Vomiting sentence example

vomiting
  • He'd spent the morning vomiting blood and was able to remember Jule and Dusty by afternoon.

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  • Vomiting, incapacity of movement.

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  • Vomiting may occur after being treated with the Heimlich maneuver.

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  • Drug reactions are another common allergic cause of rash; in this case, a rash is only one of a variety of possible symptoms, including fever, seizures, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, heartbeat irregularities, and breathing problems.

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  • Rotavirus is the major cause of diarrhea and vomiting in young children worldwide.

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  • The main symptoms of the rotavirus infection are fever, stomach cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea (which can lead to severe dehydration).

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  • Oral rehydration therapy (drinking enough fluids to replace those lost through bowel movements and vomiting) is the primary aim of the treatment.

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  • Digestive system symptoms such as vomiting, constipation, and feeding difficulties may occur.

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  • Some patients with Wilms' tumor experience abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, high blood pressure, or blood in the urine.

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  • The digestive system rebels, resulting in gas, bloating, upset stomach, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting.

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  • Meconium ileus causes abdominal swelling and vomiting and often requires surgery immediately after birth.

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  • Symptoms of testicular torsion are sudden severe pain in the scrotum, swelling and/or discoloration of the scrotum, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • It develops in early infancy with initial symptoms of irritability, vomiting, and episodes of partial unconsciousness.

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  • In cases of tumor, most commonly craniopharyngioma (a tumor near the pituitary gland), children and adolescents may have neurological symptoms such as headaches, vomiting, and problems with vision.

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  • In children with gastroenteritis caused by the adenovirus, symptoms may include diarrhea, fever, nausea, vomiting, and respiratory symptoms.

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  • Because a child can become easily dehydrated if suffering from vomiting or diarrhea, it is important care-givers provide adequate fluid intake.

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  • Symptoms appear about one to two days after infection and include fever (in 50% of patients), nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps and pain.

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  • Gastroenteritis-Inflammation of the stomach and intestines that usually causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and cramps.

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  • It is the primary reason for most vomiting in infants during the first four months, at which time the vomiting should stop.

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  • Frequent vomiting or spitting up is the usual indicator for GERD in children.

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  • However, vomiting can be a symptom of many other childhood disorders, including stomach flu, allergy, or a related symptom to almost any illness.

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  • Frequent vomiting that continues after the first four months of life or is excessive at any time usually indicates the presence of GERD.

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  • Constant crying with back arching usually accompanies the frequent vomiting.

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  • Tension headaches usually are not associated with symptoms of nausea or vomiting.

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  • Migraines are often accompanied by other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light, sound, strong odors, and movement.

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  • Headaches accompanied by severe nausea or vomiting.

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  • Cyclic vomiting-Uncontrolled vomiting that occurs repeatedly over a certain period of time.

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  • Symptoms of DKA include abdominal pain, excessive thirst, nausea and vomiting, rapid breathing, extreme lethargy, and drowsiness.

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  • Symptoms of ketoacidosis include excessive thirst and urination, abdominal pain, vomiting, rapid breathing, extreme tiredness, and drowsiness.

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  • Should the behavior pattern of crying suddenly change and be associated with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, or other abnormal symptoms, parents should call the doctor immediately.

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  • Fever, vomiting, and diarrhea can cause a child to become dehydrated fairly quickly.

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  • Oral products that restore fluid and electrolytes balance are better for hydrating a sick child who has been vomiting during an illness or after strenuous activity in extremely hot weather.

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  • Danger signs that a head injury is more serious include worsening headaches, vomiting, weakness, numbness, unsteadiness, change in the appearance of the eyes, seizures, slurred speech, confusion, agitation, or a change in mental status.

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  • Symptoms related to any diarrheal illness are often those associated with any injury to the gastrointestinal tract, such as fever, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

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  • Parents should also call the doctor if a child is vomiting so often that he or she cannot keep fluids down, has a high fever, complains of severe abdominal pain, or shows no improvement in symptoms after 24 hours.

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  • Vertigo is characterized by a sensation of spinning or turning, accompanied by nausea, vomiting, ringing in the ears, headache, or fatigue.

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  • There may be nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and multiple swollen lymph nodes.

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  • Death due to sodium toxicity has also resulted when baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was used to treat excessive diarrhea or vomiting.

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  • Potassium is potentially quite toxic; however, potassium poisoning is usually prevented because of the vomiting reflex.

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  • Within six hours of ingestion, iron toxicity can result in vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, seizures, and possibly coma.

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  • These symptoms include cardiac arrhythmias, headache, nausea and vomiting, and in severe cases, seizures.

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  • Taking excessive supplemental zinc can result in nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

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  • Bulimia nervosa-An eating disorder characterized by binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behavior, such as vomiting, misusing laxatives, or excessive exercise.

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  • Affected people may complain of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, headache, sweating, and a metallic taste in the mouth.

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  • In cases of acute mercury or arsenic ingestion, vomiting may be induced.

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  • For younger infants and children that require sedation or anesthesia to complete the examination, reactions to the anesthesia are possible, including headaches and vomiting.

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  • Other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, discomfort looking into bright lights, confusion, and sleepiness.

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  • In newborns and small infants, these symptoms may be absent or difficult to detect, and the infant may only appear slow or inactive, or be irritable, have vomiting, or be feeding poorly.

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  • Some antihistamines also help inhibit nausea and vomiting and reduce motion sickness.

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  • Gastrointestinal problems include increased appetite, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation.

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  • Of the few cases on record, the prominent symptoms are vomiting, pain in the abdomen, arms, and legs, and neuropathy.

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  • Attacks occur after puberty and commonly feature severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and constipation.

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  • In the absence of a family history of porphyria, non-specific symptoms, such as abdominal pain and vomiting, may be attributed to other disorders.

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  • Phenothiazines can be used to counter nausea, vomiting, and anxiety, and chloral hydrate or diazepam is useful for sedation or to induce sleep.

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  • Other possible symptoms include excessive sweating, nausea, vomiting, headaches, and vertigo, as well as breathing, vision, and speech problems.

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  • The bite may also be accompanied by fever, chills, edema (an accumulation of excess tissue fluid), nausea and vomiting, dizziness, muscle and joint pain, and a rash.

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  • Severe poisoning can also lead to tingling in the scalp, fingers, and toes, muscle contractions, an elevated heart rate, rapid breathing, large drops in body temperature and blood pressure, vomiting of blood, and coma.

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  • One to seven hours after the bite, the victim begins to experience the effects of the venom, which include tingling at the wound site, weakness, nausea, vomiting, excessive salivation, and irrational behavior.

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  • Severe cases may lead to skin necrosis, muscle spasms and cramps, vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, headaches, excessive sweating, and other symptoms.

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  • Sometimes the victim suffers a severe reaction, including vomiting, diarrhea, hemorrhage (bleeding), a drop in blood pressure, and cardiac arrhythmia (disordered heart beat).

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  • These symptoms include a stiff neck, headache, vomiting, and a lack of energy.

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  • If the patient is nauseated and vomiting, the infection is more likely to be located in the small intestine.

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  • Herbalists may recommend cloves taken as an infusion or ginger given in drop doses to control intestinal cramps, eliminate gas, and prevent vomiting.

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  • Symptoms include jaundice, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, tenderness in the right upper abdomen, aching muscles, and joint pain.

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  • It also has some potentially serious side effects, including nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, increased susceptibility to infections, skin rashes, a decrease in the number of blood cells, and potential liver damage.

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  • It may follow vomiting, prolonged diarrhea, or excessive sweating.

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  • The fluid accumulation and reduced absorption lead to bilious vomiting, which is the vomitus will appear greenish, the classic sign of upper intestinal obstruction.

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  • Persistent vomiting or diarrhea (which can occur in a partial blockage) can result in dehydration.

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  • Vomiting is the prevailing symptom of duodenal obstruction and may occur in the first day of life.

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  • Frequent or constant vomiting, unsuccessful feeding, and poor weight gain should be reported to the pediatrician as soon as noted.

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  • Too much zinc may lead to diarrhea, vomiting, and kidney and heart problems.

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  • If vomiting or irritability is also present, then the doctor should be called immediately.

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  • A child who is experiencing abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting should not use a laxative.

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  • Some common complaints include fevers, rashes, abscesses, bleeding, and vomiting.

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  • Common Munchausen by proxy symptoms include apnea (cessation of breathing), fever, vomiting, and diarrhea.

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  • Taking iron supplements can result in diarrhea, cramps, or vomiting.

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  • Many babies with fragile X syndrome may have trouble with sucking, and some experience digestive disorders that cause frequent gagging and vomiting.

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  • Any complaints of a stiff neck, loss of consciousness, unexplained vomiting, or seizure activity should be promptly brought to competent medical attention.

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  • When vomiting episodes stop, the child may feel better after eating easy-to-digest and bland foods such as clear liquids, crackers, gelatin, and plain toast.

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  • It is important for the child to continue drinking fluids throughout the day to avoid dehydration from diarrhea or vomiting.

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  • Anti-emetic-A preparation or medication that relieves nausea and vomiting.

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  • Side effects are rare but may include vomiting, diarrhea, stomach upset, headache, skin rash, and hives.

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  • Some children may have reactions to anesthesia or sedation, including headaches, shivering, or vomiting.

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  • A shaken baby may present one or more signs, including vomiting; difficulty breathing, sucking, swallowing, or making sounds; seizures; and altered consciousness.

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  • Related symptoms include vomiting; seizures; shortness of breath; severe pain in the back, muscles, abdomen, or chest; and, if prolonged or uncorrected, shock and coma or death.

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  • The most common side effects are mild diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and stomach or abdominal cramps.

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  • Glucagon can cause vomiting, so a child that is given a glucagons injection should be monitored carefully to prevent aspiration.

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  • Symptoms of overhydration may include blurred vision, muscle cramps and twitching, paralysis on one side of the body, poor coordination, nausea and vomiting, rapid breathing, sudden weight gain, and weakness.

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  • Gastrointestinal effects may also develop, including vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps.

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  • Abdominal pain and vomiting are the most frequent symptoms and a common cause of admission to emergency rooms.

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  • Between birth and age two, these children will likely develop other symptoms, such as chronic constipation, small watery stools, a distended abdomen, vomiting, poor appetite, slow weight gain, and failure to thrive.

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  • Vomiting is another typical symptom of intestinal obstruction.

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  • Vomiting follows shortly after the pain if the obstruction is in the small intestine, but is delayed if it is in the large intestine.

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  • Persistent vomiting can result in dehydration.

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  • Parents should be aware of the child's bowel habits and report constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting to the pediatrician when it occurs.

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  • Dehydration results from the large fluid losses due to diarrhea, vomiting, and fever.

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  • Early symptoms of necrotizing enterocolitis include an intolerance to formula, distended and tender abdomen, vomiting, and blood (visible or not) in the stool.

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  • Complaints of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, lack of appetite, and headache occur when it is time to go to school and resolve quickly once the child is allowed to remain home.

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  • Most children with AP experience severe abdominal pain, vomiting (possibly with blood), and bloody stools.

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  • Because NEC is potentially fatal, doctors are quick to respond to its symptoms, which include lethargy, vomiting, a swollen and/or red abdomen, fever, and blood in the stool.

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  • When children get the flu, they often complain of nausea and have vomiting and diarrhea, although these problems are less common in older children and adults.

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  • The patient becomes ill with fever, chills, nausea and vomiting, headache, and pain in the back and joints.

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  • Symptoms of food poisoning are usually gastrointestinal, such as nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and/or diarrhea.

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  • Every year millions of people of all ages suffer from bouts of vomiting and diarrhea blamed correctly on something they ate.

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  • These toxins (except those from C. botulinum) cause inflammation of the stomach lining and the small and/or large intestines, resulting in abdominal muscle cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever.

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  • Dehydration can result from loss of fluids through persistent vomiting and diarrhea; it is one of the most frequent and serious complications of food poisoning.

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  • Symptoms of food poisoning, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and fever, begin eight to 72 hours after eating food contaminated with salmonella.

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  • Dehydration can be a complication of severe cases with persistent vomiting and/or diarrhea.

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  • Acute symptoms of vomiting and severe abdominal cramps without fever usually last three to six hours and rarely more than 24 hours.

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  • There is little or no fever and vomiting occurs only rarely.

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  • In addition to the familiar watery diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps, the individual may also have chills, fever, and neurological symptoms.

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  • Any unexplained abdominal pain accompanied by persistent vomiting or diarrhea, whether or not a food source is suspected, should be reported to the doctor.

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  • Treatment of food poisoning, except for botulism, focuses on preventing or correcting dehydration by replacing critical fluids and electrolytes lost through vomiting and diarrhea.

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  • In very serious cases of food poisoning, medications may be given to stop abdominal cramping and vomiting.

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  • During a period of active vomiting and diarrhea, solid food should be avoided and only small quantities of clear liquids should be consumed as frequently as possible.

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  • Alternative practitioners offer the same advice as traditional practitioners concerning diet modification, treatment of diarrhea and vomiting, and prevention of dehydration.

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  • These can include throbbing headaches, fatigue, drowsiness, yawning, irritability, restlessness, vomiting, or runny nose.

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  • The combination can lead to an upset stomach, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • Many have a weak suck and uncoordinated swallow resulting in choking and sometimes vomiting.

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  • Bluish skin (cyanosis), coughing, vomiting, and frothy pink sputum (material expelled from the respiratory tract by coughing) are often observed.

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  • About 50 percent of females experience fever, pain in the lower back or flanks, nausea and vomiting, or shaking chills.

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  • The most common minor side effects are nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping or bloating, breast pain, tenderness or swelling, swollen ankles or feet, tiredness, and acne.

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  • Nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity to light, and other symptoms often accompany a migraine.

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  • This conflicting information may cause the usual motion sickness symptoms of dizziness, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • This confusion may result in higher heart rates, rapid breathing, nausea and sweating, along with dizziness and vomiting.

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  • Viral and bacterial gastroenteritis are intestinal infections associated with symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • Vomiting and diarrhea symptoms occur about one week after exposure to the virus.

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  • These viruses are the most likely to produce vomiting as a major symptom.

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  • Symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea appear within one to three days after exposure to the virus.

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  • Gastroenteritis symptoms include nausea and vomiting, watery diarrhea, and abdominal pain and cramps.

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  • The loss of fluids through diarrhea and vomiting can upset the body's electrolyte balance, leading to potentially life-threatening problems such as heart beat abnormalities (arrhythmia).

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  • When diarrhea and vomiting symptoms have subsided, plain foods can be given.

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  • They are essential for replacing fluids, minerals, and salts lost from diarrhea or vomiting, and should be given when diarrhea or vomiting first occur.

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  • First described in 1882, cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a rare idiopathic disorder characterized by recurring periods of vomiting in an otherwise normal child.

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  • Children with cyclic vomiting syndrome have bouts of severe nausea and vomiting that may last for hours or days.

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  • In some cases the vomiting is so severe that the child is unable to go to school for several days.

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  • The bouts of vomiting that characterize CVS usually begin at the same time of day as previous episodes, last about the same length of time, and have the same symptoms.

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  • The most common pattern is severe nausea and vomiting that begins late at night or early in the morning.

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  • In addition to the vomiting, the child may have a headache, low-grade fever, dizziness, pain in the abdomen, heavy drooling, and diarrhea.

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  • Patients with CVS often feel pain in the abdomen a few minutes or hours before the vomiting starts.

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  • The vomiting and other symptoms associated with CVS are so severe that parents will usually call the doctor during the first episode, before a pattern has been identified.

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  • The first episode of cyclic vomiting syndrome may be diagnosed as stomach flu when nothing more serious turns up.

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  • There is no permanent cure for cyclic vomiting syndrome as of the early 2000s.

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  • This approach is recommended for children with CVS who have 10 to 12 episodes per year or have episodes of vomiting lasting longer than three days.

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  • Avoiding dehydration is the primary nutritional concern during episodes of cyclic vomiting syndrome.

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  • Some children have a normal appetite for food soon after the vomiting stops, while others may take several days to return to a full diet.

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  • The average duration of cyclic vomiting syndrome is 2.5 to 5.5 years.

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  • If the more severe complications of prolonged vomiting can be successfully prevented or managed, however, most patients can lead normal lives between acute attacks.

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  • Some episodes of vomiting may be prevented by avoiding specific triggers or by taking prophylactic medications.

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  • Cyclic vomiting syndrome can be a heavy emotional and financial burden on the families of affected children.

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  • Some individuals also experience nausea and vomiting and spontaneous eye movements in the direction of the unaffected ear.

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  • If a child has vertigo, especially along with nausea, vomiting, or hearing loss, the doctor should be called.

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  • If vomiting cannot be controlled, so that fluids cannot be kept down, fluids may be administered intravenously to prevent dehydration.

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  • Cramping and abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting occur frequently.

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  • Children with EE have classic signs of gastroesophageal reflux (abdominal pain, difficulty swallowing, and vomiting) but fail to respond to antireflux medications.

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  • Infants with eosinophilic gastroenteropathies usually have acute reactions after food intake (within minutes to in one to two hours) that generally include nausea, vomiting and severe abdominal pain, later followed by diarrhea.

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  • Taking iron supplements can result in constipation, diarrhea, cramps, or vomiting in sensitive individuals.

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  • If a child is known to have an immunodeficiency disorder, a healthcare provider should be contacted if the child shows signs of having an infection, such as fever, vomiting, diarrhea, swelling of the lymph nodes, or unusual fatigue.

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  • The child usually develops upper respiratory symptoms followed by fever, loss of appetite, vomiting, headache, and a stiff or sore neck or back.

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  • Sodium-sodium deficiency (hyponatremia) is a serious deficiency, arising most often after excessive losses of body fluid (dehydration) during prolonged and severe diarrhea or vomiting.

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  • Dietary magnesium deficiency is rare because the mineral is found in nearly all foods, but it can occur through poor diet or in malnutrition, or result from excessive losses due to severe diarrhea or vomiting.

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  • Possible gastrointestinal problems include constipation, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • Genuine physical symptoms are common and include dizziness, headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, shaking or trembling, fast heart rate, chest pains, and back, joint or stomach pains.

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  • Diagnosis is made on the basis of family history, the absence of causes for physical symptoms such as heart palpitations, vomiting, or dizziness, and the results of a battery of psychological tests.

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  • Possible side effects of lamotrigine include skin rash, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • Bupropion (Wellbutrin) has several side effects, including drowsiness, lightheadedness, headache, constipation, dry mouth, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • Vomiting, or emesis, is the expelling from the stomach of undigested food through the mouth.

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  • Persistent or recurrent nausea and vomiting should be checked by a doctor.

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  • Nausea and vomiting are commonly experienced.

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  • Persistent, unexplained, or recurring nausea and vomiting can be symptoms of a variety of serious illnesses.

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  • Such poisonous substances as arsenic and other heavy metals cause nausea and vomiting.

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  • Gallstones, gastroenteritis, and stomach ulcer may cause nausea and vomiting.

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  • Nausea and vomiting may also be psychological in origin.

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  • In addition, some eating disorders are characterized by self-induced vomiting.

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  • A doctor should be notified if vomiting is heavy and/or bloody, if the vomitus looks like feces, or if the affected person has been unable to keep food down for 24 hours.

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  • Most vomiting episodes should stop in eight to 12 hours of onset.

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  • The pediatrician should be consulted if vomiting continues beyond that time, if the child shows signs of dehydration, seems extremely lethargic, or if the child is a very young infant.

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  • Nausea and vomiting continue after other symptoms of viral infection have subsided.

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  • Nausea, vomiting, and breathing problems occur after exposure to a known allergen.

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  • If the nausea and vomiting appear to be related to anxiety, stress, or an eating disorder, the doctor may refer the person to a psychiatrist for further evaluation.

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  • Vomiting relieves nausea quickly but can cause dehydration.

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  • The solution should be given a teaspoon at a time, at frequent intervals, starting 30-60 minutes after vomiting has ceased.

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  • Food should be reintroduced gradually, several hours after vomiting stops, beginning with small amounts of dry, bland food like crackers and toast.

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  • Medications that are given to relieve nausea and vomiting are called antiemetics.

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  • Other drugs that have been developed to treat postoperative or post-chemotherapy nausea and vomiting include ondansetron (Zofran) and granisetron (Kytril).

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  • Most instances of nausea and vomiting respond well to appropriate treatment, including removing any substance or condition that precipitates the nausea.

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  • Vomiting related to emotional upsets may be avoided by forms of psychotherapy that teach people to manage stress in healthier ways.

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  • Prolonged vomiting can lead to fluid and electrolyte depletion.

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  • Parents should be especially concerned about prolonged vomiting in children younger than two years of age.

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  • This concern intensifies if the vomiting is accompanied by diarrhea that accelerates fluid and electrolyte depletion.

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  • Baggley A., et al. "Determinants of women's decision making on whether to treat nausea and vomiting of pregnancy pharmacologically."

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  • E., et al. "Association between severe nausea and vomiting in pregnancy and lower rate of preterm births."

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  • H., et al. "Effect of acupressure on nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy cycle for Korean postoperative stomach cancer patients."

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  • This condition generally occurs in children who have a stomach flu characterized by vomiting and diarrhea or who cannot or will not take enough fluids to compensate for excessive losses associated with fever and sweating of acute illness.

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  • An infant younger than two months of age has diarrhea or is vomiting.

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  • During both rehydration and maintenance phases, fluid losses from vomiting and diarrhea should be replaced continuously.

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  • Children with minimal dehydration weighing less than 10 kilograms (22 pounds) should be given 60 to 120 mL (2-4 ounces) of an oral rehydration solution (ORS) for each episode of vomiting or diarrheal stool.

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  • Additional ORS should be administered to replace ongoing losses from vomiting and diarrhea.

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  • For example, if dehydration is caused by vomiting, medications may be prescribed to resolve these symptoms.

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  • Vomiting and diarrhea that continue for several days without adequate fluid replacement can be fatal.

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  • Parents can prevent dehydration in infants and children who are vomiting or who have diarrhea by increasing fluids to compensate for losses.

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  • Infants and children with diarrhea and vomiting should be given ORS such as Pedialyte immediately to help prevent dehydration.

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  • Symptoms of Reye's syndrome are nausea and vomiting, and more seriously, neurological problems such as confusion or delirium.

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  • The most common side effects are stomach pain or cramps, nausea, vomiting, indigestion, diarrhea, heartburn, headache, dizziness or lightheadedness, and drowsiness.

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  • Prostaglandins can also cause headaches, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

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  • Systemic symptoms of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, headache, or lightheadedness are fairly common.

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  • Spasms of uncontrollable coughing, the whooping sound of the sharp inspiration of air, and vomiting are all hallmarks of this stage.

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  • Nausea, vomiting, and upset stomach are also common.

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  • Characteristically, a newborn with galactosemia who is fed milk products will have jaundice, vomiting, lethargy, irritability, and convulsions.

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  • People with bulimia, known as bulimics, consume large amounts of food (binge) and then try to rid themselves of the food and calories (purge) by fasting, excessive exercise, vomiting, or using laxatives.

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  • Vomiting causes other serious problems, including acid-related scarring of the fingers (if used to induce vomiting) and damage to tooth enamel.

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  • Purge-To rid the body of food and calories, commonly by vomiting or using laxatives.

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  • If the baby's behavior or crying pattern changes suddenly or if the crying is associated with fever, forceful vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stools, or other abnormal spasms or symptoms, call the doctor immediately.

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  • After the beginning of recovery from the viral illness, the affected person suddenly becomes more ill again, with the development of persistent vomiting.

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  • In infants, diarrhea may be more common than vomiting.

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  • Reye's syndrome may be suspected in a child who begins vomiting three to six days after a viral illness, followed by an alteration in consciousness.

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  • In children younger than age two years, the most common symptoms are vomiting and a bloated or swollen abdomen.

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  • Symptoms in combination that require a doctor's immediate attention include significant abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, swollen or bloated abdomen, and loss of appetite.

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  • If abdominal pain begins before nausea and vomiting, rather than after, appendicitis rather than intestinal infection is more likely.

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  • There have been rare reports of vomiting caused by dextromethorphan.

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  • Less severe, more common side effects include blurred vision, insomnia, drowsiness, gastrointestinal distress (nausea or vomiting), dizziness, headaches, and possible addiction.

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  • Between 1978 and 1980 thousands went to emergency rooms with high fever, vomiting, low blood pressure, diarrhea, and a rash resembling sunburn.

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  • In severe cases, the burn may occur with sunstroke (vomiting, fever, and collapse).

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  • The doctor should be called any time there are symptoms of heatstroke, dehydration, blurred vision (possible sun damage to the eyes), chills, fever, vomiting, or blistering associated with sun exposure.

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  • Persons with listeriosis may develop flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea and vomiting, tiredness, and diarrhea.

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  • If children are vomiting their oral medicine, have severe diarrhea, are unconscious, or cannot take anything by mouth before surgery, they may need to receive their medications by injections.

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  • Early symptoms may also include a sore throat, low-grade fever, headaches, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea.

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  • Symptoms of toxicity are nausea, vomiting, pain in the joints, and lack of interest in eating food.

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  • Other side effects could include blisters, nosebleeds, and vomiting.

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  • These symptoms might include nausea or vomiting, odd sensations of the abdomen, changes in appetite, and fatigue, among others.

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  • If you notice contractions, chest pain, vaginal bleeding, nauseua, or vomiting, you should contact your care provider.

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  • In the first trimester, and for some women throughout the 9 months, nausea and/or vomiting can be overwhelming; so much so that the thought of eating anything makes the symptoms worse.

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  • Nausea and vomiting don't only happen in the morning.

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  • Bulimia is binge eating, sometimes with purging (vomiting) as well.

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  • As well as suffering a headache, migraine sufferers often report visual disturbance and possible photophobia along with nausea and sometimes vomiting.

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  • Morning sickness symptoms involve nausea with or without vomiting.

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  • This is especially important if you experience fever, vomiting, or abdominal pain.

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  • Using the combined pills in high enough doses to prevent pregnancy may cause severe nausea and vomiting.

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  • Rarely, hormonal emergency contraception may cause severe nausea and vomiting.

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  • Some pregnant women feel a bit queasy, while others experience vomiting.

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  • If you're vomiting so often that you can't get the nutrition you need, this places both you and your baby at risk.

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  • Hyperemesis gravidarum may require you to be hospitalized for intravenous hydration and to take prescription drugs to control the vomiting.

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  • Queasiness, nausea, and even vomiting may occur very early in the pregnancy.

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  • Women have reported side effects right after the procedure, which include nausea, cramps, vomiting, dizziness, and spotting.

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  • Sometimes this results in vomiting, sometimes not.

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  • Nausea and vomiting are the symptoms that women report as the most disruptive to their lives.

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  • Nausea and vomiting are worst in the first trimester when the developing baby is most susceptible to effects from other drugs, consequently, there are limited conventional treatments available.

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  • Some simple alternative methods of treating nausea and vomiting are generally considered safe, although they are not always effective.

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  • Peppermint tea is another alternative treatment for nausea and vomiting.

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  • If a food causes vomiting, you may experience contractions, but this is not recommended and can be dangerous.

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  • Some of the most common types of side effects from combination pills are headaches, vomiting, nausea, breast tenderness, dizziness, weight gain, and decreased sex drive.

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  • Excessive amounts over 2,000 IU can create a toxic reaction in your body, resulting in vomiting and loss of appetite.

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  • However, eating the entire plant might cause nausea or vomiting.

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  • In children, celiac disease displays some common symptoms, including a lack of growth, vomiting, bloating in the abdomen and significant changes in behavior.

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  • Greasy diarrhea, vomiting, and cramps can take up a good portion of your day, and symptoms often persist until gluten is eradicated from your diet.

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  • Herbs can cause an array of side effects as well, such as blood thinning, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and anxiety.

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  • Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, protein deficiency, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, heartburn, abdominal pain, injury to the spleen, band slippage or erosion.

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  • Potassium gluconate is taken to avert or to treat low potassium blood levels which can result from taking certain medicines or after a prolonged illness with diarrhea or vomiting.

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  • Symptoms include pain and a feeling of fullness and bloating in the stomach, accompanied by belching and sometimes nausea and vomiting.

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  • If at any time you are vomiting blood or passing blood in your stools, this is a medical emergency and warrants immediate medical treatment.

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  • It is the hormone that is thought to be the cause of nausea and vomiting during the first trimester of pregnancy for so many women.

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  • While on the reality TV show, Perrin displayed erratic behavior including yelling, screaming and unexplained vomiting.

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  • In addition, if a bruise does not heal within a couple of weeks or if the injury or condition worsens, or if it's accompanied by severe pain, blurred vision, vomiting or dizziness, it's time to seek medical care.

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  • Occasionally, bee stings can cause systemic reactions that may result in much more serious medical concerns, such as shortness of breath, wheezing, hives, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, anxiety or low blood pressure.

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  • These symptoms include nausea, vomiting, fever, severe headache, body aches, swollen glands, rash, lethargy, jaundice and sensitivity to light.

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  • If there is blistering, vomiting, fever or severe pain, it's crucial to seek medical treatment immediately.

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  • If you are suffering from a case of prickly heat rash, be on the lookout for other symptoms of heat exhaustion such as dizziness, nausea, vomiting and excessive perspiration.

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  • He dropped his arm, and she picked her way through the bodies, covering her mouth to keep from vomiting.

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  • She heard the kid scream and hunched her shoulders, nearly vomiting at the sounds of his body being torn apart.

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  • A good palliative is sweet oil; this will allay any corrosive irritation of the throat and stomach, and at the same time cause vomiting.

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  • Other symptoms of undue absorption are vertigo, deafness, sounds in the ears, stupefaction, a subnormal temperature, nausea, vomiting and a weak pulse (Sir Thomas Fraser).

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  • Salicylic acid is a powerful irritant when inhaled or swallowed in a concentrated form, and even when much diluted it causes pain, nausea and vomiting.

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  • After about an hour there is severe vomiting.

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  • Haematemesis is vomiting of blood, the colour of which may be altered by digestion, as is also the case in melaena, or passage of blood with the faeces, in which the blood becomes dark and tarrylooking from the action of the intestinal fluids.

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  • Great prostration, vomiting and cold, clammy perspiration follow within one to three hours.

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  • First faintness and irresistible desire to sleep. Then alarming prostration and vomiting.

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  • A caustic taste in the mouth is quickly followed by burning abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, with a feeble pulse and a cold clammy skin; the post-mortem appearances are those of acute gastrointestinal irritation.

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  • The diluted acid is used internally to relieve vomiting or gastric pain.

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  • The new fibrous tissue which is developed throughout the liver, as the result of the chronic inflammation, causes general enlargement of the liver with, perhaps, nausea, vomiting and jaundice.

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  • A similar stimulation of the non-striped muscle in the alimentary canal results in violent vomiting and purging, if a large dose has been taken.

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  • It must never be prescribed in large doses to begin with, as some patients are quite unable to take it,intractable vomiting being caused.

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  • The sudden withdrawal of the drug from a morphine habitué is followed by a train of alarming symptoms. As the time approaches for the usual dose there is marked restlessness, followed by excitement and later by chills, pallor, sinking, nausea, with perhaps vomiting and diarrhoea.

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  • Thus irritation of the eye causes winking and secretion of tears, by which the irritant is removed; irritation of the nose causes sneezing; of the air-passages, coughing; of the stomach, vomiting; and of the intestines, diarrhoea.

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  • In inflammation of the stomach also such continuous vomiting occasionally occurs that the patient's life is in danger by his inability to retain food; and similar danger also occurs from inflammation of the intestines and consequent diarrhoea.

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  • In the stomach we aid the vomiting by which microbes or the products of decomposition of food are usually eliminated by giving to the patient repeated draughts of hot water so as to wash the stomach clean.

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  • Accompanying the pain there is more or less of nausea, and when the attack reaches its height vomiting may occur, after which relief comes, especially if sleep supervene.

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  • Tartar emetic (antimony tartrate) when swallowed, acts directly on the wall of the stomach, producing vomiting, and after absorption continues this effect by its action on the medulla.

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  • Often it relieves vomiting, though in a few persons it may cause vomiting, but in far less degree than apomorphine, which is a powerful emetic. Opium has a more marked diaphoretic action than morphine, and is much less certain as a hypnotic and analgesic. There are a few therapeutic indications for the use of opium rather than morphine, but they are far less important than those which make the opposite demand.

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  • Taken in large doses nitrate of silver is a powerful poison, causing violent abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea with the development of gastro-enteritis.

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  • In concentrated or large doses lithium salts cause vomiting and diarrhoea, due to a gastro-enteritis set up by their action.

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  • They may have been swallowed several hours before symptoms of acute poisoning show themselves, with nausea and vomiting, and a burning in the oesophagus, stomach and abdomen.

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  • Given in toxic doses or in strong solution, sulphuric acid is a severe gastro-intestinal irritant, causing intense burning pain, extending from the mouth to the stomach, and vomiting of mucous and coffee-coloured material.

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  • This is soon followed by uncontrollable vomiting, and a little later by severe purging, the stools being first of all faecal but later assuming a rice water appearance and often containing blood.

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  • The oesophageal orifice is small, and guarded by a strong crescentic or horseshoe-like band of muscular fibres, supposed to be the cause of the difficulty of vomiting in the horse.

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  • Locally they cause considerable irritation, and when swallowed in concentrated solution may cause vomiting.

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  • Locally they are both very irritating, and antimony has a special tendency to cause vomiting.

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  • Apomorphine is essentially a muscle poison, but owing to the fact that minute 'doses stimulate the vomiting centre and cause emesis before any other symptoms are observable, its emetic action is the most prominent effect in man.

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  • The onset of the flu was abrupt with fever followed by vomiting, abdominal pain and profuse diarrhea.

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  • An incapacitating agent called aflatoxin, which produces vomiting and internal bleeding, was manufactured at Baghdad¹s Agricultural and Water Research Center.

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  • These include amnesia, headache, eye pain, loss of vision, nausea, and vomiting.

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  • Up to 40% of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy do not respond to the standard treatment for preventing vomiting.

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  • Slippery elm quickly stops violent diarrhea and allays even convulsive vomiting.

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  • Symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting diarrhea and abdominal cramps.

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  • For the past week, Ali has suffered from vomiting and diarrhea, leaving him badly dehydrated.

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  • Nausea, vomiting and watery diarrhea occur with some patients developing a maculopapular rash, red eyes and have hiccups.

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  • Humans - often severe with abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, vomiting, fever.

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  • Adverse events included nausea, headache, gastrointestinal pain, flushing, dyspepsia, asthenia, loss of appetite, vomiting and hot flushes.

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  • Throughout this time she had however been passing flatus, was not vomiting and had been eating and drinking normally.

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  • Gastrointestinal system Vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, reduced bowel motility.

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  • Subsequent hypohydration impairs gastric emptying and can cause gastric upset, nausea or vomiting, which in turn limit further ability to drink.

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  • The body's allergic reactions may include repeated episodes of fever, shaking chills, sweating, headaches, vomiting, and pain.

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  • Pregnancy, which commonly causes heartburn, indigestion or vomiting.

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  • April 27th 1746 A local highwayman, known for vomiting on his victims, decided to retire.

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  • Common adverse effects include a metallic taste and gastrointestinal irritation (in particular, nausea and vomiting ).

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  • Some of these symptoms include jaundice, dark urine, nausea, vomiting, abdominal swelling, unusual weight gain, and abdominal pain.

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  • This is because kidney beans contain a natural toxin (called lectin) that can cause stomach aches and vomiting.

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  • If vomiting is not a problem, oral methionine may be a suitable alternative for remote areas, outside hospital.

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  • Its main therapeutic use is in the suppression of vomiting, in particular preventing motion sickness.

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  • Other indicators include soft stools, mucus in the stool, vomiting or diarrhea.

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  • Continued research with other agents and combinations of these agents is under way to determine their usefulness in controlling chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

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  • Nausea and vomiting postoperative nausea and vomiting postoperative nausea and vomiting was less frequent in some, but not all studies.

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  • If you get severe pain and vomiting get urgent advice from your GP.

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  • Even in the 'better' zoos, abnormal behavior can be widespread, and include repeated pacing, rocking, vomiting and even self mutilation.

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  • In very ill patients, hydration can cause problems with bronchial secretions, vomiting or incontinence.

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  • Side effects are uncommon, but include sedation and vomiting.

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  • Symptoms include headaches, dizziness, vomiting, muscle cramps and spasms, pale skin, weak pulse and high temperature.

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  • If you develop vomiting, fever, Headache and shivering you might have sunstroke and should consult your doctor.

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  • Upon hospitalization two hours after ingestion symptoms were sinus tachycardia, nausea and vomiting.

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  • Later symptoms include watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, a dry sore throat, & anorexia.

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  • Taken internally, in doses of from one to three grains, carbolic acid will often relieve obstinate cases of vomiting and has some value as a gastric antiseptic.

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  • In a well-marked case there is usually an initial rigor - in children convulsions - followed by a rise of temperature, with vomiting, headache, giddiness, intolerance to light; pain in epigastrium, back and limbs; sleeplessness, apathy or delirium.

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  • Your dog may show signs of distress by whining, crying, retching, vomiting, gasping for air or restlessness.

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  • There is a recurring pattern of binge eating, which may be followed by self-induced vomiting.

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  • The symptoms include severe stomach pain and tenderness, nausea and vomiting, swelling of the abdomen and wind, fever and muscle aches.

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  • I have spent my day caring for around 30 patients with infectious diarrhea and vomiting on an understaffed ward.

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  • I see people vomiting, urinating in shop doorways blind drunk.

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  • He did then made up for it by ecstatically vomiting green bile over the poor bloke in the seat in front.

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  • Others died in frenzy, brought on by an affliction of the head, or vomiting blood.

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  • They replied it was an immense Serpent, which the Manitou, the Great Spirit, was vomiting forth.

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  • Mr C had not told Dr. M that Mrs D had been vomiting continuously.

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  • Richard had set off with them but had to turn back due to having a bad headache and vomiting repeatedly.

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