Verona sentence example

verona
  • Milan 4s the most important railway centre in the country, and is followed by Turin, Genoa, Verona, Bologna, Rome, Naples.
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  • A post-station bearing the name Sirmio stood on the high-road between Brixia and Verona, near the southern shore of the lake.
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  • The whole structure is composed of red and grey Verona marble.
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  • Besides these international lines the most important are those from Milan to Turin (via Vercelli and via Alessandria), to Genoa via Tortona, to Bologna via Parma and Modena, to V~rona, and the shorter lines to the district of the lakes of Lombardy; from Turin to Genoa via Savona and via Alessandria; from Genoa to Savona and Ventimiglia along the Riviera, and along the south-west coast of Italy, via Sarzana (whence a line runs to Parma) to Pisa (whence lines run to Pistoia and Florence) and Rome; from Verona to Modena, and to Venice via Padua; from Bologna to Padtia, to Rimini (and thence along the north-east coast via Ancona, Castellammare Adriatico and Foggia to Brindisi and Otranto), and to Florence and Rome; from Rome to Ancona, to Castellammare Adriatico and to Naples; from Naples to Foggia, via Metaponto (with a junction for Reggio di Calabria), to Brindisi and to Reggio di Calabria.
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  • Foreign editions were published in Italian at Verona in 1623, in Latin at Leiden in 1626 and 1628, and in Dutch at Gouda in 1626.
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  • The most considerable towns on its banks (south of Botzen) are Trent and Rovereto, in Tirol, and Verona and Legnago, in Italy.
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  • The Adige, formed by the junction of two streams—the Etsch or Adige proper and the Eisak, both of which belong to Tirol rather than to Italy—descends as far as Verona, where it enters the great plain, with a course from north to south nearly parallel to the rivers last described, and would seem likely to discharge its waters into those of the Po, but below Legnago it turns eastward and runs parallel to the Po for about 40 m., entering the Adriatic by an independent mouth about 8 m.
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  • He was the uncle and guardian of Conradin of Hohenstaufen, whom he assisted to make his journey to Italy in 1267, and accompanied as far as Verona.
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  • Farther west came the roads over the higher Alpine passes the Brenner from Verona, the Septimer and the Splugen from Clavenna (Chiavenna), the Great and the Little St Bernard from Augusta Praetoria (Aosta), and the Mont Genvre from Augusta Taurinorum (Turin).
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  • Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Venice entered into a compact to defend their liberties; and when he came again in 1163 with a brilliant staff of German knights, the imperial cities refused to join his standards.
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  • His army found itself a little to the north of the town near the village of Legnano, when the troops of the city, assisted only by a few allies from Piacenza, Verona, Brescia, Novara and Vercelli, met and overwhelmed it.
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  • On the one side we find Vercelli, Novara, Milan, Lodi, Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua, Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Bologna, Faenza, Modena, Reggio, Parma, Piacenza; on the other, Pavia, Genoa, Alba, Cremona, Como, Tortona, Asti, Cesarea.
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  • Having established Ezzelino in Verona, Vicenza and Padua, he defeated the Milanese and their allies at Cortenuova in 1237, and sent their carroccio as a trophy of his victory to Rome.
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  • The Scaligers in Verona and the Carraresi in Padua were strengthened; and in Tuscany Castruccio Castracane, Ugucciones successor at Lucca, became formidable.
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  • Lucchinos brother John, arch bishop of Milan, now assumed the lordship of the city, and extended the power of the Visconti over Genoa and the whole of north Italy, with the exception of Piedmont, Verona, Mantua, Ferrara and Venice.
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  • The last scions of the Della Scala family still reigned in Verona, the last Carraresi in Padua; the Estensi were powerful in Ferrara, the Gonzaghi in Mantua.
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  • During this second struggle to the death with Genoa, the Venetians had been also at strife with the Carraresi of Padua and the Scaligers of Verona.
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  • In 1406, after the extinction of these princely houses they added Verona, Vicenza and Padua to the territories they claimed on terra firma.
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  • A month later, under the pretence of stilling the civil strifes in the Valtelline, Bonaparte absorbed that Swiss district in the Cisalpine Republic, which thus included all the lands between Como and Verona on the north, and Rimini on the south.
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  • At the latters death in 1830 Ferdinand now flew to arms, and the Austrian garrisons, except in the Quadrilateral (Verona, Peschiera, Mantua and Legnano) were expelled.
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  • He still protested his loyalty to Philip, but the latter advanced against him and was slain near Verona.
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  • From 104 to for he served again under Marius in the war with the Cimbri and Teutones and fought in the last great battle in the Raudian plains near Verona.
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  • The rest of his life was passed in Verona, Mantua and Rome - chiefly Mantua; Venice and Florence have also been named, but without confirmation.
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  • His favourite pupil was known as Carlo del Mantegna; Caroto of Verona was another pupil, Bonsignori an imitator.
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  • He mentions in another place that when at Verona the king was anxious to transfer the accusation of treason brought against Albinus to the whole senate, he defended the senate at great risk.
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  • He supported himself as a teacher of Greek, first at Verona and afterwards in Venice and Florence; in 1436 he became, through the patronage of Lionel, marquis of Este, professor of Greek at Ferrara; and in 1438 and following years he acted as interpreter for the Greeks at the councils of Ferrara and Florence.
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  • Among the later buildings, a few may be noted by Sanmicheli of Verona, who was employed as chief architect of the cathedral from 1509 to 1528.
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  • He visited Italy before 1486, for he heard the lectures of Argyropulus, who died in that year; he formed a friendship with Paulus Aemilius of Verona.
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  • The whole surface of the ponderous upper storey is covered with a diaper pattern in slabs of creamy white Istrian stone and red Verona marble, giving a delicate rosy-orange hue to the building.
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  • The period with which we are now dealing is the epoch of the despots, the signori, and in pursuit of expansion on the mainland Venice was brought into collision first with the Scaligeri of Verona, then with the Carraresi of Padua, and finally with the Visconti of Milan.
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  • She was forced into war by Mastino della Scala, lord of Padua, Vicenza, Treviso, Feltre and Belluno, as well as of Verona, who imposed a duty on the transport of Venetian goods.
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  • Carrara, lord of Padua, attempted to seize Vicenza and Verona.
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  • Accordingly when Gian Galeazzo's widow applied to the republic for help against Carrara it was readily granted, and, after some years of fighting, the possessions of the Carraresi, Padua, Treviso, Bassano, commanding the Val Sugana route, as well as Vicenza and Verona, passed definitely under Venetian rule.
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  • He was determined to recover Verona and Vicenza from Venice, and intended, as his father had done, to make himself master of all north Italy.
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  • She established her hold permanently on Verona and Vicenza, and acquired besides both Brescia and Bergamo; and later she occupied Crema.
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  • He thwarted the efforts of Alaric to seize lands in Italy by his victories at Pollentia and Verona in 402-3 and forced him to return to Illyricum, but was criticized for having withdrawn the imperial forces from Britain and Gaul to employ against the Goths.
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  • During this period the revolt of the African prince Gildo was suppressed (398); Italy was successfully defended against Alaric, who was defeated at Pollentia (402) and Verona (403); and the barbarian hordes under the Goth Radagaisus were destroyed (406).
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  • Save for the barest rudiments of reading and writing, he tells us that he had no master; yet we find him at Verona in 1521 an esteemed teacher of mathematics.
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  • Philip was defeated and slain in a battle near Verona.
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  • The Congress of Verona (1822) passed without any serious developments in the Eastern Question.
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  • In the instructions drawn up, shortly before his death, for his guidance at Verona, Castlereagh had stated the possibility of the necessity for recognizing the Greeks as belligerents if the war continued.
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  • Thus in 1822, at the congress of Verona, in order to overcome the objection of Great Britain to any interference of the European concert in Spain, identical notes were presented to the Spanish government instead of a collective note.
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  • Pledging his lands, he crossed the Alps and issued a manifesto at Verona setting forth his claim on Sicily.
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  • It is inferior in size only to the Colosseum and the amphitheatres of Capua and Verona, measuring about 153 by 130 yds.
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  • He was secretary to the congress of Vienna (1814-1815) and to all the congresses and conferences that followed, up to that of Verona (1822), and in all his vast knowledge of men and affairs made him a power.
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  • The Florentines now turned their eyes towards Lucca; they might have acquired the city immediately after Castruccio's death for 80,000 florins, but failed to do so owing to differences of opinion in the signory; Martino della Scala, lord of Verona, promised it to them in 1335, but Lucca broke his word, and although their finances were not then very flourishing they allied themselves with Venice to make war on him.
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  • Thence it follows the valley of the Adige to Trent (35 m.) and on to Verona (562 m.) - in all 1742 m.
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  • In the Piazza dei Signori is the beautiful loggia called the Gran Guardia, begun in 1493 and finished in 1526, and close by is the Palazzo del Capitanio, the residence of the Venetian governors, with its great door, the work of Falconetto of Verona, 1532.
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  • Scala, lord of Verona, to whom they had to yield in 1311.
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  • Zeno (an early bishop of Verona who became its patron saint), which stands outside the ancient city, is one.
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  • The neighbourhood of Verona is especially rich in fine limestones and marbles of many different kinds, especially a close-grained creamcoloured marble and a rich mottled red marble, which are largely used, not only in Verona, but also in Venice and other cities of the province.
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  • Pope Lucius III., who held a council at Verona in 1184, is buried in the cathedral, under the pavement before the high altar.
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  • There are several other fine churches in Verona, some of early date.
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  • This and the other fortifications of Verona were rebuilt or repaired by the Austrians, but are no longer kept up as military defences.
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  • Verona, which is the chief military centre of the Italian province of Venetia, is now being surrounded with a circle of forts far outside the obsolete city walls.
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  • The early palaces of Verona, before its conquest by Venice, were of noble and simple design, mostly built of fine red brick, with an inner court, surrounded on the ground floor by open arches like a cloister, as, for example, the Palazzo della Ragione, an assize court, begun in the r 2th century.
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  • After the conquest by Venice the domestic buildings of Verona assumed quite a different type.
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  • The monotony and lifelessness of this form of architecture are shown in the meaningless way in which details, suited only to the Venetian methods of veneering walls with thin marble slabs, are copied in the solid marbles of Verona.
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  • From the skill of Fra Giocondo, Verona was for many years one of the chief centres in which the most refined and graceful forms of the early Renaissance were developed.
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  • Verona contains a number of handsome palaces designed by Sanmichele in the 26th century.
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  • The last of these is now the property of the city, and contains a gallery with some good pictures, especially of the Verona, Padua and Venice schools.
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  • As in Venice, many of the 16th-century palaces in Verona had stuccoed facades, richly decorated with large fresco paintings, often by very able painters.
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  • Verona, perhaps, had as many of these paintings as any town in Italy, but comparatively few are preserved and those only to a small extent.
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  • The domestic architecture of Verona cannot thus be now fairly estimated, and seems monotonous, heavy and uninteresting.
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  • The Roman remains of Verona surpass those of any other city of northern Italy.
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  • In many respects the resemblance between Verona and Florence is very striking; in both cases we have a strongly fortified city built in a fertile valley, on the banks of a winding river, with suburbs on higher ground, rising close above the main city.
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  • In architectural magnificence and in wealth of sculpture and painting Verona almost rivalled the Tuscan city, and, like it, gave birth to a very large number of artists who distinguished themselves in all branches of the fine arts.
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  • Painting in Verona may be divided into four periods.
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  • These two painters were among the ablest of Giotto's followers, and adorned Verona and Padua with a number of very beautiful frescoes, rich in composition, delicate in colour, and remarkable for their highly finished modelling and detail.
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  • These include Liberale da Verona, Domenico and Francesco Morone, Girolamo dai Libri (1 474- 1 55 6), &c. Domenico del Riccio, usually nicknamed Brusasorci (1 4941567), was a prolific painter whose works are very numerous in Verona.
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  • Verona is specially rich in early examples of decorative sculpture.
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  • Parts of these doors are covered with bronze reliefs of scenes from the Bible, which are of still earlier date, and were probably brought to Verona from the Rhine provinces.
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  • One characteristic of the 14th and 15th centuries in Verona was the custom, also followed in other Lombardic cities, of setting large equestrian statues over the tombs of powerful military leaders, in some cases above the recumbent effigy of the dead man, as if to represent him in full vigour of life as well as in death.
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  • The architecture of Verona, like its sculpture, passed through Lombard, Florentine and Venetian stages.
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  • The arches are mostly pointed, and in other respects the influence of northern Gothic was more direct in Verona than in Florence.
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  • Another of the leading architects of the next stage of the Renaissance was the Veronese Michele Sanmichele (1484-1559), a great military engineer, and designer of an immense number of magnificent palaces in Verona and other cities of Venetia.
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  • To him are also due the various gates and the most important bastions in the walls of Verona.
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  • The ancient Verona was a town of the Cenomani, a Gaulish tribe, whose chief town was Brixia.
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  • Its fertile surroundings, its central position at the junction of several great roads, and the natural strength of its position, defended by a river along two-thirds of its circumference, all combined to make Verona one of the richest and most important cities in northern Italy, although its extent within the walls was not large.
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  • The emperor Constantine, while advancing towards Rome from Gaul, besieged and took Verona (312); it was here, too, that Odoacer was defeated (499) by Theodoric the Goth, Dietrich von Bern - i.e.
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  • Verona - of German legends, who built a castle at Verona and frequently resided there.
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  • In the middle ages Verona gradually grew in size and importance.
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  • Verona had previously fallen under the power of a less able despot, Ezzelino da Romano, who died in 1259.
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  • Alberto della Scala (died in 1301) was succeeded by his eldest son Bartolomeo, who was confirmed as ruler of Verona by the popular vote, and died in 1304.
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  • Alboino, the second son, succeeded his brother, and died in 1311, when the youngest son of Alberto, Can Grande, who since 1308 had been joint-lord of Verona with his brother, succeeded to the undivided power.
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  • In 1389 Gian Galeazzo Visconti, duke of Milan, became by conquest lord of Verona.
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  • See the various works by Scipione Maffei (Verona Illustrate, 1728; Museum Veronense, 1749); and Th.
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  • In spite of his oath he went again to Italy in 904, where he secured the submission of Lombardy; but on the 21st of July 9 05 he was surprised at Verona by Berengar, who deprived him of his sight and sent him back to Provence, where he passed his days in enforced inactivity until his death in September 928.
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  • Hermann appears to have called himself by the title of margrave, and not the more usual title of count, owing to the connexion of his family with the margraviate of Verona.
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  • Trent was originally the capital of the Tridentini, and is mentioned in the Antonine Itinerary as a station on the great road from Verona to Veldidena (Innsbruck) over the Brenner.
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  • In the middle ages they were known to Ratherius of Verona (loth century), who quotes a passage from i.
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  • Selections were included in a volume of Flores compiled at Verona in 1329; and a MS. of bks.
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  • - The correspondence with Trajan was apparently preserved in a single Paris MS.; Epp. 41-121 were first printed by Avantius of Verona (1502); and Epp. I-40 by Aldus Manutius (1508).
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  • In Italy he formed a friendship with Lorgna, professor of mathematics at Verona, and one of the founders of the Societe' Italiana for the encouragement of the sciences.
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  • It is divided into two very distinct portions by the Brenner Pass (4495 ft.), connecting the Stubai and the Zillerthal groups; over this pass a splendid railway was built in1864-1867from Innsbruck to Verona, while the highway over the pass has from the earliest times been of immense importance from every point of view.
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  • At the Congress of Verona (1822) the Austrian chancellor, Prince Metternich, tried to induce Charles Felix to set aside Charles Albert's rights of succession.
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  • The course of the journey was first northwards to Plombieres, then by Basel to Augsburg and Munich, then through Tirol to Verona and Padua in Italy.
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  • Commerce is chiefly agricultural and is stimulated by a good position in the railway system, and by a canal which opens a water-way by the Panaro and the Po to the Adriatic. Modena is the point at which the railway to Mantua and Verona diverges from that between Milan and Bologna, and has several steam tramways to neighbouring places.
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  • Petrarch had discovered Cicero's Speech pro Archia at Liege (1333) and the Letters to Atticus and Quintus at Verona (1345).
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  • At the various congresses, from Aix-la-Chapelle (1818) to Verona (1822), therefore, he showed himself heartily in sympathy with the repressive policy formulated in the Troppau Protocol.
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  • Another route into Austria, the Brenner, leaves the Milan-Venice line at Verona, which is connected with Modena (and so with central and southern Italy) by a railway through Mantua.
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  • The easiness of the Brenner pass and the abundance of communication with the sea led to the rise of such towns as Verona, Padua and Aquileia: and Milan only became more important than any of these when the German attacks on Italy were felt farther west.
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  • He next accepted (1816) the post of ambassador at Rome, and on his way thither he discovered in the cathedral library of Verona the long-lost Institutes of Gaius, afterwards edited by Savigny, to whom he communicated the discovery under the impression that he had found a portion of Ulpian.
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  • 288 (Venezia, 1840); Mazzuchelli, Scrittori d'Italia; Maffei, Verona Illustrata, p. 254, &c.
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  • Londonderry had been on the eve of starting for the conference at Vienna, and the instructions which he had drawn up for his own guidance were handed over by Canning, the new foreign secretary, to Wellington, who proceeded in September to Vienna, and thence in October to Verona, whither the conference had been adjourned.
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  • At a diet held at Verona, largely attended by German and Italian princes, a fresh campaign was arranged against the Saracens.
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  • He had now plunged into the study of Bellini and the Venetian school, Fra Angelico and the early Tuscans, and he visited Lucca, Pisa, Florence, Padua, Verona and Venice, passionately devoting himself to architecture, sculpture and painting in each city of north Italy.
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  • It was by members of this Oratory - especially St Gaetano di Tiene; Carafa (later Paul IV.), and the great bishop of Verona, Giberti - that the foundations of the Catholic reformation were laid.
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  • When at the beginning of 1823, as a result of the congress of Verona, the French invaded Spain,' "invoking the God of St Louis, for the sake of preserving the throne of Spain to a descendant of Henry IV., and of reconciling that fine kingdom with Europe," and in May the revolutionary party carried Ferdinand to Cadiz, he continued to make promises of amendment till he was free.
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  • The city with its walls was, however, rebuilt five years later by the allied cities of Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua and Verona.
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  • 6,870 Reschen Scheideck Pass (Landeck to Meran), carriage road 4,902 Brenner Pass (Innsbruck to Verona), railway over.
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  • This league or concordia was soon joined by other cities, among which were Milan, Parma, Padua, Verona, Piacenza and Bologna, and the allies began to build a fortress near the confluence of the Tanaro and the Bormida, which, in honour of Pope Alexander III., was called Alessandria.
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  • Railways radiate from it to Lecco, Ponte della Selva, Usmate (for Monza or Seregno), Treviglio (on the main line from Milan to Verona and Venice) and (via Rovato) to Brescia, and steam tramways to Treviglio, Sarnico and Soncino.
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  • He received a scholar's training, studying Latin at Rome under Gasparino da Verona, and Greek at Ferrara under Guarino da Verona.
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  • After another defeat before Verona, Alaric quitted Italy, probably in 403.
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  • Brescia is situated on the main railway line between Milan and Verona, and has branch railways to Iseo, Parma, Cremona and (via Rovato) to Bergamo, and steam tramways to Mantua, Soncino, Ponte Toscolano and Cardone Valtrompia.
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  • In 1258 it fell into the hands of Eccelino of Verona, and belonged to the Scaligers (della Scala) until 1421, when it came under the Visconti of Milan, and in 1426 under Venice.
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  • By the linking-up of the various state systems several grand trunk line routes have been developednotably the lines Berlin-ViennaBudapest; Berlin-Cologne-Brussels and Paris; Berlin-HalleFrankfort-on -Main-Basel; Hamburg-Cassel-Munich and Verona; and Breslau-Dresden-Bamberg-Geneva.
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  • About six months before his death in Rome, in December 983, Otto held a diet at Verona which was attended by many ~t of the German princes, who recognized his infant son Otto as his successor.
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  • During his reign the Venetians went to war with Martino della Scala, lord of Verona, with the result that they occupied Treviso and otherwise extended their possessions on the terra firma.
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  • Owing to the discovery of inscriptions relating to the Gens Vitruvia at Formiae in Campania (Mola di Gaeta), it has been suggested that he was a native of that city, and he has been less reasonably connected with Verona on the strength of an existing arch of the 3rd century, which is inscribed with the name of a later architect of the same family name -- "Lucius Vitruvius Cerdo, a freedman of Lucius."
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  • The church contains fine inlaid choir stalls by Fra Giovanni da Verona.
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  • Livy gives their chief towns as Brixia (Brescia) and Verona; Pliny, Brixia and Cremona.
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  • He struck the name of Alexander Ypsilanti from the Russian army list, and directed his foreign minister, Count Capo d'Istria, himself a Greek, to disavow all sympathy of Russia with his enterprise; and, next year, a deputation of the Greeks of the Morea on its way to the congress of Verona was turned back by his orders on the road.
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  • He travelled by way of Munich, the Brenner and Lago di Garda to Verona and Venice, and from thence to Rome, where he arrived on the 29th of October 1786.
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  • Such, for example, are the bronze doors of San Zenone at Verona (unlike the others, of repoussel not cast work); those of the Duomo of Pisa, cast in 1180 by Bonannus, and of the Duomo of Troia, the last made in the beginning of the 12th century by Oderisius of Benevento.
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  • Among the finest examples of this sort of work are the screens round the tombs of the Scala family at Verona, 1 35 0 - 1 375, - a sort of network of light cusped quatrefoils, each filled up with a small ladder (scala) in allusion to the name of the family.
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  • It is thus the third largest Roman amphitheatre known, being surpassed only by that at Verona and the Colosseum.
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  • Other notices were furnished by Gori, Symbolae litterariae Florentinae (1748, 1751), by Marcello Venuti, Descrizione delle prime scoperte d'Ercolano (Rome, 1748), and Scipione Maffei, Tre lettere intorno alle scoperte d'Ercolano (Verona, 1748).
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  • He found the speech pro Archia at Liege in 1333, and in 1345 at Verona made his famous discovery of the letters to Atticus, which revealed to the world Cicero as a man in place of the " god of eloquence " whom they had worshipped.
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  • Conrad's plan was to attack through the Asiago and Arsiero uplands, in the direction of Vicenza and Bassano rather than towards Verona.
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  • There was considerable hostility between the newly entered family and the Salinguerra, but after considerable struggles Azzo Novello was nominated perpetual podesta in 12 4 2; in 1259 he took Ezzelino of Verona prisoner in battle.
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  • But the end was in most cases the establishment of the despotism of some leading family, such as the Visconti at Milan, the Gonzaga at Mantua, the della Scala in Verona and the Carrara in Padua.
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  • It is a junction for Verona, Cremona and Bergamo, and steam tramways run to Monza, Lodi, &c.
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  • Hagiology entered on a new development with the publication of the Sanctorum priscorum patrum vitae (Venice and Rome, 1551-1560) of Aloysius Lipomanus (Lippomano), bishop of Verona.
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  • He determined to take holy orders, in the expectation that he would become cardinal, and then pope, when he would wrest from the Venetians his principality of Verona, of which the republic had despoiled his ancestors.
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  • It was not until some time after his death that the enemies of his son first alleged that he was not of the family of La Scala, but was the son of Benedetto Bordone, an illuminator or schoolmaster of Verona; that he was educated at Padua, where he took the degree of M.D.; and that his story of his life and adventures before arriving at Agen was a tissue of fables.
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  • His rank as a prince of Verona was recognized.
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  • Whatever the case as to Julius, Joseph had undoubtedly believed himself a prince of Verona, and in his Epistola had put forth with the most perfect good faith, and without inquiry, all that he had heard from his.
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  • Nor does he even attempt a refutation of the crucial point, which Scioppius had proved, as far as a negative can be proved - namely, that William, the last prince of Verona, had no son Nicholas, the alleged grandfather of Julius, nor indeed any son who could have been such grandfather.
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  • An independent value attaches to the ancient palimpsest of Verona, of which the first complete account was given by Mommsen in Abhandl.
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  • Occupied by the troops of Louis of Bavaria, sold to a rich Genoese Gherardino Spinola, seized by John, king of Bohemia, pawned to the Rossi of Parma, by them ceded to Martino della Scala of Verona, sold to the Florentines, surrendered to the Pisans, nominally liberated by the emperor Charles IV.
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  • His eloquence on behalf of the tyrants of Verona was successful.
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  • This was no less than a discovery at Verona of Cicero's Familiar Letters.
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  • There he can reconstruct the splendour of that Minoan age to which Homeric poems look back, as the Germanic epics looked back to Rome or Verona.
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  • The best collection is that published at Verona (1737-1738); it includes the life by Fiordibello.
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  • Another Jacopo led the Paduans in 1312 against Cangrande della Scala, lord of Verona, and though taken prisoner managed to negotiate a peace in 1318.
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  • The Scala were expelled from Verona, but Carrara and Visconti quarrelled over the division of the spoils.
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  • Visconti was determined to capture Padua as well as Verona, and made an alliance with Venice and the house of Este for the purpose.
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  • Carrara then allied himself with Guglielmo Scala, seized Verona, and tried to capture Vicenza.
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  • Padua and Verona were besieged; the latter, defended by Novello's son Jacopo, was soon captured.
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  • It lies on the main line of railway between Verona and Modena; and is also connected by rail with Cremona and with Monselice, on the line from Padua to Bologna, and by steam tramway with Brescia and other places.
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  • It was originally called na Brodé (by the ford), and received the name of Bern, Berun or Verona in the 13th century, when it obtained the privileges of a city from the emperor Charles IV., who was specially attached to the place, calling it "Verona mea."
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  • (f) The Verona Latin Fragments, discovered and published by Hauler, portions of a form akin to (e), which may be dated c. 340, though possibly earlier.
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  • The first two chapters, ire pi X apcvµarwv, may be based upon a lost work of St Hippolytus, otherwise known only by a reference to it in the preface of the Verona Latin Fragments; and an examination shows that this is highly probable.
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  • The first steps towards the inevitable breach with the reactionary rowers had already been taken before Castlereaghs tragic death on the eve of the congress of Verona brought George Canning into office as the executor of his policy.
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  • The new spirit was most conspicuous in foreign affairs; in the protest of Great Britain against the action of the continental ~ powe1s at Verona (see VERONA, CON8RESS OF), in the recognition of the South American republics, and of British later in the sympathetic attitude of the government policy, towards the insurrection in Greece.
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  • This policy had been foreshadowed in the instructions drawn up by Castlereagh for his own guidance at Verona; but Canning succeeded in giving it a popular and national color and thus removing from the government all suspicion of sympathy with the reactionary spirit of the Holy Alliance.
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  • Published under the cover, of a pseudonym at Geneva in 1667, it was supposed to be addressed by a gentleman of Verona, Severinus de Monzambano, to his brother Laelius.
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  • At the popes appeal Charles crossed the Alps, took Verona and Pavia after a long siege, assumed the iron crown of the Lombard kings (June 774), and made a triumphal entry into Rome, which had not formed part of the popes desires.
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  • In 1822 the question was again raised as the main subject of discussion at the congress assembled at Verona (see VERONA, CONGRESS oF).
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  • The decision of the powers at the congress of Verona to give a free hand to France in the matter of in.tervention in Spain, gave the British government its opportunity.
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  • 6 After Valmy he had to retire to Hamm in Westphalia, where, on the death of Louis XVI., he proclaimed himself regent; from here he went south, with the idea of encouraging the royalist feeling in the south of France, and settled at Verona, where on the death of Louis XVII.
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  • So early as 1783 Johannes von Muller of Gottingen had called attention to the historical figures appearing in the Nibelungenlied, identifying Etzel as Attila, Dietrich of Bern as Theodoric of Verona, and the Burgundian kings Gunther, Giselher and Gernot as the Gundaharius, Gislaharius and Godomar of the Lex Burgundiorum; in 1820 Julius Leichtlen (Neuaufgefundenes Bruchstick des Nibelungenliedes, Freiburg-im-Breisgau) roundly declared that "the Nibelungenlied rests entirely on a historical foundation, and that any other attempt to explain it must fail."
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  • In essence, Two Gentlemen of Verona gives you a measuring stick to see the brilliance in the best works.
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  • Sunday Independent, Ireland, May 26 1996 " Welsh mezzo Buddug Verona James whose voice and temperament seem ideal for baroque opera.
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  • The new Verona power chair enables the user to achieve a very high degree of independence.
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  • Thus he resisted all Metternich's efforts to draw him into his "system"; stoutly maintained the doctrine of non-intervention against the majority of the Powers of the continental alliance; protested at the congress of Troppau against the suggested application of the principle of intervention to the States of the Church; and at Verona joined with Tuscany in procuring the rejection of Metternich's proposal for a central committee, on the model of the Mainz Commission, to discover and punish political offences in Italy.
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  • His want of success compelled him on the 4th of December 1516 to sign the treaty of Brussels, which left Milan in the hands of the French king, while Verona was soon afterwards transferred to Venice.
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  • All we know for certain is that1 at this epoch, Rome attempts to ruin Tivoli, and Venice Pisa; Milan fights with Cremona, Cremona with Crema, Pavia with Verona, Verona with Padua, Piacenza with Parma, Modena and Reggio with Bologna, Bologna and Faenza with Ravenna and Imola, Florence and Pisa with Lucca and Siena, and so on through the whole list of cities.
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  • Matters were brought to a crisis by the outcome of the Verona conferences (see Verona, Congress Of), and the re-establishment, in 1823, of the absolute power of the king in Spain by French arms and under French influence, the logical consequence of which seemed to be the reconquest, with the aid of France, of the Spanish colonies.
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  • It comprises the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Udine, Venice, Verona and Vicenza, and has an area of 9476 sq.
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  • Wellington's official part at the congress is outlined elsewhere (see Verona, Congress Of).
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  • Yet the fact remains that when Canning came into office in September 1822, he found the instructions to be given to the representative of the British government at the congress of Verona already drawn up by his predecessor, who had meant to attend the congress himself (see Londonderry, Robert Stewart, 2nd Marquess Of).
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  • It was originally called na Brodé (by the ford), and received the name of Bern, Berun or Verona in the 13th century, when it obtained the privileges of a city from the emperor Charles IV., who was specially attached to the place, calling it "Verona mea."
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  • Fair Verona - This lingerie line is designed with woman in mind, offering flirty, sexy pieces with lots of lace, ruffles and sensual style.
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