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vogue

vogue

vogue Sentence Examples

  • She acted graciously with all the guests, yet he could pick up subtle nuances that affirmed whether she was speaking to someone who genuinely understood art, or a snob who merely bought it to be in vogue.

  • He had to steer a middle course between the extremes represented by the Carbonari on the one hand and the Sanfedisti on the other, and he consistently refused to employ the cruel and inquisitorial methods in vogue under his successors.

  • from the loch, is one of the pleasantest villages in the Highlands and has a great vogue in midsummer.

  • BOWLS, the oldest British outdoor pastime, next to archery, still in vogue.

  • There is evidence of its vogue in Holland in the 17th century, for the painting by David Teniers (1610-1690), in the Scottish National Gallery at Edinburgh, is wrongly described as "Peasants playing at Skittles."

  • As a child she had already believed herself to have visions; these now became more frequent, and her records of these "revelations," which were tanslated into Latin by Matthias, canon of Linkoping, and by her confessor, Peter, prior of Alvastra, obtained a great vogue during the middle ages.

  • This practice had been in vogue since the establishment of posts, and was frequently used by the ministers of Louis XIII.

  • The Labour movement in Australia may be traced back to the early days when transportation was in vogue, and the free immigrant and the time-expired convict objected to the competition of the bond labourer.

  • The metayer system was in vogue, especially on temple lands.

  • 14) introduced by Morse is still employed in the United States and Canada, and the international code in vogue in Europe differs only slightly from it.

  • The institution has not attained great vogue.

  • This gave immense vogue to wider and vaguer theories of evolutionary process, notably to H.

  • Hinduism, which was once the religion of Java, but has been extinct there for four centuries, is still in vogue in the islands of Bali and Lombok, where the cruel custom of widow-burning (suttee) is still practised, and the Hindu system of the four castes, with a fifth or Pariah caste (called Chandala), adhered to.

  • superseded was not indigenous to Russia, but had been set up by Peter the Great, who had taken as his model the inquisitorial procedure at that time in vogue on the continent of western Europe.

  • One pair of tracks is used for a local service with stations about one-quarter of a mile apart, following the general plan of operation in vogue on all other intra-urban railways.

  • Elizabeth required Grindal to suppress the "prophesyings" or meetings for discussion which had come into vogue among the Puritan clergy, and she even wanted him to discourage preaching; she would have no doctrine that was not inspired by her authority.

  • The works of the ancient tragedians (especially Seneca, in preference to the Greek) came into vogue, and were slavishly followed by French and Italian imitators down to the 17th century.

  • Bonaparte's essay bore signs of study of Rousseau and of the cult of Lycurgus which was coming into vogue.

  • The evocation of spirits, especially in the form of necromancy, is an important branch of the demonology of many peoples; and the peculiarities of trance mediumship, which seem sufficiently established by modern research, go far to explain the vogue of this art.

  • 141 Vogue, Syrie Centrale No.

  • In the next generation Septimius Odainath or Odenathus, son of Hairan, had attained the rank of Roman senator (UlryKX?iTCKOS, Vogue No.

  • A few months later, in the autumn of 272 - the latest inscription is dated August 272 (Vogue, No.

  • 1, and Vogue p1.

  • iii.) and De Vogue (La Syrie centrale) made in 1861-1862.

  • At the time of his visit Daniel Defoe found thread-making in vogue, which employed the women while the men were at sea.

  • The high degree of civilization then prevailing in the country is proved by its architectural remains dating from the early Christian centuries; the investigations of De Vogue, Butler and others, have shown that from the 1st to the 7th century there prevailed in north Syria and the Hauran a special style of architecture - partly, no doubt, following Graeco-Roman models, but also showing a great deal of originality in details.

  • This persecution gave the book an extraordinary vogue, and it passed through twenty-two editions in three years, besides being translated into several languages; there is an English translation by Lord Falconbridge, son-in-law of Oliver Cromwell.

  • It has been famous for its sulphur and saline waters since the middle of the 18th century, and also enjoys great vogue as a holiday resort.

  • The native methods in vogue in Brazil and Mexico are primitive and often injurious to the tree.

  • The word Isis is probably an academic rendering of Ouse or Isca, a common British river name, but there is no reason to suppose that it ever had much vogue except in poetry or in the immediate neighbourhood of Oxford.

  • Variety entertainments are also in vogue, and in Nicolson Street and elsewhere there are good music halls.

  • In the period of national poverty and depression that followed this event, a puritanical spirit came into vogue which was little in sympathy with Holberg's dramatic or satiric genius.

  • But it contained also a bold indictment of the whole system of foreign policy then in vogue, founded on ideas as to the balance of power and the necessity of large armaments for the protection of commerce.

  • The armourers of Suhl are mentioned as early as the 9th century, but they enjoyed their highest vogue from 1550 to 1634.

  • His brother, Johann Friedrich Hugo von Dalberg (1752-1812), canon of Trier, Worms and Spires, had some vogue as a composer and writer on musical subjects.

  • This is the Syriac version of a narrative which has had an extraordinary vogue in the world's literature.

  • The tenure of the presidential office was for two years, and at every alternate election Guzman Blanco was declared to be duly and legally chosen to fill the post of chief magistrate of the republic. In 1889 there was an open revolt against the dictatorial system so long in vogue; and President Rojas Paul, Blanco's locum tenens, was forced to flee the country and take refuge in the Dutch colony of Curacoa.

  • One recommendation of the system was that it favoured a milder system of treatment than was at that time in vogue; Brown may be said to have been the first advocate of the modern stimulant or feeding treatment of fevers.

  • Here Jacques Davy received his education, being taught Latin and mathematics by his father, and learning Greek and Hebrew and the philosophy then in vogue.

  • Stukeley's industrious researches into the history of Roman London cannot be said to have any particular value, although at one time they enjoyed considerable vogue.

  • Subsequently the digging plough came into vogue; the share being wider, a wider furrow is cut, while the slice is inverted by a short concave mould-board with a sharp turn which at the same time breaks up and pulverizes the soil after the fashion of a spade.

  • extremity of Nantucket Island is Siasconset (locally 'Sconset), a summer resort of some vogue; it has a Marconi wireless telegraph station, connecting with incoming steamers, the Nantucket shoals lightship and the mainland.

  • Under faith healing in a wider sense may be included (I) the cures in the temples of Aesculapius and other deities in the ancient world; (2) the practice of touching for the king's evil, in vogue from the 11th to the 18th century; (3) the cures of Valentine Greatrakes, the "Stroker" (1629-1683); and (4) the miracles of Lourdes, and other resorts of pilgrims, among which may be mentioned St Winifred's Well in Flintshire, Treves with its Holy Coat, the grave of the Jansenist F.

  • The reception of this volume was cordial, but not so universally respectful as that which Tennyson had grown to expect from his adoring public. The fact was that the heightened reputation of Browning, and still more the sudden vogue of Swinburne, Morris and Rossetti (1866-1870), considerably disturbed the minds of Tennyson's most ardent readers, and exposed himself to a severer criticism than he had lately been accustomed to endure.

  • The Taihei-ki produced another notable effect; it inspired public readers who soon developed into historical raconteurs; a class of professionals who are almost as much in vogue to-day as they were 500 years ago.

  • ROhan is one of the most renowned of Japans modern authors, and some of his historical romances have had wide vogue.

  • Accurate reviewers of the era have divided it into periods of two or three years each, according to the various groups of foreign authors that were in vogue, and every year sees a large addition to the number of Japanese who study the masterpieces of Western literature in the original.

  • Katsukawa Shunsho (d- 1792) must next be mentioned, not only for the beauty of his own work, but because he was the first master of Hokusai; then Yeishi (worked c. 178 11800), the founder of the Hosoda school; Utamaro (1754-1806), whose prints of beautiful women were collected by Dutchmen while he was still alive, and have had in our own day a vogue greater, perhaps, than those of any other of his fellows; and Toyokuni I.

  • It was not until the latter half of the I 5th ~ century that there came into vogue the elaborate decoration of the sword, a fashion that was to last four hundred years.

  • A production so degraded as the early Makuzu faience could not possibly have a lengthy vogue.

  • Dijon possesses several houses of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, notably the Maison Richard in the Gothic, and the Hotel Vogue in the Renaissance style.

  • This slight work of a Macedonian freedman, destitute of national significance and representative in its morality only of the spirit of cosmopolitan individualism, owes its vogue to its easy Latinity and popular subject-matter.

  • It was, however, the Arthurian legend which of all his fabrications attained the greatest vogue.

  • Contrary to all the rules of war then in vogue, he fought a piecemeal and unpremeditated battle, with.

  • The result of the contest was never in doubt, however, for the geological evidence, once it had been gathered, was unequivocal; and by about the middle of the century it was pretty generally admitted that the age of the earth must be measured by an utterly different standard from that hitherto in vogue.

  • It subsequently fell into disuse, but was revived in the 19th century when the Tractarian movement had brought the term "High Churchman" into vogue again in a modified sense, i.e.

  • There is also a " totem " system still in vogue.

  • 500 child baptism was in vogue.

  • (4) Worship was everywhere dramatic. Only here and there among the higher tribes were bloody sacrifices in vogue, and prayers were in pantomime.

  • of his works, and who certainly was the author of many Homiliae de Tempore which were much in vogue during the 8th and following centuries.

  • There have been in past times considerable divergences in the practice, but at present there is a fairly uniform system in vogue.

  • He belonged to the leading family of Palmyra, which bore, in token of Roman citizenship, the gentilicium of Septimius; hence his full name was Septimius Odainath (Vogue, Syrie centrale, Nos.

  • It had, however, considerable vogue in France.

  • But, under the guise of a restoration on conservative lines, Ultramontanism - notwithstanding the totally different conditions which now obtain - girds itself to work for an ideal of religion and culture in vogue during the middle ages, and at the same time holds itself justified in adopting the extreme point of view with respect to all questions which we have mentioned.

  • In the same year, however, a letter Sur la musique francaise again had a great vogue.

  • Horse-racing has also come into vogue, and Boitsfort, in the bois, and Groenendael, farther off in the Foret de Soignies, are fashionable places of reunion for society.

  • A bath of bulls' blood was much in vogue as a baptism in the mysteries of Attis.

  • Moreover, Potocki had the good taste to avoid the macaronic style so much in vogue; his language is pure and vigorous.

  • Wasilewski (1814-1846), the author of many popular songs; and Holowinski, archbishop of Mogilev (1807-1855), author of religious poems. The style of poetry in vogue in the Polish parts of Europe at the present time is chiefly lyrical.

  • In Africa it is true that no species is known to extend to within some ten degrees of the tropic of Cancer; but Pionias robustus inhabits territories Italian Papagaio still continue in vogue.

  • To facilitate the reading of Latin texts, the favourite method was the use of interlinear translations, originally proposed by Locke, first popularized in France by Dumarsais (1722), and in constant vogue down to the time of the Revolution.

  • Meanwhile the blockade had become so stringent that few ordinary vessels could expect to break through, and a special type of steamer came into vogue for the purpose.

  • It is characterized by extreme literalness, and clearly reflects the peculiar system of exegesis which was then in vogue among the Jewish rabbis.

  • The word occurs in the Regula Columbani (c. 7), and du Cange gives a few other cases of its use in Latin documents, but it never came into vogue in the West.

  • The catechisms of Bellarmine (1603) and Bossuet (1687) had considerable vogue, and a summary of the former known as Schema de Parvo was sanctioned by the Vatican council of 1870.

  • The Mexicans were also skilful makers of earthen pots, in which were cooked the native beans called by the Spanish frijoles, and the various savoury stews still in vogue.

  • Animism may have arisen out of or simultaneously with animatism as a primitive explanation of many different phenomena; if animism was originally applied to non-human or inanimate objects, animism may from the outset have been in vogue as a theory of the nature of man.

  • Novels Are Not Yet Much In Vogue; Though Madame Conan'S L'Oublie (1902) Has Been Crowned By The Academy; While Dr Choquette'S Les Ribaud (1898) Is A Good Dramatic Story, And His Claude Paysan (1899) Is An Admirably Simple Idyllic Tale Of The Hopeless Love Of A Soil Bound Habitant, Told With Intense Natural Feeling And Fine Artistic Reserve.

  • This indicates that the custom of taking out these organs and wrapping them separately was already in vogue in the most lavish form of burial.

  • Names, more or less allied to one another, are in vogue among the peoples of the Caucasus, the Caspian Sea, Armenia and Persia, and there is a Sanskrit name and several others analogous or different in modern Indian languages.

  • At the beginning the order had a great vogue, and at the time of Robert's death, 1117, there were several monasteries and 3000 nuns; afterwards the number of monasteries reached 57, all organized on the same plan.

  • The book enjoyed much vogue in England.

  • The electioneering alliances, which were everywhere in vogue, but particularly in Germany, between the Catholics and popular party and the Social Democrats, throw a lurid light upon the character of a movement that certainly went far beyond the intentions of the pope, but which it was now difficult to undo or to hold in check.

  • The difficulty that is naturally experienced by a traveller in finding sufficient support on a sparsely populated "ground" has brought into vogue the traveller on commission who represents several firms. The traveller with salary and allowances for expenses survives, but the quickening induced by an interest in the amount of sales has caused many firms to adopt the principle of commission, which may, however, be an addition to a minimum salary.

  • The results are true whatever theory be in vogue, but the results throw no light on the problem of which theory to choose.

  • There was a division of the monks into two classes, similar to the division in vogue in later time in the West into choir-monks and lay-brothers.

  • With the increasing price of copper, it is coming into vogue as an electrical conductor for uncovered mains; it is found that an aluminium wire 0.126 in.

  • According to the law of 1889 primary education is carried on in the ordinary and in continuation schools for boys and girls (co-education having been long in vogue).

  • As stated above, St Pachomius's monasteries formed an order - a curious anticipation of what six centuries later was to become the vogue in Western monasticism.

  • He was a many-sided man, whose numerous works on many subjects had a great vogue in their day, but are now forgotten.

  • Here it had a great vogue, and under the influence of the innate Asiatic love of asceticism it tended to assume ale form of strange austerities, of a kind not found in Egyptian monachism in its best period.

  • The Franciscan Third Order has always been the principal one, and it received a great impetus and a renewed vogue from Leo XIII., who in 1883 caused the Rule to be recast and made more suitable for the requirements of devout men and women at the present day.

  • They were not a sect, for we find the practice widely in vogue at an early time, even among the orthodox.

  • It was much in vogue during the middle ages, but its historical value is now regarded as slight.

  • Table-turning is still in vogue amongst spiritualist circles.

  • Of the later itineraries the Descriptio terrae sanctae,, by the Dominican Burchardus de Monte Sion, enjoyed the widest vogue.

  • Moreover, among the Jewish families settled in the 5th century B.C. in Egypt (Elephantine) and Babylonia (Nippur), the Babylonian-Assyrian principles are in vogue, and the presumption that they were not unfamiliar in Palestine is strengthened further by the otherwise unaccountable appearance of Babylonian-Assyrian elements later in the Talmudic law.

  • At the critical moment the queen's courage seems to have failed her; she and her son fled from the city to seek 1 See the Palmyrene inscriptions given in Vogue, Syrie centrale, Nos.

  • His analyses were both chemical and bacteriological, and his dissatisfaction with the processes in vogue for the former at the time of his appointment caused him to spend two years in devising new and more accurate methods.

  • The new fashion in vogue amongst the younger generation of Mussulman is called the ikbarah or patalunnuma, which is like the European trousers.

  • This cut of shoe is most in vogue amongst Moslems. (2) Gol panje ki juti, like English slippers, but rounded at the toes.

  • 5), but which enjoyed a great vogue in the middle ages.

  • At 18 of these resorts are situated, some of which have at times had considerable social vogue.

  • But despite the artificial character of the Trimurti, it has retained to this day at least its theoretical validity in orthodox Hinduism, whilst it has also undoubtedly exercised considerable influence in shaping sectarian belief, in promoting feelings of toleration towards the claims of rival deities; and in a tendency towards identifying divine figures newly sprung into popular favour with one or other of the principal deities, and thus helping to bring into vogue that notion of avatars, or periodical descents or incarnations of the deity, which has become so prominent a feature of the later sectarian belief.

  • These were lists, prepared by collating observations on the actions of substances one upon another, showing the varying degrees of affinity exhibited by analogous bodies for different reagents, and they retained their vogue for the rest of the century, until displaced by the profounder conceptions introduced by C. L.

  • One mass of Greek and Roman erudition, including history and metaphysics, law and science, civic institutions and the art of war, mythology and magistracies, metrical systems and oratory, agriculture and astronomy, domestic manners and religious rites, grammar and philology, biography and numismatics, formed the miscellaneous subject-matter of this so-styled rhetoric. Notes taken at these lectures supplied young scholars with hints for further exploration; and a certain tradition of treating antique authors for the display of general learning, as well as for the elucidation of their texts, came into vogue, which has determined the method of scholarship for the last three centuries in Europe.

  • de Vogue, Mélanges d'archeologie orientate (Paris, 1869); J.

  • The perfecting machine has had a great vogue, and has been much improved from time to time, especially in America, though the two-revolution machine in recent years superseded it, whether temporarily or not being still uncertain.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • In recent years competitions of the "missing word" type have had considerable vogue, the competitor, for instance, having to supply the last line of the limerick.

  • The higher organization - which the volunteers (q.v.) and yeomanry (q.v.) never possessed - varies only slightly from that in vogue in the regular army.

  • Political parties in congress were so evenly balanced and so subdivided into groups that a vote against the ministry was easy to obtain, and the resignation of the cabinet immediately followed in accordance with the so-called parliamentary system in vogue in Chile.

  • (This explains the gigantic focal lengths in vogue before the discovery of achromatism.) Examples.

  • At present the oyster is one of the cheapest articles of diet in the United States; and, though it can hardly be expected that the price of American oysters will always remain so low, still, taking into consideration the great wealth of the natural beds along the entire Atlantic coast, it seems certain that a moderate amount of protection would keep the price of seed oysters far below European rates, and that the immense stretches of submerged land especially suited for oyster planting may be utilized and made to produce an abundant harvest at much less cost than that which accompanies the complicated system of culture in vogue in France and Holland.

  • Syria, Phoenicia and Babyloniathe old mode o~ commerce was still in vogue, conducted by means of gold and silver bars, weighed at each transaction.

  • Some compositions in English poetry, written at sixteen, and not without a touch of genius, give evidence of the influence which Bowles, whose poems were then in vogue, had over his mind at this time.

  • He sought to judge them from the standpoint of the ancient world, and to account for them by the superstitious beliefs which were then generally in vogue.

  • In 1337 a wholesale massacre of the Jews, who were accused of having thrown the sacred host of the church of the Holy Sepulchre into a well, took place in the town; and it is probably from about this date that the pilgrimage above mentioned came into vogue.

  • With Panaetius the Stoa became eloquent: he did his best to improve upon the uncouth words in vogue, even at some slight cost of accuracy, e.g.

  • Jorge Ferreira de Vasconcellos, who produced in the Eufrosina the first prose play, really belongs to the Spanish school, yet, though he wrote under the influence of the Celestina, which had a great vogue in Portugal, and of Roman models, his types, language and general characteristics are deeply national.

  • In so far as he gave vogue to that style the credit must be given to William of Wynford, not to William of Wykeham.

  • After its appearance among the writings of John of Damascus, it was incorporated with Simeon Metaphrastes' Lives of the Saints (c. 950), and thence gained great vogue, being translated into almost every European language.

  • Her numerous journeys, and the vogue she enjoyed wherever she went, account for the numerous portraits from her brush that are to be found in the great collections of many countries.

  • Korra(30s), a game of skill for a long time in great vogue at ancient Greek drinking parties, especially in the 4th and sth centuries B.C. It is frequently alluded to by the classical writers of the period, and not seldom depicted on ancient vases.

  • All the early royal seals which have been referred to were affixed to the face of the documents, that is, en placard; but in the 11th century the practice of appending the seal from thongs or cords came into vogue; by the 12th century it was universal.

  • Afterwards, when the use of seals became common, and when they were as often toys as signets, fanciful legends or mottoes appropriate to the devices naturally came into vogue.

  • This led her, in 1868, to contract one of those conventional marriages in vogue at the time, with a young student, Waldemar Kovalevsky, and the two went together to Germany to continue their studies.

  • But it had little vogue, except among Socialists, until the third volume of Das Kapital was published in 1894, when its importance was borne in upon continental scholars.

  • The present building is assigned by De Vogue to the second half of the 12th century, but the columns may have belonged to the 4th-century church of Paulinus (Euseb.

  • As to public processions, these seem to have come into rapid vogue after the recognition of Christianity as the religion of the empire.

  • These serious shortcomings may explain the diminution of his vogue in Spain; they will certainly tell against him in the estimate of posterity.

  • The name tarantella, in use at the present time, applies both to a dance still in vogue in Southern Italy and also to musical pieces resembling in their stimulating measures those that were necessary to rouse to activity the sufferer from tarantism in the middle ages.

  • Before Islam the Ka`ba was the local sanctuary of the Meccans, where they prayed and did See De Vogue, Syrie centrale: inscr.

  • The rubrics of the MSS., it is true, enjoin total immersion, but it only came into general vogue in the 7th century, " when the growing rarity of adult baptism made the Gr.

  • Further, a system of granting monopolies and other privileges had again sprung up. Many of these grants embodied some scheme which was intended to serve the interests of the public, and many actions which appear startling to us were covered by the extreme protectionist theories then in vogue.

  • In England the Inquiry had considerable vogue, but it has left no permanent trace in the development of aesthetic thought.

  • Its vogue was instant and enormous.

  • Lying on Biggar Water and near the Clyde, in a bracing, picturesque, upland country, Biggar enjoys great vogue as a health and holiday resort.

  • Of the line of twenty-three bishops the most distinguished were George Enyedi (1592-1597), whose Explicationes obtained European vogue, and Michael Lombard Szentabrahami (1737-1758), who rallied the forces of his Church, broken by persecution and deprivation of property, and gave them their existing constitution.

  • The vogue of Socinian views, which for a time affected men like Falkland and Chillingworth, led to the abortive fourth canon of 1640 against Socinian books.

  • Arian or semi-Arian views had much vogue during the 18th century, both in the Church and in dissent.

  • Overt Unitarianism has never had much vogue in Scotland.

  • The alternative spelling of Dunse seems to have been in vogue from 1740 till 1882.

  • For their courtiers he wrote epithalamial and funeral orations; ambassadors and visitors from foreign states he greeted with the rhetorical lucubrations then so much in vogue.

  • The importance of their heliacal risings, or first visible appearances at dawn, for the purposes both of practical life and of ritual observance, caused them to be systematically noted; the length of the year was accurately fixed in connexion with the annually recurring Nile-flood; while the curiously precise orientation of the Pyramids affords a lasting demonstration of the high degree of technical skill in watching the heavens attained in the third millennium B.C. The constellational system in vogue among the Egyptians appears to have been essentially of native origin; but they contributed little or nothing to the genuine progress of astronomy.

  • It had an immense vogue, perpetuated by the printing-press in fifty-nine editions.

  • Tobias Mayer of Göttingen (1723-1762) originated the mode of adjusting transit-instruments still in vogue; drew up a catalogue of nearly a thousand zodiacal stars (published posthumously in 1775); and deduced the proper motions of eighty stars from a comparison of their places as given by Olaus Romer in 1706 with those obtained by himself in 1756.

  • In any case the ideal of the apostle from Britain was almost certainly very different from the monastic system in vogue in Ireland in the 6th and 7th centuries.

  • The bee-keeper's object is to utilize to the utmost the brief space of a worker-bee's life in summer, by adopting the best methods in vogue for building up stocks to full strength before the honey-gathering time begins, and preparing for it by the exercise of skill and intelligence in carrying out this work.

  • Hewins, in particular - brought effective criticism to bear on the one-sided "free trade" in vogue.

  • How far the more serious claim is likely to be revived in connexion with the renewal of research into the "occult" sciences generally, it is still too early to speculate; and it has to be recognized that such a point of view is opposed to the generally established belief that astrology is either mere superstition or absolute imposture, and that its former vogue was due either to deception or to the tyranny of an unscientific environment.

  • Under Domitian, who claimed her special protection, the worship of Minerva attained its greatest vogue in Rome.

  • Pliny describes in detail the apparatus and processes for obtaining olive oil in vogue among his Roman contemporaries, who used already a simple screw press, a knowledge of which they had derived from the Greeks.

  • At present vertical presses are almost exclusively in vogue; the three chief types of these have been already mentioned.

  • This spontaneous clarification was at one time the only method in vogue.

  • The Isis temples discovered at Pompeii and in Rome show that ancient monuments as well as objects of small size were brought from Egypt to Italy for dedication to her worship, but the goddess absorbed the attributes of all female divinities; she was goddess of the earth and its fruits, of the Nile, of the sea, of the underworld, of love, healing and magic. From the time of Vespasian onwards the worship of Isis, always popular with some sections, had a great vogue throughout the western world, and is not without traces in Britain.

  • The instruction prescribed by the Didache is very largely ethical, and stands in striking contrast to the more elaborate doctrinal teaching which came into vogue in later days.

  • It is believed that the ultimate origin of the constellation figures and names is to be found in the corresponding systems in vogue among the primitive civilizations of the Euphrates valley - the Sumerians, Accadians and Babylonians; that these were carried westward into ancient Greece by the Phoenicians, and to the lands of Asia Minor by the Hittites, and that Hellenic culture in its turn introduced them into Arabia, Persia and India.

  • She acted graciously with all the guests, yet he could pick up subtle nuances that affirmed whether she was speaking to someone who genuinely understood art, or a snob who merely bought it to be in vogue.

  • bland diets were in vogue.

  • Wise young chanteuses seem to be very much in vogue right now.

  • high-rise flats, then much in vogue.

  • originate most of the alternative therapies currently enjoying vogue are based on ideas originating somewhere in the 1880's and the 1930's.

  • wedding photojournalism has been in vogue for the past decade.

  • This shop definitely has the most upmarket feel to it, more Vogue than The Face.

  • All too often the mundane clutter of today's cultural world becomes the vogue of tomorrow's art world.

  • Georgia... is now enjoying a vogue that borders on trendiness, says the mighty Jeffrey Zeldman.

  • These not only paid the rent, but were also responsible for starting the vogue of boxing throughout the Latin Quarter.

  • It had a vogue in England in the forties.. .

  • For a gentleman of his standing it was essential to follow the current vogue for ' improvement ' .

  • given the vogue for assessing everything in sight, I believe it is time for the Association to re-examine our stance on this matter.

  • vogue at the moment with even more films currently in production or already on release.

  • vogue at present?

  • There is a current vogue for Where's Wally?

  • The escape from pretense, the search for authenticity -- these are in great vogue in the world of today.

  • These are of course critical terms of opprobrium which only recently acquired a new meaning and a new vogue.

  • DSU will still be denounced as unrepresentative whilst forcing the latest vogue leftwing idea onto the students.. .

  • The recent vogue for product centered cause related marketing initiatives is such a case in point.

  • Spider Man is an African trickster god.) There was a brief vogue for calling Batman " the Batman " .

  • vogue today: the ' focus group ' mentality.

  • vogue word in the later 1970s.

  • vogue in the early centuries, and was translated and adapted into Armenian, Syriac, Coptic, and Arabic.

  • vogue among newspapers is Martin Sorrell, chief executive of the advertising giant WPP.

  • vogue for a short time.

  • vogue for all things eastern in the arts.

  • Forget the current vogue for anorexic waifs - these are real men and women, abundant, sensuous and committed.

  • He had to steer a middle course between the extremes represented by the Carbonari on the one hand and the Sanfedisti on the other, and he consistently refused to employ the cruel and inquisitorial methods in vogue under his successors.

  • from the loch, is one of the pleasantest villages in the Highlands and has a great vogue in midsummer.

  • BOWLS, the oldest British outdoor pastime, next to archery, still in vogue.

  • There is evidence of its vogue in Holland in the 17th century, for the painting by David Teniers (1610-1690), in the Scottish National Gallery at Edinburgh, is wrongly described as "Peasants playing at Skittles."

  • As a child she had already believed herself to have visions; these now became more frequent, and her records of these "revelations," which were tanslated into Latin by Matthias, canon of Linkoping, and by her confessor, Peter, prior of Alvastra, obtained a great vogue during the middle ages.

  • This practice had been in vogue since the establishment of posts, and was frequently used by the ministers of Louis XIII.

  • v.); Tobler, Topographie von Jerusalem (Berlin, 1854); Dritte Wanderung (1859); Sepp, Jerusalem and das heilige Land (1873); Rohricht, Regesta Regni Hierosolymitani; Bibliotheca Geographica Palaestinae (1890); De Vogue, Le Temple de Jerusalem (1864); Sir C. W.

  • The Labour movement in Australia may be traced back to the early days when transportation was in vogue, and the free immigrant and the time-expired convict objected to the competition of the bond labourer.

  • The metayer system was in vogue, especially on temple lands.

  • 14) introduced by Morse is still employed in the United States and Canada, and the international code in vogue in Europe differs only slightly from it.

  • The institution has not attained great vogue.

  • Cynicism appears to have had a considerable vogue in Rome in the ist and 2nd centuries A.D.

  • This gave immense vogue to wider and vaguer theories of evolutionary process, notably to H.

  • Hinduism, which was once the religion of Java, but has been extinct there for four centuries, is still in vogue in the islands of Bali and Lombok, where the cruel custom of widow-burning (suttee) is still practised, and the Hindu system of the four castes, with a fifth or Pariah caste (called Chandala), adhered to.

  • superseded was not indigenous to Russia, but had been set up by Peter the Great, who had taken as his model the inquisitorial procedure at that time in vogue on the continent of western Europe.

  • One pair of tracks is used for a local service with stations about one-quarter of a mile apart, following the general plan of operation in vogue on all other intra-urban railways.

  • Elizabeth required Grindal to suppress the "prophesyings" or meetings for discussion which had come into vogue among the Puritan clergy, and she even wanted him to discourage preaching; she would have no doctrine that was not inspired by her authority.

  • The works of the ancient tragedians (especially Seneca, in preference to the Greek) came into vogue, and were slavishly followed by French and Italian imitators down to the 17th century.

  • Bonaparte's essay bore signs of study of Rousseau and of the cult of Lycurgus which was coming into vogue.

  • Then we have Selby's Illustrations of British Ornithology, two folio volumes of coloured plates engraved by himself, between 1821 and 1833, with letterpress also in two volumes (8vo, 1825-1833), a second edition of the first volume being also issued (1833), for the author, having yielded to the pressure of the " Quinarian " doctrines then in vogue, thought it necessary to adjust his classification accordingly, and it must be admitted that for information the 6 Copies are said to exist bearing the date 1814.

  • The evocation of spirits, especially in the form of necromancy, is an important branch of the demonology of many peoples; and the peculiarities of trance mediumship, which seem sufficiently established by modern research, go far to explain the vogue of this art.

  • 141 Vogue, Syrie Centrale No.

  • In the next generation Septimius Odainath or Odenathus, son of Hairan, had attained the rank of Roman senator (UlryKX?iTCKOS, Vogue No.

  • A few months later, in the autumn of 272 - the latest inscription is dated August 272 (Vogue, No.

  • 1, and Vogue p1.

  • iii.) and De Vogue (La Syrie centrale) made in 1861-1862.

  • At the time of his visit Daniel Defoe found thread-making in vogue, which employed the women while the men were at sea.

  • The high degree of civilization then prevailing in the country is proved by its architectural remains dating from the early Christian centuries; the investigations of De Vogue, Butler and others, have shown that from the 1st to the 7th century there prevailed in north Syria and the Hauran a special style of architecture - partly, no doubt, following Graeco-Roman models, but also showing a great deal of originality in details.

  • This persecution gave the book an extraordinary vogue, and it passed through twenty-two editions in three years, besides being translated into several languages; there is an English translation by Lord Falconbridge, son-in-law of Oliver Cromwell.

  • It has been famous for its sulphur and saline waters since the middle of the 18th century, and also enjoys great vogue as a holiday resort.

  • The native methods in vogue in Brazil and Mexico are primitive and often injurious to the tree.

  • The word Isis is probably an academic rendering of Ouse or Isca, a common British river name, but there is no reason to suppose that it ever had much vogue except in poetry or in the immediate neighbourhood of Oxford.

  • Variety entertainments are also in vogue, and in Nicolson Street and elsewhere there are good music halls.

  • In the period of national poverty and depression that followed this event, a puritanical spirit came into vogue which was little in sympathy with Holberg's dramatic or satiric genius.

  • But it contained also a bold indictment of the whole system of foreign policy then in vogue, founded on ideas as to the balance of power and the necessity of large armaments for the protection of commerce.

  • The armourers of Suhl are mentioned as early as the 9th century, but they enjoyed their highest vogue from 1550 to 1634.

  • His brother, Johann Friedrich Hugo von Dalberg (1752-1812), canon of Trier, Worms and Spires, had some vogue as a composer and writer on musical subjects.

  • This is the Syriac version of a narrative which has had an extraordinary vogue in the world's literature.

  • The tenure of the presidential office was for two years, and at every alternate election Guzman Blanco was declared to be duly and legally chosen to fill the post of chief magistrate of the republic. In 1889 there was an open revolt against the dictatorial system so long in vogue; and President Rojas Paul, Blanco's locum tenens, was forced to flee the country and take refuge in the Dutch colony of Curacoa.

  • One recommendation of the system was that it favoured a milder system of treatment than was at that time in vogue; Brown may be said to have been the first advocate of the modern stimulant or feeding treatment of fevers.

  • Here Jacques Davy received his education, being taught Latin and mathematics by his father, and learning Greek and Hebrew and the philosophy then in vogue.

  • Stukeley's industrious researches into the history of Roman London cannot be said to have any particular value, although at one time they enjoyed considerable vogue.

  • In the first half of the 18th century a plough with a short convex mould-board of wood was introduced from the Netherlands into England and, as improved at Rotherham in Yorkshire, became known as the Rotherham plough and enjoyed considerable vogue.

  • Subsequently the digging plough came into vogue; the share being wider, a wider furrow is cut, while the slice is inverted by a short concave mould-board with a sharp turn which at the same time breaks up and pulverizes the soil after the fashion of a spade.

  • extremity of Nantucket Island is Siasconset (locally 'Sconset), a summer resort of some vogue; it has a Marconi wireless telegraph station, connecting with incoming steamers, the Nantucket shoals lightship and the mainland.

  • Under faith healing in a wider sense may be included (I) the cures in the temples of Aesculapius and other deities in the ancient world; (2) the practice of touching for the king's evil, in vogue from the 11th to the 18th century; (3) the cures of Valentine Greatrakes, the "Stroker" (1629-1683); and (4) the miracles of Lourdes, and other resorts of pilgrims, among which may be mentioned St Winifred's Well in Flintshire, Treves with its Holy Coat, the grave of the Jansenist F.

  • The reception of this volume was cordial, but not so universally respectful as that which Tennyson had grown to expect from his adoring public. The fact was that the heightened reputation of Browning, and still more the sudden vogue of Swinburne, Morris and Rossetti (1866-1870), considerably disturbed the minds of Tennyson's most ardent readers, and exposed himself to a severer criticism than he had lately been accustomed to endure.

  • The Taihei-ki produced another notable effect; it inspired public readers who soon developed into historical raconteurs; a class of professionals who are almost as much in vogue to-day as they were 500 years ago.

  • ROhan is one of the most renowned of Japans modern authors, and some of his historical romances have had wide vogue.

  • Accurate reviewers of the era have divided it into periods of two or three years each, according to the various groups of foreign authors that were in vogue, and every year sees a large addition to the number of Japanese who study the masterpieces of Western literature in the original.

  • Katsukawa Shunsho (d- 1792) must next be mentioned, not only for the beauty of his own work, but because he was the first master of Hokusai; then Yeishi (worked c. 178 11800), the founder of the Hosoda school; Utamaro (1754-1806), whose prints of beautiful women were collected by Dutchmen while he was still alive, and have had in our own day a vogue greater, perhaps, than those of any other of his fellows; and Toyokuni I.

  • It was not until the latter half of the I 5th ~ century that there came into vogue the elaborate decoration of the sword, a fashion that was to last four hundred years.

  • A production so degraded as the early Makuzu faience could not possibly have a lengthy vogue.

  • Dijon possesses several houses of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, notably the Maison Richard in the Gothic, and the Hotel Vogue in the Renaissance style.

  • Mrs Veal has been to some extent popularized by the work which it helped to sell; Religious Courtship and The Family Instructor had a vogue among the middle class until well into the 19th century, and The History of the Union was republished in 1786.

  • This slight work of a Macedonian freedman, destitute of national significance and representative in its morality only of the spirit of cosmopolitan individualism, owes its vogue to its easy Latinity and popular subject-matter.

  • It was, however, the Arthurian legend which of all his fabrications attained the greatest vogue.

  • Contrary to all the rules of war then in vogue, he fought a piecemeal and unpremeditated battle, with.

  • The result of the contest was never in doubt, however, for the geological evidence, once it had been gathered, was unequivocal; and by about the middle of the century it was pretty generally admitted that the age of the earth must be measured by an utterly different standard from that hitherto in vogue.

  • It subsequently fell into disuse, but was revived in the 19th century when the Tractarian movement had brought the term "High Churchman" into vogue again in a modified sense, i.e.

  • There is also a " totem " system still in vogue.

  • 500 child baptism was in vogue.

  • " Philistine " thus became the name of contempt applied by the cultured to those whom they considered beneath them in intellect and taste, and was first so used in English by Carlyle, and Matthew Arnold (Essays in Criticism, " Heinrich Heine," 1865) gave the word its vogue and its final connotation, as signifying " inaccessible to and impatient of ideas."

  • These various orders were also organized and governed according to the system of centralized authority devised by St Pachomius (see Monasticism) and brought into vogue by Cluny in the West.

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