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vestiges

vestiges Sentence Examples

  • I've left vestiges of my activities along the roadsides of America and yet, they don't know I exist!

  • Aguilar "of the Frontier" was so named in the middle ages from its position on the border of the Moorish territories, which were defended by the castle of Anzur, now a ruin; but the spacious squares and modern houses of the existing town retain few vestiges of Moorish dominion.

  • 7 Vestiges of the Molten Globe (London, 1875).

  • Parker has described vestiges of the corresponding cartilages in the Apteryx (Phil.

  • There is no renal portal system, excepting unimportant vestiges of such a system in the head kidneys.

  • In many beetles the hindwings are reduced to mere vestiges useless for flight, or are altogether absent, and in such cases the two elytra are often fused together at the suture; thus organs originally intended for flight have been transformed into an armour-like covering for the beetle's hind-body.

  • The first conception of the Decline and Fall arose as he lingered one evening amidst the vestiges of ancient glory.

  • Many of them are at high elevations (Lake Victoria, 13,400 ft., being probably the most elevated), and are undoubted vestiges of an ancient period of glaciation.

  • Bateman, Vestiges of the Antiquities of Derbyshire (London, 1848); L.

  • Distinct vestiges of the maxillulae exist also in the earwigs and booklice, according to G.

  • 2, II), while in moths and caddis-flies they are reduced to mere vestiges or altogether suppressed.

  • In some embryos there is but a single pair of these rudiments (or vestiges) situate on the first abdominal segment, and in some cases they become invaginations of a glandular nature.

  • boring grub of a longhorn-beetle or of the saw-fly Sires, with its stumpy vestiges of thoracic legs; the large-headed but entirely legless, fleshy grub of a weevil; and the legless larva, with greatly reduced head, of a bee.

  • If it should be objected that the wings so developed would be rudimentary, and that there would be nothing to encourage their development into perfect functional organs, we may remind the reader that we have already pointed out that imperfect wings of Exopterygota do, even at the present time under certain conditions, become perfect organs; and we may also add that there are, even among existing Endopterygota, species in which the wings are usually vestiges and yet sometimes become perfectly developed.

  • 3 Neither Lamarck nor Robert Chambers (the now acknowledged author of Vestiges of Creation), though thorough evolutionists, rationally indicated any means whereby, to use the old phrase, " the transmutation of species " could be effected.

  • In 1236 he had to promise to recognize fully the laws of the kingdom: and when, in 1239, he was again excommunicated by Gregory IX., and a new quarrel of papacy and empire began, he soon lost the last vestiges of his power.

  • Again, the adult Pentastomum shows no trace of appendages, unless the two pairs of chitinous hooks are to be regarded as the vestiges of jaws or ambulatory limbs.

  • For a time the Borinquenos, aided by Caribs from the neighbouring islands, threatened to destroy all vestiges of white occupation in Porto Rico, but in the end the Spaniards prevailed.

  • - lv.) found vestiges of a keel in a young rhea, and apteria in the embryonic ostrich, and she concluded that they were descendants of birds which originally possessed the power of flight.

  • We have seen that the last vestiges of the monstrous anomaly of modern colonial slavery are disappearing from all civilized states and their foreign possessions.

  • The interments are not nearly so numerous as in other catacombs, nor are there any vestiges of painting, sculpture or inscriptions.

  • Not far off, similar relics were found at Sobunar, Zlatiste and Debelobrdo; iron and bronze ornaments, vessels and weapons, often of elaborate design, occur in the huts and cemeteries of Glasinac, and in the cemetery of Jezerine, where they are associated with objects in silver, tin, amber, glass, &c. Among the numerous finds made in other districts may be mentioned the discovery, at Vrankamer, near Bihac, of 98 African coins, the oldest of which dates from 300 B.C. Many vestiges of Roman rule survive, such as roads, mines, ruins, tombs, coins, frescoes and inscriptions.

  • Beyond the wall line on that side vestiges of ancient buildings are visible in various directions, and the plain is strewn with fragments of bricks, tiles and rubbish.

  • There are reasons for supposing that the truncal coelom was at one time provided with pore-canals, but supposed vestiges of these structures have only been described for one genus, Spengelia,in which they lie near the anterior end of the truncal coelom.

  • Some vestiges of this celebrated monastic house, which formerly owned the famous Welsh MS. known as the "Black Book of Carmarthen," are visible between the present Priory Street and the river.

  • Among the most remarkable are the ruins of a bridge and a citadel, or palace, besides vestiges of canals and watermills, which tell of former commercial activity.

  • The news of this manifesto, arriving as it did simultaneously with that of Gdrgei's successes, destroyed the last vestiges of a desire of the Hungarian revolutionists to compromise, and on the 14th of April, on the motion of Kossuth, the diet proclaimed the independence of Hungary, declared the house of Habsburg as false and perjured, for ever excluded from the throne, and elected Kossuth president of the Hungarian Republic. This was an execrable blunder in the circumstances, and the results were fatal to the national cause.

  • ul-Bdkiya (Vestiges of the Past) was published by C. E.

  • Wheatley, London past and present; Vestiges of Old London, etchings by J.

  • There are some vestiges of a Roman bridge across the Danube, built (c. A.D.

  • 1400), earl and prince of Orkney and 1st earl of Caithness, its last vestiges having been demolished in 1865 to provide better access to the harbour; and the earthwork to the east of the town thrown up by the Cromwellians has been converted into a battery of the Orkney Artillery Volunteers.

  • They may be characterized as very elongated reptiles without limbs (unless with tiny vestiges of posterior limbs), without eyelids and external ear openings, with the teeth anchylosed to the supporting bones, a bifid slender tongue which is telescoped into its basal half, and with a transverse vent.

  • No ectopterygoid pterygoid not extending to quadrate; no supratemporal or squamosal; prefrontal forming a suture with nasal; coronoid present; vestiges of pelvis present.

  • Vestiges of hind-limbs; supratemporal present.

  • No vestiges of limbs.

  • Eyes functional, free, with vestiges of the hind-limbs appearing as claw-like spurs on each side of the vent.

  • There are no vestiges of limbs or of their girdles.

  • The vestiges of the pelvis are reduced to a single bone on each side, and there are no traces of limbs.

  • The rest of the snakes are supposed to have started from some primitive, nondegenerate, therefore boa-like group, leading by loss of the vestiges of the hind-limbs and loss of the coronoid bone of the of which, for instance, T.

  • The pelvic girdle and the hind-limbs show the least reduction found in any recent snakes, ilia, pubes and ischia being still distinguishable, the last even retaining their symphysis, and there are small vestiges of the femurs.

  • There are no vestiges of hind-limbs or of the pelvis.

  • - Typical, often very large, snakes, which have vestiges of pelvis and hind-limbs, the latter appearing as claw-like spurs on each side of the vent.

  • No vestiges of limes or pelvis.

  • The squamosals are reduced to pad-like vestiges.

  • Sfax occupies the site of the ancient Taphrura, of which few vestiges remain.

  • It was taken on the 4th of February 1860 by the Spaniards under O'Donnell, and almost transformed by them into a European city before its evacuation on the 2nd of May 1862, but so hateful were the changes to the Moors that they completely destroyed all vestiges of alteration and reduced the city to its former state.

  • The bathing establishment was built in 1705 near the site of the ancient baths of Sextius, of which vestiges still remain.

  • In fact, the whole skeletons of the wings and of the shoulder girdle seem to have been lost, excepting Anomalopteryx dromaeoides, which, according to Hutton,' had still some vestiges.

  • The "spacious arches of stone and other vestiges of departed majesty," with which Ker Porter found it surrounded in 1818, were possibly remains of the college (medresseh) and monastery (zavieh) where Ibn Batuta found shelter during his visit to the locality.

  • As the vestiges of its Roman walls tend to prove, Sissek was a large and flourishing city under Roman rule.

  • But the limbs show with regard to development great variation, and an uninterrupted transition from the most perfect condition of two pairs with five separate clawed toes to their total disappearance; yet even limbless lizards retain bony vestiges beneath the skin.

  • - The body is covered with soft skin, forming numerous rings with mere vestiges of scales.

  • Some have functional fore-limbs but mere vestiges of hind-limbs; in others this condition is reversed.

  • Seps, of the Mediterranean countries and south-western Asia, has a transparent disk on the lower eyelid which is movable; limbs very short or reduced to mere vestiges.

  • Livingston, a seaport at the mouth of the Polochic (here called the Rio Dulce), was founded in 1806, and subsequently named after the author of a code of Guatemalan laws; few vestiges remain of the Spanish settlement of Sevilla la Nueva, founded in 1844, and of the English colony of Abbotsville, founded in 1825, - both near Livingston.

  • In 1865 the last vestiges of its ramparts were removed, and since that date,.

  • Near Campulung are the remains of a Roman camp; and, just beyond the gates, vestiges of a Roman colony, variously identified with Romula, Stepenium and Ulpia Traiana, but now called Gradistea or Jidovi.

  • During this troubled period it retained some vestiges of its former trade, and the woollen manufacture was established here at an early date.

  • In the prehistoric " kitchenmiddens " (kj okkenmodding) and elsewhere, however, vestiges are found which prove that the urochs, the wild boar, the beaver, the bear and the wolf all existed subsequently to the arrival of man.

  • Few vestiges of antiquity survived, except the baths from which Alhama (in Arabic " the Bath ") derives its name.

  • Robert Chambers, in the once famous Vestiges of Creation, interested and shocked his contemporaries by his denial of the fixity of species and his insistence on creation by progressive evolution, but had no better theory of the cause of variation than to suppose that organisms - "from the simplest and oldest to the highest and most recent" were possessed of "an inherent impulse, imparted by the Almighty both to advance them from the several grades and modify their structure as circumstances required."

  • There are in some places vestiges of this primitive state of society still remaining; the transition to a limited or to a despotic monarchy may be traced by means of the ancient legends in some islands, and in others it is a matter of recent history.

  • What in Socrates still betrays some vestiges of historical sense, his moderation, his reserve in questions of dogma, his impartiality - all this is wanting in Sozomen.

  • In course of time more than a hundred places were embraced in this relation, the last vestiges of which did not disappear until the beginning of the 18th century.

  • Along the road are still to be seen vestiges of cities and inscribed monuments, such as the Himyaritic inscriptions on the high plateau of Kohait, the six obelisks with a Saban inscription at Toconda, and an obelisk with an inscription at Amba Sait.

  • The chief of these are: (1) The vestiges of the royal palace, which stood within an enclosure containing also the pyramidal religious structure known as the Phimeanakas.

  • And in several cities of the Languedoc, each of the two classes composing the population retained its separate laws and customs. It is matter of dispute whether vestiges of Roman institutions had survived in these parts down to the time when the new constitutions sprang into being; but all investigators are pretty well agreed that in no case did such remnants prove of any practical importance.

  • There are reasons for supposing that these funnels are vestiges of an ancient excretory system, which has given way by substitution to the excretory tubules described above.

  • They agree with the true crabs in not having appendages (uropods) to the sixth segment of the pleon, the atrophy being complete in the Homolidae and Homolodromiidae, whereas in the Dromiidae and Dynomenidae a pair of small plates appear to be vestiges of these organs.

  • For a decade the natives enjoyed their independence, destroying nearly all vestiges of Spanish occupation, and venting their wrath particularly upon the churches.

  • Specimens of the distinctive Claddagh ring, for example, were worn and treasured as venerated heirlooms. These customs, with the distinctive dress of the women, died out but slowly, and even to-day their vestiges remain.

  • The city used to be the extensive, splendid and opulent capital of an independent sovereignty of the same name, but now retains only the vestiges of its former grandeur.

  • There were consequently a few vestiges of the slavery system in New Jersey until the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Federal Constitution.

  • The quiet beauty of the rural country in the south, where the barren Bunter pebble-beds have never invited agriculture, and where considerable vestiges of the old woodland still remain in and near Sherwood Forest, has attracted so many seats of the landed aristocracy as to earn for that part the familiar name of " the Dukeries."

  • The capital Auxume and the seaport Adulis were then the chief centres of the trade with the interior of Africa in gold dust, ivory, leather, aromatics, &c. At Axum, the site of the ancient capital, many vestiges of its former greatness still exist; and the ruins of Adulis, which was once a seaport on the bay of Annesley, are now about 4 m.

  • Tocilescu, Das Monument von Adam Klissi, Vienna, 1895.) Few monuments were left by the barbarian invaders who ravaged Rumania from the 3rd century to the 14th save some vestiges of Gothic culture at Buzeu, and at Petroasa, close by.

  • Up to this point the prince had ruled wisely; he had founded the universities of Bucharest and Jassy; his reforms had swept away the last vestiges of feudalism and created a class of peasant freeholders.

  • All Boidae possess vestiges of pelvis and hind limbs, appearing externally as claw-like spurs on each side of the vent, but they are so small that they are practically without function in climbing.

  • It has heaps, but no hills; bushes, but no trees, unless indeed three or four tamarisks of aspiring height deserve the name; many old ruins and vestiges of civilization, but few monuments or relics of antiquity.

  • In many instances the parts which are afterwards suppressed can be seen in the early stages of growth, and occasionally some vestiges of them remain in the fully developed flower.

  • In unisexual flowers it is not uncommon to find vestiges of the undeveloped stamens in the form of filiform bodies or scales.

  • But in Primulaceae no vestiges of septa or marginal ovules can be perceived at any period of growth; the placenta is always free, and rises in the centre of the ovary.

  • But of this, as well as of the temple of Artemis that formerly crowned Mount Skopos, no vestiges can now be discovered.

  • Among modern floras we find here and there isolated types, such as Ginkgo, Sequoia, Matonia, Dipteris and the Cycads, persisting as more successful survivals which have held their own through the course of ages; these plants remain as vestiges from a remote past, and as links connecting the vegetation of to-day with that of the Mesozoic era.

  • I've left vestiges of my activities along the roadsides of America and yet, they don't know I exist!

  • Finally, a short blast of canned air to remove any vestiges of cotton lint from the swabs.

  • No longer can any vestiges of the silo mentality be tolerated.

  • Gutted by fire and further destroyed by gale-force winds, only vestiges of ornate brick and stone walls stand like some ruined Italian palazzo.

  • Such deep banks of raised beach shingle, vestiges from the last ice-age, are found nowhere else around the Ulster coast.

  • vestiges of an encampment can be traced near the burn of Barden.

  • vestiges of a colonial past.

  • He also retains some vestiges of his native heritage, which makes him unique.

  • It was he who finally removed the last vestiges of the god Apollo, with the laurel band becoming an ear of barley.

  • Work finally lost the last vestiges of appeal that it had.

  • The neglected classes of earlier times left few vestiges of their passing.

  • The last vestiges of my hangover blew away in the wind of our speed.

  • A slender rougher pasture leads to the brow; only vestiges of this old enclosed way remain.

  • But this, like many other vestiges of our past, is an instinctive reaction.

  • Aguilar "of the Frontier" was so named in the middle ages from its position on the border of the Moorish territories, which were defended by the castle of Anzur, now a ruin; but the spacious squares and modern houses of the existing town retain few vestiges of Moorish dominion.

  • 7 Vestiges of the Molten Globe (London, 1875).

  • Parker has described vestiges of the corresponding cartilages in the Apteryx (Phil.

  • There is no renal portal system, excepting unimportant vestiges of such a system in the head kidneys.

  • In many beetles the hindwings are reduced to mere vestiges useless for flight, or are altogether absent, and in such cases the two elytra are often fused together at the suture; thus organs originally intended for flight have been transformed into an armour-like covering for the beetle's hind-body.

  • The first conception of the Decline and Fall arose as he lingered one evening amidst the vestiges of ancient glory.

  • Many of them are at high elevations (Lake Victoria, 13,400 ft., being probably the most elevated), and are undoubted vestiges of an ancient period of glaciation.

  • Bateman, Vestiges of the Antiquities of Derbyshire (London, 1848); L.

  • Distinct vestiges of the maxillulae exist also in the earwigs and booklice, according to G.

  • 2, II), while in moths and caddis-flies they are reduced to mere vestiges or altogether suppressed.

  • In some embryos there is but a single pair of these rudiments (or vestiges) situate on the first abdominal segment, and in some cases they become invaginations of a glandular nature.

  • boring grub of a longhorn-beetle or of the saw-fly Sires, with its stumpy vestiges of thoracic legs; the large-headed but entirely legless, fleshy grub of a weevil; and the legless larva, with greatly reduced head, of a bee.

  • If it should be objected that the wings so developed would be rudimentary, and that there would be nothing to encourage their development into perfect functional organs, we may remind the reader that we have already pointed out that imperfect wings of Exopterygota do, even at the present time under certain conditions, become perfect organs; and we may also add that there are, even among existing Endopterygota, species in which the wings are usually vestiges and yet sometimes become perfectly developed.

  • 3 Neither Lamarck nor Robert Chambers (the now acknowledged author of Vestiges of Creation), though thorough evolutionists, rationally indicated any means whereby, to use the old phrase, " the transmutation of species " could be effected.

  • In 1236 he had to promise to recognize fully the laws of the kingdom: and when, in 1239, he was again excommunicated by Gregory IX., and a new quarrel of papacy and empire began, he soon lost the last vestiges of his power.

  • Again, the adult Pentastomum shows no trace of appendages, unless the two pairs of chitinous hooks are to be regarded as the vestiges of jaws or ambulatory limbs.

  • The Pnyx, the Hill of the Nymphs and the Museum Hill are covered with vestiges of early settlements which extend to a considerable distance towards the south-east in the - direction of Phalerum.

  • For a time the Borinquenos, aided by Caribs from the neighbouring islands, threatened to destroy all vestiges of white occupation in Porto Rico, but in the end the Spaniards prevailed.

  • - lv.) found vestiges of a keel in a young rhea, and apteria in the embryonic ostrich, and she concluded that they were descendants of birds which originally possessed the power of flight.

  • We have seen that the last vestiges of the monstrous anomaly of modern colonial slavery are disappearing from all civilized states and their foreign possessions.

  • The interments are not nearly so numerous as in other catacombs, nor are there any vestiges of painting, sculpture or inscriptions.

  • Not far off, similar relics were found at Sobunar, Zlatiste and Debelobrdo; iron and bronze ornaments, vessels and weapons, often of elaborate design, occur in the huts and cemeteries of Glasinac, and in the cemetery of Jezerine, where they are associated with objects in silver, tin, amber, glass, &c. Among the numerous finds made in other districts may be mentioned the discovery, at Vrankamer, near Bihac, of 98 African coins, the oldest of which dates from 300 B.C. Many vestiges of Roman rule survive, such as roads, mines, ruins, tombs, coins, frescoes and inscriptions.

  • Beyond the wall line on that side vestiges of ancient buildings are visible in various directions, and the plain is strewn with fragments of bricks, tiles and rubbish.

  • There are reasons for supposing that the truncal coelom was at one time provided with pore-canals, but supposed vestiges of these structures have only been described for one genus, Spengelia,in which they lie near the anterior end of the truncal coelom.

  • Some vestiges of this celebrated monastic house, which formerly owned the famous Welsh MS. known as the "Black Book of Carmarthen," are visible between the present Priory Street and the river.

  • Among the most remarkable are the ruins of a bridge and a citadel, or palace, besides vestiges of canals and watermills, which tell of former commercial activity.

  • The news of this manifesto, arriving as it did simultaneously with that of Gdrgei's successes, destroyed the last vestiges of a desire of the Hungarian revolutionists to compromise, and on the 14th of April, on the motion of Kossuth, the diet proclaimed the independence of Hungary, declared the house of Habsburg as false and perjured, for ever excluded from the throne, and elected Kossuth president of the Hungarian Republic. This was an execrable blunder in the circumstances, and the results were fatal to the national cause.

  • ul-Bdkiya (Vestiges of the Past) was published by C. E.

  • Wheatley, London past and present; Vestiges of Old London, etchings by J.

  • There are some vestiges of a Roman bridge across the Danube, built (c. A.D.

  • 1400), earl and prince of Orkney and 1st earl of Caithness, its last vestiges having been demolished in 1865 to provide better access to the harbour; and the earthwork to the east of the town thrown up by the Cromwellians has been converted into a battery of the Orkney Artillery Volunteers.

  • They may be characterized as very elongated reptiles without limbs (unless with tiny vestiges of posterior limbs), without eyelids and external ear openings, with the teeth anchylosed to the supporting bones, a bifid slender tongue which is telescoped into its basal half, and with a transverse vent.

  • No ectopterygoid pterygoid not extending to quadrate; no supratemporal or squamosal; prefrontal forming a suture with nasal; coronoid present; vestiges of pelvis present.

  • Vestiges of hind-limbs; supratemporal present.

  • No vestiges of limbs.

  • Eyes functional, free, with vestiges of the hind-limbs appearing as claw-like spurs on each side of the vent.

  • There are no vestiges of limbs or of their girdles.

  • The vestiges of the pelvis are reduced to a single bone on each side, and there are no traces of limbs.

  • The rest of the snakes are supposed to have started from some primitive, nondegenerate, therefore boa-like group, leading by loss of the vestiges of the hind-limbs and loss of the coronoid bone of the of which, for instance, T.

  • The pelvic girdle and the hind-limbs show the least reduction found in any recent snakes, ilia, pubes and ischia being still distinguishable, the last even retaining their symphysis, and there are small vestiges of the femurs.

  • Vestiges of the pelvis and hind-limbs are small, but they terminate in claw-like spurs which protrude FIG.

  • There are no vestiges of hind-limbs or of the pelvis.

  • - Typical, often very large, snakes, which have vestiges of pelvis and hind-limbs, the latter appearing as claw-like spurs on each side of the vent.

  • No vestiges of limes or pelvis.

  • The squamosals are reduced to pad-like vestiges.

  • Sfax occupies the site of the ancient Taphrura, of which few vestiges remain.

  • It was taken on the 4th of February 1860 by the Spaniards under O'Donnell, and almost transformed by them into a European city before its evacuation on the 2nd of May 1862, but so hateful were the changes to the Moors that they completely destroyed all vestiges of alteration and reduced the city to its former state.

  • The bathing establishment was built in 1705 near the site of the ancient baths of Sextius, of which vestiges still remain.

  • In fact, the whole skeletons of the wings and of the shoulder girdle seem to have been lost, excepting Anomalopteryx dromaeoides, which, according to Hutton,' had still some vestiges.

  • The "spacious arches of stone and other vestiges of departed majesty," with which Ker Porter found it surrounded in 1818, were possibly remains of the college (medresseh) and monastery (zavieh) where Ibn Batuta found shelter during his visit to the locality.

  • As the vestiges of its Roman walls tend to prove, Sissek was a large and flourishing city under Roman rule.

  • But the limbs show with regard to development great variation, and an uninterrupted transition from the most perfect condition of two pairs with five separate clawed toes to their total disappearance; yet even limbless lizards retain bony vestiges beneath the skin.

  • - The body is covered with soft skin, forming numerous rings with mere vestiges of scales.

  • Some have functional fore-limbs but mere vestiges of hind-limbs; in others this condition is reversed.

  • Seps, of the Mediterranean countries and south-western Asia, has a transparent disk on the lower eyelid which is movable; limbs very short or reduced to mere vestiges.

  • The Maya district of Yucatan has also some vestiges of native traditions in the manuscript translated by D.

  • Livingston, a seaport at the mouth of the Polochic (here called the Rio Dulce), was founded in 1806, and subsequently named after the author of a code of Guatemalan laws; few vestiges remain of the Spanish settlement of Sevilla la Nueva, founded in 1844, and of the English colony of Abbotsville, founded in 1825, - both near Livingston.

  • Griffiths, had copied in colours a number of them before the last vestiges had disappeared, and other copies of certain of the paintings have also been made.

  • In 1865 the last vestiges of its ramparts were removed, and since that date,.

  • Near Campulung are the remains of a Roman camp; and, just beyond the gates, vestiges of a Roman colony, variously identified with Romula, Stepenium and Ulpia Traiana, but now called Gradistea or Jidovi.

  • During this troubled period it retained some vestiges of its former trade, and the woollen manufacture was established here at an early date.

  • The medieval inquisitor saw in them an aping of the rites of the Catholic church as he knew them; but they were really, says the same authority, "archaeological vestiges (i.e.

  • In the prehistoric " kitchenmiddens " (kj okkenmodding) and elsewhere, however, vestiges are found which prove that the urochs, the wild boar, the beaver, the bear and the wolf all existed subsequently to the arrival of man.

  • Few vestiges of antiquity survived, except the baths from which Alhama (in Arabic " the Bath ") derives its name.

  • Robert Chambers, in the once famous Vestiges of Creation, interested and shocked his contemporaries by his denial of the fixity of species and his insistence on creation by progressive evolution, but had no better theory of the cause of variation than to suppose that organisms - "from the simplest and oldest to the highest and most recent" were possessed of "an inherent impulse, imparted by the Almighty both to advance them from the several grades and modify their structure as circumstances required."

  • There are in some places vestiges of this primitive state of society still remaining; the transition to a limited or to a despotic monarchy may be traced by means of the ancient legends in some islands, and in others it is a matter of recent history.

  • What in Socrates still betrays some vestiges of historical sense, his moderation, his reserve in questions of dogma, his impartiality - all this is wanting in Sozomen.

  • In course of time more than a hundred places were embraced in this relation, the last vestiges of which did not disappear until the beginning of the 18th century.

  • Along the road are still to be seen vestiges of cities and inscribed monuments, such as the Himyaritic inscriptions on the high plateau of Kohait, the six obelisks with a Saban inscription at Toconda, and an obelisk with an inscription at Amba Sait.

  • The chief of these are: (1) The vestiges of the royal palace, which stood within an enclosure containing also the pyramidal religious structure known as the Phimeanakas.

  • And in several cities of the Languedoc, each of the two classes composing the population retained its separate laws and customs. It is matter of dispute whether vestiges of Roman institutions had survived in these parts down to the time when the new constitutions sprang into being; but all investigators are pretty well agreed that in no case did such remnants prove of any practical importance.

  • There are reasons for supposing that these funnels are vestiges of an ancient excretory system, which has given way by substitution to the excretory tubules described above.

  • They agree with the true crabs in not having appendages (uropods) to the sixth segment of the pleon, the atrophy being complete in the Homolidae and Homolodromiidae, whereas in the Dromiidae and Dynomenidae a pair of small plates appear to be vestiges of these organs.

  • For a decade the natives enjoyed their independence, destroying nearly all vestiges of Spanish occupation, and venting their wrath particularly upon the churches.

  • iv., we notice several vestiges of an acrostic. The Aleph stanza (verses 7, 8) still precedes the Beth (verses 9, io), and the Ain is still quite clear (verses 17, 18; cf.

  • Specimens of the distinctive Claddagh ring, for example, were worn and treasured as venerated heirlooms. These customs, with the distinctive dress of the women, died out but slowly, and even to-day their vestiges remain.

  • The city used to be the extensive, splendid and opulent capital of an independent sovereignty of the same name, but now retains only the vestiges of its former grandeur.

  • There were consequently a few vestiges of the slavery system in New Jersey until the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Federal Constitution.

  • The quiet beauty of the rural country in the south, where the barren Bunter pebble-beds have never invited agriculture, and where considerable vestiges of the old woodland still remain in and near Sherwood Forest, has attracted so many seats of the landed aristocracy as to earn for that part the familiar name of " the Dukeries."

  • The capital Auxume and the seaport Adulis were then the chief centres of the trade with the interior of Africa in gold dust, ivory, leather, aromatics, &c. At Axum, the site of the ancient capital, many vestiges of its former greatness still exist; and the ruins of Adulis, which was once a seaport on the bay of Annesley, are now about 4 m.

  • Tocilescu, Das Monument von Adam Klissi, Vienna, 1895.) Few monuments were left by the barbarian invaders who ravaged Rumania from the 3rd century to the 14th save some vestiges of Gothic culture at Buzeu, and at Petroasa, close by.

  • Up to this point the prince had ruled wisely; he had founded the universities of Bucharest and Jassy; his reforms had swept away the last vestiges of feudalism and created a class of peasant freeholders.

  • All Boidae possess vestiges of pelvis and hind limbs, appearing externally as claw-like spurs on each side of the vent, but they are so small that they are practically without function in climbing.

  • If we are to regard the Egyptian myths about the gods in animal shape, and about the non-natural superhuman heroes, and their wars and loves, as esoteric allegories devised by civilized priests, perhaps we should also explain Pund-jel, Qat, Quawteaht, the Mantis god, the Spider creator, the Coyote and Raven gods as priestly inventions, put forth in a civilized age, and retained by Australians, Bushmen, Hottentots, Ahts, Thlinkeets, Papuans, who preserve no other vestiges of high civilization.

  • It has heaps, but no hills; bushes, but no trees, unless indeed three or four tamarisks of aspiring height deserve the name; many old ruins and vestiges of civilization, but few monuments or relics of antiquity.

  • In many instances the parts which are afterwards suppressed can be seen in the early stages of growth, and occasionally some vestiges of them remain in the fully developed flower.

  • In unisexual flowers it is not uncommon to find vestiges of the undeveloped stamens in the form of filiform bodies or scales.

  • But in Primulaceae no vestiges of septa or marginal ovules can be perceived at any period of growth; the placenta is always free, and rises in the centre of the ovary.

  • But of this, as well as of the temple of Artemis that formerly crowned Mount Skopos, no vestiges can now be discovered.

  • Among modern floras we find here and there isolated types, such as Ginkgo, Sequoia, Matonia, Dipteris and the Cycads, persisting as more successful survivals which have held their own through the course of ages; these plants remain as vestiges from a remote past, and as links connecting the vegetation of to-day with that of the Mesozoic era.

  • The Israeli government is a barbaric regime that is systematically destroying vestiges of Palestinian self-rule.

  • Some vestiges of an encampment can be traced near the burn of Barden.

  • Like Christianity, Islam at the height of its power will not tolerate even the vestiges of a former religion.

  • Furthermore, English will also carry with it vestiges of a colonial past.

  • He also retains some vestiges of his native heritage, which makes him unique.

  • It was he who finally removed the last vestiges of the god Apollo, with the laurel band becoming an ear of barley.

  • Work finally lost the last vestiges of appeal that it had.

  • The neglected classes of earlier times left few vestiges of their passing.

  • The last vestiges of my hangover blew away in the wind of our speed.

  • A slender rougher pasture leads to the brow; only vestiges of this old enclosed way remain.

  • But this, like many other vestiges of our past, is an instinctive reaction.

  • Step 3: As is true with a regular bikini wax, cloth strips are placed over the warm wax, and then quickly pulled in the opposite direction of hair growth to remove all vestiges of the hair from the skin.

  • In choosing to help those who hold on to the vestiges of civilization, the desolate loner of the original movie rediscovers his lost soul.

  • The new look was tight and form-fitting, with stirrup stockings and the rounded caps the only vestiges of the old baseball uniforms.

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