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vestry

vestry

vestry Sentence Examples

  • It derived its name from the old place of assembly, the vestry room attached to the church or chapel.

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  • parish It is true that the inhabitants in vestry had certain The and the powers.

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  • Above the vestry there is a library containing choice manuscripts and rare books.

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  • The powers and duties of the vestry were defined, the position of the parish priest was fixed and his salary was regularly provided for at the public expense, and pedagogues were brought over from Scotland.

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  • He then put on his shoes in the vestry, and a chapter was held, and the bishop or his commissary preached a suitable sermon.

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  • The powers and duties of the vestry were defined, the position of the parish priest was fixed and his salary was regularly provided for at the public expense, and pedagogues were brought over from Scotland.

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  • Each civil or " poor law " parish was governed by the vestry and the overseers of the poor, dating from the Poor Law of 1601; the vestry, which dealt with general affairs, being presided over by the rector, and having the churchwardens as its chief officials.

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  • The remains include the vestry, the southern transept (the famous rose window of which is still entire), part of the chancel, the southern wall of the nave, part of the entrance towers and the western doorway.

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  • The remains include the vestry, the southern transept (the famous rose window of which is still entire), part of the chancel, the southern wall of the nave, part of the entrance towers and the western doorway.

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  • He was appointed by the parishioners in vestry, and his wages were payable out of the church rate.

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  • Scriptorium with library Sacristy and vestry.

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  • He also attended upon the clergy, the churchwardens and the vestry.

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  • See further Charity And Charities, Public Health, Education, Justice Of The Peace, Vestry, &C.

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  • Among the duties transferred to parish councils may be mentioned the provision of parish books and of a vestry room or parochial office, parish chest, fire engine or fire escape, the holding or management of parish property, other than property Powers relating to affairs of the church or held for an ecclesiastical and duties charity, the holding or management of village greens or of parish of allotments, the appointment of trustees of parochial councils.

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  • The Watching Lighting and Watching Act was formerly adopted for a Watchin or part of a parish, by the inhabitants in vestry, who elected lighting inspectors, of whom one-third went out of office in every year.

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  • Formerly, when the acts had been adopted by the vestry, it was necessary to appoint a burial board to carry the acts into execution and provide and manage burial grounds.

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  • The vestry represented the old assembly of the township, and retained so much of its business as had not been insensibly transferred to the court-baron and court-leet.

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  • North wall: two stepped buttresses divide the nave into three bays to the west side of the vestry.

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  • Architecture The church consists of a nave and slightly narrower chancel, a west tower and a south vestry.

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  • chancel with a small south vestry and a north chapel.

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  • choir vestry door on a sunny August day in 1999.

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  • clergy vestry, north of the sanctuary, is the oldest surviving part of the church.

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  • From 1799 to 1827 the vestry clerk was William Masters, who was succeeded by John Masters, probably his son.

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  • Some reports state the high box pews and the north gallery were removed, a small vestry and bell cote were added.

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  • The doorway now into the N vestry has straight jambs too.

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  • perambulaten for example, every seventh year on Ascension Day the Vestry organized the centuries-old custom of perambulating the parish boundaries.

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  • Below the east window of the vestry to which it opens is the cinquefoiled head of a fifteenth-century piscina, built in.

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  • Up to 1834 In 1728, a proposal to erect a poorhouse in Bury was rejected by the Vestry meeting.

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  • Within the parish Anthony Luther of Great Myles's, a staunch Protestant, took over Wright's role in vestry affairs.

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  • Also in the vestry there hangs a portrait of a former parish schoolmaster.

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  • A subterranean boiler room with access via a flight of stone steps leading down alongside the north wall of the vestry.

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  • vestry on the north, nave, and north aisle.

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  • vestry on the south side of the chancel.

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  • Other officers appointed by the vestry included a common driver, (fn.

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  • Parts of the chancel walls are of 13th century date, and the north vestry is of the 14th century.

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  • A proposal to create a select vestry in 1822 was easily defeated.

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  • The annual vestry Meeting is the equivalent of the Annual General Meeting of the Parish.

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  • The join in the masonry is visible above the south vestry.

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  • An unusual modern vestry adjoins the 19th century chancel.

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  • vestry mins.

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  • vestry clerk was William Masters, who was succeeded by John Masters, probably his son.

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  • vestry door on a sunny August day in 1999.

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  • vestry minutes of 30th December 1743.

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  • vestry roof lines.

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  • vestry hall above was erected on the site.

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  • The choir vestry door on a sunny August day in 1999.

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  • Space was made for a Lady Chapel in the area between the iron gates on the South side of the church the clergy vestry.

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  • Many farmers either gave tacit support to their workmen, or urged the parish vestry to improve the levels of poor relief.

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  • The north vestry was erected at the same time.

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  • Facilities There is a toilet in the church vestry, key available from the Tower Captain.

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  • vestry of the parish of Marylebone have erected a large public mortuary in the burial ground at Paddington.

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  • During his residence in Maryland he vigorously opposed the "vestry act," by which the powers and emoluments of the Maryland pastors were greatly diminished.

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  • The legal point in the dispute (which Campbell afterwards made the subject of a separate pamphlet) was whether the churchwardens of the parish, in the absence of the vestry, had any means of enforcing a rate except the antiquated interdict or ecclesiastical censure.

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  • Greater London (in the sense in which that name might then have been applied) was governed by the inhabitants of each parish in vestry assembled, save that in some instances parishes had elected select vestries under the provisions of the Vestries Act 1831.

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  • Under that act a vestry elected by the ratepayers of the parish was established for each parish in the metropolis outside the City.

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  • In some parishes overseers were appointed in the ordinary manner; in others the vestry, by local acts and by orders under the Local Government Act 1894, was appointed to act as, or empowered to appoint, overseers, whilst in Chelsea the guardians acted as overseers.

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  • The Jethro Coffin House was built in 1686, according to tradition; the Old North Vestry, the first Congregational meeting-house, built in r 7 r r, was moved in 1767, and again in 1834 to its present site on Beacon Hill.

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  • Scriptorium with library Sacristy and vestry.

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  • In the 18th century the corporation, a close body, declined, its duties being performed by the vestry, and in 1789 the one survivor resigned and handed over the town papers to the bishop. Farnham sent representatives to parliament in 1311 and 1460, on both occasions being practically the bishop's pocket borough.

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  • Earlier than the rest of the fabric (except the crypt) is part of the chapter-house and the vestry, adjoining the south side of the choir, and terminating eastward in an apse.

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  • The church or minster of St Cuthberga is a fine cruciform structure of various styles from Early Norman to Perpendicular, and consists of a central lantern tower, nave and choir with aisles, transepts without aisles, western or bell tower, north and south porches, crypt and vestry or sacristy, with the library over it.

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  • In Boston, then a great cotton mart, he tried in vain to procure a church or vestry for the delivery of his lectures, and thereupon announced in one of the daily journals that if some suitable place was not promptly offered he would speak on the common.

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  • He was responsible for the passing of the Vestry Act of 1831, and is said to have first used the phrase "his majesty's opposition."

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  • He also attended upon the clergy, the churchwardens and the vestry.

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  • He was appointed by the parishioners in vestry, and his wages were payable out of the church rate.

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  • Each civil or " poor law " parish was governed by the vestry and the overseers of the poor, dating from the Poor Law of 1601; the vestry, which dealt with general affairs, being presided over by the rector, and having the churchwardens as its chief officials.

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  • See further Charity And Charities, Public Health, Education, Justice Of The Peace, Vestry, &C.

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  • Before that time there was practically no sanitary authority outside the urban district, for although the vestry of a parish had in some cases power to make sewers and had also some other sanitary powers, there was no authority for such a district as now corresponds to a rural district.

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  • Except in these cases the highway authority in a parish was the surveyor of highways, elected annually by the inhabitants in vestry, or in a highway district consisting of a number of parishes united by order of quarter sessions, the highway board composed of waywardens representing the several parishes.

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  • parish It is true that the inhabitants in vestry had certain The and the powers.

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  • The assistant overseer, who was formerly nominated by the inhabitants and vestry and then formally appointed by justices, is now, as has been stated, appointed by the parish council.

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  • Among the duties transferred to parish councils may be mentioned the provision of parish books and of a vestry room or parochial office, parish chest, fire engine or fire escape, the holding or management of parish property, other than property Powers relating to affairs of the church or held for an ecclesiastical and duties charity, the holding or management of village greens or of parish of allotments, the appointment of trustees of parochial councils.

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  • The Watching Lighting and Watching Act was formerly adopted for a Watchin or part of a parish, by the inhabitants in vestry, who elected lighting inspectors, of whom one-third went out of office in every year.

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  • Formerly, when the acts had been adopted by the vestry, it was necessary to appoint a burial board to carry the acts into execution and provide and manage burial grounds.

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  • He then put on his shoes in the vestry, and a chapter was held, and the bishop or his commissary preached a suitable sermon.

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  • Above the vestry there is a library containing choice manuscripts and rare books.

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  • It derived its name from the old place of assembly, the vestry room attached to the church or chapel.

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  • The vestry represented the old assembly of the township, and retained so much of its business as had not been insensibly transferred to the court-baron and court-leet.

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  • Also in the vestry there hangs a portrait of a former parish schoolmaster.

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  • A subterranean boiler room with access via a flight of stone steps leading down alongside the north wall of the vestry.

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  • Note the curious 19th century vestry to the north, with its tall chimney.

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  • The modern church consists of a chancel, organ chamber and vestry on the north, nave, and north aisle.

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  • There is also a vestry on the south side of the chancel.

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  • Other officers appointed by the vestry included a common driver, ( fn.

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  • Parts of the chancel walls are of 13th century date, and the north vestry is of the 14th century.

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  • A proposal to create a select vestry in 1822 was easily defeated.

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  • The Annual Vestry Meeting is the equivalent of the Annual General Meeting of the Parish.

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  • The join in the masonry is visible above the south vestry.

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  • An unusual modern vestry adjoins the 19th century chancel.

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  • Hampstead, 208; Farmer, Hampstead Heath, 54; vestry mins.

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  • Latimer cites an amusing article from the vestry minutes of 30th December 1743.

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  • Nave and north aisle roof lines higher than the chancel and vestry roof lines.

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  • A police station with vestry hall above was erected on the site.

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  • Space was made for a Lady Chapel in the area between the iron gates on the South side of the church the clergy vestry.

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  • Many farmers either gave tacit support to their workmen, or urged the parish vestry to improve the levels of poor relief.

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  • The north vestry was erected at the same time.

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  • Facilities There is a toilet in the church vestry, key available from the Tower Captain.

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  • The vestry of the parish of Marylebone have erected a large public mortuary in the burial ground at Paddington.

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  • The legal point in the dispute (which Campbell afterwards made the subject of a separate pamphlet) was whether the churchwardens of the parish, in the absence of the vestry, had any means of enforcing a rate except the antiquated interdict or ecclesiastical censure.

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  • Greater London (in the sense in which that name might then have been applied) was governed by the inhabitants of each parish in vestry assembled, save that in some instances parishes had elected select vestries under the provisions of the Vestries Act 1831.

    0
    1
  • In some parishes overseers were appointed in the ordinary manner; in others the vestry, by local acts and by orders under the Local Government Act 1894, was appointed to act as, or empowered to appoint, overseers, whilst in Chelsea the guardians acted as overseers.

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  • The Jethro Coffin House was built in 1686, according to tradition; the Old North Vestry, the first Congregational meeting-house, built in r 7 r r, was moved in 1767, and again in 1834 to its present site on Beacon Hill.

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  • in some of the larger parishes in the north of England a churchwarden is chosen for each township of the parish; in the old ecclesiastical parishes of London both churchwardens are chosen by the parishioners; in some cases they are appointed by the select vestry, or by the lord of the manor, and in a few exceptional cases are chosen by the outgoing churchwardens.

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  • In the 18th century the corporation, a close body, declined, its duties being performed by the vestry, and in 1789 the one survivor resigned and handed over the town papers to the bishop. Farnham sent representatives to parliament in 1311 and 1460, on both occasions being practically the bishop's pocket borough.

    0
    1
  • Earlier than the rest of the fabric (except the crypt) is part of the chapter-house and the vestry, adjoining the south side of the choir, and terminating eastward in an apse.

    0
    1
  • The church or minster of St Cuthberga is a fine cruciform structure of various styles from Early Norman to Perpendicular, and consists of a central lantern tower, nave and choir with aisles, transepts without aisles, western or bell tower, north and south porches, crypt and vestry or sacristy, with the library over it.

    0
    1
  • In Boston, then a great cotton mart, he tried in vain to procure a church or vestry for the delivery of his lectures, and thereupon announced in one of the daily journals that if some suitable place was not promptly offered he would speak on the common.

    0
    1
  • He was responsible for the passing of the Vestry Act of 1831, and is said to have first used the phrase "his majesty's opposition."

    0
    1
  • Before that time there was practically no sanitary authority outside the urban district, for although the vestry of a parish had in some cases power to make sewers and had also some other sanitary powers, there was no authority for such a district as now corresponds to a rural district.

    0
    1
  • Except in these cases the highway authority in a parish was the surveyor of highways, elected annually by the inhabitants in vestry, or in a highway district consisting of a number of parishes united by order of quarter sessions, the highway board composed of waywardens representing the several parishes.

    0
    1
  • The assistant overseer, who was formerly nominated by the inhabitants and vestry and then formally appointed by justices, is now, as has been stated, appointed by the parish council.

    0
    1
  • in some of the larger parishes in the north of England a churchwarden is chosen for each township of the parish; in the old ecclesiastical parishes of London both churchwardens are chosen by the parishioners; in some cases they are appointed by the select vestry, or by the lord of the manor, and in a few exceptional cases are chosen by the outgoing churchwardens.

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  • During his residence in Maryland he vigorously opposed the "vestry act," by which the powers and emoluments of the Maryland pastors were greatly diminished.

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  • In neither case had the vestry powers of town management.

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  • In neither case had the vestry powers of town management.

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  • Under that act a vestry elected by the ratepayers of the parish was established for each parish in the metropolis outside the City.

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