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vicious

vicious

vicious Sentence Examples

  • This was not a mangy or vicious creature standing before him, but a breathtakingly beautiful, gigantic wolf.

  • She thinks she is some kind of vicious animal.

  • But admiration of his talents must not blind us to his moral worthlessness, nor is it right to cast the blame for his excesses on the brutal and vicious society in which he lived.

  • The owner of an ox which gored a man on the street was only responsible for damages if the ox was known by him to be vicious, even if it caused death.

  • When the rustic talks in the vernacular to his horse he is not much concerned to know whether he is heard and understood; still less when he mutters threats against an absent rival, or kicks the stool that has tripped him up with a vicious "Take that!"

  • The president of the senate, Dr Vidal, nominally administered the government for two years, when General Santos, who had held the real power, became president: His administration was so vicious and tyrannical that the opposition organized a revolution.

  • When the results proved unsatisfactory, remedies were sought in increased administrative supervision, draconian legislation and severe punishment, and no attempt was made to get out of the vicious circle.

  • The existence of the parasite is maintained by a vicious interchange between its alternate hosts, mosquitoes and man,.

  • His court was grossly vicious.

  • During his brief administration Vitellius showed indications of a desire to govern wisely, but he was completely under the control of Valens and Caecina, who for their own ends encouraged him in a course of vicious excesses which threw his better qualities into the background.

  • The principle on which their treatment proceeded is stated by him in the following memorable words: "To make vicious and abandoned people happy," he says, "it has generally been supposed necessary first to make them virtuous.

  • Even if we do not accept all the stories of his murders and poisonings and immoralities as true, there is no doubt that his greed for money and his essentially vicious nature led him to commit a great number of crimes.

  • Snakes are not numerous, and it is said that none is poisonous or vicious.

  • This vicious system, grafted as it was upon an inefficient administration, and added to the weight of a continually depreciated currenc y, debased both by ill-advised fiscal measures and by public cupidity, formed one of the principal causes of the financial embarrassments which assailed the treasury with ever increasing force in the latter part of the 16th and during the 17th and 18th centuries.

  • From the very first, however, the inherent weakness of the vast army, and the vicious choice of time for the beginning of the advance, began to make itself felt.

  • The world saw with astonishment this vicious, rough, coarse-fibred man of the world transformed into an austere penitent, who worked miracles of healing.

  • In these circumstances his accession could not have the political importance which would otherwise have attached to it, though it was disfigured by a vicious outburst of party passion in which the names of the emperor and the empress were constantly misused.

  • p-r-s-t), a district embracing the rich lowlands on the Mediterranean coast from the neighbourhood 1 " Philistine," as a term of contempt, hostility or reproach, appears first in English, in a sense equivalent to " the enemy," as early as the beginning of the 17th century, and later as a slang term for a bailiff or a sheriff's officer, or merely for drunken or vicious people generally.

  • In other lands things did not on the whole go so well, and many causes at work during the later middle ages tended to bring about relaxation in the Benedictine houses; above all the vicious system of commendatory abbots, rife everywhere except in England.

  • The hopelessly vicious policemen hated him, but no man ever had a stronger personal hold upon the great body of the honest officers - a hold which existed long after he left the police department, and was frequently expressed by members of the force as he passed through the city streets.

  • His wife, Maria Luisa of Parma, his first cousin, a thoroughly coarse and vicious woman, ruled him completely, though he was capable of obstinacy at times.

  • The university of Cracow, the sole source of knowledge in the vast Polish realm, still moved in the vicious circle of scholastic formularies.

  • Subsequently this vicious principle was extended still further.

  • The grounds for a divorce a mensa et thoro, which may be granted for ever or for a limited time only, are cruelty, excessively vicious conduct, or desertion; for a divorce a vinculo matrimonii the chief grounds are impotence at the time of marriage, adultery or deliberate abandonment for three years.

  • With this dualism and the recognition of the worthlessness and absolutely vicious nature of the material world is combined a decided spiritualism.

  • Here his vicious practices became notorious, and in 1772 he was condemned to death at Aix for an unnatural offence, and for poisoning.

  • He was one of the weakest and most vicious princes that occupied the Byzantine throne.

  • (5) The reform of the civil service and the gradual elimination of the vicious principle of " to the victors belong the spoils."

  • Under his influence the Hale Naua Society was organized in 1886 for the spread of idolatry and king-worship; and in the same year a " Board of Health" was formed which revived the vicious practices of the kahunas or medicine-men.

  • From the Catholic standpoint Savonarola must certainly be condemned: mainly because he completely forgot the doctrine of the Church that the sinful and vicious life of superiors, including the pope, is not competent to abrogate their jurisdiction.

  • To this category belong Myrmarachne plataleoides, one of the Salticidae, and Amyciaea forticeps, one of the Thomisidae, which in India imitate and live with the vicious little red ant (Oecophylla smaragdina); also Myrmarachne providens, which mimics the red and black Indian ant (Sima rufonigra); and the South American species of Clubionidae, e.g.

  • An example of the latter occurs in Singapore where the vicious red spinning-ant (Oecophylla smaragdina) is mimicked by the larva of a Noctuid moth and by spiders belonging to two distinct families, namely, Saltiicus plataleoides (Salticidae) and Amyciaea forticeps (Thomisidae), there being no reason to suppose that either the moth larva or the spiders are protected forms. Mimetic aggregations of species similar to those mentioned above have been found in other countries; but the instances cited are sufficient to show how widespread are the influences of mimicry and how profoundly it has modified the insect fauna of various parts of the world.

  • We may conclude that Sappho was not utterly vicious, though by no means a paragon of virtue.

  • It has sometimes been supposed that Pascal, from 1651 or earlier to the famous accident of 1654, lived a dissipated, extravagant, worldly, luxurious (though admittedly not vicious) life with his friend the duc de Roannez and others.

  • "Harry Hervey," said Johnson many years later, "was a vicious man; but he was very kind to me.

  • Cruel, vicious, unscrupulous and strong, the country groaned beneath his oppression.

  • They are uneducated, indolent and vicious.

  • Idleness, drunkenness, vicious intercourse, sickness, starvation, squalor, cruelty, chains, awful oppression and everywhere culpable neglect - in these words may be summed up the state of the gaols at the time of Howard's visitation.

  • The third stage in Sir George Grey's scheme contemplated the enforced emigration of released convicts, whom the discipline of separation and public works was supposed to have purged and purified, and who would have better hopes of entering on a new career of honest industry in a new country than when thrown back among vicious associations at home.

  • A vicious circle is obviously involved.

  • In spite of these admonitions all but a few instrument makers have continued to make the vicious type of instrument consisting of a pair of gold-leaves suspended within a glass shade or bottle, no means being provided for keeping the walls of the vessel continually at zero potential.

  • The Sakta cult is, however, known to be especially prevalent - though apparently not in a very extreme form - amongst members of the very respectable Kayastha or writer caste of Bengal, and as these are largely employed as clerks and accountants in Upper India, there is reason to fear that their vicious practices are gradually being disseminated through them.

  • Yet he did not hesitate to place his powers at the disposal of the most vicious members of that house for the enslavement of Florence.

  • If we may believe report, Nero found time in the intervals of his artistic triumphs for more vicious excesses.

  • Whilst they remain with her she is peculiarly vicious and aggressive, defending them with the greatest courage and energy, and when robbed of them is terrible in her rage; but she has been known to desert them when pressed, and even to eat them when starved.

  • So, too, with the attempt to show that from the analogy of the present life we may not unreasonably infer that virtue and vice will receive their respective rewards and punishments hereafter; it may be admitted that virtuous and vicious acts are naturally looked upon as objects of reward or punishment, and treated accordingly, but we may refuse to allow the argument to go further, and to infer a perfect distribution of justice dependent upon our conduct here.

  • The first stage is the eradication of vicious habits: evil tendencies are to be corrected, and a guard kept on the corrupt propensities of the reason.

  • The king was feeble and vicious, but had wit enough to leave the Melhor conduct of affairs to stronger hands.

  • Contrary to his expectations Darnley did not receive the crown matrimonial, and his foolish and haughty behaviour, his vicious habits, and his boisterous companions did not improve matters.

  • They are monogamous, and their conjugal fidelity contrasts strongly with the vicious habits of the Sinhalese.

  • It would seem that the key to his conduct was that he hated the hard work without which a despotic king cannot hope to assert his personality, and preferred leisure and vicious self-indulgence.

  • with his combination of vicious selfindulgence and spasmodic cruelty was no unfit representative of his age.

  • A war with the Dutch broke out, and there were strong suspicions that The first Charles applied money voted for the fleet to the maintenance of a vicious and luxurious court.

  • gifted, but vicious and extravagant, and he soon fell into the hands of unworthy favourites.

  • But this does not interfere with the general ethical agreement between the two thinkers; and the doctrine that vicious pleasures are not true or real pleasures is so characteristically Platonic that we are almost surprised to find it in Aristotle.

  • How could the vicious man be responsible if his vice were strictly pre-determined?

  • No doubt it depended on the innate force and firmness' of a man's soul whether his reason was effectually exercised; but moral responsibility was saved if the vicious act proceeded from the man himself and not from any external cause.

  • Rabbinic erudition could not forget the repression of vicious desires in the tenth commandment, the stress laid in Deuteronomy on the necessity of service to God, or the inculcation by later prophets of humility and faith.

  • But it remains true that the contrast with the " righteousness of the scribes and pharisees " has always served to mark the requirement of " inwardness " as a distinctive feature of the Christian code - an inwardness not merely negative, tending to the repression of vicious desires as well as vicious acts, but also involving a positive rectitude of the inner state of the soul.

  • Rightness of purpose, preference of virtue for its own sake, suppression of vicious desires, were made essential points by the - Aristotelians, who attached the most importance to outward circumstances in their view of virtue, no less than by the Stoics, to whom all outward things were indifferent.

  • This knowledge, as Aristotle held, might be permanently precluded by vicious habits, or temporarily obliterated by passion, but if present in the mind it must produce rightness of purpose.

  • Then, when Christianity threw off the Mosaic ritual, this religious sense of purity was left with no other sphere besides morality; while, from its highly idealized character, it was peculiarly well adapted for that repression of vicious desires which Christianity claimed as its special function.

  • He asserts that the inherited propensity to evil is not strictly a sin, which is only committed when the conscious self yields to vicious inclination.

  • But to Butler's more cautious mind the completeness of this harmony did not seem sufficiently demonstrable to be taken as a basis of moral teaching; he has at least to contemplate the possibility of a man being convinced of the opposite; and he argues that unless we regard conscience as essentially authoritative - which is not implied in the term " moral sense " - such a man is really bound to be vicious; " since interest, one's own happiness, is a manifest obligation."

  • Both thinkers hold that this perception of right and wrong in actions is accompanied by a perception of merit and demerit in agents, and also by a specific emotion; but whereas Price conceives this emotion chiefly as pleasure or pain, analogous to that produced in the mind by physical beauty or deformity, Reid regards it chiefly as benevolent affection, esteem and sympathy (or their opposites), for the virtuous (or vicious) agent.

  • He drank heavily, and indulged in vicious excesses which ruined his constitution.

  • Such a process is a vicious circle and has no logical validity.

  • However she did not get on well with her husband's family, who were very poor and made her do menial work, until at last her beauty attracted Francesco, the grand duke's son, a vicious and unprincipled rake.

  • The new king, Henry III., vacillating and vicious, and Catherine herself, eager for war as she was, had no means 01 separating the Protestants and the politiques.

  • He soon became prominent; first by his contributions to its organ the Messenger; then by The Anxious Bench - A Tract for the Times (1843), attacking the vicious excesses of revivalistic methods; and by his defence of the inauguration address, The Principle of Protestantism, delivered by his colleague Philip Schaff, which aroused a storm of protest by its suggestion that Pauline Protestantism was not the last word in the development of the church but that a Johannean Christianity was to be its outgrowth, and by its recognition of Petrine Romanism as a stage in ecclesiastical development.

  • - Animals to breed from should be of good blood, sound and compactly built, with good pluck and free from nervous excitability and vicious tendency.

  • The feeble inadequacy of conception, infirmity of power, factional jealousy, disintegrating particularism, and vicious finance of the Confederation were realized by many others; but none other saw so clearly the concrete nationalistic remedies for these concrete ills, or pursued remedial ends so constantly, so ably, and so consistently.

  • on camels and mules, and was constantly engaged in the task of trying to reform a vicious system of administration.

  • The vicious whisper was accompanied by a thick hand clamping around the back of her neck.

  • He ranted, signed her papers with a vicious flourish, then shoved them at her and manhandled her out his door.

  • This was not a mangy or vicious creature standing before him, but a breathtakingly beautiful, gigantic wolf.

  • She thinks she is some kind of vicious animal.

  • All these years I thought I was a vicious killer.

  • One of the goats was voicing a terrified cry and with it mingled vicious snarls and anxious barking.

  • The vicious strike of Darian's sword against the rusted chain of the fence was enough to show Xander he was right about the Grey God not taking Jenn's deception well.

  • Demonstrations of thousands of people, including many anarchists, against the vicious and violent reaction from the state became a regular occurrence.

  • A deadly assassin, who wants to murder a prosecution witness on a plane, releases a whole crate full of vicious snakes!

  • Gwah screwing Drusifer out of his title to Matty D, then some vicious attacks followed from Drusifer.

  • Some in the group are strong enough to withstand the continuous barrage, dishing it back or just ignoring the stupid, vicious taunts.

  • At some time during the next two to three hours he received a vicious beating.

  • In the first innings, Randall had infuriated Lillee by doffing his cap to him after a vicious bouncer.

  • Water bosses fear farmers could be trapped in a ' vicious circle ' to save crops from drought.

  • contact lens wear and dry eyes can be a vicious cycle.

  • Simon Butler, prosecuting counsel from Cornwall & Hackney appeared to be very uncomfortable with Sunderland's vicious attack.

  • Fuff followed up with a vicious 30 yard curler which was well saved.

  • The vicious cycle of compounding one's depression by having to deal with hair loss makes these drugs a thing worth trying to avoid.

  • This causes the body to respond by producing even more oil to combat dryness thereby starting a vicious never ending cycle.

  • One gets a deeply-felt elegy, the other a vicious scherzo - no prizes for guessing which!

  • Deflation effectively made debt more expansive and, as Fisher explained, this reinforced deflation again in a vicious spiral.

  • It was an odious face crafty, vicious, malignant, with shifty, light-grey eyes and white eyelashes.

  • Progress was made but soon halted by a series of Iraqi obstacles and a vicious firefight that developed around them.

  • I became frightened that I was in a vicious circle.

  • Nonetheless, about halfway home a sudden and vicious gust of wind literally stopped me in my tracks.

  • Poverty is a vicious circle, which is virtually impossible to get out of.

  • If anyone thought the infighting on this board was vicious... .

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