs of the republic. For the first time in the history of Chile a perfectly free election was held, and Admiral Montt was duly chosen by a nearly unanimous vote to be chief magistrate for the constitutional term of five years.

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  • A large majority of the English members, 265 out of 400, were to be elected by the counties, where voters must possess land or personal property of the value of £ 200, while in the boroughs the franchise remained unaltered.

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  • The House of Assembly consists (as originally constituted) of 121 members, elected by single-membered constituencies, each constituency containing as nearly as possible the same number of voters.

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  • Members of the House of Assembly must, like senators, be British subjects of European descent, they must be qualified to be registered as voters and have lived for five years within the Union.

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  • The qualifications of parliamentary voters are those which existed in the several colonies at the establishment of the Union, save that " no member of His Majesty's regular forces on full pay " can be registered as a voter.

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  • As the franchise laws in the several colonies differed the qualifications of voters in the provinces differ also.

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  • In the Cape province, where there is also a low property qualification, no colour bar exists and there are a large number of Kaffir voters (see Cape Colony: Constitution).

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  • Seats were to be allotted on a voters' (not population) basis, and there was to be an automatic redistribution of seats as voters increased or decreased " in given localities.

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  • To this the Progressive party would not agree, and they gained support from Botha, Smuts and other prominent Dutch delegates for their contention that " equal rights " could only be secured by making the basis of representation the number of voters as distinct from the number of European inhabitants of any given area.

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  • Among the other decisions of the convention were: the choice of Pretoria as the seat of administration anti of Cape Town as the seat of the legislature, the renaming the Orange River Colony, Orange Free State Province; the provision of three membered constituencies and of proportional representation and the safe-guarding of the smaller communities by giving Natal and the Orange River colonies more members of parliament than they were entitled to on the voters basis.

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  • The inclusion in the charter of the principle of the " initiative and referendum " enables a percentage of the voters to compel the submission of measures to public approval.

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  • largely to his clear, if non-committal, political record, rendered him the most " available " candidate for the Whig party for the campaign of 1840, and he was nominated by the Whig convention at Harrisburg, Pa., in December 1839, his most formidable opponent being Henry Clay, who, though generally regarded as the real leader of his party, was less " available " because as a mason he would alienate former members of the old Anti-Masonic party, and as an advocate of a protective tariff would repel many Southern voters.

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  • By determining to admit no new freemen the voters became reduced to between 30 and 60.

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  • Amendments to the constitution must first be passed by the legislature at two consecutive sessions (receiving a majority' vote of all members elected to each house), and then be ratified by the voters at a special election, and no amendment or amendments may be submitted by the legislature to the people oftener than once in five years.

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  • In 1903 a law (revised in 1908) was passed providing for the conduct at public cost of primary elections for the nomination of nearly all elective officers, and for the nomination of delegates to party nominating conventions; nominations for primary elections are made by petitions signed by at least ten voters (except in very small election districts) who make affidavit as to their party affiliations; the nominee thus indorsed must file a letter of acceptance.

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  • 1874), then a Republican member of the Assembly and in1906-1908a state senator, began in 1904; it did much to secure the passage of acts limiting public service franchises to 20 years (unless extended to 40 years by the voters of the municipality concerned), the increase of taxes on railways, the increase of franchise tax rates by 12% each year up to 5%, the adoption of direct primary elections, and the modification of the existing promoters' liability law.

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  • The lists are conclusive of the right to vote at an election, although on election petition involving a scrutiny the vote of a person disqualified by law may be struck off, notwithstanding the inclusion of his name in a list of voters.

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  • Of the powers vested in the county authority under the Highway Act 1878, the most important are those relating to main roads, which are specially noticed hereafter; (ix.) the tables of fees to be taken by and the costs to be allowed to any inspector, analyst or person holding any office in the county other than the clerk of the peace and the clerks of the justices; (x.) the appointment, removal and determination of salaries of the county treasurer, the county surveyor, the public analysts, any officer under the Explosives Act 1875, and any officers whose remuneration is paid out of the county rate, other than the clerk of the peace and the clerks of the justices; (xi.) the salary of any coroner whose salary is payable out of the county rate, the fees, allowances and disbursements allowed to be paid by any such coroner, and the division of the county into coroners' districts and the assignments of such districts; (xii.) the division of the county into polling districts for the purposes of parliamentary elections, the appointment of the places of election, the places of holding courts for the revision of the lists of voters, and the costs of, and other matters to be done for the registration of parliamentary voters; (xiii.) the execution as local authority of the acts relating to contagious diseases of animals, to destructive insects, to fish conservancy, to wild birds, to weights and measures, and to gas meters, and of the Local Stamp Act i 869; (xiv.) any matters arising under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886.

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  • Any bill proposed in the legislature or passed by it must be referred to popular vote before becoming law, if there is a referendum petition therefor signed by 10,000 voters; and a petition signed by 12,000 voters initiates new legislation.

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  • An act for restricting the sale of such liquors was passed in 1846; the first prohibitory act was passed, largely through the influence of Neal Dow, in 1851; this was frequently amended; and in 1884 an amendment 1 An unincorporated township containing less than 200 inhabitants may, on the application of three resident voters, be organized as a plantation, but does not pay state or county taxes unless by special legislative order.

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  • By an amendment of 1900, the legislature was instructed to provide that a fixed fraction of the voters might cause any law to be submitted to the people, or that they might require any legislative act (except one passed by a two-thirds vote of each house) to be so submitted before going into effect, but up to 1910 no law had been passed putting the amendment into force.

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  • Initiative petitions, signed by at least 8% of the legal voters in each two-thirds (at least) of the congressional districts of the state, must be filed not later than four months before the election at which the measure is to be voted upon.

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  • The referendum may be ordered by the legislature or by a petition signed by at least 5% of the legal voters in each of two-thirds (at least) of the congressional districts of the state; such petition must be filed not more than 90 days after the final adjournment of the legislature; referred measures become law upon receiving a favourable majority of the popular vote.

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  • The convention of 1861, by maintaining continuous government, had saved the state from anarchy and from reconstruction by the national power; but an ironclad test oath (it required denial of forty-five distinct offences) was provided, to be taken by all voters, state, county and municipal officers, lawyers, jurors, teachers and clergymen.

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  • The qualifications of voters for the election of members of the House of Assembly are the same as those existing in Cape Colony at the establishment of the Union, and are as follows: Voters must be born or naturalized British subjects residing in the Cape province at least twelve months, must be males aged 21 (no distinction being made as to race or colour), must be in possession of property worth X75, or in receipt of salary or wages of not less than L50 a year.

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  • The qualifications of voters for the council are the same as for the House of Assembly.

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  • All voters, European and non-European, are eligible for seats on the council, but any councillor who becomes a member of parliament thereupon ceases to be a member of the provincial council.

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  • Members of the councils must be registered voters and owners of immovable property in the division valued at not less than £500.

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  • It was fought on a register purged of the rebel voters, many of whom, besides being disfranchised, were in prison.

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  • The issue was doubtful, and each side sought to secure the support of the native voters, who in several constituencies held the balance of power.

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  • In fact, the bill was called for by the glaring anomalies in the distribution of seats by which a minority of voters in the country districts returned a majority of members, and it left the towns still inadequately represented.

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  • (The registration of 1905 showed that there were over 23,000 coloured voters in the colony.) The commission proposed separate voting by natives only for a fixed number of members of the legislature - the plan adopted in New Zealand with the Maori voters.

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  • Until 1902 the legislature was the sole law-making body in the state, but on the 2nd of June of this year the voters adopted a constitutional amendment which declared that "the people reserve to themselves power to propose laws and amendments to the constitution, and to enact or reject the same at the polls, independent of the legislative assembly, and also reserve power at their own option to approve or reject at the polls any act of the legislative assembly."

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  • Eight per cent of the number of voters who at the last preceding election voted for a justice of the supreme court, by filing with the secretary of state a petition for the enactment of any law or constitutional amendment - the petition must contain the full text of the law and must be filed at least four months before the election at which it is to be voted upon - may secure a vote on the proposed measure at the next general election, and if it receives the approval of the voters it becomes a law without interposition of the legislature, and goes into effect from the day of the governor's proclamation announcing the result of the election.

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  • A referendum of legislative enactments may be ordered in two ways: the legislature itself may refer any of its acts to the people for approval or rejection at the next regular election, in which case the act may not be vetoed by the governor and does not go into effect until approved at the polls; or 5% of the number of voters at the last election for a supreme court justice may by petition order any act, except such as are "necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health or safety," to be referred to the voters for their approval or rejection.

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  • This "text-book" for the voters contained 60 pages in 1906 and 126 pages in 1908.

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  • The measures to be voted on consisted of eleven laws or constitutional amendments proposed by initiative petition, four constitutional amendments referred to the people by the legislature, and four laws upon which the voters had ordered a referendum.

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  • representation for each political party in proportion to its numerical strength, by providing for first and second choice in voting - the system of preferential voting adopted in Idaho in 1909; and the "recall," by which the voters may remove from office after six months' service by a special election any local official.4 Judiciary.

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  • The initiative and the referendum are employed in municipal ordinances as well as in state laws; towns and cities make their own provisions as to "the manner of exercising the initiative and referendum powers as to their own municipal legislation"; but "not more than 10% of the legal voters may be required to order the referendum nor more than 15% to propose any measure by the initiative, in any city or town."

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  • Until 1908 the state had a prohibition law " by remonstrance," under which if a majority of the legal voters of a township or city ward remonstrated against the granting of licences for the sale of liquor, no licence could be granted by the county commissioners in that township or ward.

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  • The county voters were the freeholders; but in the towns, with some important exceptions, the electors were the richer inhabitants who formed the corporations of the boroughs, or a body of select householders more or less under the control of some neighboring landowner.

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  • The merchant needed protection for his trade; the voters gladly welcomed election days as bringing guineas to their pockets.

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  • The judicial power of the state is vested: in a supreme court' of seven members (salary $6000 a year; elected for a term of ten years; the senior justice is chief justice) with appellate jurisdiction throughout the state, general superintendence over all inferior courts, power to issue, hear and determine writs of habeas corpus, mandamus, injunction, quo warranto, certiorari and other original and remedial writs; nineteen (only five under the constitution of 1848) circuit courts, of one judge each except in the second circuit (including Milwaukee) in which there are four judges, elected (at a spring election, and not at the general state election) by the voters of the circuit district; probate judges, one elected (for two years) in each county, except where the legislature confers probate powers on inferior courts; and in towns, cities and villages, justices of the peace, elected for two years.

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  • An act of 1909 provides for the adoption of government by commission in any city of the second, third or fourth class which votes for this form of government at an election called by a petition signed by 25% of the voters at the preceding election for mayor.

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  • As a result of the failure of "wildcat" banks during the Territorial period, a clause was inserted in the state constitution forbidding the legislature to charter a bank or pass a general banking law until the people had voted in favour of banks, and providing further that no bank charter or general banking law should be of any force until a majority of the voters at a general election had approved of it.

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  • Their ideal in fact was a combination of a king who frankly accepted the results of the Revolution, and who governed in a liberal spirit, with the advice of a chamber elected by a very limited constituency, in which men of property and education formed, if not the whole, at least the very great majority of the voters.

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  • The elections to the Convention were by almost universal suffrage, but indifference or intimidation reduced the voters to a The small number.

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  • The constitution reserves to the people the privilege of rejecting any act or any item of any act whenever 5% of the legal voters ask that the matter be voted upon at a general election; and the people may initiate legislation by a petition signed by 8% of the electorate.

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  • Cities or towns having a population of 2000 or more may become cities of the first class whenever a favourable majority vote is obtained at a general or special election held in that city or town, and this question must be submitted at such an election whenever 35% of the legal voters petition for it.

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  • The proposals of Sulpicius became law, and, with the assistance of the new voters, the command was bestowed upon Marius, then a mere privatus.

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  • In Ireland there had been 66 elections contested, and out of 451,000 voters 93,000 were illiterates.

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  • In February 1902 Lord Rosebery definitely repudiated Home Rule, and steps to oppose his followers were at once taken among Irish voters in English constituencies.

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  • Up to the 1st of January 1898 all persons otherwise qualified could register, provided they could read any section of the constitution or understand and explain it when read to them by the registration officer, and all persons so registered were qualified voters for life.

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  • Other requirements for voters 2 According to previous censuses the population was as follows: are: residence in the state for two years (except that ministers in charge of organized churches and teachers of public schools need have a residence in the state of six months only), in the county for one year, and in the polling precinct for four months, and the payment six months before election-time of a poll-tax.

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  • The constitution also provides for the establishment of a new county, " whenever one-third of the qualified electors within the area of each section of an old county proposed to be cut off to form a new county shall petition the governor .for the creation of a new county," whereupon the governor " shall order an election within a reasonable time thereafter," and if two-thirds of the voters vote " yes," the General Assembly at the next session shall establish the new county, provided that no section of a county shall be cut off without the consent of two-thirds of those voting in such section; that no new county " shall contain less than one one hundred and twenty-fourth part of the whole number of inhabitants of the state, nor shall it have less assessed taxable property than one and one-half millions of dollars, nor shall it contain an area of less than four hundred square miles "; and that " no old county shall be reduced to less area than five hundred square miles, to less assessed taxable property than two million dollars, nor to a smaller population than fifteen thousand inhabitants."

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  • The General Assembly may alter county lines at any time, provided the proposed change is sanctioned by two-thirds of the voters in the section proposed to be cut off.

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  • The General Assembly may also provide for the consolidation of two or more counties if a majority of the voters concerned approve, " but such election shall not be held oftener than once in four years in the same counties."

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  • The legislature is forbidden to create any further debt except for the ordimary current business of the state, unless the proposition he submitted to the voters of the state and approved by a two-thirds majority.

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  • Briefly, he proposed a governor and two chambers - an Assembly elected by the people for three years, and a Senate - the governor and senate holding office for life or during good behaviour, and chosen, through electors, by voters qualified by property; the governor to have an unqualified veto on federal legislation; state governors to have a similar veto on state legislation, and to be appointed by the federal government; the federal government to control all militia.

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  • The system of representation had sometimes put in power a political party representing a minority of the voters: in 1878, 1884, 1886, 1888 and 1890 the Democratic candidates for state executive offices received a plurality vote; but, as a majority was not obtained, these elections were referred to the general assembly, and the Republican party in control of the lower house secured the election of its candidates; in 1901 constitutional amendments were adopted making a plurality vote sufficient for election, increasing the number of senatorial districts, and stipulating that " in forming them regard shall be had " to population.

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  • It featured a tailor-made fifth pledge to Welsh and Scottish voters, offering them a referendum on devolution.

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  • This was n't an obvious reluctance on the part of the Italian voters to swallow a bitter pill of economic reform.

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  • Distribution of the Searchlight newspaper to every home in the three wards did not deter enough voters from supporting the fascists.

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  • This will not come easy to European leaders who share with their voters a deep skepticism toward using force for political ends.

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  • There is no clarity as to the proportion between registered voters and people eligible for registration, which makes any judgment speculative.

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  • Many politicians used the psychological fears of the West Coasters against the Japanese Americans to gain political stature among the voters.

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  • To sway voters we are seeing was being developed.

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  • As the alienation of voters increases, technology is increasingly been touted as a magical cure for this pressing political problem.

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  • At the same time Dobson is quite prepared to use Blair 's patronage to tug on the heartstrings of Labor voters.

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  • Unlike the real election, there was a good turnout of voters, 85 per cent.

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  • To the Blair camp, unfortunately, this is simply a political problem: how to avoid alienating uncommitted voters.

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  • This whole thing about ' undecided voters ' being the key to the US election.

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  • A: Unionist voters on the ground simply are not asking about the Agreement.

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  • Moreover, it is manifestly unpopular with Scottish voters.

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  • We already have regional government by quango and civil servant - the point is to make regional viceroys answerable to local voters.

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  • Shortly afterward, the voters in Holland expressed the same view by an even larger majority 58% to 42 %.

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  • Of all possible voting systems, the single transferable vote gives the maximum power to individual voters over the choice of their local representatives.

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  • The Democrats were snookered because they could n't say that they were against homosexual equality without alienating voters who were already in the bag.

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  • The government can also appeal to disillusioned heartland voters, by claiming to be improving inner-city schools.

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  • The Chancellor must convince skeptical voters that the fruits of the strong economy have not been squandered.

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  • I have a solid team of local activists who are out every day leafleting and canvassing the voters of Tyne Bridge.

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  • A description such as " Save Kidderminster Hospital " or " No to George Bush " would remind voters of what you stand for.

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  • The voters in each constituency will elect a single person to represent them in the House of Commons.

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  • The Belfast Agreement was endorsed by 71.1 per cent of NI voters in a referendum held on 22 May.

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  • Many Conservative voters either did n't turn out or voted for another party.

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  • They see an issue that appeals to first-time voters who do n't seem to care about anything else very much.

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  • There is already enough such information displayed in the polling station, or included in the instructions sent to postal voters.

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  • The second stage, an open primary for all eligible voters, was replaced by opinion polls.

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  • Voters, meanwhile, are hoping the upcoming presidential elections will spell an end to the economic downturn and their pension woes.

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  • Presumably he thinks free childcare will woo back the female voters who have fallen out of love with him over Iraq.

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  • Spencer Fitz-Gibbon National Executive It is interesting to note the Liberal Democrats efforts to woo disenchanted Tory voters.

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  • Voters find the peaceable kingdom in which they have lived for so long shattered by the brutal emergence of yob rule.

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  • The politicians are hoping that the voters pay most attention to the positive ramification in the bill.

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  • If she can convince hundreds of thousands of people to go buy a book simply by saying she liked it, there really is no telling how much pull she will have with voters in the next upcoming election.

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  • It was the third time the winners of these pop culture awards were decided by online voters instead of a Gallup poll.

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  • Since the voters tended to be internet-savvy, the winners reflected a younger, more hip group than in years past.

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  • New York and Oklahoma have also developed universal pre-K programs, and Florida voters have approved a constitutional amendment for a free pre-school program to be available for all four-year-olds by 2005.

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  • In 1980 voters in Dade County, Florida, made English their official language.

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  • In 1986 California voters passed Proposition 63 that made English the state's official language.

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  • From deaths, divorces, marriage records, to births, business filings, property, unclaimed property, voters, government employees and missing persons, the list of public information databases is very long.

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  • The financing plan was carefully developed to appeal to voters who had little money to spare to finance a bridge in the middle of the Great Depression.

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  • In the week before the election, Brezny's campaign started to pick up a lot of support, and the candidate responded by taking out an ad in the newspaper explaining why voters should not vote for him.

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  • Even without an official ceremony and with comments about the awards being in poor taste, the Razzie Awards still have a large following and feature voters in 20 different countries worldwide.

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  • With the accolades from judges, good numbers from the voters and rave reviews from the guest artists on the show, Lambert seemed like the heir apparent for the American Idol throne.

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  • Boyd surprised millions of voters when he clinched the title of America's Got Talent Season 3 winner in 2008.

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  • They point to the short lived reality show Homeland Security, the take-off on Cops that deals with terrorism rather than street crime, as a tool to convince voters that the government is effectively protecting the country.

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  • During the 2008 Presidential election, social networks played a significant role for voters aged 18 to 29.

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  • A research study from the Pew Research Center found that 42% of voters in that key demographic obtained their campaign news and updates from the Internet, and more specifically social network sites.

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  • Politicians who grasp the power of the Internet can harness it to reach a demographic of voters who are less likely to watch television advertisements and debates, but are more willing to read position papers, post its and profiles.

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  • That said, there are many who would argue that social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook helped Obama win the election, because they gave him more credibility with younger voters.

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  • "The final decision of which candidate is best suited for the job rests with you, the voters," he added.

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  • At the general elections of March I9o9, over a score of Clerical deputies were returned, Clericals of a very mild tone who had no thought of the temporal power and were supporters of the monarchy and anti-socialists; where no Clerical candidate was in the field the Catholic voters plumped for the constitutional candidate against all representatives of the Extreme Left.

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  • 2 A law passed in 1887, requiring all voters to take an oath against polygamy, with the object of disfranchising Mormons, was declared unconstitutional by the State Supreme Court.

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  • At the election of 1904 an amendment was adopted which provides that whenever 10% of the voters of the state, as shown by the votes of the last preceding election, express a wish that any law or resolution of the legislature shall be submitted to the people, the Act or Resolve shall be voted on at the next election of the state or county officers, and if a majority of the voters approve the measure it shall stand; otherwise, it shall become void.

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  • The effect of this was that in January 1835 the legislature passed a bill for submitting the question legally to all the voters of the state, although this bill itself limited the proposed convention's power relating to representation by providing that it should so amend the constitution that senators be chosen by districts according to public taxes, and that commoners be apportioned by districts according to Federal representation, i.e.

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  • The voters were to choose one-tenth of their number (notabilities of the commune); one-tenth of these would form the notabilities of the department; while by a similar decimal sifting, the notabilities of the nation were selected.

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  • 2 A law passed in 1887, requiring all voters to take an oath against polygamy, with the object of disfranchising Mormons, was declared unconstitutional by the State Supreme Court.

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  • The voters were to choose one-tenth of their number (notabilities of the commune); one-tenth of these would form the notabilities of the department; while by a similar decimal sifting, the notabilities of the nation were selected.

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