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vict

vict Sentence Examples

  • c. 1 and 7 & 8 Vict.

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  • Bishops may now be summoned as assessors by 39 & 40 Vict.

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  • In regard to clerical offences, 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • c. 85) gave criminal jurisdiction over beneficed clerks (concurrent with ' that of the tribunal under 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • Finally, the Clergy Discipline Act 1892 (55 & 56 Vict.

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  • (1) The taking away of all matrimonial, testamentary and ab intestate jurisdiction by 20 & 21 Vict.

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  • c. 77 (testamentary, &c., England), c. 79 (testamentary, &c., Ireland), c. 85 (matrimonial, England); 33 & 34 Vict.

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  • (5) Church rates can no longer be enforced by suit (31 & 32 Vict.

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  • (6) Defamation was taken away in England by 18 & 19 Vict.

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  • c. 41, and in Ireland by 23 & 24 Vict.

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  • (8) The jurisdiction for " brawling " in church, &c., is taken away by 23 & 24 Vict.

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  • Ecclesiastical jurisdiction in Ireland was as in England till the Irish Church was disestablished in 1869 by 32 & 33 Vict.

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  • Questions of patronage now (by 37 & 38 Vict.

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  • Vict.

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  • By the Diseases of Animals Act 1896 (59 & 60 Vict.

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  • The Cattle Diseases Prevention Act 1866 (29 & 30 Vict.

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  • The Act 30 & 31 Vict.

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  • The re-introduction of cattle plague into England in 1877 led to the passing of the Act 41 & 42 Vict.

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  • In 1884 the Act 47 & 48 Vict.

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  • After one or two other measures of minor importance came the Act 53 & 54 Vict.

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  • In 1892 by the Act 55 & 56 Vict.

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  • In 1894 was passed the Diseases of Animals Act (57 & 58 Vict.

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  • The Diseases of Animals Act 1896 (59 & 60 Vict.

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  • 4 of 1846; Jamaica, z Vict.

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  • The general result of the law previous to the Benefices Act 1898, as gathered from the statutes and decisions, may be exhibited as follows: (1) it was not simony for a layman or spiritual person not purchasing for himself to purchase, while the church was full, as advowson or next presentation, however immediate the prospect of a vacancy; (2) it was not simony for a spiritual person to purchase for himself a life or any greater estate in an advowson, and to present himself thereto; (3) it was not simony to exchange benefices under an agreement that no payment was to be made for dilapidations on either side; (4) it was not simony to make certain assignments of patronage under the Church Building and New Parishes Acts (9 & 10 Vict.

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  • c. 88, 32 & 33 Vict.

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  • By an act of 1859 (22 Vict.

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  • He is entitled to consecrate all the bishops within his province and was formerly entitled, upon consecrating a bishop, to select a benefice within his diocese at his option for one of his chaplains, but this practice was indirectly abolished by 3 and 4 Vict.

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  • By 1 Vict.

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  • By 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • Troy weight was abolished, from the 1st of January 1879, by the Weights and Measures Act 1878, with the exception only of the Troy ounce, its decimal parts and multiples, legalized in 1853, 16 Vict.

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  • 33], Victoria, Lands Compensation Act 1890 [54 Vict.

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  • 1109]; New Zealand, Public Works Act 18 94 [58 Vict.

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  • A table which indicates the weight per gallon of spirituous liquors for every degree of Sikes's hydrometer is printed in 23 and 24 Vict.

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  • As a result an act was passed in 1854 (17 & 18 Vict.

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  • The act to carry into effect the above convention is the Submarine Telegraph Act 1885 (48 & 49 Vict.

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  • c. 49) which was slightly modified by 50 Vict.

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  • Petitions against municipal elections were dealt with in 35 & 36 Vict.

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  • and i Vict.

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  • As already indicated above, certain lands are exempt from payment of tithes while in the occupation of their owners, either by reason of their having been parcel of the possessions of any privileged order, or by reason of their being of the tenure of ancient demesne and exempt whilst in the tenure, occupation or manurance of the Crown, its tenants, farmers and lessees or under-tenants, although they are subject to tithes when aliened or occupied by subjects not being such; and in these and in all such cases, with the consent of such owners, a fixed rent charge may be substituted for any contingent rent charge imposed on them (2 & 3 Vict.

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  • c. 62; 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • in the case of Lammas lands or in the case of common lands, power was given to charge a fixed sum or rate per head of the cattle there pasturing, with an exception in the case of Lammas lands which for seven years before Christmas 18, 35 had paid no tithe; and also to fix a rent charge in respect of tithes of common appurtenant on the allotment made in respect of the lands to which such right of common attached (2 & 3 Vict.

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  • C. 15; 9 & 10 Vict.

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  • By an act of 1860 (23 & 24 Vict.

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  • C. 71; 2 & 3 Vict.

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  • C. 62; 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • c. 15; 23 & 24 Vict.

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  • c. 93; 36 & 37 Vict.

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  • Under the act of 1840 (3 & 4 Vict.

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  • The limitation of time for recovery of tithes or estates in tithes, whether between rival claimants to tithes or tithe-owners or tithe-payers, if belonging to lay individuals or lay or spiritual corporations aggregate, is a period of twelve years, as in the case of other real property (37 & 38 Vict.

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  • It may be observed that all of them, except the treaty of 1842, now, however, varied by one of 1889, with the United States, are subsequent to, and governed by, the provisions of 33 & 34 Vict.

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  • c. 102, 1844; 9 & 10 Vict.

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  • The act of 1829 preserved the liability of Roman Catholics to take certain oaths of office, but these have been modified by later legislation (see 29 & 30 Vict.

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  • C. 19; 30 & 31 Vict.

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  • C. 75; 31 & 32 Vict.

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  • c. 72; 34 & 35 Vict.

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  • In 1869 the Irish Church Act (32 and 33 Vict.

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  • yaµos, marriage), in English law, according to the statute now in force (24 and 25 Vict.

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  • Under this statute the areas of parishes continued to be altered and defined down to 1844, when the act commonly known as Graham's Act was passed (7 & 8 Vict.

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  • c. 1 and 7 & 8 Vict.

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  • Bishops may now be summoned as assessors by 39 & 40 Vict.

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  • In regard to clerical offences, 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • The Public Worship Regulation Act (37 & 38 Vict.

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  • c. 85) gave criminal jurisdiction over beneficed clerks (concurrent with ' that of the tribunal under 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • Finally, the Clergy Discipline Act 1892 (55 & 56 Vict.

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  • (1) The taking away of all matrimonial, testamentary and ab intestate jurisdiction by 20 & 21 Vict.

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  • c. 77 (testamentary, &c., England), c. 79 (testamentary, &c., Ireland), c. 85 (matrimonial, England); 33 & 34 Vict.

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  • (5) Church rates can no longer be enforced by suit (31 & 32 Vict.

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  • (6) Defamation was taken away in England by 18 & 19 Vict.

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  • c. 41, and in Ireland by 23 & 24 Vict.

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  • (8) The jurisdiction for " brawling " in church, &c., is taken away by 23 & 24 Vict.

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  • Ecclesiastical jurisdiction in Ireland was as in England till the Irish Church was disestablished in 1869 by 32 & 33 Vict.

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  • Questions of patronage now (by 37 & 38 Vict.

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  • By the Diseases of Animals Act 1896 (59 & 60 Vict.

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  • The Cattle Diseases Prevention Act 1866 (29 & 30 Vict.

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  • The Act 30 & 31 Vict.

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  • The Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act 1869 (32 & 33 Vict.

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  • The re-introduction of cattle plague into England in 1877 led to the passing of the Act 41 & 42 Vict.

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  • In 1884 the Act 47 & 48 Vict.

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  • After one or two other measures of minor importance came the Act 53 & 54 Vict.

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  • In 1892 by the Act 55 & 56 Vict.

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  • Under the provisions of the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act 18 93 (56 & S7 Vict.

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  • In 1894 was passed the Diseases of Animals Act (57 & 58 Vict.

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  • The Diseases of Animals Act 1896 (59 & 60 Vict.

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  • 4 of 1846; Jamaica, z Vict.

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  • The general result of the law previous to the Benefices Act 1898, as gathered from the statutes and decisions, may be exhibited as follows: (1) it was not simony for a layman or spiritual person not purchasing for himself to purchase, while the church was full, as advowson or next presentation, however immediate the prospect of a vacancy; (2) it was not simony for a spiritual person to purchase for himself a life or any greater estate in an advowson, and to present himself thereto; (3) it was not simony to exchange benefices under an agreement that no payment was to be made for dilapidations on either side; (4) it was not simony to make certain assignments of patronage under the Church Building and New Parishes Acts (9 & 10 Vict.

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  • c. 88, 32 & 33 Vict.

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  • By an act of 1859 (22 Vict.

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  • He is entitled to consecrate all the bishops within his province and was formerly entitled, upon consecrating a bishop, to select a benefice within his diocese at his option for one of his chaplains, but this practice was indirectly abolished by 3 and 4 Vict.

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  • By 1 Vict.

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  • By 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • Troy weight was abolished, from the 1st of January 1879, by the Weights and Measures Act 1878, with the exception only of the Troy ounce, its decimal parts and multiples, legalized in 1853, 16 Vict.

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  • - Legislation analogous to the Lands Clauses Acts is in force in India (Land Acquisition Act 1894 [Act i of 1894]) and in most of the colonies (see western Australia, Lands Resumption Act 1894 [58 Vict.

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  • 33], Victoria, Lands Compensation Act 1890 [54 Vict.

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  • 1109]; New Zealand, Public Works Act 18 94 [58 Vict.

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  • A table which indicates the weight per gallon of spirituous liquors for every degree of Sikes's hydrometer is printed in 23 and 24 Vict.

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  • As a result an act was passed in 1854 (17 & 18 Vict.

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  • The act to carry into effect the above convention is the Submarine Telegraph Act 1885 (48 & 49 Vict.

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  • c. 49) which was slightly modified by 50 Vict.

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  • Petitions against municipal elections were dealt with in 35 & 36 Vict.

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  • and i Vict.

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  • As already indicated above, certain lands are exempt from payment of tithes while in the occupation of their owners, either by reason of their having been parcel of the possessions of any privileged order, or by reason of their being of the tenure of ancient demesne and exempt whilst in the tenure, occupation or manurance of the Crown, its tenants, farmers and lessees or under-tenants, although they are subject to tithes when aliened or occupied by subjects not being such; and in these and in all such cases, with the consent of such owners, a fixed rent charge may be substituted for any contingent rent charge imposed on them (2 & 3 Vict.

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  • c. 62; 3 & 4 Vict.

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  • in the case of Lammas lands or in the case of common lands, power was given to charge a fixed sum or rate per head of the cattle there pasturing, with an exception in the case of Lammas lands which for seven years before Christmas 18, 35 had paid no tithe; and also to fix a rent charge in respect of tithes of common appurtenant on the allotment made in respect of the lands to which such right of common attached (2 & 3 Vict.

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  • C. 15; 9 & 10 Vict.

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  • By an act of 1860 (23 & 24 Vict.

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  • C. 71; 2 & 3 Vict.

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  • c. 15; 23 & 24 Vict.

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  • c. 93; 36 & 37 Vict.

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  • Under the act of 1840 (3 & 4 Vict.

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  • The limitation of time for recovery of tithes or estates in tithes, whether between rival claimants to tithes or tithe-owners or tithe-payers, if belonging to lay individuals or lay or spiritual corporations aggregate, is a period of twelve years, as in the case of other real property (37 & 38 Vict.

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  • It may be observed that all of them, except the treaty of 1842, now, however, varied by one of 1889, with the United States, are subsequent to, and governed by, the provisions of 33 & 34 Vict.

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  • The principal English acts directed against " popish recusants " 2 will be found in the list given in the acts repealing them (7 & 8 Vict.

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  • c. 102, 1844; 9 & 10 Vict.

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  • The act of 1829 preserved the liability of Roman Catholics to take certain oaths of office, but these have been modified by later legislation (see 29 & 30 Vict.

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  • C. 19; 30 & 31 Vict.

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  • C. 75; 31 & 32 Vict.

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  • c. 72; 34 & 35 Vict.

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  • i r of the Prison Act 1898, or by the written order of a court of criminal jurisdiction before which he is required to take his trial on indictment (Criminal Law Amendment Act 30 & 31 Vict.

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  • In 1869 the Irish Church Act (32 and 33 Vict.

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  • yaµos, marriage), in English law, according to the statute now in force (24 and 25 Vict.

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  • Under this statute the areas of parishes continued to be altered and defined down to 1844, when the act commonly known as Graham's Act was passed (7 & 8 Vict.

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