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vicar

vicar

vicar Sentence Examples

  • He appears to have been actual vicar of Dundee in 1552.

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  • 1761), formerly vicar of Llanddowror.

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  • 1761), formerly vicar of Llanddowror.

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  • He seems to have remained at Oxford until 1630, when he became vicar of Chippenham.

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  • Sayce, vicar of Caldicot.

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  • On the 30th of June 1532 the council of two hundred had ordained that in every church and cloister of the city "the pure Gospel" should be preached; against this order the bishop's vicar led the opposition.

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  • 3 But a party in Jerusalem, headed by the late "vicar" Arnulf, opposed itself to the hierarchical pretensions of Dagobert and the Norman influence by which they were backed; and this party, representing the Lotharingian laity, carried the day.

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  • Summoned before the bishop's vicar, his trial was a scene of insult and clamour, ending in his being violently thrust from the court and bidden to leave the city within three hours.

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  • He was ordained in 1818, and was appointed vicar of Cowley, Oxford, in 1823.

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  • In 1768 he became vicar of South Mimms near Barnet; and in November 1769 he was presented to the rectory of Tewkesbury, with which he held also the vicarage of Longdon in Worcestershire.

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  • John Fletcher, the vicar of Madeley, to whom Wesley had turned as a possible successor, died in 1785.

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  • This was enough to make him unpopular with many of the Welsh clergy, and being denied the privilege of preaching for nothing at two churches, he helped his old Oxford friend John Mayor, now vicar of Shawbury, Shropshire, from October until January 11th, 1784.

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  • In 1825 he was ordained priest, and was appointed vicar of the Madeleine at Paris.

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  • In 1768 he became vicar of South Mimms near Barnet; and in November 1769 he was presented to the rectory of Tewkesbury, with which he held also the vicarage of Longdon in Worcestershire.

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  • JOHN GAUDEN (1605-1662), English bishop and writer, reputed author of the Eikon Basilike, was born in 1605 at Mayland, Essex, where his father was vicar of the parish.

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  • The term "curate" in the present day is almost exclusively used to signify a clergyman who is assistant to a rector or vicar, by whom he is employed and paid; and a clerk in deacon's orders is competent to be licensed by a bishop to the office of such assistant curate.

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  • He was now one of the most powerful sovereigns of Europe, for besides ruling over Provence and Anjou and the kingdom of the Two Sicilies, he was imperial vicar of Tuscany, lord of many cities of Lombardy and Piedmont, and as the pope's favourite practically arbiter of the papal states, especially during the interregnum between the death of Clement IV.

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  • in 1530, was ordained priest, and succeeded his uncle John Barry as vicar of Dundee; but before he came into actual possession he also was suspected of heresy, and was compelled to flee to France and Germany.

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  • In 1872 he became vicar of St Jude's, Commercial Street, Whitechapel, and in the next year married Henrietta Octavia Rowland, who had been a co-worker with Miss Octavia Hill and was no less ardent a philanthropist than her husband.

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  • After the Restoration he was successively rector of Wimbush, Essex, vicar of Frome Selwood, Somersetshire, rector of Streat and Walton.

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  • Once he had defended the monastic orders, advocating their reform and not their suppression, supported the rural clergy and idealized the village priest in his Parocho da Aldeia, after the manner of Goldsmith in the Vicar of Wakefield.

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  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.

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  • He then returned to Balliol as a Snell exhibitioner; became vicar of High Ercall, Shropshire, in 1750; canon of Windsor, 1762; bishop of Carlisle, 1787 (and also dean of Windsor, 1788); bishop of Salisbury, 1791.

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  • Frederick enlisted his Saracen troops at Nocera and Luceria, and appointed the terrible Ezzelino da Romano his vicar in.

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  • The crimes of his vicar Ezzelino, who laid whole provinces waste and murdered men by thousands in his Paduan prisons, increased the horror with which he was regarded.

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  • They made him senator of Rome and vicar of Tuscany, and promised him the investiture of the regno provided he stipulated that it should not be held in combination with the empire.

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  • In 1509 he was ordained priest and became a vicar in the collegiate Marienkirche at Treptow; in 1517 he was appointed lecturer on the Bible and Church Fathers at the abbey school at Belbuck.

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  • His father, Jacob Stephen Hawker, was at that time a doctor, but afterwards curate and vicar of Stratton, Cornwall.

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  • See The Vicar of Morwenstow (1875; later and corrected editions, 1876 and 1886), by the Rev. S.

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  • The church is cruciform and the altar stands beneath the eastern lantern arch, a fine rood screen separating off the choir, which was devoted to monastic use, while the nave was kept for the parishioners, in consequence of a dispute between the vicar and the monastery in 1499.

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  • After holding the living of Wethersfield in Essex he became vicar of Finchingfield in the same county, and in 1636 was reported for " want of conformity."

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  • He then returned to Balliol as a Snell exhibitioner; became vicar of High Ercall, Shropshire, in 1750; canon of Windsor, 1762; bishop of Carlisle, 1787 (and also dean of Windsor, 1788); bishop of Salisbury, 1791.

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  • They made him senator of Rome and vicar of Tuscany, and promised him the investiture of the regno provided he stipulated that it should not be held in combination with the empire.

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  • made him cardinal (1596) and later vicar in Rome and inquisitor.

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  • He became vicar of Morwenstow, a village on the north Cornish coast, in 1834.

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  • CHARLES LUTWIDGE DODGSON (LEWIS CARROLL] (1832-1898), English mathematician and author, son of the Rev. Charles Dodgson, vicar of Daresbury, Cheshire, was born in that village on the 27th of January 1832.

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  • In 1784 he became vicar of Epsom in Surrey, where he continued until his death on the 27th of April 1804, becoming known as one of the most eloquent preachers of his day.

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  • This time they were actively aided by Charles IV., who, having returned from Rome, sent his militia, commanded by the imperial vicar Malatesta da Rimini, to attack the public palace.

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  • He was vicar of a small church in the country 150 years ago.

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  • Dressed in full armour and attended by the papal vicar, Cola headed a procession to the Capitol; here he addressed the assembled crowd, speaking "with fascinating eloquence of the servitude and redemption of Rome."

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  • In 1786 he was appointed vicar of Kingston-on-Thames, and in 1788 rector of Bemerton, Wiltshire.

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  • 1618), Puritan author, and of William Erbury, sometime vicar of St Mary's in the town, who, with his curate, Walter Cradock,were among the founders of Welsh nonconformity.

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  • Still more outspoken is the Savoyard vicar in the Emile (1762) of Jean Jacques Rousseau: "Whence do I get my rules of action?

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  • Dressed in full armour and attended by the papal vicar, Cola headed a procession to the Capitol; here he addressed the assembled crowd, speaking "with fascinating eloquence of the servitude and redemption of Rome."

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  • Still more outspoken is the Savoyard vicar in the Emile (1762) of Jean Jacques Rousseau: "Whence do I get my rules of action?

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  • 1 In 1851 the mayor of the English Boston sent over a copy of that city's seals, framed in oak from St Botolph's church, of which John Cotton, the famous Boston divine (he came over in 1633) had been vicar.

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  • Of their own will they devoted themselves to God, and all busied themselves in obeying their rector or his vicar....

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  • The medicinal properties of the sulphur water were discovered, or perhaps rediscovered, in 1732 by a famous Welsh writer, the Rev. Theophilus Evans, then vicar of Llangammarch (to which living Llanwrtyd was a chapelry till 1871).

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  • When elected by his native department to the Convention in 1792 he was acting as vicar to his uncle Bernard Font (1 7 23-1800), the constitutional bishop of Pamiers.

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  • SAMUEL HOOD HOOD, VISCOUNT (1724-1816), British admiral, was the son of Samuel Hood, vicar of Butleigh in Somerset, and prebendary of Wells.

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  • The Roman Catholic chaplains are classed as parish priests, curates and assistants, and are subject to an army Vicar Apostolic. In war, at an army headquarters there are a "field-rabbi," a "military imam," an evangelical minister, as well as the Roman Catholic hierarchy.

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  • The tumults against the Paterine heretics (1244-1245), among whom were many Ghibelline nobles favoured by the podestd Pace di Pesamigola, indicate a successful Guelphic reaction; but Frederick II., having defeated his enemies both in Lombardy and in the Two Sicilies, appointed his natural son, Frederick of Antioch, imperial vicar in Tuscany, who, when civil war broke out, entered the city with 1600 German knights.

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  • Rudolph of Habsburg, elected king of the Romans in 1273, having come to terms with Pope Nicholas III., Charles was obliged in 1278 to give up his title of imperial vicar in Tuscany, which he had held during the interregnum following on the death of Frederick II.

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  • The Pisans, fearing the vengeance of the Guelphs now that Henry was dead, had accepted the lordship of Uguccione della Fagginola, imperial vicar in Genoa.

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  • FRANCOIS CHABOT (1757-1794), French revolutionist, had been a Franciscan friar before the Revolution, and after the civil constitution of the clergy continued to act as "constitutional" priest, becoming grand vicar of Henri Gregoire, bishop of Blois.

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  • found little difficulty in establishing his vicar Ezzelino da Romano in Padua and the neighbouring cities, where he practised frightful cruelties on the inhabitants.

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  • At Christmas 1815 he was sent to the grammar school at Louth, his mother having kept up a connexion with this typical Lincolnshire borough, of which her father, the Rev. Stephen Fytche, had been vicar.

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  • The vicar of the parish gave him instruction and procured his entrance in 1563 as an exhibitioner to Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • In 1842 he published a treatise on The Unity of the Church, and his reputation as an eloquent and earnest preacher being by this time considerable, he was in the same year appointed select preacher by his university, thus being called upon to fill from time to time the pulpit which Newman, as vicar of St Mary's, was just ceasing to occupy.

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  • Thomas, who reigned until 1222, was a Ghibelline in politics and greatly increased the importance of Savoy, for he was created Imperial Vicar and acquired important extensions of territory in the Bugey, Vaud and Romont to the west of the Alps, and Carignano, Pinerolo, Moncalieri and Vigone to the east; he also exercised sway over Geneva, Albenga, Savona and Saluzzo.

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  • articles, usually called the Creed of Pius IV., which reaffirmed the Nicene Creed, and dealt with the preservation of the apostolic and ecclesiastical traditions, the interpretation of the Holy Scriptures " according to the sense which our Holy Mother Church has held," the seven sacraments, the offering of the mass, transubstantiation, purgatory, the veneration of saints, relics, images, the efficacy of indulgences, the supremacy of the Roman Church and of the bishop of Rome as vicar of Christ.

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  • See also ADVOWSON; GLEBE; INCUMBENT; VICAR; also Phillimore, Eccles.

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  • He became vicar in 1858 of Broadchalke with Bowerchalke and Alvedistone, Wiltshire.

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  • His father, Captain Peter Garrick, who had married Arabella Clough, the daughter of a vicar choral of Lichfield cathedral, was on a recruiting expedition when his famous third son was born at Hereford on the 19th of February 1717.

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  • But it is not necessary to stand in such fear of the thunder of Christ's vicar, but rather to fear Christ Himself, for it is the Florentine's business, not Christ's, that is at issue."

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  • After a residence in the north as chaplain to Henry Hastings, earl of Huntingdon, President of the North, he was made vicar of St Giles's, Cripplegate, in 1588, and there delivered his striking sermons on the temptation in the wilderness and the Lord's prayer.

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  • In 1784 the vicar of Tintagel, as mayor and only qualified elector, enjoyed the probably unique privilege of returning two members to the House of Commons.

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  • fled to France, had been left behind as his vicar in Italy.

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  • FREDERICK WILLIAM FABER (1814-1863), British hymn writer and theologian, was born on the 28th of June 1814 at Calverley, Yorkshire, of which place his grandfather, Thomas Faber, was vicar.

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  • He was vicar of Huddersfield from 1759 to 1771, when he exchanged to the living of Yelling,.

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  • The Roman Catholics number 2 30% of the whites, the head of their church in the province being a vicar apostolic. At the head of the Anglican community, which is in full communion with the Church of England, is the bishop of Bloemfontein, whose diocese, founded in 1863, includes not only the Orange Free State, but Basutoland, Griqualand West and British Bechuanaland.

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  • The other districts are managed by an apostolic vicar at Dresden, under the direction of the minister of public worship. Two nunneries in Lusatia are the only conventual establishments in Saxony, and no others may be founded.

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  • She died in November 1687, and was buried on the 17th, according to her own request, in the church of St Martin-in-the-Fields, her funeral sermon being preached by the vicar, Thomas Tenison, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, who said "much to her praise."

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  • In 1365 the count obtained from the emperor the office of imperial vicar over Geneva, but the next bishop William of Marcossay (1366-1377: he began the construction of a new wall round the.

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  • Early in 1873 the pope named him "vicar apostolic of Geneva," but he was expelled a few weeks later from Switzerland, not returning till 1883, when he became bishop of Lausanne, being made cardinal in 1890.

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  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.

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  • An impressive announcement of the Easter Communion Service, made by the Rev. Pryce Davies, vicar of Talgarth, on the 30.th of March 1735, was the means of awakening Howell Harris (1714-1773) of Trevecca, and he immediately began to hold services in his own house.

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  • gave him the distinguished post of cardinal vicar.

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  • The first prior acted as vicar in all matters in the absence of the abbot, and was generally charged with the details of the discipline of the monastery.

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  • Educated at Repton, whence he proceeded to Aberdeen University, he became in 1817 vicar of Little Horwood, Buckinghamshire, and devoted his spare time to literature and particularly to the study of Anglo-Saxon.

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  • After the death of the first general there was an interregnum of two years, with Laynez as vicar.

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  • The general's supremacy received a shock when the eleventh general congregation appointed Oliva as vicar, with the right of succession and powers that practically superseded those of the general Goswin Nickel, whose infirmities, it is said, did not permit him to govern with the necessary application and vigour; and an attempt was made to depose Tirso Gonzalez, the thirteenth general, whose views on probabilism diverged from those favoured by the rest of the Jesuits.

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  • A royal commission, appointed by the duc de Choiseul to examine the constitutions, convoked a private assembly of fifty-one archbishops and bishops under the presidency of Cardinal de Luynes, all of whom except six voted that the unlimited authority of the general was incompatible with the laws of France, and that the appointment of a resident vicar, subject to those laws, was the only solution of the question fair on all sides.

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  • granted them liberty to reconstitute themselves in north Russia, and permitted Kareu, then vicar, to exercise full authority as general.

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  • The second period of Oecolampadius's life opens with his return to Basel in November 1522, as vicar of St Martin's and (in 1523) reader of the Holy Scripture at the university.

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  • Humphry (1815-1886), vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London; the Rev. Benjamin Hall Kennedy, canon of Ely; William Lee (1815-1883), archdeacon of Dublin, and professor of ecclesiastical history in the university; J.

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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.

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  • He was in turn vicar at Ware, Hertfordshire (1627-1633), and at Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire (1633-1637).

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  • It states essentially the Roman doctrine of purgatory, and asserts the world-wide primacy of the pope as the "true vicar of Christ and the head of the whole Church, the Father and teacher of all Christians"; but, to satisfy the Greeks, inconsistently adds that all the rights and privileges of the Oriental patriarchs are to be maintained unimpaired.

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  • As pope he established peace between the republics of Lucca and Pisa, and confirmed Charles of Anjou in his office of imperial vicar of Tuscany.

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  • was appointed papal vicar in Romagna to resist the imperialists; thenceforth he became the recognized leader of the Guelphs or papal faction in Italy and took part in all the wars against the Ghibellines.

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  • created him papal vicar in Italy against the emperor Louis the Bavarian.

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  • As vicar of St Andrewthe-Great, Cambridge, he was conspicuous for his devoted attention to the sufferers from the plague.

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  • in 1552, and was made vicar of Sunningwell, and public orator of the university, in which capacity he had to compose a congratulatory epistle to Mary on her accession.

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  • He was ordained and became vicar of Fawsley in 1637, but soon resigned and became chaplain successively to Lord Saye and Sele, Lord Berkeley, and Prince Charles Louis, nephew of Charles I.

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  • In 1661 he was preacher at Gray's Inn, and in 1662 vicar of St Lawrence Jewry, London.

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  • He became vicar of Polebrook, Northamptonshire, in 1666, prebendary of Exeter in 1667, and in the following year prebendary of St Paul's and bishop of Chester.

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  • He early became vicar of Boughton Malherbe and of Sutton Valence, and later of Ivychurch, Kent; but, desiring a more worldly career, he entered the service of Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of London.

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  • He was a younger brother of William Alleine, the saintly vicar of Blandford.

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  • The convention, started in a private manner by Canon Harford-Battersby, then vicar of Keswick, and Mr Robert Wilson in 1874, met first in 1875, and rapidly grew after the first few years, both in numbers and influence, in spite of attacks on the alleged "perfectionism" of some of its leaders and on the novelty of its methods.

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  • The assiduity with which Huc devoted himself to the study of the dialects and customs of the Tatars, for whom at the cost of much labour he translated various religious works, was an admirable preparation for undertaking in 1844, at the instigation of the vicar apostolic of Mongolia, an expedition whose object was to dissipate the obscurity which hung over the country and habits of the Tibetans.

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  • as successor of St Peter and Vicar of Christ, over the Catholic Church, and as sovereign of the former papal states.

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  • The Fathers of the Church had repeated times without number that the priesthood stands above even the supreme secular authority; the Bible was full of stories most aptly illustrating this theory; nobody questioned that, within the Church, the pope was the Vicar of Christ, and that, as such, his powers were unlimited; as proof positive could be cited councils and decretals - whether authentic or spurious; at any rate all authorized by long usage and taken as received authorities.

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  • The new pope's motto, it is said, was " to establish all things in Christ " (instaurare omnia in Christo); and since, ex hypothesi, he himself was Christ's vicar on earth, the working out of this principle meant in effect the extension and consolidation of the papal authority and, as far as possible, an end to the compromises by means of which the papacy had sought to make friends of the Mammon of unrighteousness.

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  • Through this Congregation the pope, as bishop of Rome, made the inspection of his diocese; it is for this reason that he was president of this commission, the most important member of which was the cardinal vicar.

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  • He entered Queen's College, Cambridge, in 1644, and after taking orders in 1651 became successively chaplain to Sir Walter St John and vicar of Battersea, Surrey.

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  • Napoleone obtained the title of imperial vicar from Rudolph of Hapsburg.

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  • William Bedwell, the Arabic scholar, was vicar of Tottenham, and published in 1632 a Briefe Description of the Towne of Tottenham, in which he printed for the first time the burlesque poem, the Turnament of Tottenham.

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  • Officers and sisters are paid a limited sum for their services either by the vicar or by voluntary local contributions.

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  • Consequently where the right of patronage (the right of the patron to present to the bishop the person whom he has nominated to become rector or vicar of the parish to the benefice of which he claims the right of advowson) remains attached to the manor, it is called an advowson appendant, and passes with the estate by inheritance The distinction between nomination to a living and presentation is to be noted.

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  • The assistance of a vicar enabled him to escape from the growing administrative cares and devote himself solely to asceticism, apparently the only field of human activity in which he excelled.

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  • He was fellow and dean of divinity at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1893 to 1896, and at the same time vicar of the university church of St.

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  • In 1896 he became vicar of Portsea, when his success in administering a large working-class parish led in 1901 to his nomination as bishop suffragan of Stepney in the East End of London.

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  • This state of matters was so clearly proved that an arrangement was agreed to on the part of the vicar (Dance), by which he allowed £60 a year, out of his income X200, to a preacher who should be chosen by certain trustees.

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  • Les Trois Verites ran through several editions, and obtained for its author the favour of the bishop of Cahors, who appointed him grand vicar and theological canon.

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  • forest lands, belong to the Crown, although by canon law they were to be disposed of by the bishop; but by custom a parson or vicar might be entitled to them.

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  • They were not payable of the following, except by custom: things of the substance of the earth, such as coals, minerals, turf and the like; things ferae naturae, such as fish, deer and the like; things tame, such as fowls, hounds or fish kept for pleasure or curiosity; barren land, until it is converted into arable or meadow land, and has been so for seven years; forest land, if in the hands of the king or his lessee, unless disafforested; a park which is disparked; or glebe land in the hands of the parson or vicar, which was mutually exempted from payment by the one to the other, but not if in the hands of the vicar's lessee.

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  • Except, however, where made under parliamentary authority, no composition for tithes, although made between the landowner and the parson or vicar with the consent of the patron and ordinary, bound a succeeding incumbent, the statute 13 Eliz.

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  • c. so prohibiting any parson or vicar from making any conveyance of (inter alia) tithes, being parcel of the possessions of their churches, to any persons, except leases for twenty-one years or three lives.

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  • He was ordained in 1762 and became vicar of Harpford with Fenn-Ottery, Devonshire, in 1766.

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  • His father, vicar of Charlton and Westport, an illiterate and choleric man, quarrelled, it is said, with a brother clergyman at the church door, and was forced to decamp, leaving his three children to the care of an elder brother Francis, a flourishing glover at Malmesbury.

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  • At last, after a vast amount of tedious and useless discussion, it was agreed that the parliament should appoint an imperial vicar (Reichsverweser) who sh~iuld carry on the government by means of a ministry selected by himself; and on the motion of Heinrich von Gagern the archduke John of Austria was chosen by a large majority for the office.

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  • For some time Austria offered no counter scheme, but she ultimately proposed that there should be a directory of seven princes, the chief place being held alternately by a Prussian and an Austrian imperial vicar.

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  • It was now ruled by a corrector, afterwards by a consular under the authority of the vicar of the Roman city (Not.

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  • in 1059, and as papal vicar in south Italy conducted frequent negotiations between the Normans and the pope.

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  • As vicar of the Holy See he convened a synod at Capua on the 7th of March 1087, resumed the papal insignia on the 21st of March, and received tardy consecration at Rome on the 9th of May.

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  • Falling ill at the synod, Vicar returned to Monte Cassino, where he died on the 16th of September 1087.

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  • He was appoined vicar of Gateshead in 1808, prebendary of Durham in 1809, and vicar of St Margaret, Durham, in 1810.

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  • He hurried back to Rome upon the accession of Pius V., who made him apostolic vicar of his order, and, later (1570), cardinal.

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  • To safeguard the authority of the Holy See over the bishops of Illyricum, Siricius entrusted his powers to the bishop of Thessalonica, who was henceforth the vicar of the pope in those provinces.

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  • JOHN HENLEY (1692-1759), English clergyman, commonly known as "Orator Henley," was born on the 3rd of August 1692 at Melton-Mowbray, where his father was vicar.

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  • VICAR (Lat.

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  • In the early middle ages the term was applied to representatives of a count administering justice for him in the country or small towns and dealing with unimportant cases, levying taxes, &c. Monasteries and religious houses often employed a vicar to answer to their feudal lords for those of their lands which did not pass into mortmain.

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  • The title of " vicar of Jesus Christ," borne by the popes, was introduced as their special designation during the 8th century, in place of the older style of " vicar of St Peter " (or vicarius principis apostolorum).

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  • In the early Church other bishops commonly described themselves as vicars of Christ (Du Cange gives an example as late as the 9th century from the capitularies of Charles the Bald); but there is no proof in their case, or indeed in that of " vicar of St Peter " given to the popes, that it was part of their formal style.

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  • The assumption of the style " vicar of Christ " by the popes coincided with a tendency on the part of the Roman chancery to insist on placing the pontiff's name before that of emperors and kings and to refuse to other bishops the right to address him as " brother " (Mas Latrie, s.

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  • A neighbouring bishop was sometimes appointed by the pope vicar of a church which happened to be without a pastor.

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  • A special vicar was appointed by the pope to superintend the spiritual affairs of Rome and its suburbs, to visit its churches, monasteries, &c., and to correct abuses.

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  • In the middle ages there was not a very clear distinction drawn between the vicar and the official of the bishop. When the voluntary and contentious jurisdiction came to be distinguished, the former fell generally to the vicars, the latter to the officials.

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  • Such a vicar possesses an ordinary and not a delegated jurisdiction, which he exercises like the bishop. He cannot, however, exercise functions which concern the episcopal order, or confer benefices without express and particular commission.

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  • He had amassed some wealth, which on his return to Rome he so employed among the poor as to secure for himself great popularity; and, when Vigilius was summoned to Byzantium in 544, Pelagius, now archdeacon, was left behind as his vicar, and by his tact in dealing with Totila, the Gothic invader, saved the citizens from murder and outrage.

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  • Lux Mundi and the Bampton lectures led to a situation of some tension which was relieved when in 1893 Dr Gore resigned his principalship and became vicar of Radley, a small parish near Oxford.

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  • he is not a mere vicar of the pope.

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  • From 1360, when Galeazzo was appointed imperial vicar by Charles IV., Pavia became practically a possession of the Visconti family and in due course formed part of the duchy of Milan.

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  • Of all his singular opinions the best known is his advocacy of clerical monogamy, immortalized in the Vicar of Wakefield.

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  • As such, the pope is regarded as " vicar of Christ, head of the bishops, and supreme governor of the whole Catholic Church, of whom the whole world is the territory or diocese."

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  • Such as there are are under the authority of a vicar apostolic residing at Keren.

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  • Descended from a family which had attained some legal eminence in the time of the Commonwealth, John Keble, the father of the poet, was vicar of Coln St Aldwyn, but lived at Fairford, about 3 m.

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  • ' Circa 1554-1616; educated at Cambridge; ordained priest 1581; vicar of Ridge, Herts, 1581; rector of Hinton St George, Somerset, 1587; eventually condemned to death at the Taunton Assizes (7th August 1615).

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  • The honour of presenting his countrymen with a complete Welsh version of the Bible was reserved for William Morgan (c. 1547-1604), vicar of Llanrhayader, in Denbighshire, and afterwards bishop successively of Llandaff and of St Asaph.

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  • Of these two Puritan divines, Vicar Prichard, who was essentially orthodox in his behaviour, forms an interesting connecting link between the learned Elizabethan translators of the Bible and the great revivalists of the 18th century, and his moral rhymes in the vernacular, collected and printed after his death under the title of The Welshman's Candle (Canwyll y Cymry), still retain some degree of popularity amongst his countrymen.

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  • During the years prior to the Great Rebellion, however, in spite of the preaching and writings of Vicar Prichard, Wroth and others, the vast mass of Welshmen of all classes remained friendly to the High Church policy of Laud and staunch supporters of the king's prerogative.

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  • So striking was the devotion shown throughout the Principality to the king, who fought his last disastrous campaign in the friendly counties of Wales and the Marches, that on the final victory of the parliament there was passed within a month of Charles's execution 1 Sometimes known as vicar of Llandingat, his church being in that parish.

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  • Amongst these Stephen Hughes of Carmarthen (1623-1688), a devoted follower of Vicar Prichard and an editor of his works, was ejected from the living of Mydrim in Carmarthenshire, whereby the valuable services of this eminent divine were lost to the Church and gained by the Nonconformists, who had increased considerably in numbers since the Civil Wars.

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  • From 1848 to 1861 he was vicar of Horningsea, near Cambridge, and from 1866 to his death on the 12th of January 1889, vicar of Cockfield in Suffolk.

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  • Having returned to England some time after Edmund's death in 1240 he became vicar of Deal and chancellor of Canterbury for the second time.

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  • 1917), afterwards vicar of Sibsey, Lincs., but obtained a separation from her husband in 1873.

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  • In 1856 he became vicar of Shoreham, in 1869 canon of Worcester, and in 1871 regius professor of divinity at Oxford.

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  • He was known for his great scholarship, simplicity of character, and affectionate interest in the pupils of the grammar school, of which he was appointed master a few months before becoming vicar of the parish (1760), reigning in both capacities till his death.

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  • Having been ordained to the priesthood, he for some time acted as vicar of Archbishop Celsus or Ceallach of Armagh, and carried out many reforms tending to increase conformity with the usage of the Church of Rome.

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  • For some months he seems to have assisted the vicar of Cranbrook, Kent, but it is doubtful whether he received ordination.

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  • In 1831 he was appointed vicar at Kirchenlarnitz, where his fervent evangelical preaching attracted large congregations and puzzled the ecclesiastical authorities.

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  • He returned to England in the following year as vicar of St Saviour's, Poplar, and retained that living until his death.

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  • He studied law at Oxford, but afterwards he took holy orders, and in 1609 became vicar of St Giles, Oxford, a living which he retained until he became rector of Somerton, Oxfordshire, in 1615.

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  • and governed by his vicar, Lucca managed, at first as a demo ' Some confusion has arisen owing to the similarity of the names Luca and Luna; the theory of E.

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  • 1784), rector of Winwick, and John Clowes (1743-1831), vicar of St John's, Manchester.

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  • He returned to his native city in 1672 to become professor of anatomy, but, having become a Roman Catholic, he found it expedient to return to Florence, and was ultimately made apostolic vicar of Lower Saxony.

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  • In 1856 he became master of King Edward's grammar school at Lichfield, in 1858 warden and professor of classical literature and geology in Queen's College, Birmingham, in 1862 rector of Mellis, in Suffolk, and in 1867 vicar of St John's, Bethnal Green, London.

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  • He filled the offices of apostolic vicar of Avignon, legate at the council of Trent, nuncio to Venice, and president of the Inquisition.

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  • Entering the ministry in 1853, he was made vicar at Durlach soon afterwards, and became a licentiate in the theological faculty at Heidelberg.

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  • A serious conflict arose between Hincmar on the one side and Charles and the pope on the other in 876, when Pope John VIII., at the king's request, entrusted Ansegisus, archbishop of Sens, with the primacy of the Gauls and of Germany, and created him vicar apostolic. In Hincmar's eyes this was an encroachment on the jurisdiction of the archbishops, and it was against this primacy that he directed his treatise De jure metropolitanorum.

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  • The patriarch receives confirmation from Rome, and the political representation of the Maronites at Constantinople is in the hands of the vicar apostolic. Rome has incorporated most of the Maronite saints in her calendar, while refusing (despite their apologists) to canonize either of the reputed eponymous founders of Maronism.

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  • After leaving the university he was appointed vicar of Over-Whitacre, and rector of Sheldon in Warwickshire, where he wrote his famous Catechetical Lectures.

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  • The church was rebuilt in 1840 at the instance of the vicar, Dr Walter Farquhar Hook (1798-1875), afterwards dean of Chichester, whose work here in a poor and ill-educated parish brought him fame.

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  • His grandfather, Thomas Swift, vicar of Goodrich near Ross, appears to have been a doughty member of the church militant, who lost his possessions by taking the losing side in the Civil War and died in 1658 before the restoration could bring him redress.

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  • He was elected to a tutorship at Oriel College in 1797, and in 1800 was appointed vicar of St Mary's, Oxford.

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  • Newbolt, vicar of St Mary's, Bilston.

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  • In 1685 he became vicar of Ambrosden, Oxfordshire.

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  • Left an orphan when five years old, he was placed by his guardian under the care of the Puritan vicar of Wotton-under-Edge, with whom he remained till he attained his sixteenth year, when he entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford.

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  • The burnings began with that of William Sawtr, a London vicar, on the 2nd of March 1401; they continued intermittently throughout the reign.

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  • Entering the church in 1838, he was curate at Wylye in Wiltshire, and for a short time at Steeple Claydon in Buckinghamshire, becoming later rector of Down Hatherley in Gloucestershire, and finally (1855) vicar of Rowington in Warwickshire, and rural dean.

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  • By the 64th canon it is enacted that " every parson, vicar or curate, shall in his several charge declare to the people every Sunday at the time appointed in the communion-book [which is, after the Nicene creed has been repeated] whether there be any holy-days or fast-days the week following."

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  • But already, at the end of 1099 Dagobert, archbishop of Pisa, had been substituted as patriarch for Arnulf (who had been acting as vicar) by the influence of Bohemund; and Dagobert, whose vassal Godfrey had at once piously acknowledged himself, seems to have forced him to an agreement in April Too, by which he promised Jerusalem and Jaffa to the patriarch, in case he should acquire in their place Cairo or some other town, or should die without issue.

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  • The sovereign may be regarded, as in the case of the Russian emperor or of the English kings from the Reformation to the Revolution, as the vicar of God in all causes spiritual as well as temporal within his realm.

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  • The " Community of St John the Baptist " at Clewer, near Windsor, arose in 1849 through the efforts of Mrs Tennant and the vicar, afterwards warden of the society, the Rev. T.

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  • See also Rector; Vicar; Benefice; and Tithes.

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  • " There is," says the document, " no archbishop, ne bishop, abbot, ne prior, parson, ne vicar, ne any other person of the church, high or low, great or small, English or Irish, that useth to preach the word of God, saving the poor friars beggars.

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  • A son of the Church, a protector of bishops, a president of councils, a collector of relics, devoted to Boniface (whom he invited, as papal legate, to reform the clergy of Austrasia), he astutely accepted the new claims of the vicar of St Peter to the headship of the Church, perceiving the value of an alliance with this rising power.

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  • But three years after the arrival of Frontenac a former vicar apostolic, Francois Xavier de Laval de Montmorenci, returned to Quebec as bishop, with a jurisdiction over the whole of Canada.

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  • JOHN LIGHTFOOT (1602-1675), English divine and rabbinical scholar, was the son of Thomas Lightfoot, vicar of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, and was born at Stoke-upon-Trent on the 29th of March 1602.

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  • As a compensation for territory thus withdrawn the Danish archbishop of Lund was made legate and perpetual vicar and given the title of primate of Denmark and Sweden.

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  • This finer work was the outcome of his friendship with Lady Austen, a widow who, on a visit to her sister, the wife of the vicar of the neighbouring village of Clifton, made the acquaintance of Cowper and Mrs Unwin.

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  • Charles sought the alliance of his uncle, the emperor Charles IV., to whom he did homage at Metz as dauphin of the Viennois, and he was also made imperial vicar of Dauphine, thus acknowledging the imperial jurisdiction.

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  • The youngest, Henry, was vicar of Fyfield, near Andover.

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  • In the same year he was appointed vicar of St Mary's, to which the chapelry of Littlemore was attached, and Pusey was made regius professor of Hebrew.

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  • Frederick left several illegitimate children: Enzio has already been referred to; Frederick, who was made the imperial vicar in Tuscany; and Manfred, his son by the beloved Bianca Lancia or Lanzia, who was legitimatized just before his father's death,and was appointed by his will prince of Tarento and regent of Sicily.

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  • A rector is incumbent of a benefice never held under a monastery, and he receives all the tithes; a vicar (i.e.

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  • It follows that, rectories being usually richer than vicarages, the style of "rector" is in England slightly more dignified than that of "vicar."

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  • In 1885 he became vicar of St Nicolas, Strassburg, and in 1889, declining an offer of preferment which was conditional on his becoming a German subject, he was expelled.

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  • The rector, vicar or incumbent is a corporation-sole, in whom is vested the freehold of the church and churchyard, subject to the parishioners' rights of user; their rights of burial have been enlarged by various acts.

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  • According to Bishop Burnet he was cast out by the Presbyterians; but whether this be so or not, he soon made his way to England and became vicar of Godmersham, Kent, from which living he was expelled by the Act of Uniformity in 1662.

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  • the conducting of the ordinary church services, except when he has a vicar, as in the old cathedral foundations (see Cathedral).

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  • Carlo (1364-1429) was energetic, valiant and a friend of the popes, who named him vicar of the church in Romagna.

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  • Am I morally obliged to kill him myself or may I arrange for our vicar to do it?

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  • Together they search for a missing vicar - uncovering an unholy alliance.

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  • Another aspect of rural life that the writers have managed to convey with considerable aplomb is the role of the vicar.

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  • vicar apostolic: A titular bishop who rules a vicariate apostolic or missionary district as delegate of the papacy.

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  • The trouble with the vicar parody is that the most militant atheists in Britain don't believe vicars are evil.

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  • There is a moat and an impressive aisled barn The unwieldy vicarage of 1882, built by its vicar, once had vast grounds.

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  • In a vacancy in a rectorial benefice the Chairman shall be a Vicar of that benefice designated by the Area Dean.

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  • Inside can be found many wood carvings by a Canon Wilson, a vicar there for 40 years.

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  • I n brief, the groom is responsible for: Booking the services of registrar, vicar or other celebrant.

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  • Then usually at the end of the service you will be required to sign the register and receive your marriage certificate from the Vicar.

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  • commemoration of the death of late Vicar, the Rev. J.F.

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  • rising crescendo Milligan: (vicar) It started in Brighton - 1898 - the year of the great Edison Bell.

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  • In 1830 he was appointed curate in charge at Audley, vicar Hicken being in poor health.

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  • And one young man has seen the vicar's daughter in the cemetary at midnight, dancing with the devil.

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  • Pastoral service is carried out by 156 bishops including 130 diocesan and 26 vicar bishops; 12 bishops are retired.

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  • One of them was wearing a vicar's dog collar, and another was wearing a lawyer's wig.

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  • erected by parishioners as a token of universal respect and affection for their late Vicar.

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  • A local vicar will also come in to perform an exorcism.

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  • Tho Eddie has translated the Vicar's parable of the talents plans as a free fiver for going to church!

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  • During the years of World War 1 the former headmaster of Henry VIII Grammar School was Vicar.

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  • incumbency of the first resident vicar.

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  • Vicar If I might just interject Pressing I fail to see what argument you will use.

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  • ministry of evangelism, through the former vicar, Canon John Collins.

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  • Of this sum only £ 50 now remains, the other moiety having been distributed by a former vicar.

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  • Wordsworth even obfuscates the origin of the ' joy ' that the Vicar has taken with him to Heaven.

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  • papists known to the vicar and churchwardens?

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  • I was reminded of a young vicar burying an elderly parishioner whom he had never actually met.

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  • did the parson or vicar come into his benefice through simony?

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  • patronage of the vicar.

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  • In 1577, the year that prophesyings were suppressed by the Privy Council, the strongly Puritan William Jennings was appointed vicar.

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  • Mr Rosedale was the last vicar to be elected by the ratepayers by means of an election.

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  • Charles received the Vicar of Christ with all due reverence.

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  • A slightly saucy card... and from a vicar, too!

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  • Ralph and ' laud recovered seisin of the premises but were " in mercy " for a false claim against the Vicar.

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  • Taylor is Vicar, into the Hands of certain Sequestrators named in the said sequestration, for the Use of Mr. Geo.

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  • sittings for 160 persons; the vicar of Headington officiates.

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  • third of the population died, including the vicar.

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  • The greater tithes, or part payment in kind, were given to the vicar by the priest who served the parish.

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  • Its rector was the Archdeacon of St Andrews who appointed a vicar to do the work of a parish priest.

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  • More About The BAP Friday, July 21st, 2006 " How do I go about becoming a vicar?

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  • UFOs are the Devil's messengers, says vicar, Sunday People, 23 April 1978 18.

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  • Mrs. xxxxxxxx did in fact tell the vicar of her local Methodist church of which she is a member.

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  • Donald left £ 500 to the poor of Aspatria and Brayton, the interest to be distributed by the vicar and churchwardens.

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  • The Rev Peter Allen, a retired vicar, joined the team in the snowy weather in January this year.

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  • Whilst in Spain, I worked on a new film about an eccentric vicar.

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  • Henry Venn was the great evangelical vicar of Huddersfield in the late 18th century.

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  • Also in the nave is a memorial to a former vicar.

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  • A local vicar provides free use of a garage for book storage.

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  • For example, a parish vicar in Bradford has enabled a major regeneration scheme to provide neighborhood facilities.

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  • Despite a number of noteworthy past inhabitants, the most famous was Harold Davidson, the village vicar in the 1930s.

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  • vicar's wife arrived to pay her respects.

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  • vicar's daughter.

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  • vicar's son in trouble.

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  • vicar of two parishes in Bristol.

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  • vicar of a small church in the country 150 years ago.

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  • It was a perpetual vicarage with the appointment of the vicar being in the hands of Dunkeld.

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  • vicarage of the annual value of £ 327, in the patronage of the vicar of St. James ' .

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  • The local vicar is ferried by helicopter to conduct Easter Sunday services in surrounding villages.

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  • A papal bull having also been obtained, on the 28th of August 1425, the archbishop, in the course of a visitation of Lincoln diocese, executed his letters patent founding the college, dedicating it to the Virgin, St Thomas Becket and St Edward the Confessor, and handed over the buildings to its members, the vicar of Higham Ferrers being made the first master or warden.

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  • He was ordained in 1818, and was appointed vicar of Cowley, Oxford, in 1823.

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  • Unlike the advocate, however, the vice-dominus was at the outset an ecclesiastic, who acted as the bishop's lieutenant (locum tenens) or vicar.

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  • cura, &c. In a more limited sense it is applied in the Church of England to the incumbent of a parish who has no endowment of tithes, as distinguished from a perpetual vicar, who has an endowment of small tithes, which are for that reason sometimes styled vicarial tithes.

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  • The term "curate" in the present day is almost exclusively used to signify a clergyman who is assistant to a rector or vicar, by whom he is employed and paid; and a clerk in deacon's orders is competent to be licensed by a bishop to the office of such assistant curate.

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  • The consequence of this misuse of the term "curate" was that the title of "perpetual curate" fell into desuetude in the Anglican Church, and an act of parliament (1868) was passed to authorize perpetual curates to style themselves vicars (see Vicar).

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  • made him cardinal (1596) and later vicar in Rome and inquisitor.

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  • Frederick enlisted his Saracen troops at Nocera and Luceria, and appointed the terrible Ezzelino da Romano his vicar in.

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  • The crimes of his vicar Ezzelino, who laid whole provinces waste and murdered men by thousands in his Paduan prisons, increased the horror with which he was regarded.

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  • In 1509 he was ordained priest and became a vicar in the collegiate Marienkirche at Treptow; in 1517 he was appointed lecturer on the Bible and Church Fathers at the abbey school at Belbuck.

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  • in 1530, was ordained priest, and succeeded his uncle John Barry as vicar of Dundee; but before he came into actual possession he also was suspected of heresy, and was compelled to flee to France and Germany.

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  • He appears to have been actual vicar of Dundee in 1552.

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  • He was now one of the most powerful sovereigns of Europe, for besides ruling over Provence and Anjou and the kingdom of the Two Sicilies, he was imperial vicar of Tuscany, lord of many cities of Lombardy and Piedmont, and as the pope's favourite practically arbiter of the papal states, especially during the interregnum between the death of Clement IV.

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  • In 1540 Sir John Horsey, who had bought the manor and church at the Dissolution, sold the abbey to the vicar and parishioners.

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  • His father, Jacob Stephen Hawker, was at that time a doctor, but afterwards curate and vicar of Stratton, Cornwall.

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  • He became vicar of Morwenstow, a village on the north Cornish coast, in 1834.

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  • See The Vicar of Morwenstow (1875; later and corrected editions, 1876 and 1886), by the Rev. S.

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  • The church is cruciform and the altar stands beneath the eastern lantern arch, a fine rood screen separating off the choir, which was devoted to monastic use, while the nave was kept for the parishioners, in consequence of a dispute between the vicar and the monastery in 1499.

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  • After holding the living of Wethersfield in Essex he became vicar of Finchingfield in the same county, and in 1636 was reported for " want of conformity."

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  • Sayce, vicar of Caldicot.

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  • On the 30th of June 1532 the council of two hundred had ordained that in every church and cloister of the city "the pure Gospel" should be preached; against this order the bishop's vicar led the opposition.

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  • Summoned before the bishop's vicar, his trial was a scene of insult and clamour, ending in his being violently thrust from the court and bidden to leave the city within three hours.

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  • In 1786 he was appointed vicar of Kingston-on-Thames, and in 1788 rector of Bemerton, Wiltshire.

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  • 1 In 1851 the mayor of the English Boston sent over a copy of that city's seals, framed in oak from St Botolph's church, of which John Cotton, the famous Boston divine (he came over in 1633) had been vicar.

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  • In 1872 he became vicar of St Jude's, Commercial Street, Whitechapel, and in the next year married Henrietta Octavia Rowland, who had been a co-worker with Miss Octavia Hill and was no less ardent a philanthropist than her husband.

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  • Of their own will they devoted themselves to God, and all busied themselves in obeying their rector or his vicar....

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  • In the meeting of the crusaders on the 22nd of July, some few voices were raised in support of the view that a "spiritual vicar" should first be chosen in the place of the late patriarch of Jerusalem (who had just died in Cyprus), before the election of any lay ruler was taken in hand.

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  • The refusal of Raymund meant the choice of Godfrey of Bouillon, who had, as we have seen, become prominent since the siege of Arca; and Godfrey accordingly became - not king, but "advocate of the Holy Sepulchre," while a few days afterwards Arnulf, the chaplain of Robert of Normandy, and one of the sceptics in the matter of the Holy Lance, became "vicar" of the vacant patriarchate.

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  • 3 But a party in Jerusalem, headed by the late "vicar" Arnulf, opposed itself to the hierarchical pretensions of Dagobert and the Norman influence by which they were backed; and this party, representing the Lotharingian laity, carried the day.

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  • JOHN GAUDEN (1605-1662), English bishop and writer, reputed author of the Eikon Basilike, was born in 1605 at Mayland, Essex, where his father was vicar of the parish.

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  • He seems to have remained at Oxford until 1630, when he became vicar of Chippenham.

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  • John Fletcher, the vicar of Madeley, to whom Wesley had turned as a possible successor, died in 1785.

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  • This was enough to make him unpopular with many of the Welsh clergy, and being denied the privilege of preaching for nothing at two churches, he helped his old Oxford friend John Mayor, now vicar of Shawbury, Shropshire, from October until January 11th, 1784.

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  • 1618), Puritan author, and of William Erbury, sometime vicar of St Mary's in the town, who, with his curate, Walter Cradock,were among the founders of Welsh nonconformity.

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  • Marsilius, appointed imperial vicar, abused his power to persecute the clergy who had remained faithful to John XXII.

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  • In 1825 he was ordained priest, and was appointed vicar of the Madeleine at Paris.

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  • CHARLES LUTWIDGE DODGSON (LEWIS CARROLL] (1832-1898), English mathematician and author, son of the Rev. Charles Dodgson, vicar of Daresbury, Cheshire, was born in that village on the 27th of January 1832.

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  • In 1784 he became vicar of Epsom in Surrey, where he continued until his death on the 27th of April 1804, becoming known as one of the most eloquent preachers of his day.

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  • After the Restoration he was successively rector of Wimbush, Essex, vicar of Frome Selwood, Somersetshire, rector of Streat and Walton.

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  • This time they were actively aided by Charles IV., who, having returned from Rome, sent his militia, commanded by the imperial vicar Malatesta da Rimini, to attack the public palace.

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  • Once he had defended the monastic orders, advocating their reform and not their suppression, supported the rural clergy and idealized the village priest in his Parocho da Aldeia, after the manner of Goldsmith in the Vicar of Wakefield.

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  • The medicinal properties of the sulphur water were discovered, or perhaps rediscovered, in 1732 by a famous Welsh writer, the Rev. Theophilus Evans, then vicar of Llangammarch (to which living Llanwrtyd was a chapelry till 1871).

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  • When elected by his native department to the Convention in 1792 he was acting as vicar to his uncle Bernard Font (1 7 23-1800), the constitutional bishop of Pamiers.

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  • SAMUEL HOOD HOOD, VISCOUNT (1724-1816), British admiral, was the son of Samuel Hood, vicar of Butleigh in Somerset, and prebendary of Wells.

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  • The Roman Catholic chaplains are classed as parish priests, curates and assistants, and are subject to an army Vicar Apostolic. In war, at an army headquarters there are a "field-rabbi," a "military imam," an evangelical minister, as well as the Roman Catholic hierarchy.

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  • The tumults against the Paterine heretics (1244-1245), among whom were many Ghibelline nobles favoured by the podestd Pace di Pesamigola, indicate a successful Guelphic reaction; but Frederick II., having defeated his enemies both in Lombardy and in the Two Sicilies, appointed his natural son, Frederick of Antioch, imperial vicar in Tuscany, who, when civil war broke out, entered the city with 1600 German knights.

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  • Rudolph of Habsburg, elected king of the Romans in 1273, having come to terms with Pope Nicholas III., Charles was obliged in 1278 to give up his title of imperial vicar in Tuscany, which he had held during the interregnum following on the death of Frederick II.

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  • The Pisans, fearing the vengeance of the Guelphs now that Henry was dead, had accepted the lordship of Uguccione della Fagginola, imperial vicar in Genoa.

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  • FRANCOIS CHABOT (1757-1794), French revolutionist, had been a Franciscan friar before the Revolution, and after the civil constitution of the clergy continued to act as "constitutional" priest, becoming grand vicar of Henri Gregoire, bishop of Blois.

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  • found little difficulty in establishing his vicar Ezzelino da Romano in Padua and the neighbouring cities, where he practised frightful cruelties on the inhabitants.

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  • At Christmas 1815 he was sent to the grammar school at Louth, his mother having kept up a connexion with this typical Lincolnshire borough, of which her father, the Rev. Stephen Fytche, had been vicar.

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  • The vicar of the parish gave him instruction and procured his entrance in 1563 as an exhibitioner to Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • In Kerk Street, on the outskirts of central Johannesburg, is the Roman Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception, the headquarters of the vicar apostolic of the Transvaal.

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  • In 1842 he published a treatise on The Unity of the Church, and his reputation as an eloquent and earnest preacher being by this time considerable, he was in the same year appointed select preacher by his university, thus being called upon to fill from time to time the pulpit which Newman, as vicar of St Mary's, was just ceasing to occupy.

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  • Thomas, who reigned until 1222, was a Ghibelline in politics and greatly increased the importance of Savoy, for he was created Imperial Vicar and acquired important extensions of territory in the Bugey, Vaud and Romont to the west of the Alps, and Carignano, Pinerolo, Moncalieri and Vigone to the east; he also exercised sway over Geneva, Albenga, Savona and Saluzzo.

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  • articles, usually called the Creed of Pius IV., which reaffirmed the Nicene Creed, and dealt with the preservation of the apostolic and ecclesiastical traditions, the interpretation of the Holy Scriptures " according to the sense which our Holy Mother Church has held," the seven sacraments, the offering of the mass, transubstantiation, purgatory, the veneration of saints, relics, images, the efficacy of indulgences, the supremacy of the Roman Church and of the bishop of Rome as vicar of Christ.

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  • See also ADVOWSON; GLEBE; INCUMBENT; VICAR; also Phillimore, Eccles.

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  • He became vicar in 1858 of Broadchalke with Bowerchalke and Alvedistone, Wiltshire.

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  • His father, Captain Peter Garrick, who had married Arabella Clough, the daughter of a vicar choral of Lichfield cathedral, was on a recruiting expedition when his famous third son was born at Hereford on the 19th of February 1717.

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  • But it is not necessary to stand in such fear of the thunder of Christ's vicar, but rather to fear Christ Himself, for it is the Florentine's business, not Christ's, that is at issue."

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  • After a residence in the north as chaplain to Henry Hastings, earl of Huntingdon, President of the North, he was made vicar of St Giles's, Cripplegate, in 1588, and there delivered his striking sermons on the temptation in the wilderness and the Lord's prayer.

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  • In 1784 the vicar of Tintagel, as mayor and only qualified elector, enjoyed the probably unique privilege of returning two members to the House of Commons.

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  • fled to France, had been left behind as his vicar in Italy.

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  • FREDERICK WILLIAM FABER (1814-1863), British hymn writer and theologian, was born on the 28th of June 1814 at Calverley, Yorkshire, of which place his grandfather, Thomas Faber, was vicar.

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  • He was vicar of Huddersfield from 1759 to 1771, when he exchanged to the living of Yelling,.

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  • The Roman Catholics number 2 30% of the whites, the head of their church in the province being a vicar apostolic. At the head of the Anglican community, which is in full communion with the Church of England, is the bishop of Bloemfontein, whose diocese, founded in 1863, includes not only the Orange Free State, but Basutoland, Griqualand West and British Bechuanaland.

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  • The other districts are managed by an apostolic vicar at Dresden, under the direction of the minister of public worship. Two nunneries in Lusatia are the only conventual establishments in Saxony, and no others may be founded.

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  • She died in November 1687, and was buried on the 17th, according to her own request, in the church of St Martin-in-the-Fields, her funeral sermon being preached by the vicar, Thomas Tenison, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, who said "much to her praise."

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  • In 1365 the count obtained from the emperor the office of imperial vicar over Geneva, but the next bishop William of Marcossay (1366-1377: he began the construction of a new wall round the.

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  • Early in 1873 the pope named him "vicar apostolic of Geneva," but he was expelled a few weeks later from Switzerland, not returning till 1883, when he became bishop of Lausanne, being made cardinal in 1890.

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  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.

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  • An impressive announcement of the Easter Communion Service, made by the Rev. Pryce Davies, vicar of Talgarth, on the 30.th of March 1735, was the means of awakening Howell Harris (1714-1773) of Trevecca, and he immediately began to hold services in his own house.

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  • gave him the distinguished post of cardinal vicar.

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  • The first prior acted as vicar in all matters in the absence of the abbot, and was generally charged with the details of the discipline of the monastery.

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  • Educated at Repton, whence he proceeded to Aberdeen University, he became in 1817 vicar of Little Horwood, Buckinghamshire, and devoted his spare time to literature and particularly to the study of Anglo-Saxon.

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  • After the death of the first general there was an interregnum of two years, with Laynez as vicar.

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  • The general's supremacy received a shock when the eleventh general congregation appointed Oliva as vicar, with the right of succession and powers that practically superseded those of the general Goswin Nickel, whose infirmities, it is said, did not permit him to govern with the necessary application and vigour; and an attempt was made to depose Tirso Gonzalez, the thirteenth general, whose views on probabilism diverged from those favoured by the rest of the Jesuits.

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  • A royal commission, appointed by the duc de Choiseul to examine the constitutions, convoked a private assembly of fifty-one archbishops and bishops under the presidency of Cardinal de Luynes, all of whom except six voted that the unlimited authority of the general was incompatible with the laws of France, and that the appointment of a resident vicar, subject to those laws, was the only solution of the question fair on all sides.

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  • granted them liberty to reconstitute themselves in north Russia, and permitted Kareu, then vicar, to exercise full authority as general.

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  • The second period of Oecolampadius's life opens with his return to Basel in November 1522, as vicar of St Martin's and (in 1523) reader of the Holy Scripture at the university.

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  • Humphry (1815-1886), vicar of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London; the Rev. Benjamin Hall Kennedy, canon of Ely; William Lee (1815-1883), archdeacon of Dublin, and professor of ecclesiastical history in the university; J.

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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.

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  • He was in turn vicar at Ware, Hertfordshire (1627-1633), and at Marston St Lawrence, Northamptonshire (1633-1637).

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  • It states essentially the Roman doctrine of purgatory, and asserts the world-wide primacy of the pope as the "true vicar of Christ and the head of the whole Church, the Father and teacher of all Christians"; but, to satisfy the Greeks, inconsistently adds that all the rights and privileges of the Oriental patriarchs are to be maintained unimpaired.

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  • As pope he established peace between the republics of Lucca and Pisa, and confirmed Charles of Anjou in his office of imperial vicar of Tuscany.

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  • was appointed papal vicar in Romagna to resist the imperialists; thenceforth he became the recognized leader of the Guelphs or papal faction in Italy and took part in all the wars against the Ghibellines.

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  • created him papal vicar in Italy against the emperor Louis the Bavarian.

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  • As vicar of St Andrewthe-Great, Cambridge, he was conspicuous for his devoted attention to the sufferers from the plague.

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  • in 1552, and was made vicar of Sunningwell, and public orator of the university, in which capacity he had to compose a congratulatory epistle to Mary on her accession.

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  • He was ordained and became vicar of Fawsley in 1637, but soon resigned and became chaplain successively to Lord Saye and Sele, Lord Berkeley, and Prince Charles Louis, nephew of Charles I.

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  • In 1661 he was preacher at Gray's Inn, and in 1662 vicar of St Lawrence Jewry, London.

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  • He became vicar of Polebrook, Northamptonshire, in 1666, prebendary of Exeter in 1667, and in the following year prebendary of St Paul's and bishop of Chester.

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  • He early became vicar of Boughton Malherbe and of Sutton Valence, and later of Ivychurch, Kent; but, desiring a more worldly career, he entered the service of Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of London.

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  • He was a younger brother of William Alleine, the saintly vicar of Blandford.

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  • The convention, started in a private manner by Canon Harford-Battersby, then vicar of Keswick, and Mr Robert Wilson in 1874, met first in 1875, and rapidly grew after the first few years, both in numbers and influence, in spite of attacks on the alleged "perfectionism" of some of its leaders and on the novelty of its methods.

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  • The assiduity with which Huc devoted himself to the study of the dialects and customs of the Tatars, for whom at the cost of much labour he translated various religious works, was an admirable preparation for undertaking in 1844, at the instigation of the vicar apostolic of Mongolia, an expedition whose object was to dissipate the obscurity which hung over the country and habits of the Tibetans.

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  • as successor of St Peter and Vicar of Christ, over the Catholic Church, and as sovereign of the former papal states.

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  • The Fathers of the Church had repeated times without number that the priesthood stands above even the supreme secular authority; the Bible was full of stories most aptly illustrating this theory; nobody questioned that, within the Church, the pope was the Vicar of Christ, and that, as such, his powers were unlimited; as proof positive could be cited councils and decretals - whether authentic or spurious; at any rate all authorized by long usage and taken as received authorities.

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  • The new pope's motto, it is said, was " to establish all things in Christ " (instaurare omnia in Christo); and since, ex hypothesi, he himself was Christ's vicar on earth, the working out of this principle meant in effect the extension and consolidation of the papal authority and, as far as possible, an end to the compromises by means of which the papacy had sought to make friends of the Mammon of unrighteousness.

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  • Through this Congregation the pope, as bishop of Rome, made the inspection of his diocese; it is for this reason that he was president of this commission, the most important member of which was the cardinal vicar.

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  • He entered Queen's College, Cambridge, in 1644, and after taking orders in 1651 became successively chaplain to Sir Walter St John and vicar of Battersea, Surrey.

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  • Napoleone obtained the title of imperial vicar from Rudolph of Hapsburg.

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  • William Bedwell, the Arabic scholar, was vicar of Tottenham, and published in 1632 a Briefe Description of the Towne of Tottenham, in which he printed for the first time the burlesque poem, the Turnament of Tottenham.

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  • Officers and sisters are paid a limited sum for their services either by the vicar or by voluntary local contributions.

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  • Consequently where the right of patronage (the right of the patron to present to the bishop the person whom he has nominated to become rector or vicar of the parish to the benefice of which he claims the right of advowson) remains attached to the manor, it is called an advowson appendant, and passes with the estate by inheritance The distinction between nomination to a living and presentation is to be noted.

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  • (See also BENEFICE; GLEBE; INCUMBENT; VICAR.) Authorities.

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  • In the 17th century the vicarage of Llandingat was held by the celebrated Welsh poet and preacher, Rhys Prichard, commonly called "the vicar of Llandovery" (d.

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  • The assistance of a vicar enabled him to escape from the growing administrative cares and devote himself solely to asceticism, apparently the only field of human activity in which he excelled.

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  • He was fellow and dean of divinity at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1893 to 1896, and at the same time vicar of the university church of St.

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  • In 1896 he became vicar of Portsea, when his success in administering a large working-class parish led in 1901 to his nomination as bishop suffragan of Stepney in the East End of London.

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  • The tower is without bells, and the tradition that a ship bearing a peal hither was wrecked within sight of the harbour, and that the lost bells may still be heard to toll beneath the waves, has been made famous by a ballad of the Cornish poet Robert Stephen Hawker, vicar of Moorwinstow.

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  • This state of matters was so clearly proved that an arrangement was agreed to on the part of the vicar (Dance), by which he allowed £60 a year, out of his income X200, to a preacher who should be chosen by certain trustees.

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  • Les Trois Verites ran through several editions, and obtained for its author the favour of the bishop of Cahors, who appointed him grand vicar and theological canon.

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  • forest lands, belong to the Crown, although by canon law they were to be disposed of by the bishop; but by custom a parson or vicar might be entitled to them.

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  • They were not payable of the following, except by custom: things of the substance of the earth, such as coals, minerals, turf and the like; things ferae naturae, such as fish, deer and the like; things tame, such as fowls, hounds or fish kept for pleasure or curiosity; barren land, until it is converted into arable or meadow land, and has been so for seven years; forest land, if in the hands of the king or his lessee, unless disafforested; a park which is disparked; or glebe land in the hands of the parson or vicar, which was mutually exempted from payment by the one to the other, but not if in the hands of the vicar's lessee.

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  • Except, however, where made under parliamentary authority, no composition for tithes, although made between the landowner and the parson or vicar with the consent of the patron and ordinary, bound a succeeding incumbent, the statute 13 Eliz.

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  • c. so prohibiting any parson or vicar from making any conveyance of (inter alia) tithes, being parcel of the possessions of their churches, to any persons, except leases for twenty-one years or three lives.

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  • He was ordained in 1762 and became vicar of Harpford with Fenn-Ottery, Devonshire, in 1766.

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  • His father, vicar of Charlton and Westport, an illiterate and choleric man, quarrelled, it is said, with a brother clergyman at the church door, and was forced to decamp, leaving his three children to the care of an elder brother Francis, a flourishing glover at Malmesbury.

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  • At last, after a vast amount of tedious and useless discussion, it was agreed that the parliament should appoint an imperial vicar (Reichsverweser) who sh~iuld carry on the government by means of a ministry selected by himself; and on the motion of Heinrich von Gagern the archduke John of Austria was chosen by a large majority for the office.

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  • For some time Austria offered no counter scheme, but she ultimately proposed that there should be a directory of seven princes, the chief place being held alternately by a Prussian and an Austrian imperial vicar.

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  • It was now ruled by a corrector, afterwards by a consular under the authority of the vicar of the Roman city (Not.

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  • in 1059, and as papal vicar in south Italy conducted frequent negotiations between the Normans and the pope.

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  • As vicar of the Holy See he convened a synod at Capua on the 7th of March 1087, resumed the papal insignia on the 21st of March, and received tardy consecration at Rome on the 9th of May.

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  • Falling ill at the synod, Vicar returned to Monte Cassino, where he died on the 16th of September 1087.

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  • He was appoined vicar of Gateshead in 1808, prebendary of Durham in 1809, and vicar of St Margaret, Durham, in 1810.

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  • He hurried back to Rome upon the accession of Pius V., who made him apostolic vicar of his order, and, later (1570), cardinal.

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  • To safeguard the authority of the Holy See over the bishops of Illyricum, Siricius entrusted his powers to the bishop of Thessalonica, who was henceforth the vicar of the pope in those provinces.

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  • JOHN HENLEY (1692-1759), English clergyman, commonly known as "Orator Henley," was born on the 3rd of August 1692 at Melton-Mowbray, where his father was vicar.

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  • VICAR (Lat.

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  • In the early middle ages the term was applied to representatives of a count administering justice for him in the country or small towns and dealing with unimportant cases, levying taxes, &c. Monasteries and religious houses often employed a vicar to answer to their feudal lords for those of their lands which did not pass into mortmain.

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  • The title of " vicar of Jesus Christ," borne by the popes, was introduced as their special designation during the 8th century, in place of the older style of " vicar of St Peter " (or vicarius principis apostolorum).

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  • In the early Church other bishops commonly described themselves as vicars of Christ (Du Cange gives an example as late as the 9th century from the capitularies of Charles the Bald); but there is no proof in their case, or indeed in that of " vicar of St Peter " given to the popes, that it was part of their formal style.

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  • The assumption of the style " vicar of Christ " by the popes coincided with a tendency on the part of the Roman chancery to insist on placing the pontiff's name before that of emperors and kings and to refuse to other bishops the right to address him as " brother " (Mas Latrie, s.

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  • It was not till the 13th century that the alternative style " vicar of St Peter " was definitively forbidden, this prohibition thus coinciding with the extreme claims of the pope to rule the world as the immediate " vicar of God " (see INNOCENT III.).

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  • A neighbouring bishop was sometimes appointed by the pope vicar of a church which happened to be without a pastor.

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  • A special vicar was appointed by the pope to superintend the spiritual affairs of Rome and its suburbs, to visit its churches, monasteries, &c., and to correct abuses.

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  • In the middle ages there was not a very clear distinction drawn between the vicar and the official of the bishop. When the voluntary and contentious jurisdiction came to be distinguished, the former fell generally to the vicars, the latter to the officials.

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  • Such a vicar possesses an ordinary and not a delegated jurisdiction, which he exercises like the bishop. He cannot, however, exercise functions which concern the episcopal order, or confer benefices without express and particular commission.

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  • He had amassed some wealth, which on his return to Rome he so employed among the poor as to secure for himself great popularity; and, when Vigilius was summoned to Byzantium in 544, Pelagius, now archdeacon, was left behind as his vicar, and by his tact in dealing with Totila, the Gothic invader, saved the citizens from murder and outrage.

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  • Lux Mundi and the Bampton lectures led to a situation of some tension which was relieved when in 1893 Dr Gore resigned his principalship and became vicar of Radley, a small parish near Oxford.

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  • he is not a mere vicar of the pope.

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  • From 1360, when Galeazzo was appointed imperial vicar by Charles IV., Pavia became practically a possession of the Visconti family and in due course formed part of the duchy of Milan.

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  • Of all his singular opinions the best known is his advocacy of clerical monogamy, immortalized in the Vicar of Wakefield.

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  • As such, the pope is regarded as " vicar of Christ, head of the bishops, and supreme governor of the whole Catholic Church, of whom the whole world is the territory or diocese."

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  • Such as there are are under the authority of a vicar apostolic residing at Keren.

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  • Descended from a family which had attained some legal eminence in the time of the Commonwealth, John Keble, the father of the poet, was vicar of Coln St Aldwyn, but lived at Fairford, about 3 m.

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  • ' Circa 1554-1616; educated at Cambridge; ordained priest 1581; vicar of Ridge, Herts, 1581; rector of Hinton St George, Somerset, 1587; eventually condemned to death at the Taunton Assizes (7th August 1615).

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  • The honour of presenting his countrymen with a complete Welsh version of the Bible was reserved for William Morgan (c. 1547-1604), vicar of Llanrhayader, in Denbighshire, and afterwards bishop successively of Llandaff and of St Asaph.

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  • 1579-1644), the famous vicar of Llandovery, 1 Carmarthenshire, and William Wroth (d.

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  • Of these two Puritan divines, Vicar Prichard, who was essentially orthodox in his behaviour, forms an interesting connecting link between the learned Elizabethan translators of the Bible and the great revivalists of the 18th century, and his moral rhymes in the vernacular, collected and printed after his death under the title of The Welshman's Candle (Canwyll y Cymry), still retain some degree of popularity amongst his countrymen.

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  • During the years prior to the Great Rebellion, however, in spite of the preaching and writings of Vicar Prichard, Wroth and others, the vast mass of Welshmen of all classes remained friendly to the High Church policy of Laud and staunch supporters of the king's prerogative.

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  • So striking was the devotion shown throughout the Principality to the king, who fought his last disastrous campaign in the friendly counties of Wales and the Marches, that on the final victory of the parliament there was passed within a month of Charles's execution 1 Sometimes known as vicar of Llandingat, his church being in that parish.

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  • Amongst these Stephen Hughes of Carmarthen (1623-1688), a devoted follower of Vicar Prichard and an editor of his works, was ejected from the living of Mydrim in Carmarthenshire, whereby the valuable services of this eminent divine were lost to the Church and gained by the Nonconformists, who had increased considerably in numbers since the Civil Wars.

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  • From 1848 to 1861 he was vicar of Horningsea, near Cambridge, and from 1866 to his death on the 12th of January 1889, vicar of Cockfield in Suffolk.

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  • Having returned to England some time after Edmund's death in 1240 he became vicar of Deal and chancellor of Canterbury for the second time.

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  • 1917), afterwards vicar of Sibsey, Lincs., but obtained a separation from her husband in 1873.

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  • In 1856 he became vicar of Shoreham, in 1869 canon of Worcester, and in 1871 regius professor of divinity at Oxford.

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  • He was known for his great scholarship, simplicity of character, and affectionate interest in the pupils of the grammar school, of which he was appointed master a few months before becoming vicar of the parish (1760), reigning in both capacities till his death.

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  • On the case being appealed to the Privy Council, this particular indictment was dismissed on the ground that the vicar, not the bishop, was responsible for the presence of the lights, the general question of the legality of altar lights being discreetly left open.

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  • Having been ordained to the priesthood, he for some time acted as vicar of Archbishop Celsus or Ceallach of Armagh, and carried out many reforms tending to increase conformity with the usage of the Church of Rome.

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  • For some months he seems to have assisted the vicar of Cranbrook, Kent, but it is doubtful whether he received ordination.

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  • In 1831 he was appointed vicar at Kirchenlarnitz, where his fervent evangelical preaching attracted large congregations and puzzled the ecclesiastical authorities.

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  • He returned to England in the following year as vicar of St Saviour's, Poplar, and retained that living until his death.

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  • He studied law at Oxford, but afterwards he took holy orders, and in 1609 became vicar of St Giles, Oxford, a living which he retained until he became rector of Somerton, Oxfordshire, in 1615.

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  • and governed by his vicar, Lucca managed, at first as a demo ' Some confusion has arisen owing to the similarity of the names Luca and Luna; the theory of E.

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  • 1784), rector of Winwick, and John Clowes (1743-1831), vicar of St John's, Manchester.

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  • He returned to his native city in 1672 to become professor of anatomy, but, having become a Roman Catholic, he found it expedient to return to Florence, and was ultimately made apostolic vicar of Lower Saxony.

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  • In 1856 he became master of King Edward's grammar school at Lichfield, in 1858 warden and professor of classical literature and geology in Queen's College, Birmingham, in 1862 rector of Mellis, in Suffolk, and in 1867 vicar of St John's, Bethnal Green, London.

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  • He filled the offices of apostolic vicar of Avignon, legate at the council of Trent, nuncio to Venice, and president of the Inquisition.

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  • Entering the ministry in 1853, he was made vicar at Durlach soon afterwards, and became a licentiate in the theological faculty at Heidelberg.

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  • Dante, who had become embittered against Boniface while on a political mission in Rome, calls him the "Prince of the new Pharisees" (Inferno, 27, 85), but laments that "in his Vicar Christ was made a captive," and was "mocked a second time" (Purgatory, 20, 87 f.).

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  • A serious conflict arose between Hincmar on the one side and Charles and the pope on the other in 876, when Pope John VIII., at the king's request, entrusted Ansegisus, archbishop of Sens, with the primacy of the Gauls and of Germany, and created him vicar apostolic. In Hincmar's eyes this was an encroachment on the jurisdiction of the archbishops, and it was against this primacy that he directed his treatise De jure metropolitanorum.

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  • The patriarch receives confirmation from Rome, and the political representation of the Maronites at Constantinople is in the hands of the vicar apostolic. Rome has incorporated most of the Maronite saints in her calendar, while refusing (despite their apologists) to canonize either of the reputed eponymous founders of Maronism.

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  • After leaving the university he was appointed vicar of Over-Whitacre, and rector of Sheldon in Warwickshire, where he wrote his famous Catechetical Lectures.

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  • The church was rebuilt in 1840 at the instance of the vicar, Dr Walter Farquhar Hook (1798-1875), afterwards dean of Chichester, whose work here in a poor and ill-educated parish brought him fame.

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  • His grandfather, Thomas Swift, vicar of Goodrich near Ross, appears to have been a doughty member of the church militant, who lost his possessions by taking the losing side in the Civil War and died in 1658 before the restoration could bring him redress.

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  • But after a period of internal discord Ludovico Gonzaga attained to power (1328), and was recognized as imperial vicar (1329); and from that time till the death of Ferdinando Carbo in 1708 the Gonzagas were masters of Mantua (see Gonzaga).

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  • He was elected to a tutorship at Oriel College in 1797, and in 1800 was appointed vicar of St Mary's, Oxford.

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  • Newbolt, vicar of St Mary's, Bilston.

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  • In 1685 he became vicar of Ambrosden, Oxfordshire.

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  • Left an orphan when five years old, he was placed by his guardian under the care of the Puritan vicar of Wotton-under-Edge, with whom he remained till he attained his sixteenth year, when he entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford.

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  • The burnings began with that of William Sawtr, a London vicar, on the 2nd of March 1401; they continued intermittently throughout the reign.

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  • Next year he published Le Pape, a vision of the spirit of Christ in appeal against the spirit of Christianity, his ideal follower confronted and contrasted with his nominal vicar; next year again La Pitie supreme, a plea for charity towards tyrants who know not what they do, perverted by omnipotence and degraded by adoration; two years later Religions et religion, a poem which is at once a cry of faith and a protest against the creeds which deform and distort and leave it misshapen and envenomed and defiled; and in the same year L'Ane, a paean of satiric invective against the past follies of learned ignorance, and lyric rapture of confidence in the future wisdom and the final conscience of the world.

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  • Entering the church in 1838, he was curate at Wylye in Wiltshire, and for a short time at Steeple Claydon in Buckinghamshire, becoming later rector of Down Hatherley in Gloucestershire, and finally (1855) vicar of Rowington in Warwickshire, and rural dean.

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  • By the 64th canon it is enacted that " every parson, vicar or curate, shall in his several charge declare to the people every Sunday at the time appointed in the communion-book [which is, after the Nicene creed has been repeated] whether there be any holy-days or fast-days the week following."

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  • But already, at the end of 1099 Dagobert, archbishop of Pisa, had been substituted as patriarch for Arnulf (who had been acting as vicar) by the influence of Bohemund; and Dagobert, whose vassal Godfrey had at once piously acknowledged himself, seems to have forced him to an agreement in April Too, by which he promised Jerusalem and Jaffa to the patriarch, in case he should acquire in their place Cairo or some other town, or should die without issue.

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  • The sovereign may be regarded, as in the case of the Russian emperor or of the English kings from the Reformation to the Revolution, as the vicar of God in all causes spiritual as well as temporal within his realm.

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  • The " Community of St John the Baptist " at Clewer, near Windsor, arose in 1849 through the efforts of Mrs Tennant and the vicar, afterwards warden of the society, the Rev. T.

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  • See also Rector; Vicar; Benefice; and Tithes.

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  • " There is," says the document, " no archbishop, ne bishop, abbot, ne prior, parson, ne vicar, ne any other person of the church, high or low, great or small, English or Irish, that useth to preach the word of God, saving the poor friars beggars.

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  • A son of the Church, a protector of bishops, a president of councils, a collector of relics, devoted to Boniface (whom he invited, as papal legate, to reform the clergy of Austrasia), he astutely accepted the new claims of the vicar of St Peter to the headship of the Church, perceiving the value of an alliance with this rising power.

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  • But three years after the arrival of Frontenac a former vicar apostolic, Francois Xavier de Laval de Montmorenci, returned to Quebec as bishop, with a jurisdiction over the whole of Canada.

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  • JOHN LIGHTFOOT (1602-1675), English divine and rabbinical scholar, was the son of Thomas Lightfoot, vicar of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, and was born at Stoke-upon-Trent on the 29th of March 1602.

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  • As a compensation for territory thus withdrawn the Danish archbishop of Lund was made legate and perpetual vicar and given the title of primate of Denmark and Sweden.

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  • This finer work was the outcome of his friendship with Lady Austen, a widow who, on a visit to her sister, the wife of the vicar of the neighbouring village of Clifton, made the acquaintance of Cowper and Mrs Unwin.

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  • Charles sought the alliance of his uncle, the emperor Charles IV., to whom he did homage at Metz as dauphin of the Viennois, and he was also made imperial vicar of Dauphine, thus acknowledging the imperial jurisdiction.

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  • The youngest, Henry, was vicar of Fyfield, near Andover.

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  • In the same year he was appointed vicar of St Mary's, to which the chapelry of Littlemore was attached, and Pusey was made regius professor of Hebrew.

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  • Frederick left several illegitimate children: Enzio has already been referred to; Frederick, who was made the imperial vicar in Tuscany; and Manfred, his son by the beloved Bianca Lancia or Lanzia, who was legitimatized just before his father's death,and was appointed by his will prince of Tarento and regent of Sicily.

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  • A rector is incumbent of a benefice never held under a monastery, and he receives all the tithes; a vicar (i.e.

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  • It follows that, rectories being usually richer than vicarages, the style of "rector" is in England slightly more dignified than that of "vicar."

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  • In 1885 he became vicar of St Nicolas, Strassburg, and in 1889, declining an offer of preferment which was conditional on his becoming a German subject, he was expelled.

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  • The rector, vicar or incumbent is a corporation-sole, in whom is vested the freehold of the church and churchyard, subject to the parishioners' rights of user; their rights of burial have been enlarged by various acts.

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  • According to Bishop Burnet he was cast out by the Presbyterians; but whether this be so or not, he soon made his way to England and became vicar of Godmersham, Kent, from which living he was expelled by the Act of Uniformity in 1662.

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  • the conducting of the ordinary church services, except when he has a vicar, as in the old cathedral foundations (see Cathedral).

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  • Carlo (1364-1429) was energetic, valiant and a friend of the popes, who named him vicar of the church in Romagna.

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  • In 1577, the year that prophesyings were suppressed by the Privy Council, the strongly puritan William Jennings was appointed vicar.

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  • The vicar at the time was The Reverend Anderson who was famous for his long and somewhat rambling sermons.

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  • Mr Rosedale was the last vicar to be elected by the ratepayers by means of an election.

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  • Charles received the Vicar of Christ with all due reverence.

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  • The Vicar of St. John 's (blessings on his reverend head !

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  • A slightly saucy card... and from a vicar, too !

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  • Ralph and ' laud recovered seisin of the premises but were " in mercy " for a false claim against the Vicar.

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  • Taylor is Vicar, into the Hands of certain Sequestrators named in the said Sequestration, for the Use of Mr. Geo.

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  • All Saints ' chapel, New Headington, erected in 1870, has sittings for 160 persons; the vicar of Headington officiates.

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  • At a further meeting the Riot Act was read and the vicar was smuggled away by the military.

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  • The local vicar is ferried by helicopter to conduct Easter Sunday services in surrounding villages.

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  • In Stantonbury a third of the population died, including the vicar.

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  • The greater tithes, or part payment in kind, were given to the vicar by the priest who served the parish.

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  • The matter was referred to Bishop Bell, who awarded to the vicar the tithes of wool and lamb, and other small dues.

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  • Its rector was the Archdeacon of St Andrews who appointed a vicar to do the work of a parish priest.

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  • More About The BAP Friday, July 21st, 2006 How do I go about becoming a vicar?

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  • UFOs are the Devil 's messengers, says vicar, Sunday People, 23 April 1978 18.

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  • Mrs. xxxxxxxx did in fact tell the vicar of her local Methodist church of which she is a member.

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  • Donald left £ 500 to the poor of Aspatria and Brayton, the interest to be distributed by the vicar and churchwardens.

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  • The Rev Peter Allen, a retired vicar, joined the team in the snowy weather in January this year.

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  • Whilst in Spain, I worked on a new film about an eccentric vicar.

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  • Henry Venn was the great evangelical vicar of Huddersfield in the late 18th century.

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  • Also in the nave is a memorial to a former vicar.

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  • A local vicar provides free use of a garage for book storage.

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  • For example, a parish vicar in Bradford has enabled a major regeneration scheme to provide neighborhood facilities.

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  • Despite a number of noteworthy past inhabitants, the most famous was Harold Davidson, the village vicar in the 1930s.

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  • The vicar 's wife arrived to pay her respects.

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  • His mother, Margaret Diana Mary was a vicar 's daughter.

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  • A drunken man from Derwenlas... A weaver attacks a miner... The vicar 's son in trouble.

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  • Paul Roberts is vicar of two parishes in Bristol.

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  • It was a perpetual vicarage with the appointment of the vicar being in the hands of Dunkeld.

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  • The benefice is a vicarage of the annual value of £ 327, in the patronage of the vicar of St. James '.

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