This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

voted

voted Sentence Examples

  • Why Quinn wasn't voted the least likely to land the school's prom queen beauty, I'll never know.

  • Ben, we voted you in so we're willing to give you the ball.

  • Dean's marriage to Cynthia hadn't helped break the tie as she wisely refused to divulge to either of them how she voted.

  • You couldn't have been twenty-one during the war and voted for FDR.

  • I voted for Franklin Delano Roosevelt five or six times.

  • Even if you were a hundred, you'd only have voted four times.

  • In any case, my husband, Mike—who was voted to be the liaison with the soldiers—isn't likely to let it happen.

  • Just tell her the Parkside Betterment Society voted for Billie and Willie to improve the city by getting lost.

  • Here it is sufficient to say that only nine of the forty-six delegates from the present state of West Virginia voted to secede.

  • Some delegates favoured the immediate formation of a new state, but the more far-sighted members argued that as the ordinance had not yet been voted upon by the people, and Virginia was still in the Union, such action would be revolutionary, since the United States Constitution provides that no state may be divided without its consent.

  • Berkeley and Jefferson counties lying on the Potomac east of the mountains, in 1863, with the consent of the " Reorganized " government of Virginia voted in favour of annexation to West Virginia.

  • In July 1871 he was returned to the National Assembly for Marseilles at a by-election, and voted steadily with the Republican party.

  • On the 7th of December, to his lasting dishonour, he voted for the condemnation of Lord Stafford.

  • It culminated in 1864, when the country clergy, provoked by the final acquittal of the essayists, had voted in convocation against the endowment of the Greek chair.

  • The president and vicepresident are voted for by separate tickets.

  • The increase in the tonnage of sailing vessels, which in other countries tends to decline, was due to the bounties voted by parliament to its merchant sailing fleet with the view of increasing the number of skilled seamen.

  • When the Chamber of Deputies has voted the budget it is submitted to a similar course of procedure in the Senate.

  • Communal Finances.The budget of the commune is prepared by the mayor, voted by the municipal council and approved by the prefect.

  • After attempting to govern under these conditions for nearly two years, the prince, with the consent of the tsar Alexander III., assumed absolute power (May 9, 1881), and a suspension of the ultra-democratic constitution for a period of seven years was voted by a specially convened assembly (July 13).

  • In 1879 a congress assembled in the rooms of the Geographical Society at Paris, under the presidency of Admiral de la Ronciere le Noury, and voted in favour of the making of the Panama Canal.

  • He voted consistently on the Radical side, but his chief energies were devoted to promoting the cause of Italian unity.

  • holder and had voted a large grant of supplies.

  • Propositions to establish the judiciary on a more permanent tenure were also voted down in 1814, 1822, 1857 and 1870, and the state still elects its judges for two years' terms. On its own suggestion, the council of censors was abolished in 1870 and the present method of amending the constitution was adopted.

  • The first legislature of the state met at Windsor in March 1778, and voted to admit sixteen towns east of the Connecticut river which were dissatisfied with the rule of New Hampshire.

  • On her accession Elizabeth refused to allow him to kiss her hand; but he sat and voted in the parliament and convocation of 1559.

  • In 1896 and 1900 he voted the Republican ticket, but did not ally himself with the organization.

  • The number of electors (2,541,327) at the general election in 1904 was 29% of the male population over twenty-one years of age, and 7~6% of the total population exclusive of those temporarily disfranchised on account of military service; and of these 627% voted.

  • The demands of the Commission were only partly complied with, but a large special grant was voted amounting to at least 1/2I,ooo,000 per annum for the next seven years.

  • the gth it voted the downfall of the temporal power and proclaimed the republic. Mazzini hurried p~c7ama to Rome to see his dream realized, and was chosen tlon,of the head of the Triumvirate.

  • The assembly voted: Venice resists the Austrians at all costs, and the citizens and soldiers, strengthened by the arrival of volunteers from all parts of Italy, including Pepe, who was given the chief command of the defenders, showed the most splendid devotion in their hopeless task.

  • Constituent assemblies met and voted for unity under Victor Emmanuel, but the king could not openly accept the proposal owing to the emperors opposition, backed by the presence of French armies in Lombardy; at a word from Napoleon there might have been an Austrian, and perhaps a Franco-Austrian, invasion of central Italy.

  • The railway redemption contracts were in fact immediately voted by parliament, with a clause pledging the government to legislate in favor of farming out the railways to private companies.

  • The Chamber, though convinced of the danger of this reform, the perils of which were incisively demonstrated by Sella, voted by an overwhelming majority for an immediate reduction of the impost by onefourth, and its complete abolition within four years.

  • In fact, the conventionf were only voted by a majority of twenty-three votes after the government had undertaken to increase the length of new statebuilt lines from 1500 to 2500 kilometres.

  • eager for revenge, voted a credit of 200,000, and sanctioned the despatch of reinforcements.

  • The financial situation continued satisfactory; a new loan at 3~% was voted by the Chamber in April 1902, and by June the whole of it had been placed in Italy.

  • Credits for the army and navy were voted almost without a dissentient voice; new battleships were laid down, the strength of the army was increased, and the defences of the exposed eastern border were strengthened.

  • He was voted guilty by the Commons; but while the Lords were disputing whether the accused peer should have bail, and whether the charges amounted to more than a misdemeanour, parliament was prorogued on the 30th of December and dissolved three weeks later.

  • A motion was passed for his committal by the Lords, who, as in Clarendon's case, voted his banishment.

  • He appears to have thought that William would not claim the crown,' and at first supported the theory that the throne having been vacated by James's flight the succession fell as of right to Mary; but as this met with little support, and was rejected both by William and by Mary herself, he voted against the regency and joined with 7 Add.

  • He voted for the exclusion of James, duke of York, from the throne, and made overtures to William, prince of Orange, and consequently in 168r he lost both his secretaryship and his seat on the privy council.

  • The address in reply to the speech from the throne, voted after a debate in which abstract theories had triumphed over common sense, demanded universal suffrage, the establishment of pure parliamentary government, the abolition of capital punishment, the expropriation of the landlords, a political amnesty, and the suppression of the Imperial Council.

  • Goremykin, who had succeeded Witte at the head of the government, met these preposterous demands with a flat refusal, the House voted, on the motion of M.

  • That in the work of restoring its military position the Russian government had the support of the Russian parliament was proved by a subsidy of Li 1,000,000 voted by the Duma, on the 30th of December 1909, for the special service of the reorganization and redistribution of the army.

  • At the election of 1904 an amendment was adopted which provides that whenever 10% of the voters of the state, as shown by the votes of the last preceding election, express a wish that any law or resolution of the legislature shall be submitted to the people, the Act or Resolve shall be voted on at the next election of the state or county officers, and if a majority of the voters approve the measure it shall stand; otherwise, it shall become void.

  • Moreover, as state officers were to be chosen at the same time that the constitution was voted on, disappointed candidates for party nominations fought against ratification.

  • After three months' tenure of this office he was returned by the department to the Constituent Assembly, where he voted with the Mountain, and brought forward the celebrated motion for the abolition of the presidential office.

  • On the 27th of April 1899 a new autonomous constitution was voted by a constituent assembly, and in the following June the local administration was handed over to Cretan officials by the international authorities.

  • of October the Cretan Assembly once more voted the union with Greece, and in the absence of M.

  • On the 26th of May 1908 the people of the state voted " against the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors " in the state; the prohibition act thus approved went into effect on the 1st of January 1909.

  • State prohibition had been defeated in 1881 by a vote of 100,000; in 1902 the Anti-Saloon League organized in the state; in 1903 the Watts Law enacted rural prohibition, giving towns local option, under which many of the towns voted " no licence "; and in 1905 severe police regulations were provided for towns in which saloons were licensed.

  • 25 a favourable to the East, voted strongly for it and carried the election with a total majority in the state of 5856 votes.

  • He successfully opposed a bill providing for what would have been practically an irredeemable currency, and he voted against the bill for chartering the second United States bank, although it provided for the redemp - tion of bank notes in specie, because he objected to permitting the government to have so large a share in its management.

  • c. 14, known as the Pleuro-pneumonia Act 1890, which transferred the powers of local authorities to slaughter and pay compensation in cases of pleuro-pneumonia to the Board of Agriculture, and provided further for the payment of such compensation out of money specifically voted by parliament.

  • c. 47 power was given to the Board of Agriculture to use the sums voted on account of pleuro-pneumonia for paying the costs involved in dealing with foot-and-mouth disease; under this act the board could order the slaughter of diseased animals and of animals in contact with these, and could pay compensation for animals so slaughtered.

  • The republicans in nearly every case voted for him: and it is significant of the curious trend of French thought that the new imperial constitution of the 18th of May 1804 opened with the words: "The government of the Republic is confided to an emperor, who takes the title Emperor of the French."

  • He was of the party of the "Mountain," and voted for the abolition of royalty and the death of the king.

  • Since 18 9 4 women who possess the usual qualifications required of men may vote for and be voted for as members of boards of education.

  • Opposed to the Reconstruction measures, he voted for them on the ground that it was better to accept than reject them, since they were probably the best that could be obtained.

  • Large sums were voted loosely, and expended by executive boards without any budgetary control.

  • On a referendum in 1895 on the expediency of granting municipal suffrage to women only 59.08% of the women who were registered voted, and probably less than 10% of those entitled to be registered.

  • He favoured the anti-strike clause of the Cummins Railway bill, and voted for return of the lines to their owners within a year after the end of the war.

  • He voted for the Lodge reservations and also for the Reed reservation that the United States alone should judge whether matters of direct interest to it should be brought before the League; and finally he voted against ratification of the Treaty as submitted by President Wilson.

  • Nevertheless, when the trial proceeded, he voted with the majority which declared Louis to be guilty, but recommended that the penalty should be postponed until the cessation of hostilities, and that the sentence should then be ratified by the Convention or by some other legislative body.

  • He voted for the death of Louis XVI., without appeal or delay, but played no noticeable part in the Convention.

  • The Empire heaped favours upon him, but in 1814 he abandoned Napoleon, and voted for his deposition.

  • After careful study of playground systems a bond issue of $800,000 was voted (1919) to initiate a constructive development of parks and playgrounds at public expense.

  • Parliament voted her £ 20,000 in 1660 for the payment of her debts, but Elizabeth did not receive the money, and on the 19th of May 1661 she left the Hague for England, in spite of the king's attempts to hinder her journey, receiving no official welcome on her arrival in London and being lodged at Lord Craven's house in Drury Lane.

  • A sum of 20 millions sterling was voted as compensation to the planters.

  • For the renewal of its privileges in 1890 the company finally agreed to give the state $1,250,000 yearly, and despite strenuous opposition by a powerful party the legislature voted a renewal, but this measure was vetoed by the governor.

  • In 1784 and 1786 sums were voted in parliament to indemnify the descendants of the old lords proprietors, and the islands.

  • New construction to an amount of £T5,000,000, repayable over ten years at the rate of £T50o,000 a year by national subscription guaranteed by the government, had by 1910 been voted by parliament.

  • These were immediately to be taken in hand, and considerable sums are being voted for repairs of existing customs buildings and the construction of new buildings.

  • Further expenditure was voted in the course of 1909, to be met by an extraordinary budget.

  • Of the sums really received the ministry of finance expended some £T3,000,000, in payment of the Greek indemnity, in repayment of £Ti,000,000 of advances to the treasury and by assigning the credit voted to the ordnance department, and it was stated that these payments exhausted the extraordinary resources.

  • election at which it is voted.

  • He was chosen to draft the resolution of thanks voted by the legislature to General Andrew Jackson after the battle of New Orleans.

  • He voted for the tariff of 1824, then gradually abandoned the protectionist position.

  • In the debate on the "tariff of abominations" in 1828 he took no part, but voted for the measure in obedience to instructions from the New York legislature - an action which was cited against him as late as the presidential campaign of 1844.

  • In the election of 1860 he voted for the fusion ticket in New York which was opposed to Abraham Lincoln, but he could not approve of President Buchanan's course in dealing with secession, and later supported Lincoln.

  • In 1812 he purchased a seat in parliament for Weymouth and voted as a Tory.

  • Until the reform of the comitia centuriata (probabl' during the censorship of Gaius Flaminius in 220 B.C.; *see Comitia),` the equites had voted first, but after that time this privilege was transferred to tine cenfury selected by lot from the centuries of ' the equites and the first class.

  • The equites then voted with the first class, the distinction between the sex suffrakia and the other centuries being abolished.

  • Counts of princely rank (gefiirstete Grafen) voted among the princes in the imperial diet; the others (Reichsgrafen) were grouped in the Grafenbanke - originally two, to which two more were added in the 17th century - each of which had one vote.

  • The president sanctions and promulgates, or vetoes, or ignores the laws and resolutions voted by congress, and issues decrees and regulations for their execution.

  • In 1859 Siena was the first Tuscan city that voted for annexation to Piedmont and the monarchy of Victor Emmanuel II., this decision (voted 26th June) being the initial step towards the unity of Italy.

  • In 1910 £30,000 was voted for the University College buildings.

  • As deputy to the Convention, Saliceti voted for the death of Louis XVI., and was sent to Corsica on mission to oppose the counter-revolutionary intrigues.

  • At the diet of Buda, early in 1444, supplies were voted for the enterprise, and Wladislaus was on the point of quitting his camp at Szeged for the seat of war, when envoys from Sultan Murad arrived with the offer of a ten years' truce on such favourable conditions (they included the relinquishment of Servia, Walachia and Moldavia, and the payment of an indemnity) that Hunyadi persuaded the king to conclude (in July) a peace which gave him more than could reasonably be anticipated from the most successful campaign.

  • The diet, indeed, voted him aids and subsidies, but the great nobles either forbade their collection within their estates, or confiscated the amount collected.

  • Every obstacle was opposed to the collection of the taxes which had been voted to put the kingdom in a state of defence.

  • This procrastinating policy played into the hands of the extremists; for supplies had not been voted, and the question of the credits for the expenditure incurred in connexion with the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, increasingly urgent, placed a powerful weapon in the hands of the Magyars, and made it certain that in the autumn the crisis would assume an even more acute form.

  • The matter was urgent; for parliament was to meet on the 28th, and it was important that a new cabinet, acceptable to it, should be appointed before that date, or that the Houses should be prorogued pending such appointment; otherwise the delegations would be postponed and no credits would be voted for the cost of the new Austro-Hungarian " Dreadnoughts " and of the annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina.

  • On the 28th the Hungarian parliament adjourned sine die, pending the settlement of the crisis, without having voted the estimates for 1910, and without there being any prospect of a meeting of the delegations.

  • In 1850 autonomy was voted by the general assembly at Rio de Janeiro, and on the 1st of January 1852 the province of Amazonas was formally installed.

  • The fact that many Slovenes voted against Yugoslavia was largely due to a desire to escape from all military service.

  • In the Convention he held apart from the various party sections, although he voted for the death of Louis XVI.

  • He voted for the death of Louis XVI., and as a member of the committees of national defence and of public safety he was despatched in October 1793 to Brittany, where he established the Terror.

  • He voted with the Orleanists the "Constitutional Laws" of 1875, and approved of MacMahon's parliamentary coup d'etat on the 16th of May 1877.

  • he voted for his death, without appeal or postponement.

  • He had, however, entered the ranks of the Girondins, and had voted in the trial of the king against the death penalty and in favour of the appeal to the people.

  • In 1814 he voted for Napoleon's abdication, which won for him a seat in the chamber of peers; but during the Hundred Days he served Napoleon, and in consequence, on the second Restoration, was for a short while excluded.

  • On the 28th of November he entered London in triumph, and on the 2nd of March 1641, reparation was voted by the Commons, at the expense of his persecutors.

  • Re-elected to the Convention he voted for the death of Louis XVI., and opposed the proposal to prosecute the authors of the massacre of September, "because among them there are heroes of Jemmapes."

  • The chamber of deputies voted him a state funeral.

  • He took his seat upon the Mountain, and showed himself one of the most vigorous Jacobins, particularly in his defence of Marat, on the 26th of February 1793; he voted for the execution of the king, and was elected a member of the Committee of General Security on the 21st of January 1793.

  • An embargo on trade with Flanders, voted in 1358 by a general assembly, resulted by 1360 in the full restoration of German privileges in Flanders, but reduced the counter at Bruges to an executive organ of a united town policy.

  • Lubeck, with the counters abroad, watched over the execution of the measures voted by the assembly, but there was no regular administrative mi.

  • In 1447 it was voted that admission be granted only by unanimous consent.

  • He warmly advocated the insertion in the Reconstruction Acts of a provision ensuring the early termination of military government; and he opposed the impeachment of President Johnson, though he voted for conviction on the trial.

  • He voted twice, but never spoke in the House.

  • In the critical division which ensued Gladstone voted with the government, who were left in a minority.

  • He received an address of sympathy from the consistory of Anduze, and a provision was voted for him by the Union Protestante Liberale, to enable him to continue his preaching.

  • Ifut it reserved the power of suppressing or suspending a newspaper, and against that reservation a majority of the lower house voted, session after session, only to see the bill rejected by the peers, who shared the governments opinion that to grant a larger measure of liberty would certainly encourage licence.

  • The budget is voted in either duchy for four years, a distinction being made between domain revenue and state revenue.

  • The parties of the Left in the chamber, united upon this question in the Bloc republicain, supported Combes in his application of the law of 1901 on the religious associations, and voted the new bill on the congregations (1904), and under his guidance France took the first definite steps toward the separation of church and state.

  • The state subsidy having been withdrawn, the Institute voted a yearly subscription of Io,000 francs and nominated a commission of five members, one for each section, who managed the Journal.

  • gave it to be understood that he would not look upon any member of the House of Lords who voted for the India Bill as his friend.

  • In the political troubles which preceded the outbreak of the Civil War, Hopton, as member of parliament successively for Bath, Somerset and Wells, at first opposed the royal policy, but after Strafford's attainder (for which he voted) he gradually became an ardent supporter of Charles, and at the beginning of the Great Rebellion he was made lieutenant-general under the marquess of Hertford in the west.

  • de Chenier in his La Write sur la famille de Chenier (1844) the Council of Five Hundred, and had voted for the death of Louis XVI.; he had a seat in the tribunate; he belonged to the committees of public instruction, of general security, and of public safety.

  • He was a strong opponent of the reconstruction measures of President Johnson, for whose conviction he voted (on most of the specific charges) in the impeachment trial.

  • Thereupon, although large stretches of territory were still in enemy occupation, the Taryba voted the provisional constitution, elected A.

  • It centralizes power in a council of five (mayor and four councilmen), nominated at a non-partisan primary and voted for on a non-partisan ticket by the electors of the entire city, ward divisions having been abolished.

  • In the Assembly, to which he was returned in 1791 by the department of Seine-et-Marne, he voted generally with the minority, and his views being obviously too moderate for his colleagues he resigned in 1792 and was soon after arrested on suspicion of being a reactionary.

  • On the 6th of June it was voted that all commissions should be signed by Lenthall and not by the commander-in-chief.

  • He was very hostile to the king, furnished a Rapport sur les crimes imputes a Louis Ca pet (loth of December 1792), and voted for the death of Louis without appeal or respite.

  • At the close of 1857, £8,000,000, of which the breakwater cost over £2,500,000, had been expended on the works; in 1889 a further sum of £680,000 was voted by the Chamber of Deputies for the improvement of the port.

  • State-wide prohibition of the sale of intoxicating liquors was voted down in 1887 and a local option law went into effect; in 1907, when there was no licence in 145 (out of 243) counties and licence only in parts of 51 other counties, a law was passed giving local option to parts of cities and towns.

  • he supported an appeal to the people, but voted for the death sentence.

  • Annexation to Piedmont having been voted by plebiscite and the opposition of Napoleon III.

  • He served in this body from 1835 until 1843, and here the marked inconsistency which characterized his public life became manifest; for when John Tyler had become president, had been "read out" of the Whig party, and had vetoed Whig measures (including a tariff bill), for which Cushing had voted, Cushing first defended the vetoes and then voted again for the bills.

  • a state was voted on as early as 1840, the Territory in that year having a population of 43,112; but the measure was defeated then, as it was again in 1842, by those who most wished to avoid an increase of taxes.

  • The year 1899 had been a costly one, £329,000 being voted in aid.

  • His influence in the estate of the clergy, however, was cast against the union of the three estates in a single assembly, and he voted in the minority of his order which in the middle of June opposed the merging of the clergy in the National Assembly.

  • When he resigned office in the early 'eighties he established the Semmon Gako, or school for special studies, at the cost of the 30,000 yen which had been voted him when he received the title of count, and subsequently he was instrumental in founding other schools and colleges.

  • During and after the war, for which he voted, he retired for a while into private life; but in 1872 he was again elected deputy, this time as a Legitimist, and took his seat among the extreme Right.

  • In the presidential election of 1896, when an unprecedentedly large vote was cast, the number of voters registered was nearly 20% of the population, and of these nearly 82% actually voted.

  • The popular majority kept up the feeling of hostility to the royal authority in recurrent combats in the legislative assembly over the salary to be voted to the governor; though these antagonisms were from time to time forgotten in the wars with the French and Indians.

  • At the Vatican council he vigorously maintained the rights of the bishops, and strongly opposed the dogma of papal infallibility, against which he voted as inopportune.

  • He had voted against the act of November 1549 for a reform of the canon law, and on a later occasion his nonconformity brought him into conflict with the Council; he was also the only bishop who satisfied Hooper's test of sacramental orthodoxy.

  • He was the only bishop who voted for the disestablishment of the Irish Church, though a scheme of concurrent endowment would have been much more agreeable to him.

  • Carnot was a stern and sincere republican, and voted for the execution of the king.

  • The second provided that whenever a majority of the members elected to each house of the legislature voted for an amendment and two-thirds of those elected to the next legislature approved, it should be submitted to the people for their adoption or rejection.

  • The House of Representatives, at first aghast, presently voted four millions as a beginning.

  • An Immigrants Exclusion Act voted by the general assembly in 1896 did not receive the royal assent; but, by arrangement with the colonial office, another measure, giving power to impose a reading test on aliens landing in the colony, became law in 1899.

  • Throughout the World War he belonged to the Governmental section of the Socialists, and voted in the Reichstag for the war credits.

  • During the Revolution he was elected by the department of Meurthe deputy to the Legislative Assembly and the Convention, where he attached himself to the Mountain and voted for the death of Louis XVI.

  • The annual reports, of which he was the chief author, became controversial pamphlets; he published bold replies to criticisms upon the work of the Commission; he explained its purposes to newspaper correspondents; when Congress refused to appropriate the amount which he believed essential for the work, he made the necessary economies by abandoning examinations of candidates for the Civil Service in those districts whose representatives in Congress had voted to reduce the appropriation, thus very shrewdly bringing their adverse vote into disfavour among their own constituents; and during the six years of his commissionership more than twenty thousand positions for government employes were taken out of the realm of merely political appointment and added to the classified service to be obtained and retained for merit only.

  • 15 a by Jerome Napoleon, but in 1906 money was voted for a new building on the Auetor.

  • In the long run, however, even this palliative ceased to work; and accordingly on June 5 1917 a new stiffening of the standing orders was voted, which sufficed in effect during the later period of the Parliament.

  • From 1822 to 1829 he was a member of the National House of Representatives,' and there voted for John Quincy Adams for the presidency, and served as chairman of the committee on agriculture.

  • In the trial of Louis XVI., Buzot voted for death, but with appeal to the people and postponement of sentence.

  • When both houses had voted loyal addresses, the question of the Civil List was considered, and a week or two later a message was brought to parliament requesting an increase of the grant formerly made to the duchess of Kent.

  • Government recommended an addition of £30,000 a year, which was voted, and before the close of the year a Civil List Bill was passed, settling £385,000 a year on the queen.

  • The dukes of Edinburgh, Connaught and Albany were each voted an income of £15,000, and £10,000 on marrying.

  • He declared himself an out-and-out republican and voted even with the socialists.

  • Large sums have been voted in Holland for the establishment of primary and secondary schools, and the government has undertaken to assist in the establishment of parochial schools, the object being that every village, at least in Java, should possess one.

  • He was a member of the German parliament at Frankfort in 1848, when he attached himself to the Right, and of the Erfurt parliament in 1850, when he voted against the Prussian Union.

  • the bulk of them had voted for the "appeal to the people," and so laid themselves open to the charge of "royalism"; they denounced the domination of Paris and summoned provincial levies to their aid, and so fell under suspicion of "federalism," though they rejected Buzot's proposal to transfer the Convention to Versailles.

  • On the 13th of June it voted that the city of Paris had deserved well of the country, and ordered the imprisonment of the detained deputies, the filling up of their places in the Assembly by their sup pleants, and the initiation of vigorous measures against the movement in the provinces.

  • He was sent by his department as deputy to the Convention, where he associated himself with the party of the Mountain and voted for the death of Louis XVI.

  • In the course of a few years this mileage was to be largely increased, Parliament having voted some 6,500 million crowns for further construction and improvements.

  • On the 8th of February 1871 he was elected a member of the National Assembly, in which he maintained that the republic was "the necessary form of national sovereignty," and voted for the continuation of the war; yet, though a member of the extreme Left, he was too clear-minded to sympathize with the Commune, and exerted his influence in vain on the side of moderation.

  • The apella voted on peace and war, treaties and foreign policy in general: it decided which of the kings should conduct a campaign and settled questions of disputed succession to the throne: it elected elders, ephors and other magistrates, emancipated helots and perhaps voted on legal proposals.

  • He strongly opposed secession, but finally voted for the Virginia ordinance, was commissioned brigadier-general in the Confederate army and served throughout the war.

  • Dollinger, however, voted against the proposition, and withdrew from any further steps towards the promotion of the movement.

  • In that year, however, a League for Municipal Improvements was formed; in February 1902 a loan of $1,000,000 for municipal improvements was voted, landscape gardeners and sewage engineers were consulted, and a nonpartisan mayor was elected, under whom great advances were made in street cleaning and street paving, a new filtration plant was completed, the river front was beautified and protected from flood, sewage was diverted from Paxton Creek, and the development of an extensive park system was undertaken.

  • He was unable to achieve much during his last term of office, as his health was greatly impaired; his Divorce Bill, although voted in the chamber, had to be withdrawn on account of the strong opposition of the country.

  • Having treated with, and received lavish promises from, both parties, he appears to have hoped for the dignity for himself; but when the election came he turned to the winning side and voted for Charles.

  • The constitution provides for local option elections on the liquor question in counties, cities, towns and precincts; in 1907, out of 119 counties 87 had voted for prohibition.

  • Kentucky voted the Whig ticket in every presidential election from 1832 until the party made its last campaign in 1852.

  • This body, composed mostly of Kentucky men who had joined the Confederate army, passed an ordinance of secession, elected state officers, and sent commissioners to the Confederate Congress, which body voted on the 9th of December to admit Kentucky into the Confederacy.

  • A royal commission, appointed by the duc de Choiseul to examine the constitutions, convoked a private assembly of fifty-one archbishops and bishops under the presidency of Cardinal de Luynes, all of whom except six voted that the unlimited authority of the general was incompatible with the laws of France, and that the appointment of a resident vicar, subject to those laws, was the only solution of the question fair on all sides.

  • He succeeded in convincing the deputies that the peace was necessary, and it was (March 1871) voted by more than five to one.

  • On May 16th 1877, he was one of the "363" who voted want of confidence in the Broglie ministry (thus paying his debts), and he took considerable part in organizing the subsequent electoral campaign.

  • The American Congress at Philadelphia, acting for all the thirteen colonies, voted general defensive measures, called out troops and appointed George Washington of Virginia commander-in-chief.

  • Deputy for his department to the Legislative Assembly in 1792, and to the Convention in the same year, he voted for "the death of the tyrant."

  • he dissociated himself more and more from the principles of the Mountain, and he voted for the king's detention during the war and subsequent banishment.

  • The curia voted as a single unit and thus furnished the type for that system of group-voting which runs through all the later organization of the popular assemblies.

  • he added new charges to the accusation, proposed to refuse counsel to the king, and voted for death "within 24 hours."

  • The method of amending the constitution varies in detail from state to state, but that most usual is for the legislature to propose amendments, often by a prescribed majority, and for these amendments to be voted on by the people.

  • The Constitution leaves the method of choosing electors to each state, but by universal custom they are now everywhere elected by popular vote, and all the electors for each state are voted for on a general ticket.

  • In the end 25 out of 53 French members voted in justification of Riel's punishment.

  • The legislature of 1907 voted an increase of $300,000 in the appropriation for the common school fund, and granted state-aid for rural school-houses; but its most important work probably was the establishment of county high schools.

  • Johnson took a prominent and undignified part in the congressional campaign of 1866, in which his policies were voted down by the North.

  • On the 16th of May, after sessions in which the Senate repeatedly reversed the rulings of the chief justice as to the admission of evidence, in which the president's counsel showed that their case was excellently prepared and the prosecuting counsel appealed in general to political passions rather than to judicial impartiality, the eleventh article was voted on and impeachment failed by a single vote (35 to 19; 7 republicans and 12 democrats voting " Not guilty ") of the necessary two-thirds.

  • He was no advocate of violent measures; but, as deputy to the Convention, he voted for the death of Louis XVI., and as a member of the council of legislation he presented to the Convention on the 17th of September 1793 the infamous law permitting the detention of suspects.

  • After a period of vacillation Hanover threw in her lot with Austria, the decisive step being taken when the question of the mobilization of the federal army was voted upon in the diet on the 14th of June 1866.

  • He voted for Johnson's conviction on his trial for impeachment, and for this was severely criticized, since, in the event of conviction, he would have become president; but Wade's whole course before and after the trial would seem to belie the charge that he was actuated by any such motive.

  • The terms of elective officers are shorter; and as there are also more offices to be filled, the number of persons to be voted for is necessarily much greater.

  • In the year of a presidential election the citizen may be called upon to vote at one time for all of the following: (1) National candidates - president and vice-president (indirectly through the electoral college) and members of the House of Representatives; (2) state candidates - governor, members of the state legislature, attorney-general, treasurer, &c.; (3) county candidates - sheriff, county judges, district attorney, &c.; (4) municipal or town candidates - mayor, aldermen, selectmen, &c. The number of persons actually voted for may therefore be ten or a dozen, or it may be many more.

  • A president and vice-president are voted for every fourth year, in the years divisible by four, on the first Tuesday following the first Monday of November.

  • His necessitous condition was so notorious that the clergy in convocation voted him a present of f5000.

  • She had a new constitution drawn up, practically providing for an absolute monarchy, and disfranchising a large class of citizens who had voted since 1887; this constitution (drawn up, so the royal party declared, in reply to a petition signed by thousands of natives) she undertook to force on the country after proroguing the legislature on the 14th of January 1893, but her ministers shrank from the responsibility of so revolutionary an act, and with difficulty prevailed upon her to postpone the execution of her design.

  • The growth of the protectionist movement and the development of anti-slavery sentiment, however, drew it in the opposite direction, and it voted the Whig national ticket in 1840 and in 1848, and the Republican ticket for Lincoln in 1860.

  • Believing protective tariff duties to be unconstitutional, he voted against the "tariff of abominations" in 1828, and also against the tariff of 1832, since the latter measure, though reducing duties, showed no abandonment of the protective principle.

  • The compromise tariff of 1833, made necessary by the hostile attitude of South Carolina, owed its inception largely to him, but he voted against the "force bill," an act for enforcing the collection of duties, being the only senator whose vote was so recorded.

  • In the controversy over the removal of the government deposits from the Bank of the United States he sided with the bank, and voted for Clay's resolution censuring Jackson for his course in the matter.

  • When the legislature of Virginia voted instructions to its senators to support Senator Thomas H.

  • When the Belgian Chambers voted in February 1906 the sums necessary for the improvement of the harbour of Antwerp no definite scheme was sanctioned, the question being referred to a special mixed commission.

  • Measures were taken for the defence of the territory and the punishment of the assailants, which culminated in the despatch of Sir Garnet (afterwards Viscount) Wolseley as British administrator, 800,000 being voted by parliament for the expenses of the expedition.

  • The government in 1904 voted nearly 7,000,000 francs in aid of the religious establishments of, and the benevolent institutions kept up by, the Roman Church.

  • Addresses were unanimously voted urging the king to resist separation, great excitement was g P ?

  • A large war credit was voted, the strength of the army was raised and strong bodies of troops were moved to the frontier.

  • The constitution of the republic was voted by a constituent assembly on the 25th of November 1870.

  • Returned to the Legislative Assembly in 1849 by his native department of Manche, he voted with the anti-republican party, but devoted his principal attention to subjects connected with science and education.

  • In general Grattan supported the government for time after 1782, and in particular spoke and voted for the stringent coercive legislation rendered necessary by the Whiteboy outrages in 1785; but as the years passed without Pitt's personal favour towards parliamentary reform bearing fruit in legislation, he gravitated towards the opposition, agitated for commutation of tithes in Ireland, and supported the Whigs on the regency question in 1788.

  • In 1648 the General Assembly urged him to complete the work he had designed, and voted him a yearly pension of 800.

  • While he was in Congress he voted repeatedly for the principle of the Wilmot Proviso.

  • At the election held on the 8th of November 1864, Lincoln received 2,216,076 of the popular votes, and M'Clellan (who had openly disapproved of the resolution declaring the war a failure) but 1,808,725; while of the presidential electors 212 voted for Lincoln and 21 for M'Clellan.

  • The office of the accountant-general of the empire (RechnungsIzof), which controls and supervises the expenditure of the sums voted by the legislative bodies, and revises the accounts of the imperial bank (Reichsbank).

  • Finance.The imperial budget is voted every year by the Reichstag.

  • Meeting at Nuremberg early in 1522 it voted some ~ slight assistance for the campaign against the invading regiment.

  • But the Lutherans were absent from the diet, and the Romanists, although they voted help, displayed a very uncompromising temper towards their religious foes.

  • Although his first diet voted liberal assistance for the defence of the country, and a large and splendid army was collected, he had gain.ed no advantage when the campaign.

  • large majority voted an order countermanding the withdrawal of the Prussian troops, in spite of the protest of the ministry, who saw that it would be impossible to make it effective.

  • Some voted that a directory of princes should be appointed, others that there should be a president, eligible from the whole German nation; but the final decision was that the headship of the state should be offered by the parliament to some particular German prince, and that he should bear the title of German emperor.

  • In the event of the rejection of Prussias motion, Bismarck had made it clear that Prussia would withdraw from the Confederation, and Prussia that in the event of her being victorious in the ensuing withdraws war those states of northern Germany that voted from the against her would cease to exist.

  • The remainder of the Progressives, the Fortsc/zrittspartei, maintained their protest against the military and monarchical elements in the state; they voted against the constitution in 1867 on the ground that it did not provide sufficient guarantees for popular liberty, and in 1871 against the treaty with Bavaria because it left too much independence to that state.

  • In 1867 the peace establishment had been provisionally fixed by the constitution at 1% of the population, and a sum of 225 thalers (~33, 15s.) had been voted for each soldier.

  • The whole party had voted against the Franckenstein Clause, but a few days later fifteen of the right wing left the party and transferred their support to the government.

  • In the new parliament the government proposals were accepted by a majority of 223to 48 (seven members of the Centre voted for it,the others abstained).

  • An amendment had been carried omitting this clause, and the National Liberals therefore voted for the bill in its amended form.

  • The Conservatives were ready to vote as the government wished; if Bismarck was content with the amended bill, they would vote for it, and it would be carried; no instructions were sent to the party; they therefore voted against the bill, and it was lost.

  • Notwithstanding this the bill was only carried by sixteen votes, and it would have been thrown out again had not the Poles for the first time voted for the government, since the whole of the Centre voted in opposition.

  • In Prussia a majority of the Tipper House and a very large minority of the Lower House (193 to 206) voted for an amendment expressly empowering the police to break up meetings in which anarchistic, socialistic or communistic doctrines were defended in such a manner as to be dangerous to society; the Saxon Conservatives demanded that women at least should be forbidden to attend socialistic meetings, and it remained illegal for any one under twenty-one years of age to be present at a political meeting.

  • Their part henceforth was to vote blindly with the Conservative groups, in a common fear of the Social Democracy, or to indulge in protests, futile because backed by no power inside or outside the parliament; their impotence was equally revealed when in December 1902 they voted with the Agrarians for the tariff, and in May 1909 when they withdrew in dudgeon from the new tariff committee, and allowed the reactionary elements a free hand.

  • In the Convention he sat with the Mountain, opposed adjourning the trial of Louis XVI., and voted for his death.

  • The yearly contingent of recruits for the army is fixed by the military bills voted by the Austrian and Hungarian parliaments, and is generally determined on the basis of the population, according to the last census returns.

  • The minister of war controlled the common army, but even the laws determining the method by which the army was to be recruited had to be voted separately in each of the parliaments.

  • the Austrian Deputation it was voted only by a majority of 39 to 20, for the Germans were alarmed at the report that it would be used for an occupation of part of the Turkish territory.

  • The opposition in the Delegations, which met at the end of the year, was so strong that the government had to be content with a credit to cover the expenses for 1879 of less than half what they had originally asked, and the supplementary estimate of 40,000,000 gulden for 1878 was not voted till the next year.

  • The Recruits bill and the estimates were adopted, the Delegations were enabled to meet at Budapest - where they voted £2 2,000,000 as extraordinary estimates for the army and navy and especially for the renewal of the field artillery - and the negotiations for new commercial treaties with Germany and Italy were sanctioned, although parliament had never been able to ratify the Szell-Korber compact with the tariff on the basis of which the negotiations would have to be conducted.

  • and the normal contingent of recruits to be voted for 1905 and 1906; the extraordinary military credits, sanctioned by the delegations in 1904, to be voted by the Hungarian Chamber; ratification of the commercial treaties concluded by Tisza; election of the Hungarian Delegation and of the Quota-Deputation; introduction of a suffrage reform at least as far reaching as the Kristoffy scheme.

  • This having been done, it was budget, which Hungary had accepted and Austria rejected, the Poles and Tirolese voted in favour of the Hungarian proposal.

  • Nearly all the Austrian prelates had been opposed to the new doctrine; many of them remained to the end of the council and voted against it, and they only declared their submission with great reluctance.

  • The Germans in their turn now left the diet, and the Czechs voted an address to the crown, drawn up by Count Thun, demanding the restoration of the Bohemian kingdom.

  • So long as parliament was sitting they were kept in check; as soon as it had voted supplies and the Delegations had separated, they ordered new elections in all those diets where there was a Liberal majority.

  • During discussions on the economic arrangement with Hungary in 1877 a large number voted against the duties on coffee and petroleum, which were an essential part of the agreement; they demanded, moreover, that the treaty of Berlin should be laid before the House, and 112 members, led by Herbst, gave a vote hostile to some of its provisions, and in the Delegation refused the supplies necessary for the occupation of Bosnia.

  • But the Liberals again voted against the government on an important military bill, an offence almost as unpardonable in Austria as in Germany, and a great meeting of the party decided that they would not support the government.

  • The estimates were voted with regularity, racial animosity was somewhat less prominent, and some large issues were debated.

  • In 1848 he voted for Hume's household suffrage motion, and introduced a bill for the repeal of the Game Laws.

  • For two sessions he spoke and voted with his colleagues, but after the bombardment of the Alexandria forts he left the ministry and never held office again.

  • In the new parliament he voted against the Home Rule Bill, and it was generally felt that in the election of 1886 which followed its defeat, when he was re-elected without opposition, his letters told with fatal effect against the Home Rule Liberals.

  • In January 1833 the funds available were all spent, but so much progress had been shown that the legislature voted $6000, later increased to $30,000 a year, to the institution on condition that it should educate gratuitously twenty poor blind from the state; money was also contributed from Salem, and from Boston, and Colonel Thomas H.

  • Fox and Grenville came into power in 1806, Lord Moira, who had always voted with them, received the place of master-general of the ordnance.

  • An annual sum is voted by parliament out of which loans are granted to cottagers who desire to purchase small freehold plots.

  • In 1779-1780 he was a member of the Pennsylvania assembly, where he voted for the abolition of slavery - he freed his own slaves whom he had brought from Maryland.

  • The complete identification of the Danish king with the Danish people was accomplished at the Herredag of Copenhagen, 1542, when the nobility of Denmark voted Christian a twentieth part of all their property to pay off his heavy debt to the Holsteiners and Germans.

  • He spoke and voted for exclusion in the House of Lords, and used language not likely to be forgotten by James when an opportunity should come for resenting it.

Browse other sentences examples →