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vicars

vicars Sentence Examples

  • "The earth," he adds elsewhere, "especially if fresh, has a certain magnetism in it, by which it attracts the salt, power, or virtue (call it either) which gives it life, and is the logic of all the labor and stir we keep about it, to sustain us; all dungings and other sordid temperings being but the vicars succedaneous to this improvement."

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  • The term is used in this general sense in certain rubrics of the English Book of Common Prayer, in which it is applied equally to rectors and vicars as to perpetual curates.

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  • Henry established imperial vicars in the Lombard towns, confirming the tyrants, but gaining nothing for the empire in exchange for the titles he conferred.

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  • The tyrants, as we have already seen, established themselves as captains of the people, vicars of the empire, vicars for the church, leaders of the Guelph and Ghibelline parties.

    0
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  • Rienzis revolution in Rome (3471354), and hi~ establishment of a republic upon a fantastic basis, half classical half feudal, proved the temper of the times; while the rise of dynastic families in the cities of the church, claiming the title of papal vicars, but acting in their own interests, Tb weakened the authority of the Holy See.

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  • The church of St Andrew is of unknown foundation, but the list of vicars is complete from 1223.

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  • For this purpose he obtained, after much difficulty, a papal brief emancipating the Dominicans of St Mark from the rule of the Lombard vicars of that order.

    0
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  • Certain homilies, accordingly, composed by dignitaries of the lower house, were in the following year produced by the prolocutor; and after some delay a volume was published in 1547 entitled Certain sermons or homilies appointed by the King's Majesty to be declared and read by all parsons, vicars, or curates every Sunday in their churches where they have cure.

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  • They elected three Poles successively as generals, taking, however, only the title of vicars, till on the 7th of March 1801 Pius VII.

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  • The Society has been ruled by twenty-five generals and four vicars from its foundation to the present day (1910).

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  • They claimed that they, as vicars of Christ, had the right to interfere in the temporal concerns of princes, and even to depose sovereigns of whom they disapproved.

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  • His musical duties are usually performed by the "succentor," one of the vicars choral.

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  • From the 6th century onwards the apostolic vicars of Arles and Thessalonica were merely the titular holders of pontifical honours, with no real authority over those who were nominally under their jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • To the former were attached two commissions, one for the approbation of those religious congregations which devote themselves to missions, which is now transferred to the Congregation of the Religious Orders; the other for the examination of the reports sent in by the bishops and vicars apostolic on their dioceses or missions.

    0
    0
  • In 1853 the Roman Catholic Church, which before had been a mission in the hands of papal legates and vicars, was raised into an independent ecclesiastical province with five dioceses, namely, the archbishopric of Utrecht, and the suffragan bishoprics of Haarlem, Breda, 's Hertogenbosch and Roermond, each with its own seminary.

    0
    0
  • In the early Church other bishops commonly described themselves as vicars of Christ (Du Cange gives an example as late as the 9th century from the capitularies of Charles the Bald); but there is no proof in their case, or indeed in that of " vicar of St Peter " given to the popes, that it was part of their formal style.

    0
    0
  • All bishops were looked upon as in some sort vicars of the pope, but the title vicarius sedis apostolicae came especially to be applied as an alternative to legatus sedis apostolicae to describe papal legates to whom in certain places the pope delegated a portion of his authority.

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  • " Lay vicars 'l also were and are employed to sing those parts of the office which can be sung by laymen.

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  • The employment of such vicars was by no means general in the early Church, but towards the 13th century it became very general for a bishop to employ a vicar-general, often to curb the growing authority of the archdeacons.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages there was not a very clear distinction drawn between the vicar and the official of the bishop. When the voluntary and contentious jurisdiction came to be distinguished, the former fell generally to the vicars, the latter to the officials.

    0
    0
  • In the style of the Roman chancery, official documents are addressed to the bishops or their vicars for dioceses beyond the Alps, but for French dioceses to the bishops or their officials.

    0
    0
  • In the Roman Catholic Church bishops sometimes appoint lesser vicars to exercise a more limited authority over a limited district.

    0
    0
  • In canon law priests doing work in place of the parish priest are called vicars.

    0
    0
  • Formerly, and especially in England, many churches were appropriated to monasteries or colleges of canons, whose custom it was to appoint one of their own body to perform divine service in such churches, but in the 13th century such corporations were obliged to appoint permanent paid vicars who were called perpetual vicars.

    0
    0
  • Hence in England the distinction between rectors, who draw both the greater and lesser tithes, and vicars, who are attached to parishes of which the great tithes, formerly held by monasteries, are now drawn by lay rectors.

    0
    0
  • In Ireland the Culdees of Armagh endured until the dissolution in 1541, and enjoyed a fleeting resurrection in 1627, soon after which their ancient property passed to the vicars choral of the cathedral.

    0
    0
  • At the head of this is the college of cardinals, who are the princes and senators of the Church, the counsellors of the pope, and his vicars in the functions of the pontificate.

    0
    0
  • The scattered communities of the Uniat Armenian Church in Russia are subordinate to Latin vicars apostolic. The Uniat Armenian Church in the Caucasus, however, is under the jurisdiction of the patri archate of Cilicia.

    0
    0
  • There are not more than 10,000 to 15,000 Uniat Bulgarians, who have been ruled since 1883 by three vicars apostolic. The Uniat Armenians and Melchites in Constantinople belong to the Eastern patriarchates.

    0
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  • established in 1887 three special vicariates apostolic (Vicariates apostolici Syro-Malabarorum); the vicars apostolic are Latins, but have the right to pontificate and to confirm according to the Syrian rite.

    0
    0
  • 2 It was officially adopted in the Relief Act of 1791 in place of the designation " Protesting Catholic Dissenters," to which the vicars apostolic objected.

    0
    0
  • somewhat prolonged conflict between the Committee and the vicars apostolic, who for the most part represented the high ultramontane view.

    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical organization includes one archbishop, who resides at Santiago, three bishops residing at La Serena, Concepcion and Ancud, and two vicars residing in Antofagasta and Tarapaca.

    0
    0
  • There are altogether some 90 bishops and about 40 auxiliary bishops called vicars.

    0
    0
  • There were 14,029 incumbents (rectors, vicars, and perpetual curates), 7500 curates, i.e.

    0
    0
  • Nicholas was condemned to perpetual imprisonment, and died in obscurity at Avignon; while the Roman people submitted to King Robert, who governed the church through his vicars.

    0
    0
  • The bishops registers of the diocese of Norwich show that many parishes had three and some four successive vicars admitted in eighteen months.

    0
    0
  • The bishops constitute the episcopal synod, the supreme court of appeal, 1 During the long period of proscription, the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland survived in scattered groups; after the Reformation it was at first under the jurisdiction of the English arch-priest, but from 1653 to 1694 it was governed by prefects apostolic and from 1694 to 1878 by vicars apostolic appointed by the pope.

    0
    0
  • At last, just as the kingdom had become the personal property of the king, so the officialsdukes, counts, royal vicars, tribunes, centenariiwho had for the most part bought their unpaid offices by means of presents to the monarch, came to look upon the public service rather as a mine of official wealth than as an administrative organization for furthering the interests, material or moral, of the whole nation.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages a large number of rectories were held by religious houses, which drew the bulk of the tithes and appointed vicars to do the work.

    0
    0
  • Hence the modern distinction in England between rectors and vicars.

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  • advowson of the vicarage was alienated a few years ago by Vicars.

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  • The trouble with the vicar parody is that the most militant atheists in Britain don't believe vicars are evil.

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  • busty beauties or sour battleaxes, vicars are easily shocked prudes - that sort of thing.

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  • Our reason for fighting jet lag was that the vicars choral were to sing this anthem this day.

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  • consistory court cases involving adulterous vicars, is deemed by many to be expensive and cumbersome.

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  • quadrangle of Georgian houses built for the vicars choral.

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  • This is what the Anglican Church asked the parish vicars to do with the registers.

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  • Only one problem - the new denizens of this master caff all seem to be graphic designers, supermodels and trendy vicars.

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  • vicars choral were to sing this anthem this day.

    0
    0
  • The term is used in this general sense in certain rubrics of the English Book of Common Prayer, in which it is applied equally to rectors and vicars as to perpetual curates.

    0
    0
  • The consequence of this misuse of the term "curate" was that the title of "perpetual curate" fell into desuetude in the Anglican Church, and an act of parliament (1868) was passed to authorize perpetual curates to style themselves vicars (see Vicar).

    0
    0
  • Henry established imperial vicars in the Lombard towns, confirming the tyrants, but gaining nothing for the empire in exchange for the titles he conferred.

    0
    0
  • The tyrants, as we have already seen, established themselves as captains of the people, vicars of the empire, vicars for the church, leaders of the Guelph and Ghibelline parties.

    0
    0
  • Rienzis revolution in Rome (3471354), and hi~ establishment of a republic upon a fantastic basis, half classical half feudal, proved the temper of the times; while the rise of dynastic families in the cities of the church, claiming the title of papal vicars, but acting in their own interests, Tb weakened the authority of the Holy See.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Andrew is of unknown foundation, but the list of vicars is complete from 1223.

    0
    0
  • For this purpose he obtained, after much difficulty, a papal brief emancipating the Dominicans of St Mark from the rule of the Lombard vicars of that order.

    0
    0
  • Certain homilies, accordingly, composed by dignitaries of the lower house, were in the following year produced by the prolocutor; and after some delay a volume was published in 1547 entitled Certain sermons or homilies appointed by the King's Majesty to be declared and read by all parsons, vicars, or curates every Sunday in their churches where they have cure.

    0
    0
  • They elected three Poles successively as generals, taking, however, only the title of vicars, till on the 7th of March 1801 Pius VII.

    0
    0
  • The Society has been ruled by twenty-five generals and four vicars from its foundation to the present day (1910).

    0
    0
  • They claimed that they, as vicars of Christ, had the right to interfere in the temporal concerns of princes, and even to depose sovereigns of whom they disapproved.

    0
    0
  • It is, however, as Cardinal Hergenrdther points out, possible to exaggerate its importance in this respect; a charter purporting to be a grant by an emperor to a pope of spiritual as well as temporal jurisdiction was at best a double-edged weapon; and the popes generally preferred to base their claim to universal sovereignty on their direct commission as vicars of God.

    0
    0
  • His musical duties are usually performed by the "succentor," one of the vicars choral.

    0
    0
  • From the 6th century onwards the apostolic vicars of Arles and Thessalonica were merely the titular holders of pontifical honours, with no real authority over those who were nominally under their jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • To the former were attached two commissions, one for the approbation of those religious congregations which devote themselves to missions, which is now transferred to the Congregation of the Religious Orders; the other for the examination of the reports sent in by the bishops and vicars apostolic on their dioceses or missions.

    0
    0
  • titular bishops acting as vicars or delegates of the Apostolic see) or " Prefects-Apostolic " (i.e.

    0
    0
  • In 1853 the Roman Catholic Church, which before had been a mission in the hands of papal legates and vicars, was raised into an independent ecclesiastical province with five dioceses, namely, the archbishopric of Utrecht, and the suffragan bishoprics of Haarlem, Breda, 's Hertogenbosch and Roermond, each with its own seminary.

    0
    0
  • In the early Church other bishops commonly described themselves as vicars of Christ (Du Cange gives an example as late as the 9th century from the capitularies of Charles the Bald); but there is no proof in their case, or indeed in that of " vicar of St Peter " given to the popes, that it was part of their formal style.

    0
    0
  • All bishops were looked upon as in some sort vicars of the pope, but the title vicarius sedis apostolicae came especially to be applied as an alternative to legatus sedis apostolicae to describe papal legates to whom in certain places the pope delegated a portion of his authority.

    0
    0
  • " Lay vicars 'l also were and are employed to sing those parts of the office which can be sung by laymen.

    0
    0
  • The employment of such vicars was by no means general in the early Church, but towards the 13th century it became very general for a bishop to employ a vicar-general, often to curb the growing authority of the archdeacons.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages there was not a very clear distinction drawn between the vicar and the official of the bishop. When the voluntary and contentious jurisdiction came to be distinguished, the former fell generally to the vicars, the latter to the officials.

    0
    0
  • In the style of the Roman chancery, official documents are addressed to the bishops or their vicars for dioceses beyond the Alps, but for French dioceses to the bishops or their officials.

    0
    0
  • In the Roman Catholic Church bishops sometimes appoint lesser vicars to exercise a more limited authority over a limited district.

    0
    0
  • In canon law priests doing work in place of the parish priest are called vicars.

    0
    0
  • Formerly, and especially in England, many churches were appropriated to monasteries or colleges of canons, whose custom it was to appoint one of their own body to perform divine service in such churches, but in the 13th century such corporations were obliged to appoint permanent paid vicars who were called perpetual vicars.

    0
    0
  • Hence in England the distinction between rectors, who draw both the greater and lesser tithes, and vicars, who are attached to parishes of which the great tithes, formerly held by monasteries, are now drawn by lay rectors.

    0
    0
  • In Ireland the Culdees of Armagh endured until the dissolution in 1541, and enjoyed a fleeting resurrection in 1627, soon after which their ancient property passed to the vicars choral of the cathedral.

    0
    0
  • At the head of this is the college of cardinals, who are the princes and senators of the Church, the counsellors of the pope, and his vicars in the functions of the pontificate.

    0
    0
  • The scattered communities of the Uniat Armenian Church in Russia are subordinate to Latin vicars apostolic. The Uniat Armenian Church in the Caucasus, however, is under the jurisdiction of the patri archate of Cilicia.

    0
    0
  • There are not more than 10,000 to 15,000 Uniat Bulgarians, who have been ruled since 1883 by three vicars apostolic. The Uniat Armenians and Melchites in Constantinople belong to the Eastern patriarchates.

    0
    0
  • established in 1887 three special vicariates apostolic (Vicariates apostolici Syro-Malabarorum); the vicars apostolic are Latins, but have the right to pontificate and to confirm according to the Syrian rite.

    0
    0
  • 2 It was officially adopted in the Relief Act of 1791 in place of the designation " Protesting Catholic Dissenters," to which the vicars apostolic objected.

    0
    0
  • somewhat prolonged conflict between the Committee and the vicars apostolic, who for the most part represented the high ultramontane view.

    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical organization includes one archbishop, who resides at Santiago, three bishops residing at La Serena, Concepcion and Ancud, and two vicars residing in Antofagasta and Tarapaca.

    0
    0
  • There are altogether some 90 bishops and about 40 auxiliary bishops called vicars.

    0
    0
  • There were 14,029 incumbents (rectors, vicars, and perpetual curates), 7500 curates, i.e.

    0
    0
  • Nicholas was condemned to perpetual imprisonment, and died in obscurity at Avignon; while the Roman people submitted to King Robert, who governed the church through his vicars.

    0
    0
  • The bishops registers of the diocese of Norwich show that many parishes had three and some four successive vicars admitted in eighteen months.

    0
    0
  • The bishops constitute the episcopal synod, the supreme court of appeal, 1 During the long period of proscription, the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland survived in scattered groups; after the Reformation it was at first under the jurisdiction of the English arch-priest, but from 1653 to 1694 it was governed by prefects apostolic and from 1694 to 1878 by vicars apostolic appointed by the pope.

    0
    0
  • At last, just as the kingdom had become the personal property of the king, so the officialsdukes, counts, royal vicars, tribunes, centenariiwho had for the most part bought their unpaid offices by means of presents to the monarch, came to look upon the public service rather as a mine of official wealth than as an administrative organization for furthering the interests, material or moral, of the whole nation.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages a large number of rectories were held by religious houses, which drew the bulk of the tithes and appointed vicars to do the work.

    0
    0
  • Hence the modern distinction in England between rectors and vicars.

    0
    0
  • Vicars ' Court is an open quadrangle of Georgian houses built for the vicars choral.

    0
    0
  • This is what the Anglican Church asked the parish vicars to do with the registers.

    0
    0
  • Only one problem - the new denizens of this master caff all seem to be graphic designers, supermodels and trendy vicars.

    0
    0
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