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villi

villi

villi Sentence Examples

  • The surface of the chorion is covered evenly with minute villi, constituting a diffuse non-deciduate placenta.

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  • The interior of the rumen or paunch has no tags or villi on its surface, and there is no distinct psalterium or manyplies.

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  • The embryo passes through three stages - (I) still enclosed within the egg and living on its own yolk; (2) free, within the vitelline mass, which is directly swallowed by the mouth; (3) there is no more vitelline mass, but the embryo is possessed of long external gills, which serve for an exchange of nutritive fluid through the maternal uterus, these gills functioning in the same way as the chorionic villi of the mammalian egg.

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  • toffs is largely developed, and the placenta, so far as known, is nondeciduate, the chorionic villi being either evenly diffused or collected in groups or cotyledons (in Pecora).

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  • villusmaternal blood circulating around the placental villi is shown in red.

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  • Specialized testing of chromosome 15 will be required; the usual tests done during amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling will not reveal the specific, small genetic flaw that causes Angelman syndrome.

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  • The white blood-corpuscles are produced in the follicles at the base of the intestinal villi.

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  • murina, in the rat and mouse, the adult in the lumen of the intestine, the larvae in the villi.

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  • The small intestine is of great length (80 to 90 ft.), its mucous membrane being covered with numerous fine villi.

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  • arachnoid villi) and the water cannot flow out the pressure will also rise.

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  • villusTechie bit: The lining of the small intestine is covered with small finger like projections called villi.

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  • villusre 2: Damaged villi of the small intestine.

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  • villuse take a germ free normal animal it has beautiful villi and no inflammation.

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  • villushe drain becomes blocked (arachnoid villi) and the water cannot flow out the pressure will also rise.

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  • villusacteristic of coeliac disease is varying degrees of stunting of the small intestinal villi.

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  • villusre 1: healthy villi of the small intestine (as seen under the microscope ).

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  • villusderstand that the small intestine is folded into villi in order to enhance absorption.

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  • villusre 2: Damaged villi of the small intestine.

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  • The white blood-corpuscles are produced in the follicles at the base of the intestinal villi.

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  • murina, in the rat and mouse, the adult in the lumen of the intestine, the larvae in the villi.

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  • toffs is largely developed, and the placenta, so far as known, is nondeciduate, the chorionic villi being either evenly diffused or collected in groups or cotyledons (in Pecora).

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  • The embryo passes through three stages - (I) still enclosed within the egg and living on its own yolk; (2) free, within the vitelline mass, which is directly swallowed by the mouth; (3) there is no more vitelline mass, but the embryo is possessed of long external gills, which serve for an exchange of nutritive fluid through the maternal uterus, these gills functioning in the same way as the chorionic villi of the mammalian egg.

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  • The interior of the rumen or paunch has no tags or villi on its surface, and there is no distinct psalterium or manyplies.

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  • In mammals both caecum and colon are often sacculated, a disposition caused by the arrangement of the longitudinal bands of muscular tissue in their walls; but the small intestine is always smooth and simple-walled externally, though its lining membrane often exhibits contrivances for increasing the absorbing surface without adding to the general bulk of the organ, such as the numerous small tags, or " villi," by which it is everywhere beset, and the more obvious transverse, longitudinal, or reticulating folds projecting into the interior, met with in many animals, of which the " valvulae conniventes " of man form well-known examples.

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  • The small intestine is of great length (80 to 90 ft.), its mucous membrane being covered with numerous fine villi.

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  • The surface of the chorion is covered evenly with minute villi, constituting a diffuse non-deciduate placenta.

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  • The Techie bit: The lining of the small intestine is covered with small finger like projections called villi.

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  • Figure 2: Damaged villi of the small intestine.

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  • If we take a germ free normal animal it has beautiful villi and no inflammation.

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  • Characteristic of coeliac disease is varying degrees of stunting of the small intestinal villi.

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  • The maternal blood circulating around the placental villi is shown in red.

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  • Figure 1: Healthy villi of the small intestine (as seen under the microscope).

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  • H Understand that the small intestine is folded into villi in order to enhance absorption.

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  • Within the gastrointestinal tract, the virus rapidly reproduces and causes the intestinal villi to die.

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  • Chorionic villi develop from its outer surface early in pregnancy.

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  • The villi establish a physical connection with the wall of the uterus and eventually develop into the placenta.

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  • Prenatal diagnosis of types A and B NPD can be done with amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling.

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  • Amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling can be used to determine if the fetus has Tay-Sachs disease.

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  • During pregnancy, cell samples can be collected from the fetus using amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling.

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  • Since additional congenital defects preclude prenatal surgery, amniocentesis or chorionic villi sampling (CVS) are used to check for chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

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  • Chorionic villi develop from its outer surface early in pregnancy.

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  • The villi establish a physical connection with the wall of the uterus and eventually develop into the placenta.

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  • The resulting inflammation causes damage to the delicate finger-like structures in the intestine, called villi, where food absorption actually takes place.

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  • Damaged villi can be functional again in three to six months.

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  • The hookworm then migrates to the small intestines where it attaches itself to small sausage-shaped structures in the intestines (villi) that help with the absorption of all nutrients.

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  • The hookworm damages the villi, resulting in blood loss; they simultaneously produce anti-coagulants that promote continued bleeding.

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  • The immune system attacks the gluten and in the process damages the villi of the small intestine.

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  • The villi are small, hair like projections that come off the walls of the small intestine.

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  • The job of the villi is to absorb nutrients from your food as it digests.

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  • When your body cannot get the nutrients it needs because the villi have been damaged, the lack of nutrition can lead to health complications such as those listed here.

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  • Villi are responsible for absorbing a variety of nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, fats, carbohydrates and proteins.

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  • In some cases, a person may be eating what they believe to be a very healthy diet though their body is unable to use any of those nutrients because of damage done to the villi.

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  • It could take up to six months for the villi (or small tissues) of the small intestine to totally heal.

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  • There, small projection fingers called villi have the job of absorbing nutrients from your food into the body to nourish cells.

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  • The villi often receive damage from the immune system's reaction to gluten.

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  • During this process, small hair-like structures within the small intestine called villi, which are responsible for the absorption of digested nutrients, become damaged.

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  • Further exposure to gluten continues to damage the villi, sometimes beyond repair.

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  • Celiac disease can cause all of the above symptoms, in addition to a characteristically flattened appearance of the intestinal villi.

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  • This may occur in conjunction with villi damage, but it can occasionally be the only observable symptom of celiac disease.

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  • This attack results in the destruction of intestinal villi, which, then, leads to the body's inability to properly absorb nutrients through the small intestine.

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  • These lymphocytes attack the intestinal tissue, particularly the villi that line the intestinal tract and are responsible for the absorption of nutrients.

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  • Villi line the walls of your small intestine and are the site of nutrient absorption.

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  • The presence of villi increases the amount of surface area in your intestine so that it can be more efficient.

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  • Coeliac disease damages these villi due to a reaction to gluten.

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  • These complications occur because of the primary effect of celiac disease which is damage to the villi of your small intestine.

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  • Villi are small projections from the walls of your small intestine which increase the surface area and hence, your body's ability to absorb vitamins and minerals.

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  • For people with celiac disease, when gluten-containing foods are eaten, your body responds by attacking the villi, so rather than having all this surface area to absorb nutrients, the opposite occurs.

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  • Celiac disease is a chronic, autoimmune disorder which affects the villi of your small intestine when gluten-containing foods are eaten.

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  • If you've researched celiac disease symptoms, you've likely heard references to the small intestine and villi, but may not understand the role they play and why they are important for optimal health.

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  • Upon closer examination, this velvet texture is comprised of millions of small projections known as villi.

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  • These minuscule projections play a number of roles, but when it comes to digestion and absorption of nutrients, the villi increase the small intestine's absorptive area.

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  • This is due to digestive enzymes found on the villi surface.

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  • Healthy villi promote an effective digestive track and, as a result, a healthy body, because nutrients are transported by the villi into the blood.

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  • Celiac disease attacks the villi of the small intestine.

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  • In fact, if a product includes wheat, barley or rye in any form, people with celiac disease should not consume it because it results in damage to the villi.

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  • The villi do play an important role in health, not just of the small intestine, but of the entire body.

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  • When the villi are damaged or destroyed, digestion is impaired.

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  • As a result of the damage to the small intestine and villi, poor absorption can lead to iron deficiencies and anemia.

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  • These patients will usually not show elevated anti-gliadin antibodies or characteristically damaged villi, and as a result may be advised that their symptoms are not related to gluten sensitivity.

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  • In such a case, the body releases antibodies to attack any gluten present in your body, causing physical damage to the villi of your small intestine as a response.

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  • In the process of fighting the gluten, the antibodies also attack the villi of the small intestine, creating all sorts of gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptoms and discomfort.

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  • Eating gluten-free foods will prevent the immune system response that causes damage to the villi of small intestine.

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  • Further testing on the intestinal tissue will determine if there is damage to the villi, through examination by an endoscope.

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  • When a person with celiac disease ingests gluten, his or her immune system attacks the villi within the small intestine, resulting in an inability for nutrients from food to enter the bloodstream.

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  • As villi damage increases, the patient becomes malnourished, no matter how much food he or she consumes.

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