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vocabulary

vocabulary

vocabulary Sentence Examples

  • Surely his vocabulary included such a simple word.

  • Her English vocabulary was growing a word at a time—mostly terms like dust, vacuum, linens, dishes and other domestic terminologies.

  • Her sign language vocabulary had increased, but many things were still difficult to understand.

  • She'd like to kill the...she used a term very uncommon to her usual vocabulary.

  • The woman certainly had a vocabulary, and an imagination.

  • Not only is his vocabulary very extensive, but his employment of it extraordinarily bold and unconventional.

  • The groundwork, so far as it can be ascertained, and the grammar are Indo-European, but a large number of words have been borrowed from the Latin or Italian and Greek, and it is not always easy to decide whether the mutilated and curtailed forms now in use represent adopted words or belong to the original vocabulary.

  • There are few if any conceptions in economics which cannot be expressed in it without depleting the ordinary vocabulary.

  • The Armenians in the south-east of Asia Minor borrowed feudal institutions from the Franks and the feudal vocabulary itself.

  • Purely Arabic letters are only used in Arabic words, a great number of which have been received into the Malay vocabulary.

  • In Scotland the word "slug" is absent from the vernacular vocabulary, both shell-bearing and shell-less inland molluscs being known as snails.

  • But there is a wealth of verbal derivatives, the vocabulary is copious, and the intonation harmonious.

  • Rating, in maritime vocabulary, is the classification of men according to rank, and was formerly employed to class ships of a navy according to strength.

  • In its primitive sense the word persists in the vocabulary of coal-miners.

  • For the man of the towns its vocabulary was too copious to be easily understood, and in the age of linguistic studies many commentaries were written to explain words and idioms.

  • There is now and then an energetic phrase, but as a whole the vocabulary is jejune; the sentences are overloaded; the pitch is flat.

  • Every branch of learning can thus be equipped with a vocabulary.

  • to which authors had to address themselves; and an unparalleled development of mental activity necessitated wholesale drafts upon the Chinese vocabulary.

  • Seers there had been of old as in other primitive nations; of the two Hebrew words literally corresponding to our seer, roeh and hozeh, the second is found also in Arabic, and seems to belong to the primitive Semitic vocabulary.

  • The study of the Sumerian vocabulary falls logically into three divisions.

  • He had a style and vocabulary of his own.

  • The vocabulary of Lysias is pure and simple.

  • They seem to be relatively free from textual corruption, but the vocabulary still occasions much difficulty to the translator.

  • iv., 1824), he published a brief account of Egyptian research, with five plates containing the rudiments of an Egyptian vocabulary.

  • The distinctions between the dialects consist largely in pronunciation, but extend also to the vocabulary, word-formation and syntax.

  • The latter acquired the Semitic language imperfectly from their conquerors; they expressed the verbal conjugations by periphrases, mispronounced the consonants, and so changed greatly, the appearance of the vocabulary, which also would certainly contain a large proportion of native nonSemitic roots.

  • Brackenbury, A Short Vocabulary of the Fulani Language (Zungeru, 1907); the articles Nigeria and Sokoto and authorities there cited.

  • It is true that down to the 15th century there were many Teutonic Scots who had difficulty in expressing themselves in " Ynglis," and that, at a later date, the literary vocabulary was strongly influenced by the Latin habit of Scottish culture; but the difficulty was generally academic, arising from a scholarly sensitiveness to style in the use of a medium which had no literary traditions; perhaps also from medieval and humanistic contempt of the vulgar tongue; in some cases from the cosmopolitan circumstance of the Scot and the special nature of his appeal to the learned world.

  • His homilies, which are still preserved, furnish ample apology for the partiality of the people, exhibiting the free command of a pure and copious vocabulary, an inexhaustible fund of metaphors and similitudes, giving variety and grace to the most familiar topics, with an almost dramatic exposure of the folly and turpitude of vice, and a deep moral earnestness.

  • These people live under the poorest conditions, by doing smith's work; they speak among themselves a Romani dialect, much contaminated with Arabic in its vocabulary.

  • The entire vocabulary of the present land system is borrowed from the Mogul administration.

  • They are of importance in the history of logic for two reasons only: they affected strongly the German vocabulary of philosophy and they constituted the intellectual environment in which Kant grew to manhood.

  • This is of two main kinds: (a) evidence of history, consisting in a comparison of the political and social condition, the geography, the institutions, the manners, arts and ideas of Homer with those of other times; (b) evidence of language, consisting in a comparison with later dialects, in respect of grammar and vocabulary.

  • It is plain, in short, that the later poetical vocabulary was separated from that of prose mainly by the forms which the influence of Homer had saved from being forgotten.

  • In the vocabulary the most striking difference is that many words appear from the metre to have contained a sound which they afterwards lost, viz.

  • The ancient Chorizontes observed that the messenger of Zeus is Iris in the Iliad, but Hermes in the Odyssey; that the wife of Hephaestus is one of the Charites in the Iliad, but Aphrodite in the Odyssey; that the heroes in the Iliad do not eat fish; that Crete has a hundred cities according to the Iliad, and only ninety according to the Odyssey; that 7rpoirapotOe is used in the Iliad of place, in the Odyssey of time, &c. Modern scholars have added to the list, especially by making careful comparisons of the two poems in respect of vocabulary and grammatical forms. Nothing is more difficult than to assign the degree of weight to be given to such facts.

  • The difference of subject between the two poems is so great that it leads to the most striking differences of detail, especially in the vocabulary.

  • The condensation of the style and the peculiar vocabulary make the Exodus somewhat obscure in many places.

  • In the 7th series (1834) he defines a number of new terms, such as electrolyte, electrolysis, anode and cathode, &c., in connexion with electrolytic phenomena, which were immediately adopted into the vocabulary of science.

  • It was intended as a book of reference to facilitate the reading of old classical and sacred authors, whose language and vocabulary were out of date.

  • Theories of inspiration lurk behind the rich vocabulary of Greek prophecy; the seer is g v9Eos, 0€6X7prros, OEOirvcvoTOS, Oc040prtros, and Bakis and Musaeus give their names to sacred verses.

  • This affects even the vocabulary which has also "einen gewissen vulgaren Zug" (Nageli, Der Wortschatz des Apostels Paulus, 1905, PP. 78-79).

  • The gths are still extremely rough in style and expression; the language is richer in forms than the more recent Zend; and the vocabulary shows important differences.

  • Among his many works are: Grammatica syriaca (1867-1870); Vocabulary of the Tigre language (1868); Das Gedicht vom Hiob (1871); Die Prophetie des Joel and ihre Ausleger (1879); Die Saadjanische Ubersetzung der Hohenlieder ins Arabische (1882); Chrestomathia targumica (1888); Historia artis grammaticae apud Syros (1889); Ein samaritanisches Fragment (1893); Idee and Grundlinien einer allgemeiner Geschichte der Mystik (1893).

  • The tongue of the vast majority of the Dutch-speaking inhabit ants may thus be said to be a degenerate dialect of the 17th-century Dutch of Holland, with a very limited vocabulary.

  • The limiting of the vocabulary is due to two reasons.

  • In the first place, the early settlers were drawn principally from the peasant class, being chiefly discharged soldiers and sailors; and, further, when once settled, the necessity for making the language intelligible to the natives by whom the settlers were surrounded led to a still further simplification of speech structure and curtailment of the vocabulary.

  • C. Madan, An Outline Dictionary intended as an Aid to the Study of the Languages of the Bantu and other Uncivilized Races (1905); C. Meinhof, Die Sprache der Herero, a grammar and vocabulary (Berlin, 1909); G.

  • Allowance must be made for the difference of vocabulary produced by change of subject.

  • "Difference in vocabulary may be partially explained (though only partially in this case) by difference of subject-matter and of date; but the use of particles is one of the most unfailing of literary tests.

  • The change in the use of particles and the comparative rarity of the definite article form, together with the startling divergence in vocabulary, the chief ground of our perplexity" (Church Quarterly Review, 1903, pp. 428 seq.).

  • The peculiarities of syntax corroborate the impression made by such features of the vocabulary.

  • The Latin is unusually clean for the times, and is generally fairly classical both in vocabulary and construction.

  • The Kamchadale language cannot be assigned to any known group; its vocabulary is extremely poor.

  • In his hands Latin acquired a flexibility and a richness of vocabulary unknown to it before.

  • At the same time it will be conceded that he possessed a copious vocabulary, a fine ear for cadence, and the faculty of expressing every shade of thought or feeling.

  • It is the author's conception of the nature of the gospel which mainly gives us pause in following this pretty general disposition of modern scholarship. With all the phenomena of vocabulary and style which seem to justify such conceptions as von Soden's that c. iii.

  • With these, and other very limited classes of natural words, however, resemblance in vocabulary practically ceases.

  • 9), celebrating the victory of Constantine over Maxentius, delivered in 313 at Augusta Trevirorum (Trier), has often been attributed to Nazarius, but the difference in style and vocabulary, and the more distinctly Christian colouring of Nazarius's speech, are against this.

  • Structurally, its Latin characteristics have been well preserved; but its vocabulary has undergone great changes, becoming so far Slavonized that the ratio of words of Slavonic origin to words of Latin origin is approximately as three to two; large numbers of loan-words have also been added from Turkish, Greek, Magyar and other sources.

  • The vocabulary is still largely the same; whole sentences can be transliterated from one language to the other merely by making regular phonetic changes and without the variation of a single word (for examples see Bartholomae, Handbuch der altiranischen Dialekte, 1883, p. v.; Williams Jackson, Avesta Grammar, 1892, pp. xxxi.

  • His literary training was inadequate; his vocabulary is limited and his style awkward and pretentious; and he had a fondness for moralizing tritely and obviously, which mars his best passages.

  • That it began at a very early period to enrich itself with Scandinavian words is shown by the use it still makes of forms belonging to a linguistic stage older even than that of Icelandic. Daben has subjected the vocabulary to a very interesting analysis for the purpose of discovering what stage of culture the people had reached before their contact with the Norse.

  • A leading position among Icelandic lexicographers is occupied by Jon porkeisson, formerly head of the Latin school at Reykjavik, whose Supplement til islandske Ordbcbger, an Icelandic-Danish vocabulary (three separate collections), has hardly been equalled in learning and accuracy.

  • But, on the other hand, Portuguese has remained more exclusively Latin in its vocabulary, and, particularly in its conjugation, it has managed to preserve several features which give it, as compared with Castilian, a highly archaic air.

  • De Roepstorff, Dictionary of the Nancowry Dialect (Calcutta, 1884); Vocabulary of Dialects in the Nicobar and Andaman Islands (2nd ed., Calcutta, 1875); Prevost and Heing, Report on Preliminary Tour through the Nicobar Islands (Government, Rangoon, 1897); J.

  • Surely his vocabulary included such a simple word.

  • The results exceed any adjective in my poor vocabulary.

  • Her English vocabulary was growing a word at a time—mostly terms like dust, vacuum, linens, dishes and other domestic terminologies.

  • It must be a nuisance to carry a pencil and tablet around all the time, but her sign vocabulary was still limited, which resulted in very little communication.

  • Her sign language vocabulary had increased, but many things were still difficult to understand.

  • She'd like to kill the...she used a term very uncommon to her usual vocabulary.

  • The woman certainly had a vocabulary, and an imagination.

  • They are unlikely to know the specialized vocabulary you use.

  • She may be delayed in acquiring the vocabulary of her classmates.

  • The huge variety of immigrant languages has enriched American vocabulary.

  • His vocabulary notebook has proved a very simple solution.

  • Their vocabulary is far more formal than the others.

  • acquisition of vocabulary, differentiated labels and concepts relevant to the IE tasks as well as problem solving in general.

  • Abstract ABSTRACT What should be the role of AI in computer supported vocabulary acquisition?

  • arcane vocabulary that we preachers should be trying to avoid.

  • archaic vocabulary.

  • Her vocabulary may have become archaic, but her stance was prescient and brave.

  • He may think that this makes him sound authoritative, when all it actually does is display boorishness and a limited vocabulary.

  • brainstorming done in the previous class where I elicited vocabulary related to tourism in general.

  • Focus on vocabulary choices, using a thesaurus, and building up detail and description through the choice of subordinate clauses.

  • Perhaps the standard might usefully make explicit reference to careful choice of vocabulary and to English usage, including conventional collocations.

  • Related Think - Vocabulary - Collocation with advanced levels 1 Comment Marianna Pascal, Malaysia Your ideas on collocation with advanced levels 1 Comment Marianna Pascal, Malaysia Your ideas on collocation were absolutely fascinating.

  • colloquial phrases to my vocabulary.

  • In much electroacoustic composition, the term departs in its significance from the sense with which it is used in sound recording vocabulary.

  • consolidateed by all children as an exciting and motivating way of consolidating vocabulary and learning to read.

  • Perhaps he had used all the vocabulary garnishing his poetry, desperately trying to scout back for some for starting a polite conversation.

  • Polish teacher is responsible for teaching grammar while native speaker works on students ' speaking skills, teaching mainly conversational language and vocabulary.

  • The superstratum is the prestigious language influencing the emerging Creole from above, especially with regard to vocabulary.

  • discriminative training for large vocabulary continuous speech recognition.

  • Instead of locating the rule-breakers n the vocabulary of neoliberal economics, they are presented as threats to the security of US citizens.

  • expressive vocabulary.

  • make flashcards of key vocabulary and put these on a display board for the class to refer to during the session.

  • S. Jackson, England I teach adult beginners and find flashcards very useful when teaching vocabulary.

  • glossary who are not literate can make simple illustrated glossaries based on topic or vocabulary areas, using their own pictures or pictures provided.

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