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virtues

virtues Sentence Examples

  • She couldn't argue his virtues, but she still insisted that the situation was conducive to trouble.

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  • You're the one who was spouting all the virtues of marriage.

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  • Sometimes it was difficult to know which virtues they taught her were worthy and which were simply out-dated.

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  • At that date the science of chemistry was very imperfectly known, and the real constituents of ordinary remedies so little understood that different virtues were attributed to different products containing the same constituents.

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  • The planting of eucalyptus trees is out of favour at present, but it appears to have been successful in Portugal, not from any prophylactic virtues in the plant, but through the great absorption of moisture by its deep roots, which tends to dry the subsoil.

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  • The first part treats of the vices that hinder the attainment of holiness, the second of the virtues of a Christian.

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  • Like her brother, she had all the domestic virtues, and, as was to be expected of a sister of Louis XVI., she was in favour of absolutist principles.

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  • After the death of any of his favourite disciples he would hold a dog to the mouth of the man in order to receive the departing spirit, saying that there was no animal which could perpetuate his virtues better than that quadruped.

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  • Her beauty and virtues are praised by all ancient authorities.

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  • (Porphyry tells us that Plotinus was unwilling to name his parents or his birthplace, and seemed ashamed of being in the body.) Beyond the uaOap ra, or virtues which purify from sin, lies the further stage of complete identification with God (ovrc w aµaprias Eivac; aXAa 0E6v Elm).

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  • The chief adviser of Theodoric, the East Gothic king in Italy, he accepted with ardour that monarch's great scheme, if indeed, he did not himself originally suggest it, of welding Roman and Goth together into one harmonious state which should preserve the social refinement and the intellectual culture of the Latin-speaking races without losing the hardy virtues of their Teutonic conquerors.

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  • While several displayed commanding abilities, and some possessed many virtues, one alone attempted to conduct an administration in an enlightened manner, and he died prematurely.

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  • Ever active, he employed himself in the narrower sphere of repairing the castle and improving its domains and gardens, in shipbuilding on the Clyde, and in the exercise of the virtues of hospitality and charity.

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  • Moral goodness cannot be limited to, still less constituted by, the cultivation of self-regarding virtues, but consists in the attempt to realize in practice that moral ideal which self-analysis has revealed to us as our ideal.

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  • It is noticeable that it was on French soil that the seed had been sown.3 Preached on French soil by a pope of French descent, the Crusades began - and they continued - as essentially a French (or perhaps better Norman-French) enterprise; and the kingdom which they established in the East was essentially a French kingdom, in its speech and its customs, its virtues and its vices.

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  • Here, in the centre of a small chapel, surrounded by his chief companions in arms, by Alvar Fanez Minaya, Pero Bermudez, Martin Antolinez and Pelaez the Asturian, were placed the remains of the mighty warrior, the truest of Spanish heroes, the embodiment of all the national virtues and most of the national vices.

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  • The ruling classes among them display all the vices of the lower classes, and few of the virtues except that of courtesy.

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  • A list is preserved by Diogenes, who mentions works on Duty, Good, Virtues, Ends.

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  • As to the date, the decided Greek colouring (the conception of wisdom, the list of Stoic virtues, viii.

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  • The Report of the five bishops divides them into three schools: (1) the moralizing school, the oldest, by which - as in the case of St Jerome's treatment of the Jewish vestments - the vestments are explained as typical of the virtues proper to those who wear them; (2) the Christological school, i.e.

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  • But if he lacked the brilliant qualities of his impulsive, jovial father, he possessed in a high degree the compensating virtues of moderation, sobriety and self-control.

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  • Of his theological and philosophical works the best known are: The Endowments of Man (1882); The Groundwork of the Christian Virtues (1883); Christian Patience (1886).

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  • It is also likely enough that they did not consider sensible matter to be a vehicle worthy to contain divine effluence and holy virtues, and knew that such rites were alien to early Christianity.

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  • Paldo, Tuto and Vaso (according to Mabillon); Assumption of the Virgin; Combat between the Virtues and the Vices.

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  • He had been tried and found wanting, having neither the virtues nor the vices of his situation.

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  • Arcana were often shown to be such by their physical properties, not only by such as heat, cold, &c., but by fortuitous resemblances to certain parts of the body; thus arose the famous doctrine of "signatures," or signs indicating the virtues and uses of natural objects, which was afterwards developed into great complexity.

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  • hope dealing elements of disease, with its first beginnings; and in the field of therapeutics, chemical and biological experiment, as in the case of digitalis, mercury and the iodides, was rapidly simplifying remedies and defining their virtues, so that these agents could be used at the bedside with more precision.

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  • Catholic writers generally treat it as typifying contrition, the preaching of the Gospel, the prayers of the faithful and the virtues of the saints.

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  • Elsewhere " good desire " is analysed into the " spirits " of the several virtues, which yet are organically related, Faith being mother, and Self-mastery her daughter, and so on (Vis.

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  • treats of the virtues, each of which has two chapters of quotations allotted to it, one in prose and the other in verse.

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  • Brasidas united in himself the personal courage characteristic of Sparta with those virtues in which the typical Spartan was most signally lacking.

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  • Embodying the virtues of candor and integrity will help you to gain a favorable reputation.

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  • So, now that we have extolled the virtues of tankinis, let's take a look at how those tummy control features work.

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  • That admiration for an empire of more than two hundred millions of men, where not one had the right to call himself free; that effeminate philosophy which has more praise for luxury and pleasures than for all the virtues; that style always elegant and never energetic, reveal at the most the elector of Hanover's slave."

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  • Such public virtues at first counterbalanced his private vices in the eyes of the people.

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  • It includes dissertations on the various vices and virtues, the different arts and sciences, and carries down the history of the world to the sojourn in Egypt.

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  • Saturn for lead, Venus for copper, and Mars for iron, and the belief that the colours of flowers ' The Egyptians believed that the medicinal virtues of plants were due to the spirits who dwelt within them.

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  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.

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  • Half an hour later, the Rhetor returned to inform the seeker of the seven virtues, corresponding to the seven steps of Solomon's temple, which every Freemason should cultivate in himself.

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  • With all his virtues, however, Augustus was an intolerant Lutheran, and used very severe means to exterminate the Calvinists; in his electorate he is said to have expelled 111 Calvinist preachers in a single month.

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  • The one in the council chamber upstairs dates from 1527 and gives an allegorical representation of the Virtues and the Vices.

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  • Marat despised the ruling party because they had suffered nothing for the republic, because they talked too much of their feelings and their antique virtue, because they had for their own virtues plunged the country into war; while the Girondins hated Marat as representative of that rough red republicanism which would not yield itself to a Roman republic, with themselves for tribunes, orators and generals.

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  • Some have excluded all cooked foods, and have preached the virtues of fruits and nuts and grains in their natural ripe state.

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  • On the ground that after the virtues of courage and valour and fearlessness have been taught in the lower stages of evolution, the virtue of gentle humane ness and extended sympathy for all that can suffer should be taught in the higher cycles of the evolutionary spiral.

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  • The elder Pliny described about a thousand plants, many of them famous for their medicinal virtues.

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  • The descriptions in these early works were encumbered with much medicinal detail, including speculations as to the virtues of plants.

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  • The Girondists were idealists, doctrinaires and theorists rather than men of action; they encouraged, it is true, the "armed petitions" which resulted, to their dismay, in the emeute of the 10th of June; but Roland, turning the ministry of the interior into a publishing office for tracts on the civic virtues, while in the provinces riotous mobs were burning the chateaux unchecked, is more typical of their spirit.

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  • The third and fourth books, like the larger part of the second, treat of ethics; the third, of virtues and vices, in pairs; the fourth, of more general ethical and political subjects, frequently citing extracts to illustrate the pros and cons of a question in two successive chapters.

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  • The Czartoryscy, who were to dominate Polish politics for the next half-century, came of an ancient Ruthenian stock which had intermarried with the Jagiellos at an early date, and had always been remarkable for their civic virtues and political sagacity.

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  • While his scientific work procured him an extraordinary reputation among his contemporaries, his private character and virtues, the charm of his social manners, his wit and powers of conversation, endeared him to a large circle of personal friends.

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  • He had many of the virtues of St Louis, but neither decision of character nor devotion to duty.

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  • It is probable that the milk of ruminants possesses certain physical and physiological distinctions from that of non-ruminant animals, which will account for the virtues attributed to the milk of the ass and mare.

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  • Here he wrote his Neue Apologie des Socrates (1772), a work occasioned by an attack on the fifteenth chapter of Marmontel's Belisarius made by Peter Hofstede, a clergyman of Rotterdam, who maintained the patristic view that the virtues of the noblest pagans were only splendida peccata.

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  • The lowest stage is that of the civil virtues, then follow the purifying, and last of all the divine virtues.

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  • The civil virtues merely adorn the life, without elevating the soul.

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  • That is the office of the purifying virtues, by which the soul is freed from sensuality and led back to itself, and thence to the nous.

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  • In it he depicts the struggle of Christendom with paganism under the allegory of a struggle between the Christian virtues and the pagan vices.

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  • In ethics he made contributions to the science in regard to the place and functions of volition and attention, the separate and underived character of the moral sentiments, and the distinction between the virtues of perfect and imperfect obligation.

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  • Settled government, settled habits, remunerative employment and opportunities for the improvement of their condition are developing in them the virtues of the two parent races.

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  • Eugenius retained the stoic virtues of monasticism throughout his stormy career, and was deeply reverenced for his personal character.

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  • After a laudatory account of the past conduct of the Corinthian Church, he enters upon a denunciation of vices and a praise of virtues, and illustrates his various topics by copious citations from the Old Testament scriptures.

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  • Other virtues were all his own, his extreme gentleness, his love for children, his flawless honesty, his invariable kindliness, his chivalry to women and the weak.

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  • His fame lives in Eastern history as the conqueror who stemmed the tide of Western conquest on the East, and turned it definitely from East to West, as the hero who momentarily united the unruly East, and as the saint who realized in his personality the highest virtues and ideals of Mahommedanism.

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  • The pharmacopoeial preparations of this acid are a 2% solution, which is given in doses of from two to six minims, the tinctura chloroformi et morphinae cornposita, which contains a half-minim of this solution in each ten minims, and the aqua laurocerasi, which owes its virtues to the presence of this acid, and is of inconstant strength, besides being superfluous.

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  • In the Russo-Japanese War in 1904-5 the greatest incentive to deeds of patriotic valour was for Japanese soldiers the belief that the spirits of their ancestors were watching them; and in China it is not the man himself that is ennobled for his philanthropic virtues or learning, but his ancestor.

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  • Light presents itself to us as the good primal spirit (God, radiant with the ten [twelve] virtues of love, faith, fidelity, high-mindedness, wisdom, meekness, knowledge, understanding, mystery and insight), and then further as the heavens of light and the earth of light, with their guardians the glorious aeons.

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  • They are as a rule frugal, industrious and lawabiding, and are feared rather for their virtues than for their vices.

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  • The virtues of a scribe are honesty and care (or in a single word fidelity) and intelligence.

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  • [The first book a work of the school of Theophrastus or Eudemus, the second later Peripatetic, according to Zeller.] 7repi De virtutibus et vitiis: On virtues I.

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  • But when it comes to the moral virtues (Book iii.

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  • Then at the end of the moral virtues justice is treated at inordinate length, and in a different manner from the others, which are regarded as means between two vices, whereas justice appears as a mean only because it is of the middle between too much and too little.

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  • The motive of the moral virtues is the honourable (TO eaXov, honestum).

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  • As the rational is either deliberative or scientific, either practical or speculative intellect, there are two virtues of the intellect - prudence of the deliberative or practical, and wisdom of the scientific or speculative, intellect.

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  • Gentlemanliness it regards as perfect virtue, containing all particular virtues, and all goods for the sake of the honourable.

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  • In the Ethics to Eudemus, as Porphyry properly called the Eudemian Ethics, Aristotle in the first four books successively investigates happiness, virtue, the voluntary and the particular moral virtues, in the same order and in the same letter and spirit as in his Ethics to Nicomachus.

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  • On the other hand, nobody would have gone back afterwards on his masterly treatment of happiness, in the first book, or of virtue in the second, or of the voluntary in the third, or of the particular virtues in the third and fourth, to write the sketchy accounts of the Eudemian Ethics.

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  • from the division of virtues into moral and intellectual (E.E.

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  • But gentlemanliness is no longer called perfect virtue, as in the Eudemian Ethics: its place has been taken by justice, which is perfect virtue to one's neighbour, by prudence which unites all the moral virtues, and by wisdom which is the highest virtue.

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  • In dealing with what the Nicomachean Ethics (Book vi.) calls intellectual virtues, but the Magna Moralia (i.

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  • 5, 35) virtues of the rational part of the soul, and right reason, it distinguishes (i.

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  • But it falls into the confusion of first saying that praise is for moral virtues, and not for virtues of the reason, whether prudence or wisdom (M.M.

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  • 1130 b 28, 1280 a 16, 1261 a 30); the book on intellectual virtues (E.N.

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  • Towards the end of the 3rd and during the 4th century, as a result of the orientalizing of the Imperial court by Diocletian, it became customary to celebrate as a matter of course the superhuman virtues and achievements of the reigning emperor.

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  • Robert was a man of learning, devoted to literature, and a generous patron of literary men: he befriended the poet Petrarch, who admired the king so greatly as to express the wish to see him lord of all Italy; while Boccaccio celebrated the virtues and charms of Robert's natural daughter Maria, under the name of Fiammetta.

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  • and Mary, is one of the foremost women in the annals of the country for her virtues, high intelligence and various accomplishments.

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  • It may appear not less in the whole tone and spirit of the Church's life, in the varied Christian virtues of her members, in the general character of their Christian work, and in the grace received by them in the Christian sacraments.

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  • Henry's very virtues added to his difficulties.

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  • Thus he clearly described the preparation of hydrochloric acid by the action of oil of vitriol on common salt, the manifold virtues of sodium sulphate - sal mirabile, Glauber's salt - formed in the process being one of the chief themes of his Miraculum mundi; and he noticed that nitric acid was formed when nitre was substituted for the common salt.

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  • History has not done sufficient justice to the Italian monk Paschal II., who was the equal of Urban in private virtues, personal disinterestedness, and religious conviction, Paschal /L, but was surpassed by him in ardour and rigidity 1099-u18.

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  • At fifteen he was a man, resolute, spirited, enterprising, with the germs of many talents and virtues, but rough, reckless and very imperfectly educated.

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  • Apparently no vows were taken, but obedience, personal poverty, chastity, self-denial, and the other monastic virtues were strongly enforced, and a monk was not free to abandon the monastic life.

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  • With the proud national spirit of a Roman he combines an admiration of the virtues by which the republic had attained its greatness (xvi.

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  • The spirit of chivalry implies the arbitrary choice of one or two virtues to be practised in such an exaggerated degree as to become vices, while the ordinary laws of right and wrong are forgotten.

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  • It upheld courage and enterprise in obedience to rule, it consecrated military prowess to the service of the Church, glorified the virtues of liberality, good faith, unselfishness and courtesy, and above all, courtesy to women.

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  • Others again were believed to be endowed with specific virtues, e.g.

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  • Almost all of these virtues, general or specific, were imaginary; and at the present day, except perhaps in some remoter districts of northern Europe, only one of them is employed as a remedial agent.

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  • His very virtues were strange and therefore offensive to them.

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  • Her best though not her only fine qualities were national and political, the high public virtues of a good public servant; in the private and personal qualities which attract and attach a friend to his friend and a follower to his leader, no man or woman was ever more constant and more eminent than Mary Queen of Scots.

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  • It was natural that olive and willow should have been chosen for the Palm Sunday ceremony, for they are the earliest trees to bud in the spring; their consecration, however, may be explained by the intention to Christianize a pagan belief, and it is easy to see how their mystic virtues came in this way to be ascribed to the palm also.

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  • The personal history of Lee is lost in the history In 1859, while at Arlington on leave, he was summoned to cornof the great crisis of America's national life; friends and foes mand the United States troops sent to deal with the John alike acknowledged the purity of his motives, the virtues of his Brown raid on Harper's Ferry.

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  • His Breviate of the Life of Mrs Margaret Baxter records the virtues of his wife, and reveals on the part of Baxter a tenderness of nature which might otherwise have been unknown.

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  • The earliest known descriptions of the foxglove are those given by Leonhard Fuchs and Tragus about the middle of the 16th century, but its virtues were doubtless known to herbalists at a much remoter period.

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  • Like all the precious stones, the diamond was credited with many marvellous virtues; among others the power of averting insanity, and of rendering poison harmless; and in the middle ' Diamonds are invariably weighed in carats and in z, 4, a, 1, s, of a carat.

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  • x.), prefaced by a lively dissertation " Concerning the Virtues of an Heroic Poem," showing his unabated interest in questions of literary style.

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  • According to Chinese legend, the virtues of tea were discovered by the Emperor Chinnung, 2137 B.C., to whom all agricultural and medicinal knowledge is traced.

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  • Thomas Garway, the first English tea dealer, and founder of the well-known coffee-house, "Garraway's," in a curious broadsheet, An Exact Description of the Growth, Quality and Virtues of the Leaf Tea, issued in 1659 or 1660, writes, "in respect of its scarceness and dearness, it hath been only used as a regalia in high treatments and entertainments, and presents made thereof to princes and grandees."

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  • Prudence is, therefore, the only real guide to happiness; it is thus the chief excellence, and the foundation of all the virtues.

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  • This part consists in three distinct proceedings: (1) to establish a reputation for sanctity, (2) to establish the heroic quality of the virtues, (3) to prove the working of miracles.

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  • Believing in the perfectibility of the race, that there are no innate principles, and therefore no original propensity to evil, he considered that "our virtues and our vices may be traced to the incidents which make the history of our lives, and if these incidents could be divested of every improper tendency, vice would be extirpated from the world."

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  • But the main factor in evolutionary process was undoubtedly the formation of hs, which brought gods of independent origin into relation ii one another, and thus imbued them with human passions virtues.

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  • The occasional visitor to the tomb is reminded by its inscriptions of the many virtues of the dead man while he yet lived, and is charged, if he be come with empty hands, at least to pronounce the funerary formula; it will indeed cost him nothing but the breath of his mouth !

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  • Symbolical or imitative acts, accompanied by spoken formulae of set form and obscure content, accomplished, by some peculiar virtues of their own, results that were beyond the power of human hands and brain..

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  • What may be called the modern " art " current, with its virtues and vices, is as strong in Denmark as in England.

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  • Beside these works Ranch wrote a famous moralizing poem, entitled " A new song, of the nature and song of certain birds, in which many vices are punished, and many virtues praised."

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  • The civilians, looking on him as a patriarch of their science, have as a rule extolled his wisdom and virtues; while ecclesiastics of the Roman Church, from Cardinal Baronius downwards, have been offended by his arbitrary conduct towards the popes, and by his last lapse into heresy, and have therefore been disposed to accept the stories which ascribe to him perfidy, cruelty, rapacity and extravagance.

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  • Again, more reasonably, they have been taken as types severally of the moral, the intellectual and the theological virtues.

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  • Hillel lived in the memory of posterity chiefly as the great teacher who enjoined and practised the virtues of charity, humility and true piety.

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  • The elevation and the isolation of his position fostered a detachment from ordinary virtues and compassion, and he was a remorseless incarnation of Machiavelli's Prince.

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  • An accomplished general, a skilful diplomatist, and a patriot who not only loved his country above all things, but never feared to tell his countrymen the truth, he excelled in all private and public virtues.

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  • The negative side, the qualities that have to be suppressed by the cultivation of the opposite virtues, are the Ten Bonds (Samyojanas), the Four Intoxications (Asava) and the Five Hindrances (Nivaranas).

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  • We are familiar enough in the West with similar classifications, summed up in such expressions as the Seven Deadly Sins, the Ten Commandments, the Thirty-nine Articles, the Four Cardinal Virtues, the Seven Sacraments and a host of others.

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  • The opening chapters of the Ramayana recount the magnificence of the city, the glories of the monarch and the virtues, wealth and loyalty of his people.

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  • Apart from the titles (which are not authoritative) the difference of style in the various sections indicates difference of authorship. There is, indeed, a certain unity of thought in the book; throughout it inculcates cardinal social virtues, such as industry, thrift, discretion, truthfulness, honesty, chastity, and in general it assumes wisdom to be the guiding principle of life.

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  • All the ordinary social virtues such as truthfulness, honesty, kindness, chastity are emphasized and a great stress is laid on care for the poor (a social necessity at a tine when there were no well organized public charities).

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  • The above-named virtues are all recognized in the earlier Hebrew writings, the prophets and the law, but in certain points Proverbs goes beyond these, notably in its prohibition of exultation over a fallen enemy (xxiv.

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  • In 1830 he was rector of the university; and in his speech at the tricentenary of the Augsburg Confession in that year he charged the Catholic Church with regarding the virtues of the pagan world as brilliant vices, and giving the crown of perfection to poverty, continence and obedience.

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  • - The post-Platonic historians and critics, who, while they knew the earlier sophistry only through tradition, were eyewitnesses of the sophistry of the decadence, were more alive to the faults than to the virtues of the movement.

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  • Their origin, their previous crimes or virtues, their avarice or brutality, were indifferent to him so long as they served him loyally.

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  • In the pro Caelio he says that Catiline had in him undeveloped germs of the greatest virtues, and that it was the good in him that made him so dangerous (Cael.

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  • In 1610 he was imprisoned by the king of Poland, but his piety and virtues led to the election of his son, Mikhail Feodorovich Romanov, to the throne of the tsars in 1613.

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  • But she possessed the homely virtues; she was deeply religious, attached to the Church of England and concerned for the efficiency of the ministry.

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  • Her contemporaries almost unanimously record her excellence and womanly virtues; and by Dean Swift, no mild critic, she is invariably spoken of with respect, and named in his will as of "ever glorious, immortal and truly pious memory, the real nursing-mother of her kingdoms."

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  • In the Fable he shows a society possessed of all the virtues "blest with content and honesty," falling into apathy and utterly paralyzed.

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  • The so-called higher virtues are mere hypocrisy, and arise from the selfish desire to be superior to the brutes.

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  • "The moral virtues are the political offspring which flattery begot upon pride."

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  • Denying any form of moral sense or conscience, he regards all the social virtues as evolved from the instinct for self-preservation, the give-and-take arrangements between the partners in a defensive and offensive alliance, and the feelings of pride and vanity artificially fed by politicians, as an antidote to dissension and chaos.

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  • It begins by celebrating the ancient glories of the Danes, tells in allusive style the story of Scyld, the founder of the " Scylding " dynasty of Denmark, and praises the virtues of his son Beowulf.

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  • The Christian virtues were scorned by the foremost actors and the ablest thinkers of the time, while the antique virtues were themes for rhetoric rather than moving-springs of conduct.

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  • The Australian natives believed that the virtues of one killed could be transferred to survivors if the latter rubbed themselves with his caul-fat.

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  • Such rites are often associated with the actual eating of the victim whose virtues are coveted.

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  • It is prepared by boiling the needles in a solution of soda to remove the resin, which process loosens the fibre and renders its separation easy; it has some resemblance to coarse wool, and is spun and woven into blankets and garments that are said to be warm and durable; it is also used for stuffing cushions; an essential oil, obtained by a previous distillation of the leaves, has medicinal virtues attributed to it by some German practitioners.

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  • Excessive drinking is said to lead to skin and other diseases, but per contra many medicinal virtues are ascribed to the preparation.

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  • His home virtues are many: he is very kind and indulgent to his children and, as a son, his respect for both parents is excessive, developed in a greater degree to his father, in whose presence he will rarely sit, and whom he is in the habit of addressing and speaking of as master.

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  • He was not wanting in soldierly qualities; but his virtues were rather negative than decided.

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  • On the banks of the Susquehanna was to be founded a brotherly community, where selfishness was to be extinguished, and the virtues were to reign supreme.

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  • According to Evelyn he was " debonnaire and easy of access, naturally kind-hearted and possessed an excellent temper," virtues which covered a multitude of sins.

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  • Juvenal is no organ of the pride and dignity, still less of the urbanity, of the cultivated representatives of the great families of the republic. He is the champion of the more sober virtues and ideas, and perhaps the organ of the rancours and detraction, of an educated but depressed and embittered middle class.

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  • So absolutely is the " rare and priceless wisdom " for which we strive identical with virtue itself that the three main divisions of philosophy current at the time and accepted by Zeno - logic, physics and ethics - are defined as the most generic or comprehensive virtues.

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  • We hear, too, of corporeal days and years, corporeal virtues, and actions (like walking) which are bodies ((Teo yam) Obviously, again, the Stoic quality corresponds to Aristotle's essential form; in both systems the active principle, " the cause of all that matter becomes," is that which accounts for the existence of a given concrete thing (Xoyos Ti s ov61as).

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  • Incidentally we meet there with the doctrines of Pneuma and of tension, of the corporeal nature of the virtues and the affections, and much more to the same effect.

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  • Driven inwards upon themselves, they employed their energy in severe self-examination, or they cultivated resignation to the will of the universe, and towards their fellow men forbearance and forgiveness and humility, the virtues of the philanthropic disposition.

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  • A further outbreak of civil war, between the king and the heir-apparent, was averted in 1293 by the queen-consort Isabella of Portugal, who had married Diniz in 1281, and was canonized for her many virtues in the 16th century.

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  • It has been said of the mestizos elsewhere that they inherit the vices of both races and the virtues of neither.

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  • These are arranged, professedly on the basis of the aphorism of Augustine, Lombard's favourite authority, that "omnis doctrina vel rerum est vel signorum," into four books, of which the first treats of God, the second of the creature, the third of the incarnation, the work of redemption, and the virtues, and the fourth of the seven sacraments and eschatology.

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  • He was well fitted to secure the sympathy and admiration of his countrymen, for his virtues and his failings were alike English.

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  • The older school had taught that Gotama, who had propounded the doctrine of Arahatship, was a Buddha, that only a Buddha is capable of discovering that doctrine, and that a Buddha is a man who by self-denying efforts, continued through many hundreds of different births, has acquired the so-called Ten Paramitas or cardinal virtues in such perfection that he is able, when sin and ignorance have gained the upper hand throughout the world, to save the human race from impending ruin.

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  • He laid stress on the self-culture involved in the practice of the paramitas or cardinal virtues, and established an annual national fast or week of prayer to be held during the first days of each year.

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  • Livy writes as a Roman, to raise a monument worthy of the greatness of Rome, and to keep alive, for the guidance and the warning of Romans, the recollection alike of the virtues which had made Rome great and of the vices which had threatened her with destruction.

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  • His moral ideal is no abstract one, and the virtues he praises are those which in his view made up the truly Roman type of character.

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  • To us, therefore, they are valuable not only for their eloquence, but still more as giving us our clearest insight into Livy's own sentiments, his lofty sense of the greatness of Rome, his appreciation of Roman courage and firmness, and his reverence for the simple virtues of older times.

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  • Not for special facts, but for a general estimate, no writer is more instructive than Salvian of Marseilles in the 5th century, whose work De Gubernatione Dei "is full of passages contrasting the vices of the Romans with the virtues of the barbarians, especially of the Goths.

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  • The chief virtues which the Catholic presbyter praises in the Arian Goths are their chastity, their piety according to their own creed, their tolerance towards the Catholics under their rule, and their general good treatment of their Roman subjects.

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  • The same turn for detail is observable in his ethics, where, to judge from the imperfect evidence of the Characters, he elaborated still farther Aristotle's portraiture of the virtues See Gellius, Noct.

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  • Gibbon, Grote, Giesebrecht, Guizot stand to-day by reason of other virtues than their truth.

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  • Feats of arms, great battles, heroic virtues, devoted friendships and atrocious crimes make the chronicles of China in the 5th, 6th and 7th centuries before the birth of Christ as attractive as those of France and England in the 14th and some other centuries after it.

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  • Burke, who regarded him with great affection, said that he had "something high" in his nature, and that it was "a wild stock of pride on which the tenderest of all hearts had grafted the milder virtues."

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  • It is a just remark of Thackeray's that he everywhere half-consciously recognizes her as his better angel, and dwells on her wit and her tenderness with a fondness he never exhibits for any other topic. On the 28th of January 1728, she died, and her wretched lover sat down the same night to record her virtues in language of unsurpassed simplicity, but to us who know the story more significantly for what it conceals than for what it tells.

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  • Contemptuous of the opinion of his fellows, he hid his virtues, paraded his faults, affected some failings from which he was really exempt, and, since his munificent charity could not be concealed from the recipients, laboured to spoil it by gratuitous surliness.

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  • They form an intelligent, high-spirited class of people, with all the defects and virtues of their ancestry.

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  • Sacred wells are familiar features of Semitic sanctuaries, and Islam, retaining the well, made a quasi-biblical story for it, and endowed its tepid waters with miraculous curative virtues.

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  • This is done, not always with any deliberate consciousness of fraud (although it must be clearly recognized that truth is not one of the "natural virtues," and that the sense of the obligations of truthfulness was far from strong), but rather to emphasize the importance of what was written, and the fact that it was no new invention of the writer's.

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  • There is, however, an absolute pleasure in certain virtues such as belong to the love of country, parents and friends.

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  • Its objects are to promote a high morality among Jews, regardless of differences as to dogma and ceremonial customs, and especially to inculcate the supreme virtues of charity and brotherly love.

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  • He was not a ruffian or a tyrant like his father, and had indeed not a few of the domestic virtues.

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  • He offered to submit his case to Louis IX., the saintly king of France, whose virtues were known and respected all over Europe, if the baronial party would do the same.

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  • he was popular with his subjects, who pardoned him much in consideration of his knightly virtues, his courage, his ready courtesy and his love of adventure.

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  • In most respects he was a perfect exponent of the ideals and foibles of his age, and when he broke a promise or repudiated a debt he was but displaying the less satisfactory side of the habitual morality of the 14th century the chivalry of which was often deficient in the less showy virtues.

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  • A spirit of thoughtfulness in religious matters and of moral energy was growing in the nation, and the king was endeared to his subjects, as much by his domestic virtues as by his support of the great minister who acted in his name.

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  • But he had that quality which Aristotle places high among the virtues - the noble mean of Magnificence, standing midway between the two extremes of vulgar ostentation and narrow pettiness.

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  • "I know nothing of your story of Messalina," answered Burke; "am I obliged to prove judicially the virtues of all those I shall see suffering every kind of wrong and contumely and risk of life, before I endeavour to interest others in their sufferings?.

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  • The peculiarity of this work - written, of course, from what is known as the intuitional point of view - is its fivefold division of the springs of action and of their objects, of the primary and universal rights of man (personal security, property, contract, family rights and government), and of the cardinal virtues (benevolence, justice, truth, purity and order).

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  • Curiously enough, it is from Schleiermacher's philosophical ethics that a threefold division - the Chief Good, Virtues, and Duty or the Law - passed into almost all text-books of Christian Ethics, till recently a rebellion rose against it on the ground of redundancy and overlapping.

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  • Incarnation, Redemption, Virtues; bk.

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  • Among the Romans branches of coral were hung around children's necks to preserve them from danger, and the substance had many medicinal virtues attributed to it.

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  • The fact that men give different answers to moral problems which seem similar in character, or even the mere fact that men disregard, when they act immorally, the dictates and implicit principles of the moral consciousness is certain sooner or later to produce the desire either, on the one hand, to justify immoral action by casting doubt upon the authority of the moral consciousness and the validity of its principles, or, on the other hand, to justify particular moral judgments either by (the only valid method) an analysis of the moral principle involved in the judgment and a demonstration of its universal acceptation, or by some attempted proof that the particular moral judgment is arrived at by a process of inference from some universal conception of the Supreme Good or the Final End from which all particular duties or virtues may be deduced.

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  • In their eulogy of the virtues of the citizen, they pointed out the prudential character of justice and the like as a means of obtaining pleasure and avoiding pain.

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  • The Sophists had studied these matters superficially indeed but with thoroughness as far as they went, and it is not remarkable that they should have taken the methods which were successful in rhetoric, and applied them to the " science and art " of civic virtues.

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  • All virtues are, therefore, summed up in knowledge of the good.

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  • On this triple division of the soul he founded a systematic view of the four kinds of goodness recognized by the common moral consciousness of Greece, and in later times known as the Cardinal Virtues.

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  • We see, moreover, how in Plato's view the fundamental virtues, Wisdom and Justice in their highest forms, are mutually involved.

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  • Wisdom will necessarily maintain orderly activity, and this latter consists in regulation by wisdom, while the two more special virtues of Courage (avbpeia) and Temperance (6cwcpotruvf) are only different sides or aspects of this wisely regulated action of the complex soul.

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  • For though Aristotle's divergence from Plato is very conspicuous when we consider either his general conception of the subject of ethics, or the details of his system of virtues, still his agreement with his master is almost complete as regards the main outline of his theory of human good; the difference between the two practically vanishes when we view them in relation to the later controversy between Stoics and Epicureans.

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  • His virtues are not arranged on any clear philosophic plan; the list shows no serious attempt to consider human life exhaustively, and exhibit the standard of excellence appropriate to its different departments or aspects.

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  • He seems to have taken as a starting-point Plato's four cardinal virtues.

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  • Then, in arranging the other special virtues, he begins with courage and temperance, which (after Plato) he considers as the excellences of the " irrational element " of the soul.

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  • Though common sense will admit that virtues are the best of goods, it still undoubtedly conceives practical wisdom as chiefly exercised in providing those inferior goods which Aristotle, after recognizing the need or use of them for the realization of human well-being, has dropped out of sight; and the result is that, in trying to make clear his conception of practical wisdom, we find ourselves fluctuating continually between the common notion, which he does not distinctly reject, and the notion required as the keystone of his ethical system.

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  • Similarly, all wisdom was somehow involved in any one of the manifestations of wisdom, commonly distinguished as particular virtues; though whether these virtues were specifically distinct, or only the same knowledge in different relations, was a subtle question on which the Stoics do not seem to have been agreed.

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  • It is, however, in the impulse given to practical beneficence in all its forms, by the exaltation of love as the root of all virtues, that the most important influence of Christianity on the particulars of civilized morality is to be found; p y although the exact amount of this influence is here somewhat difficult to ascertain, since it merely carries further a development traceable in the history of pagan morality.

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  • In Plato's exposition of the different virtues there is no mention whatever of benevolence, although his writings show a keen sense of the importance of friendship as an element of philosophic life, especially of the intense personal affection naturally arising between master and disciple.

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  • Still in his formal statement of the different virtues, positive beneficence is discernible only under the notion of " liberality," in which form its excellence is hardly distinguished from that of graceful profusion in selfregarding expenditure (Nic. Eth.

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  • Without this grace it is impossible for man to obey the " first greatest commandment " of love to God; and, this unfulfilled, he is guilty of the whole law, and is only free to choose between degrees of sin; his apparent external virtues have no moral value, since inner rightness of intention is wanting.

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  • These three Augustine (after St Paul) regards as the three essential elements of Christian virtue; along with these he recognizes the fourfold division of virtue into prudence, temperance, courage and justice according to their traditional interpretation; but he explains these virtues to be in their true natures only the same love to God in different aspects or exercises.

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  • The attempt to Christianize the old Platonic list of virtues, which we have noticed in Augustine's system, was probably due to the influence of his master Ambrose, in whose treatise De officiis ministrorum we find for the first time an exposition of Christian duty systematized on a plan borrowed from a pre-Christian moralist.

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  • It is interesting to compare Ambrose's account of what subsequently came to be known as the " four cardinal virtues " with the corresponding delineations in Cicero's 3 De officiis which served the bishop as a model.

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  • Finally in the exposition of Christian Justice the Stoic doctrine of the natural union of all human interests is elevated to the full height and intensity of evangelical philanthropy; the brethren are reminded that the earth was made by God a common possession of all, and are bidden to administer their means for the common benefit; Ambrose, we should observe, is thoroughly aware of the fundamental union of these different virtues in Christianity, though he does Cicero's works are unimportant in the history of ancient ethics, as their philosophical matter was entirely borrowed from Greek treatises now lost; but the influence exercised by them (especially by the De officiis) over medieval and even modern readers was very considerable.

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  • Under the influence of Ambrose and Augustine, the four cardinal virtues furnished a basis on which the systematic ethical theories of subsequent theologians were built.

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  • In the classification of particular virtues and vices we can distinguish very clearly the elements supplied by the different teachings which Aquinas has imbibed.

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  • He follows Aristotle closely in dividing the " natural " virtues into intellectual and moral, giving his preference to the former class, and the intellectual again into speculative and practical; in distinguishing within the speculative class the " intellect " that is conversant with principles, the " science " that deduces conclusions, and the " wisdom " to which belongs the whole process of knowing the sublimest objects of knowledge; and in treating practical wisdom as inseparably connected with moral virtues, and therefore in a sense moral.

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  • His distinction among moral virtues of the justice that renders others their due from the virtues that control the appetites and passions of the agent himself, represents his interpretation of the Niconiachean Ethics; while his account of these latter virtues is a simple transcript of Aristotle's, just as his division of the non-rational element of the soul into " concupiscible " and " irascible " is the old Platonic one.

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  • In arranging his list, however, he defers to the established doctrine of the four cardinal virtues (derived from Plato and the Stoics through Cicero); accordingly, the Aristotelian ten have to stand under the higher genera of (1) the prudence which gives reasoned rules of conduct, (2) the temperance which restrains misleading desire, and (3) the fortitude that resists misleading fear of dangers or toils.

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  • But before these virtues are ranked the three " theologic " virtues, faith, love and hope, supernaturally " instilled " by God, and directly relating to him as their object.

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  • Faith is the substantial basis of all Christian morality, but without love - the essential form of all the Christian virtues - it is " formless " (informis).

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  • The exposition of this conception presents to a great extent the same matter that was dealt with by the exposition of moral virtues, but in a different form; the prominence of which may perhaps be attributed to the growing influence of Roman jurisprudence, which attained in the 12th century so rapid and brilliant a revival in Italy.

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  • It is to be observed that though More lays down the abstract principle of regarding one's neighbour's good as much as one's own with the full breadth with which Christianity inculcates it, yet when he afterwards comes to classify virtues he is too much under the influence of Platonic-Aristotelian thought to give a distinct place to benevolence, except under the old form of liberality.

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  • ordinate; they are all " artificial " virtues, due to civilization, and not belonging to man in his " ruder and more natural " condition; our approbation of all alike is founded on our perception of their useful consequences.

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  • He endeavours to establish this inductively by a survey of the qualities, commonly praised as virtues, which he finds to be always either useful or immediately agreeable, either (1) to the virtuous agent himself or (2) to others.

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  • Without denying the actuality or importance of that sympathetic pleasure in the perceived or inferred effects of virtues and vices he yet holds that the essential part of common moral sentiment is constituted rather by a more direct sympathy with the impulses that prompt to action or expression.

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  • When the effort to restrain feeling is exhibited in a degree which surprises as well as pleases, it excites admiration as a virtue or excellence; such excellences Adam Smith quaintly calls the " awful and respectable," contrasting them with the " amiable virtues " which consist in the opposite effort to sympathize, when exhibited in a remarkable degree.

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  • In later editions he avoided this strain on usage by substituting or adding " merit " in several passages - allowing that some of the laudable qualities which he mentions would be more commonly called talents," but still maintaining that " there is little distinction made in our internal estimation " of " virtues " and " talents."

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  • on modifying Th e effects of association in dif in mental h y g eno p mena were noticed by Locke, and made a cardinal point in the metaphysic of Hume; who also referred to the principle slightly in his account of justice and other " artificial " virtues.

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  • The Christian virtues, sympathy for the weak, the suffering, &c., represent a necessary stage to be passed through in the evolution of the Obermensch, i.e.

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  • They are to be superseded, not so much because all social virtues are to be scorned and rejected, as because in their effects, i.e.

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  • Among them are the sagas of Thorgils and Haflidi (I118-1121), the feud and peacemaking of two great chiefs, contemporaries of Ari; of Sturla (1150-1183), the founder of the great Sturlung family, down to the settlement of his great lawsuit by Jon Loptsson, who thereupon took his son Snorri the historian to fosterage, - a humorous story but with traces of the decadence about it, and glimpses of the evil days that were to come; of the Onundar-brennusaga (1185-1200), a tale of feud and fire-raising in the north of the island, the hero of which, Gudmund Dyri, goes at last into a cloister; of Hrafn Sveinbiornsson (1190-1213), the noblest Icelander of his day, warrior, leech, seaman, craftsman, poet and chief, whose life at home, travels and pilgrimages abroad (Hrafn was one of the first to visit Becket's shrine), and death at the hands of a foe whom he had twice spared, are recounted by a loving friend in pious memory of his virtues, c. 1220; of Aron Hiorleifsson (1200-1255), a man whose strength, courage and adventures befit rather a henchman of Olaf Tryggvason than one of King Haakon's thanes (the beginning of the feuds that rise round Bishop Gudmund are told here), of the Svinefell-men (1248-1252), a pitiful story of a family feud in the far east of Iceland.

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  • But, as a matter of fact, the latter had at least some shining virtues mingled with their vices, whereas the Romans were wholly corrupt (vii.

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  • With this iniquity of the Romans Salvian contrasts the chastity of the Vandals, the piety of the Goths, and the ruder virtues of the Franks, the Saxons, and the other tribes to whom, though heretic Arians or unbelievers, God is giving in reward the inheritance of the empire (vii.

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  • Schleiermacher classifies the virtues under the two forms of Gesinnung and Fertigkeit, the first consisting of the pure ideal element in action and the second the form it assumes in relation to circumstances, each of the two classes falling respectively into the two divisions of wisdom and love and of intelligence and application.

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  • The Sheridans were men of Irish race, but with the religion they adopted the literary tone of the dominant caste, which was small and exclusive, with the virtues and the vices of an aristocracy.

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  • The nobility remained- in debt and disaffected; and the clergy, more Grit kisn remarkable for wealth and breeding than for virtues, of Henry were won over to the ultramontane ideas of the IV.

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  • The four cardinal virtues are represented as forms of wisdom, which again is inseparable from the Mosaic law.

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  • Virtue is the perfect conformity of the will with the moral ideas; of this the single virtues are but special expressions.

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  • These works deal with music, rhetoric, ethics, signs, virtues and vices, and defend the Epicurean standpoint against the Stoics and the Peripatetics.

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  • The fathers traced all doctrines not held by the Catholic Church to the devil, and the virtues of heretics were regarded as an instance of the devil transforming himself into an angel of light (ii.

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  • CARDINAL VIRTUES (Lat.

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  • cardo, a hinge; the fixed point on which anything turns), a phrase used for the principal virtues on which conduct in general depends.

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  • Further, against the Platonic list it may be urged (I) that it is arbitrary, and (2) that the several virtues are not specifically distinct, that the basis of the division is unsound, and that there is overlapping.

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  • By the Roman Catholic Church these virtues are regarded as natural as opposed to the theological virtues, Faith, Hope and Charity.

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  • Some authors, combining the two lists, have spoken of the Seven Cardinal Virtues.

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  • In his sanctuary on the Quirinal, the foundation of which was celebrated on the 5th of June, there were shown the distaff and spindle of Tanaquil, the wife of Tarquinius Priscus, and in the, eyes of Roman matrons the embodiment of all wifely virtues.

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  • In respect of form, Polybius is far the inferior of Livy, partly, owing to his very virtues.

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  • It is not used in modern medicine, being destitute of any special virtues.

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  • Elsewhere we see prophets and sibyls, personifications of the theological virtues and of the sciences.

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  • becomeoon became a favorite with the old farmer, who spoke eloquently of his virtues.

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  • brassy organ mover of fine proportions extolling the virtues of Younger's Special.

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  • If they regard themselves as con-artists, then virtues give reasons to become businesspersons instead.

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  • cardinal virtues, by whose light the Poets can climb the Mount.

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  • Through frosted rococo cartouches she sings about the virtues of true love accompanied by miniature animated sequences.

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  • These focus on the future of HFC's and the respective virtues of reciprocating versus scroll compressors.

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  • The piano concerto was played with similar virtues to the fore.

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  • Common graces and moral virtues, these are of no long continuance; the soul must have an abiding work, an immortal work.

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  • The Lady's Newspaper of 1863 extolled the virtues of a cage crinoline (probably very similar to the photograph above ).

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  • In Hinduism, truth is the highest dharma and the source of all other virtues.

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  • For virtue ethics, the problem concerns the question of which character traits are the virtues.

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  • It isn't an angry outburst - more a passionate eulogy for American virtues strong enough to survive times like these.

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  • exemplifyive, well-drilled choral singing exemplified these virtues, impressively agile for the numbers involved.

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  • expounds the virtues of a BA in busking.

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  • The writer can not come up with a page that does not extol the virtues of brand name shopping.

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  • extolled the virtues of their brand.

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  • George the third, grandson of the second, so called, Was for virtues and goodness of heart much extolled.

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  • The cast, for all their virtues, unfortunately failed to extract the full humor of this classic farce.

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  • forty-five feet in length, extols the virtues of Vishnu Supreme Lord of the Universe.

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  • What are the essential virtues, expectations, and/or limitations of the entire samurai vampire genre?

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  • We climbed up to the statue of Lord Hanuman â the monkey god with an ocean of knowledge and virtues.

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  • Her smile is slightly lopsided, unlike her virtues.

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  • While still young she entered the Carmelite monastery at Lisieux and practiced virtues of humility, evangelical simplicity and a firm confidence in God.

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  • potentialityuman; both are endowed with potentialities of intelligence and embody the virtues of humanity.

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  • preceptive literatures written in that period equated Buddhist morality and the Confucian cardinal virtues.

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  • For Hofland, commercial probity and religious piety are united, not separate, virtues.

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  • prudence as intellectual virtues.

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  • q u the virtues of.

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  • After the fall of the Soviet Union in 1989 it was no longer feasible to praise the virtues of state socialism.

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  • Steve's address covered a wide spectrum ranging from the events of September 11th to the virtues of the internet.

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  • Dante's message is once more, degenerate Italy, fallen from its ancient virtues, lost in factional strife.

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  • The business arena provides the opportunity to practice all the Aristotelian virtues -- including temperance, justice, courage and magnanimity.

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  • We do not see adverts for any of the Mini's, explaining the virtues of the either of the other triplets.

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  • It might encourage Blair to consider - at least consider - the virtues of a trial separation from his increasingly troublesome lover.

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  • But it is equally common, in relation to particular (putative) examples of virtues to give these truisms up.

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  • Top British chefs are falling over themselves to extol the virtues of this sexy veggie.

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  • virtues of humility, evangelical simplicity and a firm confidence in God.

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  • IT Tip of the Month Mozilla Firefox Ian extolled the virtues of the open source browser Firefox at the Resources seminar.

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  • They are intimately connected with the infused virtues of faith, hope and love, as Balthasar writes.

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  • Walnut catsup embodies the medicinal virtues of the unripe nuts.

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  • Responsive, well-drilled choral singing exemplified these virtues, impressively agile for the numbers involved.

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  • It is true that for Rumi the moral virtues are never ends in themselves.

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  • A chalybeate spring, at Wares Farm, was formerly in repute for medicinal virtues.

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  • Physics requires many intellectual virtues to do it properly.

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  • For virtue ethics, the problem concerns the question of which character traits are the virtue ethics, the problem concerns the question of which character traits are the virtues.

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  • Although the album lacked the first chapters vivacity its virtues took more time to uncover.

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  • wast enlightened with the virtues of virginity, O godly Audrey.

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  • They have the virtues and defects of a somewhat isolated mountain race - a strong sense of honour and respect for women, of hospitality towards the stranger, and a natural gravity and dignity, accompanied by a considerable distrust of change and lack of enterprise.

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  • In Alexander the characteristic virtues of the Jagiellos, patience and generosity, degenerated into slothfulness and extravagance.

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  • In his ethical discussions (a full account of which is given under Ethics) Aquinas distinguishes theological from natural virtues and vices; the theological virtues are faith, hope and charity; the natural, justice, prudence and the like.

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  • The theological virtues are founded on faith, in opposition to the natural, which are founded on reason; and as faith with Aquinas is always belief in a proposition, not trust in a personal Saviour, conformably with his idea that revelation is a new knowledge rather than a new life, the relation of unbelief to virtue is very strictly and narrowly laid down and enforced.

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  • He therefore wrote out his message on sheets which were passed from hand to hand, and these, with the spectacle of his virtues and disinterestedness, soon produced a strong effect.

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  • Similarly the cynical contempt which Nietzsche shows for morality and the conventional virtues is counterbalanced by the theory of the 0bermensch, 'the highest type of manhood.

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  • Above all, many of its members have come to " the conviction, which is not new, but old, that the virtues which can be rewarded and the vices which can be punished by external discipline are not as a rule the virtues and the vices that make or mar the soul " (Hatch, Bampton Lectures, 81).

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  • It was the life of a sincere Christian and a real sage, - of one who found the best fruits of philosophy in the practice of the Christian virtues.

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  • According to Diogenes Laertius, he divided the virtues into two kinds, those founded on scientific intellectual principles (i.e.

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  • His revolt against Christian faith and morals turns him into a proudly atheistic "free-thinker," and preacher of a new "master" morality, which transposes the current valuations, deposes the "Christian virtues," and incites the "over-man" ruthlessly to trample under foot the servile herd of the weak, degenerate and poor in spirit.

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  • He then paid a generous tribute to the virtues, the abilities and services of Cobden, and he was followed by Disraeli, who with great force and felicity of language delineated the character of the deceased statesman, who, he said, "was an ornament to the House of Commons and an honour to England."

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  • With all his breadth and liberality of mind Bodin was a credulous believer in witchcraft, the virtues of numbers and the power of the stars, and in 1580 he published the Demonomanie des sorciers, a work which shows that he was not exempt from the prejudices of the age.

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  • 1830), Karl Ludwig (1816-1895), Leonard Hill - we have attained to a better conception of such events as arterial disease, apoplexy, "shock," and so forth; and pharmacologists have defined more precisely the virtues of curative drugs.

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  • According to Plutarch, apart from its mystic virtues arising from the magical combination of 4 X 4, its sweet odour had a benign physiological effect on those who offered it.'

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  • The doctrines of Sikhism as set forth in the Granth are that it prohibits idolatry, hypocrisy, class exclusiveness, the concremation of widows, the immurement of women, the use of wine and other intoxicants, tobacco-smoking, infanticide, slander and pilgrimages to the sacred rivers and tanks of the Hindus; and it inculcates loyalty, gratitude for all favours received, philanthropy, justice, impartiality, truth, honesty and all the moral and domestic virtues upheld by Christianity.

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  • down to the elaborate erection over the tomb of the fratricide Can Signorio, adorned with statuettes of the virtues, to the possession of which he could lay so little claim.'

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  • His father, Dr Jesper Swedberg, subsequently professor of theology at Upsala and bishop of Skara, was a pious and learned man, who did not escape the charge of heterodoxy, seeing that he placed more emphasis on the cardinal virtues of faith, love and communion with God than on the current dogmas of the Lutheran Church.

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  • As even" the Christian virtues of the heretics were described as hypocrisy Heretical .

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  • His intense practical-mindedness drew him away from religion, but drove him to a morality of his own (the " art of virtue," he called it), based on thirteen virtues each accompanied by a short precept; the virtues were Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility, the precept accompanying the last-named virtue being " Imitate Jesus and Socrates."

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  • 19, recognized as sacraments baptism and the chrism, and the Body and Blood, and he writes thus: "Under the screen of corporeal objects a divine virtue of the sacraments in question secretly brings about salvation; wherefore they are called sacraments from their secret or sacred virtues."

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  • Not only were the virtues to be explained by their relation to a common or universal good which only intelligence could apprehend, but there was nothing in all the furniture of heaven or earth which in like manner did not receive reality from the share it had in such an intelligible idea or essence.

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  • Christ's principle of love was widely interpreted to mean chiefly love for the Christian brotherhood, and within that circle the virtues of hospitality, charity and helpfulness were widely exercised; and if the salvation of his own soul was regarded as the most important affair of every man, the service of the brethren was recognized as an imperative Christian duty.

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  • 'The following are the more important of his works in addition to the two already mentioned: - Considerations touching the Usefulness of Experimental Natural Philosophy (1663), followed by a second part in 1671; Experiments and Considerations upon Colours, with Observations on a Diamond that Shines in the Dark (1663); New Experiments and Observations upon Cold (1665); Hydrostatical Paradoxes (1666); Origin of Forms and Qualities according to the Corpuscular Philosophy (1666); a continuation of his work on the spring of air (1669); tracts about the Cosmical Qualities of Things, the Temperature of the Subterraneal and Submarine Regions, the Bottom of the Sea, &c. with an Introduction to the History of Particular Qualities (1670); Origin and Virtues of Gems (1672); Essays of the strange Subtilty, great Efficacy, determinate Nature of Effluviums (1673); two volumes of tracts on the Saltness of the Sea, the Hidden Qualities of the Air, Cold, Celestial Magnets, Animadversions on Hobbes's Problemata de Vacuo (1674); Experiments and Notes about the Mechanical Origin or Production of Particular Qualities, including some notes on electricity and magnetism (1676); Observations upon an artificial Substance that Shines without any Preceding Illustration (1678); the Aerial Noctiluca 0680); New Experiments and Observations upon the Icy Noctiluca (1682) a further continuation of his work on the air; Memoirs for the Natural History of the Human Blood (1684); Short Memoirs for the Natural Experimental History of Mineral Waters (1685); Medicina Hydrostatica (1690); and Experimenta et Observationes Physicae (1691).

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  • The ancient virtues - hospitality to the guest and the poor, profuse expenditure of wealth, valour in battle, faithfulness to the cause of the tribe - are the themes of praise; wine and the game of maisir, forbidden by Islam, are celebrated by poets who professed themselves converts; and if there is no mention of the old idolatry, there is also little spirituality in the outlook on life.

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  • 8): then it is intruded into the diagram of moral virtues as a mean between villainy (rravoupyia) and simplicity (EUi)8ECa) (E.E.

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  • It distinguishes prudence (4poinacs) and wisdom (ao,ia) as the respective virtues of deliberative and scientific reason; and on the whole its account of prudence (cf.

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  • The German Minnesinger and romance-writers, whose golden age corresponded with that of the Hohenstaufen, were not content only to sing the joy of life or the chivalrous virtues of courage, courtesy and reverence for women; they in some sort anticipated the underlying ideas of the Reformation by championing the claims of the German nation against the papal monarchy and pure religion, as they conceived it, against the arrogance and corruption of the clergy.

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  • He was the first sultan entirely devoid of military virtues and willing to abandon all power to his ministers, provided he were left free to pursue his orgies and debauches.

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  • In general it is the simple homely virtues that are enjoined on men in Proverbs - there is no mention of courage, fortitude, intellectual truthfulness, and no recognition of beauty as an element of life; the ethical type is Semitic, not Hellenic, and the sages emphasize only those qualities that seemed to them to be most effective in the struggle of life; their insistence on the practical, not the heroic, side of character is perhaps in part the consequence of the position of the Jewish people at that time, as also the silence respecting international ethics belongs to the thought of the times.

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  • He was then a mere lad, amiable, well-meaning, but entirely under the dominion of his mother, a woman of many virtues, who surrounded him with wise counsellors, watched over the development of his character and improved the tone of the administration, but on the other hand was inordinately jealous, and alienated the army by extreme parsimony, while neither she nor her son had a strong enough hand to keep tight the reins of military discipline.

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  • Mahommed was a singular character, full of pretence at least to many accomplishments and virtues, the founder of public charities, and a profuse patron of scholars, but a parricide, a fratricide, and as madly capricious, bloodthirsty and unjust as Caligula.

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  • Ibn Batuta's statements and anecdotes regarding the showy virtues and solid vices of Sultan Muhammad Tughlak are in entire agreement with Indian historians, and add many fresh details.

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  • Good and evil, virtues and vices, remarks Plutarch, are all capable of being perceived "; sense, this common basis of all mental activity, is a sort of touch by which the ethereal Pneuma which is the soul's substance!

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  • Even the Apaches after being whipped by relentless war into temporary submission have been bound by treaties which the gifts, vices and virtues of the reservation system have tempted them to observe.

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  • The task was a great one, and the fame to be won by it uncertain, yet it would be something to have made the attempt, and the labour itself would bring a welcome relief from the contemplation of present evils; for his readers, too, this record will, he says, be full of instruction; they are invited to note especially the moral lessons taught by the story of Rome, to observe how Rome rose to greatness by the simple virtues and unselfish devotion of her citizens, and how on the decay of these qualities followed degeneracy and decline.

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  • This enthusiasm for Rome and for Roman virtues is, moreover, saved from degenerating into gross partiality by the genuine candour of Livy's mind and by his wide sympathies with every thing great and good.

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  • The fanaticism of the Meccan is an affair of the purse; the mongrel population (for the town is by no means purely Arab) has exchanged the virtues of the Bedouin for the worst corruptions of Eastern town life, without casting off the ferocity of the desert, and it is hardly possible to find a worse certificate of character than the three parallel gashes on each cheek, called Tashrit, which are the customary mark of birth in the holy city.

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  • In class (2) he includes, besides the Benevolence of Shaftesbury and Hutcheson, the useful virtues, Justice, Veracity and Fidelity to compacts; as well as such immediately agreeable qualities as politeness, wit, modesty and even cleanliness.

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  • Hume admits the difficulty that arises, especially in the case of the " artificial " virtues, such as justice, &c., from the undeniable fact that we praise them and blame their opposites without consciously reflecting on useful or pernicious consequences; but considers that this maybe explained as an effect of " education and acquired habits."

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  • Yet he thoroughly believed in honesty and the like virtues.

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  • The tutors came, and the nurses, and Dmitri, and several acquaintances, and the countess reread the letter each time with fresh pleasure and each time discovered in it fresh proofs of Nikolenka's virtues.

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  • She did not think of applying submission and self-abnegation to her own life, for she was accustomed to seek other joys, but she understood and loved in another those previously incomprehensible virtues.

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  • He also notes has already retained b q u the virtues of.

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  • Virtues developed on Earth become part of heaven, and then these heavenly virtues come back down to Earth when the ego reincarnates again.

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  • Wright has many of the virtues of W Barclay ' s Daily Study Bible (St Andrew Press, rev ed 1975.

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  • Steve 's address covered a wide spectrum ranging from the events of September 11th to the virtues of the internet.

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  • Dante 's message is once more, degenerate Italy, fallen from its ancient virtues, lost in factional strife.

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  • We do not see adverts for any of the Mini 's, explaining the virtues of the either of the other triplets.

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  • Thou wast enlightened with the virtues of virginity, O godly Audrey.

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  • While pregnant women and new mothers hear a lot about the virtues of breastfeeding, the types of foods for older babies to eat receive far less attention.

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  • Their task is to give the baby one virtue, just as virtues were given to Sleeping Beauty when she was a baby.

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  • Virtues could include wishes such as good health, sunny disposition, intelligence, musical talent, artistic ability, etc. Along with the virtue, the "godmother" should write a personal note to the parents.

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  • MAC is one of those rare companies that provide exceptional products while still retaining the very virtues it was founded on.

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  • And don't forget about the virtues of learning how to apply your daily eye makeup in a flattering, natural way.

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  • And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.

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  • Examples of word jewelry include the seven virtues, which are faith, hope, charity, fortitude, justice, temperance, and prudence.

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  • If you'd like, you could take this opportunity to explore the virtues of photochromic lenses.

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  • Schools are returning to character education programs, popular in the 1920s and 1930s, where certain virtues such as honesty, fairness, and loyalty, are taught to students along with the regular academic subjects.

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  • Unfortunately, there is little or no agreement as to which virtues are important and what exactly each virtue entails.

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  • There are plenty of virtues to the halter tankini.

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  • Minimize flaws and accentuate virtues: A tankini can be refreshingly modest without making you look drab.

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  • Humbleness, gratefulness, respect, and a non-judgmental attitude are just a few of the virtues that come out of allowing your children to serve people less fortunate.

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  • Peace features a Christmas ornament with an American flag design extoling the virtues of peace, freedom, liberty and happiness.

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  • Similarly, if they are an off-the-wall, spur-of-the-moment couple, a formalized greeting extolling the virtues of their upcoming marriage may not convey the right message.

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  • Among Virgo's virtues are a charming, if somewhat reserved, nature and a willingness to help others.

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  • Now that we've convinced you of the virtues of Charles David shoes, you're probably wondering where you can find them.

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  • However, very few eye-catching styles can actually boast the virtues of support and comfort, which is why so many women are willing to sacrifice safety and ease for style.

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  • But in the same breath, they'll extol its virtues at great length.

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  • Angels that protect the natural world are known as Virtues.

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  • A few years ago, Americans were introduced to a mild-mannered young man who extolled the virtues of losing weight on the Subway diet.

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  • North Jersey.com extols the virtues of Paul's sauerkraut, saying that it "goes great on top of burgers or hot dogs."

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  • While some financial experts extol the virtues of an investment account sheltered under a life insurance policy, others stress that a simple term life insurance policy is the best option and investments should be kept separate.

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  • Under this new umbrella, models like that of Miranda Kerr and Behati Prinsloo extol the virtues of comfortably cute underthings, collegiate sweaters, and various other apparel that showcase school "spirit."

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  • Many clients come in looking for much younger partners, and Stanger often struggles to sell the virtues of same-age companions while also catering to what her clients are truly looking for.

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  • The poem itself is meant to examine human virtues and uses these knights as a way to convey them.

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  • In this letter he ran down the poem and described that allegorical presentation of virtues by using the much loved Arthurian knights.

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  • The remaining 12 books were rumored to be about King Arthur himself displaying 12 virtues publicly.

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  • Aristotle was named as the source for the virtues that were seen in The Faerie Queene but the influence of Thomas Aquinas is also present.

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  • These six virtues represent the initial idea by Spenser but in his Raleigh letter he mentioned that King Arthur is the representation of "magnificence".

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  • Aristotle, among others of the time, viewed that the virtue of magnificence represented perfection in all virtues.

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  • Cynthia said, simplicity being one of her many virtues.

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  • He wasn't known for his morality or virtues.

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  • To the virtues of liberality, charity and clemency he added the Machiavellian qualities of falsehood and shrewdness, so highly esteemed by the princes of his time.

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  • Ezekiel's own moral code is that of the prophets, which insists on the practice of the fundamental civic virtues.

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  • GUACO, Huaco or Guao, also Vejuco and Bejuco, terms applied to various Central and South American and West Indian plants, in repute for curative virtues.

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  • The love of right reason is the supreme virtue, whence flow the cardinal virtues, diligence, obedience, justice and humility.

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  • Chief of the cardinal virtues is humility, a confession of our own helplessness and submission to God.

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  • Yet he cannot deny that "he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated"; and admits that "he was not a man of blood," and that he possessed "a wonderful understanding in the natures and humour of men," and "a great spirit, an admirable circumspection and sagacity and a most magnanimous resolution."

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  • St Vincent scarcely left him, and has given the most extraordinary testimonies (as yet unpublished) of his heroic virtues.

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  • 1626), who depicts Paul as a paragon of all public and private virtues; Vitorelli, continuator of Ciaconius, Vitae et res gestae summorum pontiff.

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  • Vincenzo Gioberti published in 1843 his famous treatise Del primato morale e civile degli Italiani, a work, which, in striking contrast to the prevailing pessimism of the day, extolled the past greatness and achievements of the Italian people and their present virtues.

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  • Worse men had been less detested, but Danby had none of the amiable virtues which often counteract the odium incurred by serious faults.

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  • Another notice occurs in the story of Nicolo Conti (c. 1440), who explains the name to mean "Island of Gold," and speaks of a lake with peculiar virtues as existing in it.

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  • This condition of mind can be obtained only by "living conformably to nature," that is to say, one's whole nature, and as a means to that man must cultivate the four chief virtues, each of which has its distinct sphere - wisdom, or the knowledge of good and evil; justice, or the giving to every man his due; fortitude, or the enduring of labour and pain; and temperance, or moderation in all things.

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  • His biographers state that he showed himself from the beginning very earnest in austere life and humility; and he became a recognized example of the virtues of a Dominican.

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  • As a specific for gout colchicum was early employed by the Arabs; and the preparation known as eau medicinale, much resorted to in the 18th century for the cure of gout, owes its therapeutic virtues to colchicum; but general attention was first directed by Sir Everard Home to the use of the drug in gout.

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  • Though this action doubtless contributes to its remarkable therapeutic power, it is very far from being an adequate explanation of the virtues of the drug in gout.

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  • In ethics the distinction he drew between natural and theological virtues is common to him with the rest of the schoolmen.

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  • LUCRETIA, a Roman lady, wife of Lucius Tarquinius Collatinus, distinguished for her beauty and domestic virtues.

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  • However this may be, remnants of their primitive superhuman qualities cling to the Celtic heroes long after they have been transfigured, under the influence of Christianity and chivalry, into the heroes of the medieval Arthurian romance, types - for the most part - of the knightly virtues as these were conceived by the middle ages; while shadowy memories of early myths live on, strangely disguised, in certain of the episodes repeated uncritically by the medieval poets.

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  • The general effect is impressive, not by any virtues of style, for we do not discern one, but by reason of the magnitude and importance of the undertaking, and the visible conscientiousness and the grasp with which it is executed.

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  • The recumbent effigies and decorative details of these tombs are very beautiful, but the smaller figures of angels, saints and virtues are rather clumsy in proportion.

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  • Concerning the virtues of truth and probity, extremely conflicting opinions have been expressed.

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  • The metre was also employed in commemorative poems, accompanied with music, which were sung at funeral banquets in celebration of the exploits and virtues of distinguished men.

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  • A number of widows and maidens met together in the house of Marcella to study the Scriptures with him; he taught them Hebrew, and preached the virtues of the celibate life.

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  • In their places are put the moral virtues.

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  • Among the moral virtues which take the place of the beasts are Truth, Prudence, Wisdom, Law and Universal Judgment, and in the explanation of what these mean Bruno unfolds the inner essence of his system.

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  • We learn from Horace that he lived on the most intimate terms of friendship with Scipio and Laelius, and that he celebrated the exploits and virtues of the former in his satires.

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  • He made a business-like little notebook, ruled off spaces for the thirteen virtues and the seven days of the week, " determined to give a week's strict attention to each of the virtues successively.

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  • Though it has resisted all attempts to reduce it to an ordered scheme, and probably was not written on any set plan, still it is possible roughly to indicate its contents: after the prologue and introductory chapter setting forth St Benedict's intention, follow instructions to the abbot on the manner in which he should govern his monastery (2, 3); next comes the ascetical portion of the Rule, on the chief monastic virtues (4-7); then the regulations for the celebration of the canonical office, which St Benedict calls "the Work of God" or "the divine work," his monks' first duty, "of which nothing is to take precedence" (8-20); faults and punishments (23-30); the cellarer and property of the monastery (31,32); community of goods (33, 34); various officials and daily life (21, 22, 35-57); reception of monks (58-61); miscellaneous (62-73).

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  • Moreover, he has to govern in accordance with the Rule, and must endeavour, while enforcing discipline and implanting virtues, not to sadden or "overdrive" his monks, or give them cause for "just murmuring."

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  • Glauber (De natura salium, 1658), who prepared it by the action of oil of vitriol or sulphuric acid on common salt, and, ascribing to it many medicinal virtues, termed it sal mirabile Glauberi.

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  • The virtues of a superior man are like the wind; the virtues of a common man are like the grass--the grass, when the wind passes over it, bends.

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  • He consoled himself with the thought that he fulfilled another of the precepts--that of reforming the human race--and had other virtues--love of his neighbor, and especially generosity.

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  • Then our talk turned to the interpretation of the seven pillars and steps of the Temple, the seven sciences, the seven virtues, the seven vices, and the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit.

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  • In like manner the evil which one does in the interval of a day prevents the germs of virtues which began to spring up again from developing themselves and destroys them.

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  • How long shall we sit in our porticoes practising idle and musty virtues, which any work would make impertinent?

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  • He used to say that there are only two sources of human vice--idleness and superstition, and only two virtues--activity and intelligence.

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  • These virtues were: 1.

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