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vitreous

vitreous

vitreous Sentence Examples

  • c, Cornea; 1, lens; v.b., vitreous body; r, retina.

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  • c, Cornea; 1, lens; v.b., vitreous body; r, retina.

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  • H2O (below 15° C.), which on being heated to a dark red heat loses its water of crystallization and leaves a white vitreous mass of the pentoxide.

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  • It is a vitreous greenish blue, as I remember it, like those patches of the winter sky seen through cloud vistas in the west before sundown.

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  • Their lustre is vitreous except when they contain many minute crystals; they are then velvety or even resinous in appearance.

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  • The sealing-wax so treated is electrified negatively or resinously, and the glass with positive or vitreous electricity.

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  • It forms a colourless vitreous mass, hence its name " glacial phosphoric acid."

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  • Chalcocite, redruthite, copper-glance or vitreous copper (Cu 2 S) contains about 80% of copper.

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  • The dazzling white effect of their peaks is produced, not by snow, as among the Himalayas, but by enormous masses of vitreous rose-coloured quartz.

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  • interior of which the pigment-cells secrete a gelatinous substance forming a rudimentary vitreous body.

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  • Hence it may be regarded as diagnostic of rocks which were vitreous when they consolidated.

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  • Hence it may be regarded as diagnostic of rocks which were vitreous when they consolidated.

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  • The simple form of ocellus described in the foregoing paragraph may become folded into a pit or cup, the interior of which becomes filled with a clear gelatinous secretion forming a sort of vitreous Modified after Linko, Travaux Soc. Imp. Nat., St.

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  • From near the entrance of the optic nerve, through the original choroidal fissure, arises the much-folded pecten, deeply pigmented and very vascular, far into the vitreous humour.

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  • Crystals of azurite belong to the monoclinic system; they have a vitreous lustre and are translucent.

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  • Rhyolitic lavas frequently are more or less vitreous, and when the glassy matter greatly predominates and the; crystals are few and inconspicuous the rock becomes an obsidian; the chemical composition is essentially the same as that of granite; the difference in the physical condition of the two rocks is due to the fact that one consolidated at the surface, rapidly and under low pressures, while the other cooled slowly at great depths and under such pressures that the escape of the steam and other gases it contained was greatly impeded.

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  • Few obsidians are entirely vitreous; usually they have small crystals of felspar, quartz, biotite or iron oxides, and when these are numerous the rock is called a porphyritic obsidian (or hyalo-liparite).

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  • Although rocks wholly or in large part vitreous are known from very ancient geological systems, such as the Devonian, they are certainly most frequent in recent volcanic countries.

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  • Yet among the older rocks there are many which, though finely crystalline, have the chemical composition of modern obsidians and possess structures, such as the perlitic and spherulitic, which are very characteristic of vitreous rocks.

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  • By many lines of evidence we are led to believe that obsidians in course of time suffer devitrification, in other words they pass from the vitreous into a crystalline state, but as the changes take place in a solid mass they require a very long time for their achievement, and the crystals produced are only of extremely small size.

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  • A dull stony-looking rock results, the vitreous lustre having entirely disappeared, and in microscopic section this exhibits a cryptocrystalline structure, being made up of exceedingly minute grains principally of quartz and felspar.

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  • Many vitreous rocks show alteration of this type in certain parts where either the glass has been of unstable nature or where agencies of change such as percolating water have had easiest access (as along joints, perlitic cracks and the margins of dikes and sills).

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  • In Arran there are pitchstone dikes, some of which are very completely vitreous, while others are changed to spherulitic felsites more or less silicified.

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  • Included in this group are some rocks which are more properly to be regarded as vitreous forms of trachyte than as glassy rhyolites (Iceland), but except by chemical analyses they cannot be separated.

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  • Aided by grants from the Prussian government, these workers systematically investigated the effect of introducing a large number of different chemical substances (oxides) into vitreous fluxes.

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  • But the ware has never found favor in Japanese eyes, an element of unpleasant garishness being imparted to it by the vitreous appearance of the glaze, which is manufactured according to European methods.

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  • In some cases it is very difficult to distinguish niello from black enamel.; but the black substance differs from true enamel in being metallic, not vitreous.

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  • Its duplex character, and the fact that the electricity produced by rubbing glass and vitreous substances was different from that produced by rubbing sealing-wax and resinous substances, seemed to necessitate the assumption of two kinds of electric fluid; hence there arose the conception of positive and negative electricity, and the two-fluid theory came into existence.

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  • The amorphous variety, which only differs from the vitreous form in its state of aggregation, is obtained by reducing solutions of selenious acid with sulphur dioxide.

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  • irXivOos, a tile), in petrology, a dark grey or dark brown crypto-crystalline substance which has an almost vitreous lustre, and when pure appears structureless to the unaided eye.

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  • In the amorphous condition it can be obtained by condensing the vapour of the oxide at as high a temperature as possible, when a vitreous mass is produced, which melts at 200° C., has a specific gravity of 3.68-3.798, and is more soluble in water than the crystalline variety.

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  • The condition is caused by blood vessels growing into the vitreous, which is followed later by fibrosis.

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  • The materials used for the cistern remained the same, although some tanks were made of vitreous china.

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  • ICCE surgery has more complications related to vitreous disturbance (i.e., cystoid macular edema, retinal detachment and corneal decompensation) than ECCE.

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  • Recurrence of symptoms occurred in only 1 patient at 3 months, due to only a partial vitreous detachment being obtained.

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  • posterior vitreous detachment does not in itself cause any permanent loss of vision.

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  • Your smooth bottom electric kettle uses vitreous enamel in the manufacture of the heating element.

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  • A modern butler sink and matching vitreous enamel drainer, exposed 'A ' frame and hip beams and a slate flagstone floor.

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  • Vitreous enamel frits The formulation of the development of the specialized glasses known as vitreous enamel frits.

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  • More serious problems include abnormalities of the vitreous gel, degeneration of the retina and glaucoma.

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  • The excellent heat retention qualities allow energy efficient cooking and the Vitreous enamel surface is totally hygienic and very easy to clean.

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  • luminescence dating, ceramic petrology, early vitreous materials analysis, and stable isotope dietary studies.

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  • As the vitreous shrinks it can pull the macula away from the back of the eye.

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  • opacity of the cornea, anterior chamber or the vitreous.

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  • About Hyaluronic Acid History In 1934 Palmer and Meyer isolated a novel polysaccharide from vitreous of bovine eyes.

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  • temporal arteritis or vitreous detachment with torn retina?

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  • They were made in vitreous glass tesserae, using the reverse method, by Greenwich Mural Workshop.

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  • vitreous enamel in the manufacture of the heating element.

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  • vitreous hemorrhage.

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  • vitreous detachment being obtained.

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  • vitreous china.

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  • vitreous gel.

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  • vitreous cavity.

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  • After fusion the mass solidifies to a transparent vitreous solid which dissolves readily in water to form boric acid (q.v.); it is exceedingly hygroscopic and even on standing in moist air becomes opaque through absorption of water and formation of boric acid.

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  • The simple form of ocellus described in the foregoing paragraph may become folded into a pit or cup, the interior of which becomes filled with a clear gelatinous secretion forming a sort of vitreous Modified after Linko, Travaux Soc. Imp. Nat., St.

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  • The distal portion of the vitreous body may project from the cavity of the cup, forming a non-cellular lens as in Lizzia (fig.

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  • From near the entrance of the optic nerve, through the original choroidal fissure, arises the much-folded pecten, deeply pigmented and very vascular, far into the vitreous humour.

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  • Crystals of azurite belong to the monoclinic system; they have a vitreous lustre and are translucent.

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  • The more highly organized species have often very numerous eyes (Amphiporus, Drepanophorus), which are provided with a spherical refracting anterior portion, with a cellular " vitreous body," with a layer of delicate radially arranged rods, with an outer sheath of dark pigment, and with a separate nerve-twig each, springing from a common or double pair of branches which leave the brain as n.

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  • The former substituted for the salt, sulphur and mercury of Basil Valentine and Paracelsus three earths - the mercurial, the vitreous and the combustible - and he explained combustion as depending on the escape of this last combustible element; while Stahl's conception of phlogiston - not fire itself, but the principle of fire - by virtue of which combustible bodies burned, was a near relative of the mercury of the philosophers, the soul or essence of ordinary mercury.

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  • Rhyolitic lavas frequently are more or less vitreous, and when the glassy matter greatly predominates and the; crystals are few and inconspicuous the rock becomes an obsidian; the chemical composition is essentially the same as that of granite; the difference in the physical condition of the two rocks is due to the fact that one consolidated at the surface, rapidly and under low pressures, while the other cooled slowly at great depths and under such pressures that the escape of the steam and other gases it contained was greatly impeded.

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  • Few obsidians are entirely vitreous; usually they have small crystals of felspar, quartz, biotite or iron oxides, and when these are numerous the rock is called a porphyritic obsidian (or hyalo-liparite).

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  • Their lustre is vitreous except when they contain many minute crystals; they are then velvety or even resinous in appearance.

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  • Although rocks wholly or in large part vitreous are known from very ancient geological systems, such as the Devonian, they are certainly most frequent in recent volcanic countries.

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  • Yet among the older rocks there are many which, though finely crystalline, have the chemical composition of modern obsidians and possess structures, such as the perlitic and spherulitic, which are very characteristic of vitreous rocks.

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  • By many lines of evidence we are led to believe that obsidians in course of time suffer devitrification, in other words they pass from the vitreous into a crystalline state, but as the changes take place in a solid mass they require a very long time for their achievement, and the crystals produced are only of extremely small size.

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  • A dull stony-looking rock results, the vitreous lustre having entirely disappeared, and in microscopic section this exhibits a cryptocrystalline structure, being made up of exceedingly minute grains principally of quartz and felspar.

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  • Many vitreous rocks show alteration of this type in certain parts where either the glass has been of unstable nature or where agencies of change such as percolating water have had easiest access (as along joints, perlitic cracks and the margins of dikes and sills).

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  • In Arran there are pitchstone dikes, some of which are very completely vitreous, while others are changed to spherulitic felsites more or less silicified.

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  • Included in this group are some rocks which are more properly to be regarded as vitreous forms of trachyte than as glassy rhyolites (Iceland), but except by chemical analyses they cannot be separated.

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  • Aided by grants from the Prussian government, these workers systematically investigated the effect of introducing a large number of different chemical substances (oxides) into vitreous fluxes.

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  • The Egyptian potteries afforded experience in dealing with vitreous glazes and vitreous colours, and from Egyptian alabaster-quarries veined vessels were wrought, which may well have suggested the decorative arrangement of zigzag lines (see Plate I.

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  • But the ware has never found favor in Japanese eyes, an element of unpleasant garishness being imparted to it by the vitreous appearance of the glaze, which is manufactured according to European methods.

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  • The sealing-wax so treated is electrified negatively or resinously, and the glass with positive or vitreous electricity.

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  • It forms a colourless vitreous mass, hence its name " glacial phosphoric acid."

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  • The sense-organs of medusae are of two classes: (1) pigment spots, sensitive to light, termed ocelli, which may become elaborated into eye-like structures with lens, retina and vitreous body; (2) organs of the sense of balance or orientation, commonly termed otocysts or statocysts.

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  • A typical resin is a transparent or translucent mass, with a vitreous fracture and a faintly yellow or brown colour, inodorous or having only a slight turpentine odour and taste.

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  • In some cases it is very difficult to distinguish niello from black enamel.; but the black substance differs from true enamel in being metallic, not vitreous.

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  • Its duplex character, and the fact that the electricity produced by rubbing glass and vitreous substances was different from that produced by rubbing sealing-wax and resinous substances, seemed to necessitate the assumption of two kinds of electric fluid; hence there arose the conception of positive and negative electricity, and the two-fluid theory came into existence.

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  • Chalcocite, redruthite, copper-glance or vitreous copper (Cu 2 S) contains about 80% of copper.

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  • The dazzling white effect of their peaks is produced, not by snow, as among the Himalayas, but by enormous masses of vitreous rose-coloured quartz.

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  • interior of which the pigment-cells secrete a gelatinous substance forming a rudimentary vitreous body.

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  • 8, c) (better perhaps termed a conjunctiva), below which the spherical lens projects into the optic vesicle, imbedded in the vitreous humour (v.b) which fills it; the retina (r) consists of visual cells with long cones (fig.

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  • Chem., 1900, 4, p. 423) seems to establish that the element exists in three distinct forms, namely liquid selenium (which includes the vitreous, soluble and amorphous forms), crystalline red selenium (which includes, perhaps, two very closely allied forms), and crystalline, grey or metallic selenium.

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  • The amorphous variety, which only differs from the vitreous form in its state of aggregation, is obtained by reducing solutions of selenious acid with sulphur dioxide.

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  • irXivOos, a tile), in petrology, a dark grey or dark brown crypto-crystalline substance which has an almost vitreous lustre, and when pure appears structureless to the unaided eye.

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  • In the amorphous condition it can be obtained by condensing the vapour of the oxide at as high a temperature as possible, when a vitreous mass is produced, which melts at 200° C., has a specific gravity of 3.68-3.798, and is more soluble in water than the crystalline variety.

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  • H2O (below 15° C.), which on being heated to a dark red heat loses its water of crystallization and leaves a white vitreous mass of the pentoxide.

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  • In the past, tubs always used to be made of vitreous enamel, which was strong, but susceptible to rust.

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  • Does anyone on here suffer from either temporal arteritis or vitreous detachment with torn retina?

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  • They were made in vitreous glass tesserae, using the reverse method, by Greenwich Mural Workshop.

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  • Aspirin therapy is not associated with an increased risk for retinal or vitreous hemorrhage.

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  • They are also in the wrong place - growing on the surface of the retina and into the vitreous gel.

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  • The tumor mass is growing from the retina (arrow) into the vitreous cavity.

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  • The result is a magnificently sculptured shape crafted of vitreous china with an extremely durable surface resistant to fading, staining, burning, and scratching for beauty that lasts.

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  • Vitreous - Tiles will absorb less than .05 percent of the water to which the tile is exposed.

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  • Floaters are small pieces of gel within the vitreous fluid of your eye, which can take on various shapes.

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  • They are more often experienced as people age, because as the vitreous deteriorates with age, these gel "spots" can form.

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  • When you see floaters, you're seeing vitreous gel pockets floating across your vision.

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  • Since colored contact lenses don't alter the vision of your pupil, they have no way of altering or "shading out" the shadowy shapes of the floaters that enter your vision as they float through your eye's vitreous.

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  • Contact lenses sit on the surface of your eyeball, however the vitreous fluid where the floaters are suspended is actually inside your eyeball.

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  • Group V (very unfavorable for maintenance of sight): large tumors involving more than half of the retina, or vitreous seeding, in which small pieces of tumor are broken off and floating around the inside of the eye.

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  • Vitreous seeding-Small pieces of tumor have broken off and are floating around the vitreous.

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  • Patients with high myopia, greater than 6.00 diopters, have an increased risk of developing a retinal tear, hole, or detachment; a posterior staphyloma; a posterior vitreous detachment; or glaucoma.

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  • The more highly organized species have often very numerous eyes (Amphiporus, Drepanophorus), which are provided with a spherical refracting anterior portion, with a cellular " vitreous body," with a layer of delicate radially arranged rods, with an outer sheath of dark pigment, and with a separate nerve-twig each, springing from a common or double pair of branches which leave the brain as n.

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  • The sense-organs of medusae are of two classes: (1) pigment spots, sensitive to light, termed ocelli, which may become elaborated into eye-like structures with lens, retina and vitreous body; (2) organs of the sense of balance or orientation, commonly termed otocysts or statocysts.

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  • A typical resin is a transparent or translucent mass, with a vitreous fracture and a faintly yellow or brown colour, inodorous or having only a slight turpentine odour and taste.

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  • de C. du Fay (1699-1739) made the great discovery that electricity is of two kinds, vitreous and resinous (Phil.

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  • de C. du Fay (1699-1739) made the great discovery that electricity is of two kinds, vitreous and resinous (Phil.

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