Vocal-cords sentence example

vocal-cords
  • He tipped his hat back, fixing her with a bright blue gaze that stunned her vocal cords.
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  • She wanted to scream at him, but her vocal cords were paralyzed.
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  • "Oh, Russ," she forced the words through constricted vocal cords.
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  • "Your vocal cords did not heal correctly," Wynn told her.
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  • At her inquiry, the doctor said the air tube had not caused any physical damage to Alex's vocal cords.
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  • It was like my vocal cords opened for me to breath and closed when I held my breath, but that was it.
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  • She might have screamed, but memory of what happened to Alex froze her vocal cords.
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  • The extreme pain and rapid swelling of the vocal cords - with threatened obstruction to the respiration - that characterize acute laryngitis may often be relieved by the sedative action of this drug upon the circulation.
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  • In the diagram there is indicated the situation of the cortical centres for movement of the vocal cords.
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  • Babies know how to cry when they are born, so using the vocal cords is autonomic – part of the autonomic nervous system.
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  • Another extension of the lining spans from the anterior membrane to insert into the cricoid cartilage, forming the vocal cords.
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  • Miles ought to be renamed Whispering Death, a tantalizing vision of severed vocal cords and whiplash obscenities.
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  • dilator muscles altering the tension of the vocal cords and the mass of the arytenoid cartilages that controls call frequency.
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  • involuntary spasms of the vocal cords cause the voice to change in quality.
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  • Future prospects After an operation to remove the larynx, normal speech is no longer possible because the vocal cords have been removed.
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  • These involuntary spasms of the vocal cords cause the voice to change in quality.
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  • stringy mucus between the vocal cords.
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  • The earliest sign may be slight redness and dryness of the laryngeal lining with stringy mucus between the vocal cords.
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  • Not unlike humans, cats use their vocal cords to make sounds.
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  • There are two vocal cords with a slit between them called the glottis.
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  • The position of the vocal cords and the size of the glottis determine the nature of the sound.
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  • When a child has croup, that portion of the airway just below the vocal cords narrows and becomes swollen, making breathing both noisy and labored.
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  • Croup affects the vocal cords and the area just below, the voice box, or larynx, and the windpipe, or trachea.
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  • It is composed of cartilage that contains the apparatus for voice production-the vocal cords and the muscles and ligaments that move the cords.
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  • Although it most commonly affects the legs and arms, spasticity can affect any part of the body including the trunk, neck, eyelids, face, or vocal cords.
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  • When stridor is present in a newborn, pediatricians and neonatologists also look for evidence of heart defects or neurological disorders that may cause paralysis of the vocal cords.
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  • Paralysis of the vocal cords can be life threatening.
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  • A cough begins with a deep breath in, at which point the opening between the vocal cords at the upper part of the larynx (glottis) shuts, trapping the air in the lungs.
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  • Glottis-The opening between the vocal cords at the upper part of the larynx.
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  • Because the vocal cords are located in the larynx just below the area of the epiglottis, the swollen epiglottis makes the patient's voice sound muffled and strained.
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  • Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is a disorder that occurs when the vocal cords move toward each other when a person breathes, narrowing the airway and causing wheezing and difficulty breathing.
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  • Normally when an individual breathes in (inhales) or out (exhales) the vocal cords are drawn apart by the muscles of the larynx (voice box) to make a wider opening for air to move into or out of the lungs.
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  • In an individual with vocal cord dysfunction, instead of being drawn apart, the vocal cords move together, narrowing and partially blocking the airway.
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  • This is called adduction of the vocal cords.
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  • Adduction of the vocal cords happens most commonly during inhalation, although it can also happen during exhalation.
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  • This examination allows the doctor to see the vocal cords and watch how and when they move.
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  • Since between attacks the vocal cords appear to move normally, it is necessary to trigger an attack.
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  • The doctor then watches the vocal cords move.
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  • The drug paralyzes the muscle, making it impossible for the vocal cords to move across the airway.
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