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voter

voter

voter Sentence Examples

  • Some require that the voter shall be able to read and understand the Constitution.

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  • There was as yet no secret ballot to set the voter free.

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  • But under the second constitution the most that was required of any white voter was the payment to the state er county of taxes on either personal or real property, and by an amendment of 1826 this requirement was abolished.

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  • There was a guy who'd give you the money and tell you the name of the voter you were supposed to be.

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  • In addition to the ordinary suffrage qualifications of age, sex, and residence, the voter must have paid all taxes due from him for the two years immediately preceding the election, and he must be able to read any section of the constitution or "be able to understand the same when read to him, or give a reasonable interpretation thereof."

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  • An elector must be able to read or write (unless he or an ancestor was a voter in 1866 or then lived in some foreign nation) and must be 21 years old, and a resident of the state for one year, in the county six months, and in the election precinct 30 days, and women have the privilege of voting at school meetings.

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  • of Hugh the Abbot, successor of Robert the Strong, each voter having been won over by gift of abbeys, counties or manors.

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  • It is said that, on this occasion, a voter, who did not know him, came up to him, and giving him his sherd, desired him to write upon it the name of Aristides.

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  • 3 Any citizen of Maryland may be elected to the office who is thirty years of age or over, who has been for ten years a citizen of the state, who has lived in the state for five years immediately preceding election, and who is at the time of his election a qualified voter therein.

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  • The town voter being mainly British, the bill met with the bitter opposition of the Bond members, who declared that its object was the extinction of their parliamentary power.

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  • MUGWUMP, in American political slang, a name applied to any independent voter, and especially to those independents in the Republican party who refused to support James G.

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  • MUGWUMP, in American political slang, a name applied to any independent voter, and especially to those independents in the Republican party who refused to support James G.

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  • The constitution requires that a voter must (in addition to other qualifications) either be able to show conclusively ability to read and write, or be the owner of property within the state assessed at not less than $300, on which, if personalty, all taxes are paid.

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  • To vote in elections to the Senate the voter must have reached the age of twenty-six.

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  • Every female citizen having the qualifications of a male voter may vote in the city and town elections for members of the school committee.

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  • Voter," in Nischl's Lehrbuch der Patrol.

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  • An educational test (dating from 1857) is exacted for the privilege of voting, every voter being required to be able to read the constitution of the commonwealth in the English language, and to write his name.

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  • The secretary of state is required to mail to every voter whose address he has a pamphlet containing the text of the laws to be voted upon at the ensuing election.

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  • A voter is qualified on an income from property of £6, or by paying rent to the same amount, or having the qualifications required to serve as a common juror.

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  • Every registered voter belonging to the party in the local election area for which party candidates are to be nominated is presumably entitled to vote in the primary.

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  • After the 1st of January 1915 no one may qualify as a voter under the first or second of these clauses (the " grandfather " and " understanding " clauses); but those who shall have registered under their requirements before the 1st of January 1915 thus become voters for life.

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  • Again, the voter, especially the ignorant one, refrains from scratching his ticket, lest in some way he should fail to comply with the technicalities of the law and his vote be lost.

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  • On the other hand, if local elections are held on the " off " or odd year, and there be no national or state candidates, the voter feels much more free to select only those candidates whom he considers best qualified for the various offices.

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  • The same law prescribes conditions under which children between fourteen and eighteen years of age may be employed in the manufacture of white-lead, red-lead, paints, phosphorus, poisonous acids, tobacco or cigars, in mercantile establishments, stores, hotels, offices or in other places requiring protection to their health or safety; and it forbids the employment of boys under sixteen years of age or of girls under eighteen years of age in such factories or establishments more than ten hours a day (unless it be to prepare for a short day) or for more than fifty-eight hours to be chosen for the same term of service each voter shall vote for one only, and when three are to be chosen he shall vote for no more than two; candidates highest in vote shall be declared elected."

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  • The term of senators is four years, that of representatives two years; and in the election of representatives since 1870 there has been a provision for "minority" representation, under which by cumulative voting each voter may cast as many votes for one candidate as there are representatives to be chosen, or he may distribute his votes (giving three votes to one candidate, or 12 votes each to two candidates, or one vote each to three candidates), the candidate or candidates receiving the highest number of votes being elected.

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  • A voter must be twenty-three years of age, must have been a resident of the municipality for six months, must not be a citizen or subject of any foreign country, and must possess at least one of the following qualifications: have been an office-holder under Spanish rule, own real estate worth Soo pesos, pay taxes amounting annually to 30 pesos, or be able to speak, read and write either Spanish or English.

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  • An amendment of 1893 requires the exhibition of a poll-tax receipt by every voter (except those " who make satisfactory proof that they have attained the age of twenty-one years since the time of assessing taxes next preceding " the election).

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  • The qualifications required for the suffrage are in no way different from those common throughout the Union, except that by a constitutional amendment of 1894 it is necessary for a voter to be able to read the state constitution and write his name.

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  • Suffrage is conferred upon both men and women, and the right to vote at a general election is given to all citizens of the United States who have attained the age of twenty-one years, are able to read the constitution, and have resided in the state one year and in the county sixty days immediately preceding, with the exception of idiots, insane persons, and persons convicted of an infamous crime; at a school election the voter must also own property on which taxes are paid.

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  • There is a State Voter's League similar to that of Illinois.

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  • be a British subject of European descent, must be thirty years old, be a parliamentary voter in one of the provinces, have lived for five years in the Union, and if an elected member be possessed of immovable property within the Union of the clear value of £500.

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  • The qualifications of parliamentary voters are those which existed in the several colonies at the establishment of the Union, save that " no member of His Majesty's regular forces on full pay " can be registered as a voter.

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  • and within 15 m.); (3) entitled to elect to the office of county councillor (for this qualification no property qualification is required, but the office of a councillor elected on this qualification only becomes vacant if for six months he ceases to reside within the county); (4) a peer owning property in the county; (5) registered as a parliamentary voter in respect of the ownership of property in the county.

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  • A borough councillor must be qualified in the same manner as a county councillor, and he is disqualified in the same way, with this addition, that a peer or ownership voter is not qualified as such, and that a person is disqualified for being a borough councillor if he is in holy orders or is the regular minister of a Dissenting congregation.

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  • No one not an elector in 1892 can be registered as a voter unless he can sign his name and write his address and occupation.

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  • There was a guy who'd give you the money and tell you the name of the voter you were supposed to be.

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  • How can we overcome voter apathy?

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  • In short, voter apathy should have come top of the list by a country mile, not bottom.

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  • Concerns over student voter apathy in the general election will be debated on the conference floor in a debate on citizenship.

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  • Could it be that they fear a massive voter backlash from people who don't want to be part of their coolie class?

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  • The high turnout, attitude, passion, enthusiasm, patience, tolerance and orderly conduct of the Ghanaian voter are applauded.

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  • Angus MacNeil (SNP) asked about voter confusion under the current system and said STV maximized power to voters.

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  • Far more drastic action is needed to address the underlying problem of voter cynicism - greater localism is the only effective remedy.

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  • The practice of our politics Of course it is for each individual party to frame its own response to the challenge of voter disengagement.

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  • Spokesman Mark Almond said only Labor's overwhelming victory prevented a firestorm of protests against voter fraud.

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  • floating voter in recent years.

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  • gulf between voter expectations of higher public spending and their actual experience.

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  • heuristics literature concedes readily that the type of voter who can benefit from them is typically the more politically aware and interested.

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  • Far more drastic action is needed to address the underlying problem of voter cynicism - greater localism is the only effective remedy.

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  • Are we really saying that an increase in voter turnout to 35% represents democratic nirvana?

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  • The voter registration period itself runs from 10 to 30 November.

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  • Another is that some parts of central Iraq populated by the once dominant Sunni community remain too restive to assure a large voter turnout.

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  • swing voter in a marginal seat then my vote is valuable.

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  • The government has looked at ways of boosting voter turnout, which fell to 59% in the last general election in 2001.

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  • The likely outcome of the election campaign is a fall in voter turnout.

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  • Become a bit of a floating voter in recent years.

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  • voter apathy is a pressing concern to everyone involved in British politics.

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  • voter turnout.

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  • voter turn-out.

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  • voter registration period itself runs from 10 to 30 November.

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  • voter intimidation and interference by security forces in the earlier rounds of elections.

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  • If I'm a middle class swing voter in a marginal seat then my vote is valuable.

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  • wavering ex-Labour voter on the doorstep they'll say, " Well it's either us or the Tories.

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  • Voter," in Nischl's Lehrbuch der Patrol.

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  • In addition to the ordinary suffrage qualifications of age, sex, and residence, the voter must have paid all taxes due from him for the two years immediately preceding the election, and he must be able to read any section of the constitution or "be able to understand the same when read to him, or give a reasonable interpretation thereof."

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  • To defend it on the ground that it created and stimulated the national consciousness is hardly reconcilable with the historic remark of the voter who voted against Aristides because he wished to hear no more of his incorruptible integrity; moreover in democratic Athens the "national consciousness" was, if anything, too frequently stimulated in the ordinary course of government.

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  • The constitution requires that a voter must (in addition to other qualifications) either be able to show conclusively ability to read and write, or be the owner of property within the state assessed at not less than $300, on which, if personalty, all taxes are paid.

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  • It is said that, on this occasion, a voter, who did not know him, came up to him, and giving him his sherd, desired him to write upon it the name of Aristides.

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  • An Australian ballot law was enacted in 1891; the qualifications for electors (adopted in 1896) require that the voter be at least twenty-one years old, that he shall have been a full citizen of the United States for three months prior to the election, and shall have lived in the state six months and in the election district thirty days.

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  • A voter is qualified on an income from property of £6, or by paying rent to the same amount, or having the qualifications required to serve as a common juror.

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  • An educational test (dating from 1857) is exacted for the privilege of voting, every voter being required to be able to read the constitution of the commonwealth in the English language, and to write his name.

    0
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  • Every female citizen having the qualifications of a male voter may vote in the city and town elections for members of the school committee.

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  • But under the second constitution the most that was required of any white voter was the payment to the state er county of taxes on either personal or real property, and by an amendment of 1826 this requirement was abolished.

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  • To vote in elections to the Senate the voter must have reached the age of twenty-six.

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  • 3 Any citizen of Maryland may be elected to the office who is thirty years of age or over, who has been for ten years a citizen of the state, who has lived in the state for five years immediately preceding election, and who is at the time of his election a qualified voter therein.

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  • Another evil which has not yet been dealt with is the large number of posts for which the voter is expected, at an.

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  • Every registered voter belonging to the party in the local election area for which party candidates are to be nominated is presumably entitled to vote in the primary.

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  • In most states the voter is required, when he obtains his ballot at the primary election, to declare to which party he belongs, but sometimes the primary is open and he may vote for any one of the persons who are put forward as desiring to be selected as candidates.

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  • After the 1st of January 1915 no one may qualify as a voter under the first or second of these clauses (the " grandfather " and " understanding " clauses); but those who shall have registered under their requirements before the 1st of January 1915 thus become voters for life.

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  • Some require that the voter shall be able to read and understand the Constitution.

    0
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  • Again, the voter, especially the ignorant one, refrains from scratching his ticket, lest in some way he should fail to comply with the technicalities of the law and his vote be lost.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, if local elections are held on the " off " or odd year, and there be no national or state candidates, the voter feels much more free to select only those candidates whom he considers best qualified for the various offices.

    0
    0
  • The same law prescribes conditions under which children between fourteen and eighteen years of age may be employed in the manufacture of white-lead, red-lead, paints, phosphorus, poisonous acids, tobacco or cigars, in mercantile establishments, stores, hotels, offices or in other places requiring protection to their health or safety; and it forbids the employment of boys under sixteen years of age or of girls under eighteen years of age in such factories or establishments more than ten hours a day (unless it be to prepare for a short day) or for more than fifty-eight hours to be chosen for the same term of service each voter shall vote for one only, and when three are to be chosen he shall vote for no more than two; candidates highest in vote shall be declared elected."

    0
    0
  • The term of senators is four years, that of representatives two years; and in the election of representatives since 1870 there has been a provision for "minority" representation, under which by cumulative voting each voter may cast as many votes for one candidate as there are representatives to be chosen, or he may distribute his votes (giving three votes to one candidate, or 12 votes each to two candidates, or one vote each to three candidates), the candidate or candidates receiving the highest number of votes being elected.

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  • A voter must be twenty-three years of age, must have been a resident of the municipality for six months, must not be a citizen or subject of any foreign country, and must possess at least one of the following qualifications: have been an office-holder under Spanish rule, own real estate worth Soo pesos, pay taxes amounting annually to 30 pesos, or be able to speak, read and write either Spanish or English.

    0
    0
  • An amendment of 1893 requires the exhibition of a poll-tax receipt by every voter (except those " who make satisfactory proof that they have attained the age of twenty-one years since the time of assessing taxes next preceding " the election).

    0
    0
  • The qualifications required for the suffrage are in no way different from those common throughout the Union, except that by a constitutional amendment of 1894 it is necessary for a voter to be able to read the state constitution and write his name.

    0
    0
  • Suffrage is conferred upon both men and women, and the right to vote at a general election is given to all citizens of the United States who have attained the age of twenty-one years, are able to read the constitution, and have resided in the state one year and in the county sixty days immediately preceding, with the exception of idiots, insane persons, and persons convicted of an infamous crime; at a school election the voter must also own property on which taxes are paid.

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  • There is a State Voter's League similar to that of Illinois.

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  • be a British subject of European descent, must be thirty years old, be a parliamentary voter in one of the provinces, have lived for five years in the Union, and if an elected member be possessed of immovable property within the Union of the clear value of £500.

    0
    0
  • The qualifications of parliamentary voters are those which existed in the several colonies at the establishment of the Union, save that " no member of His Majesty's regular forces on full pay " can be registered as a voter.

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  • and within 15 m.); (3) entitled to elect to the office of county councillor (for this qualification no property qualification is required, but the office of a councillor elected on this qualification only becomes vacant if for six months he ceases to reside within the county); (4) a peer owning property in the county; (5) registered as a parliamentary voter in respect of the ownership of property in the county.

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  • A borough councillor must be qualified in the same manner as a county councillor, and he is disqualified in the same way, with this addition, that a peer or ownership voter is not qualified as such, and that a person is disqualified for being a borough councillor if he is in holy orders or is the regular minister of a Dissenting congregation.

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  • No one not an elector in 1892 can be registered as a voter unless he can sign his name and write his address and occupation.

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  • A voter of non-European descent is not qualified for election to parliament (see further South Africa).

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  • The town voter being mainly British, the bill met with the bitter opposition of the Bond members, who declared that its object was the extinction of their parliamentary power.

    0
    0
  • The secretary of state is required to mail to every voter whose address he has a pamphlet containing the text of the laws to be voted upon at the ensuing election.

    0
    0
  • There was as yet no secret ballot to set the voter free.

    0
    0
  • An elector must be able to read or write (unless he or an ancestor was a voter in 1866 or then lived in some foreign nation) and must be 21 years old, and a resident of the state for one year, in the county six months, and in the election precinct 30 days, and women have the privilege of voting at school meetings.

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  • of Hugh the Abbot, successor of Robert the Strong, each voter having been won over by gift of abbeys, counties or manors.

    0
    0
  • The voter registration period itself runs from 10 to 30 November.

    0
    0
  • Another is that some parts of central Iraq populated by the once dominant Sunni community remain too restive to assure a large voter turnout.

    0
    0
  • If I 'm a middle class swing voter in a marginal seat then my vote is valuable.

    0
    0
  • The government has looked at ways of boosting voter turnout, which fell to 59% in the last general election in 2001.

    0
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  • The likely outcome of the election campaign is a fall in voter turnout.

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  • THE PROBLEM Voter apathy is a pressing concern to everyone involved in British politics.

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  • MDC election campaign co-ordinator Victor Moyo conceded the opposition party was unhappy with the poor voter turn-out.

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  • Egyptian judges monitoring the polls have also complained of voter intimidation and interference by security forces in the earlier rounds of elections.

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  • To the wavering ex-Labour voter on the doorstep they'll say, Well it 's either us or the Tories.

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  • The swing to the right in the voter survey were considered to be a short-term aberration and of no consequence to the election.

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  • Irregardless of the reasons behind the increase in young voter turnout, the higher numbers are a good thing.

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  • Past efforts include increasing charitable giving incentives, protection of lobbying activity rights, voter education provisions and preserving tax exemptions for Minnesota nonprofits.

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  • During the civil rights movement, Bond founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and participated in many civil rights protests and African American voter registration efforts.

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  • Another evil which has not yet been dealt with is the large number of posts for which the voter is expected, at an.

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