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verb

verb

verb Sentence Examples

  • Never let a transitive verb just lay there without an object.

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  • Paul evidently plays on the verb, krino, diakrino, katakrino (Kplvw, S&aKplvw, KaraKpivw).

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  • The subject of the sentence precedes the verb and the object follows it.

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  • The verb infinitive appears in large print at the right or left corner of the page along with the English translation.

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  • The verb "to quill" is to fold lace, muslin or other light material into narrow flutes or pleats; when so pleated the material is called "quilling."

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  • Here, for the first time in logical literature, subject and predicate suddenly appear as terms, or extremes, with the verb of being (r6 e bat) or not being (re) 1.6 that) completely disengaged from both, but connecting them as a copula.

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  • The short discourse on the expression of thought by language (irEpi `Epjs vElas, De Interpretatione) is based on the Platonic division of the sentence (X6yos) into noun and verb (ivoµa and Am).

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  • The short discourse on the expression of thought by language (irEpi `Epjs vElas, De Interpretatione) is based on the Platonic division of the sentence (X6yos) into noun and verb (ivoµa and Am).

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  • The verb "to gouge" is used in the sense of scooping or forcing out.

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  • From some of these peoples and at one of these holy places, a group of Israelite tribes adopted the religion of Yahweh, the God who, by the hand of Moses, had delivered them from Egypt.2 The tribes of this region probably belonged to some branch of the great Arab stock, and the name Yahweh has, accordingly, been connected with the Arabic hawa, " the void " (between heaven and earth), " the atmosphere," or with the verb hawa, cognate with Heb.

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  • From some of these peoples and at one of these holy places, a group of Israelite tribes adopted the religion of Yahweh, the God who, by the hand of Moses, had delivered them from Egypt.2 The tribes of this region probably belonged to some branch of the great Arab stock, and the name Yahweh has, accordingly, been connected with the Arabic hawa, " the void " (between heaven and earth), " the atmosphere," or with the verb hawa, cognate with Heb.

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  • But in spite of this great logical achievement, he continued throughout the discourse to accept Plato's grammatical analysis of all sentences into noun and verb, which indeed applies to the proposition as a sentence but does not give its particular elements.

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  • Assume that the parser doesn't allow anything to precede the verb.

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  • of the verb; the infin.

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  • of the verb; the infin.

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  • This assumption that Yahweh is derived from the verb "to be," as seems to be implied in Exod.

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  • It was certainly by Aristotle, because it contained the triple grammatical division of words into noun, verb and conjunction, which the history of grammar recognized as his discovery.

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  • 14, &c.), a derivative of the verb hitter (Pi.) or hiktir (Hiph.), which verb is used, not only in Ex.

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  • Another explanation, which appears first in Jewish authors of the middle ages and has found wide acceptance in recent times, derives the name from the causative of the verb; He (who) causes things to be, gives them being; or calls events into existence, brings them to pass; with many individual modifications of interpretation - creator, lifegiver, fulfiller of promises.

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  • A serious objection to this theory in every form is that the verb hayah, " to be," has no causative stem in Hebrew; to express the ideas which these scholars find in the name Yahweh the language employs altogether different verbs.

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  • There was a verb conjugator hosted at the University of Trieste.

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  • As in Bantu, the verb presents a multiplicity of forms, including one present, three past and future tenses, with personal endings complete, passive, interrogative, conditional, elective, negative and other forms, each with its proper participial inflexions.

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  • Whereas the Hebrew verb is devoid of real tenses, and only expresses an action as completed or as in process without indicating time past, present or future, Syriac has by the help of an auxiliary verb constructed a set of tenses.

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  • Similarly in the case of the sign MU, which, besides signifying " name " as above pointed out, is also the Sumerian word for " give," and therefore may be read iddin, " he gave," from nadanu, or may be read nadin, " giver "; and when, as actually happens, a name occurs in which the first element is the name of a deity followed by MU-MU, a new element of doubt is introduced through the uncertainty whether the first MU is to be taken as a form of the verb nadanu and the second as the noun shumu, " name," or vice versa.

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  • In the sense of "revere" or "respect," the verb "to worship" occurs in the English Prayer-book, in the phrase "with my body I thee worship" in the Marriage Service.

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  • 14, thus seeming to connect the name Yahweh with the Hebrew verb hayah, " to become, to be."

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  • The Syriac verb is remarkable for having entirely lost the original passive forms, such as in Arabic can be formed in every conjugation and in Hebrew are represented by the Pual and Hophal.

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  • The popular etymology of the name Tabriz from tab=fever, riz = pourer away (verb, rikhtan = pour away, flow; German rieseln?), hence "fever-destroying," is erroneous and was invented in modern times.

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  • The popular etymology of the name Tabriz from tab=fever, riz = pourer away (verb, rikhtan = pour away, flow; German rieseln?), hence "fever-destroying," is erroneous and was invented in modern times.

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  • (1) A verb with two principal applications, to intend, purpose or design, and to signify.

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  • The words introducing this form (6Tav bE TO '&TL Tptrov irpoo-KaTnyopijTac, chap. so, s 9 b s 9), which are the origin of the phrase tertii adjacentis, disengage the verb of being (g un) partially but not entirely, because they still treat it as an extra part of the predicate, and not as a distinct copula.

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  • 1-13 the object frequently precedes the verb and the subject nearly always.

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  • When an action is expressed in the past the word which forms with the verb the past tense is divided from the verb itself by the object.

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  • ASPERGES (" thou wilt sprinkle," from the Latin verb aspergere), the ceremony of sprinkling the people with holy water before High Mass in the Roman Catholic Church, so called from the first word of the verse (Ps.

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  • Moreover we can make a history of Aristotle's thought and gradual composition thus: (s) Earlier acceptance in the De Interpretatione of Plato's grammatical analysis of the sentence into noun and verb (secundi adjacentis) but gradually disengaging the proposition, and after wards introducing the verb of being as a third thing added (tertium adjacens) to the predicated verb, for the purpose of opposition.

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  • As a verb, the word means to stifle or check; hence damped vibrations or oscillations are those which have been reduced or stopped, instead of being allowed to die out naturally; the "dampers" of the piano are small pieces of feltcovered wood which fall upon the strings and stop their vibrations as the keys are allowed to rise; and the "damper" of a chimney or flue, by restricting the draught, lessens the rate of combustion.

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  • Among the striking peculiarities of the language are the definite and indefinite forms of the active verb, e.g.

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  • This advantage, recalled by an old though erroneous 1 Servus is not cognate with servare, as has often been supposed; it is really related to the Homeric E'lpepos and the verb Etpw, with which the Latin sero is to be connected.

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  • Nor does the work get further than the analysis of some propositions into noun and verb with " is " added to the predicated verb; an analysis, however, which was a great logical discovery and led Aristotle further to the remark that " is " does not mean " exists "; e.g.

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  • Afterwards (chap. so) proceeding to the opposition of propositions, he adds the form called tertii adjacentis, in a passage which is the first appearance, or rather adumbration, of the verb of being as a copula.

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  • Afterwards (chap. so) proceeding to the opposition of propositions, he adds the form called tertii adjacentis, in a passage which is the first appearance, or rather adumbration, of the verb of being as a copula.

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  • The Semitic name of the symbol is shin; the Greek name sigma may mean merely the hissing letter and may be a genuine Greek derivative from the verb o-4co, hiss.

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  • The word is now generally a synonym for "monkey," but the common verb for both (as transferred figuratively to human beings) is "to ape," i.e.

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  • The two main rules by which the order of the words in a sentence is regulated are - subject, verb, object; and qualifying words follow those which they qualify.

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  • Both interpretations, " He (who) is (always the same)," and " He (who) is (absolutely, the truly existent)," import into the name all that they profess to find in it; the one, the religious faith in God's unchanging fidelity to his people, the other, a philosophical conception of absolute being which is foreign both to the meaning of the Hebrew verb and to the force of the tense employed.

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  • the Categories earlier than some parts of the Metaphysics, because under the influence of Platonic forms it talks of inherent attributes, and allows secondary substances which are universal; the De Interpretatione earlier than the Analytics, because in it the Platonic analysis of the sentence into noun and verb is retained for the proposition; the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia earlier than the Nicomachean Ethics, because they are rudimentary sketches of it, and the one written rather in the theological spirit, the other rather in the dialectical style, of Plato; and the Rhetoric to Alexander earlier than the Rhetoric, because it contains a rudimentary theory of the rational evidences afterwards developed into a logic of rhetoric in the Rhetoric and Analytics.

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  • Both interpretations, " He (who) is (always the same)," and " He (who) is (absolutely, the truly existent)," import into the name all that they profess to find in it; the one, the religious faith in God's unchanging fidelity to his people, the other, a philosophical conception of absolute being which is foreign both to the meaning of the Hebrew verb and to the force of the tense employed.

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  • " him," " her," " the man," &c.), ldtok, " I see " (indefinite); the insertion of the causative, frequentative, diminutive and potential syllables after the root of the verb, e.g.

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  • He speaks of the dominical host (hostia), and takes the verb to do in Paul's letter in the sense of to sacrifice.

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  • Even when the sign indicative of the verb is clearly recognised there still remains to be determined the form of the verb intended.

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  • Even when the sign indicative of the verb is clearly recognised there still remains to be determined the form of the verb intended.

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  • The original motive of the recipients of these favours was doubtless the taste of the time for outward display; St Bernard, zealous for the monastic ideal, de nounced abbots for wearing mitres and the like more pontificum, and Peter the Cantor roundly called the abbatial mitre " inane, superfluous and puerile " (Verb.

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  • 3 At the close of the Verb.

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  • In other cases the pronunciation can be ascertained only from the context, as in use, unvoiced for the substantive, voiced for the verb.

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  • ver, " he beats "; veret, " he causes to beat "; vereget, " he beats repeatedly "; verint, " he beats a little "; verhet, " he can beat "; the mode of expressing possession by the tenses of the irregular verb lenni, " to be " (viz.

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  • The full title is ilm al jebr wa'l-mugabala, which contains the ideas of restitution and comparison, or opposition and comparison, or resolution and equation, jebr being derived from the verb jabara, to reunite, and mugabala, from gabala, to make equal.

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  • of the verb.

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  • The adverb usually follows the verb.

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  • See: Proc. Verb.

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  • 43; Festus, de verb.

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  • De Comp. Verb.

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  • the frequent use of the kindred verb) lies elsewhere.

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  • An active or causal verb requires before it the instrumental instead of the nominative case, which goes only before a neuter or intransitive verb.

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  • The word is the English representative of the substantive common to Teutonic languages, as "dead" is of the adjective, and "die" of the verb; the ultimate origin is the pre-Teutonic verbal stem dau-; cf.

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  • 34), the same verb being used as in the LXX.

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  • There can be no doubt, too, that the word rendered "tabernacle" (aKrlvii) with the corresponding verb "to tabernacle" (crKnvovv) has been chosen for use in St John i.

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  • It is an elementary introduction to the study of Hebrew, the first of its kind, in which only the most indispensable definitions and rules have a place, the remainder being almost wholly occupied by paradigms. Moses Kimhi was the first who made the verb paqadh a model for conjugation, and the first also who introduced the now usual sequence in the enumeration of stem-forms. His handbook was of great historical importance as in the first half of the 6th century it became the favourite manual for the study of Hebrew among non-Judaic scholars (1st ed., Pesaro, 1508).

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  • The latter is an extensive monograph on the verb in Egyptian and Coptic by a brilliant and laborious philologist.

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  • The typical Coptic root thus became biliteral rather than triliteral, and the verb, by means of periphrases, developed tenses of remarkable precision.

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  • In the latter case the verb was probably in the participle, so that .f~nitt-Ln, they hear, is literally hearing are they.

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  • tIpty; verb (4 lit.), tIpty.

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  • It is probable that the verb had a special form denoting condition, as in Arabic. There was a causative form prefixing t, and ti-aces of forms resembling Piel and Niphal are observed.

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  • An indefinite article has been formed, and in the conjugation of the verb a great simplicity sets in.

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  • 8, 54) Summanus and the verb summanare are used for the god of thieves and the act of stealing, with obvious reference to Summanus as a god of night, a time favourable to thieves and their business.

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  • 22-31) was early employed by Christian theologians (Irenaeus, Athanasius, Augustine and others) in the controversies respecting the nature of the Second Person of the Trinity, particularly in connexion with the idea of eternal generation; the argument turned in part on the question whether the verb in v.

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  • A collection of the various signs of the alphabet has shown thirty-two letters, four more than Arabic. De Slane, in his notes on the Berber historian Ibn Khaldun, shows the following points of similarity to the Semitic class: - its tri-literal roots, the inflections of the verb, the formation of derived verbs, the genders of the second and Arab districts to build mills for the Arabs.

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  • en graine, literally in dye, comes the French verb engrainer, Eng.

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  • The sophist Protagoras had distinguished various kinds of sentences, and Plato had divided the sentence into noun and verb, signifying a thing and the action of a thing.

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  • All these points about speech, eloquence and argument between man and man were absorbed into Aristotle's theory of reasoning, and in particular the grammar of the sentence consisting of noun and verb caused the logic of the proposition consisting of subject and predicate.

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  • Without realizing their debt to tradition, Herbart, Mill and recently Sigwart, have repeated Aristotle's separation of the copula from the verb of existence, as if it were a modern discovery that " is " is not the same as " exists."

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  • This reconstruction, which merges subject and predicate in one expression, in order to combine it with the verb of existence, is repeated in similar proposals of recent English logicians.

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  • He had abandoned for the most part - the Platonic sense of the corresponding verb, viz.

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  • The adducing of a witness for which he uses the verb is not an idea that covers all the uses.

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  • They have the chief characteristics of the Polynesian, with Malay affinities, and peculiarities such as the use of suffixes and inseparable pronouns and, as in Tagal, of the infix to denote changes in the verb; in the west groups there is a tendency to closed syllables and double consonants, and a use of the palatals ch, j, sh, the dental th, and s (the last perhaps only in foreign words), which is alien to the Polynesian.

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  • In the Ebon language, however, the tenses are sometimes marked; but in that the simple form of the verb is frequently given.

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  • The verb form See especially Athenische Mitteilungen, xxi.

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  • The absence of g from the latter expressior indicates that the circumstances of the rapid precession are verb nearly those of a free Eulerian rotation (~ 19), gravity playing only a subordinate part.

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  • The later "c-w-µ€v was at first a solecism, an attempt to conjugate a " verb in µ.c " like the " verbs in w."

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  • What the grammarians called " tmesis," the separation of the preposition from the verb with which it is compounded, is peculiar to Homer.

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  • Again, the verb p7)yvvp., " to break," occurs forty-eight times in the Iliad, and once in the Odyssey, - the reason being that it is constantly used of breaking the armour of an enemy, the gate of a city, the hostile ranks, &c. Once more, the word aKOTos, " darkness," occurs fourteen times in the Iliad, once in the Odyssey.

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  • The verb has four tenses in the indicative, one in the subjunctive, and one in the imperative.

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  • The regular verb caraf, " I love," is conjugated thus Indicative-Pres.

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  • As in other languages the verb " to be " and its compounds are irregular; the number of other irregular verbs is comparatively small.

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  • The verb may be preceded by an affirmative, a negative, or an interrogative particle.

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  • When a noun comes first, it is followed by a relative pronoun, thus, Dafydd a brynodd lyfr yno, which really means " (it is) David who bought a book there," and is never used in any other sense in the spoken language, though in literary Welsh it is used rhetorically for the simple statement which is properly expressed by putting the verb first.

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  • In a simple interrogative sentence the introductory particle before the verb is a, and the positive answer consists in a repetition of the verb; a ddaw Dafydd ?

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  • If the verb is aorist the answer is do for all verbs.

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  • In negative answers na precedes the verb.

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  • A relative pronoun immediately precedes its verb and can only be separated from it by an infixed pronoun, thus Dafydd a'i prynodd, " (it is) David who bought it," yno y'm gweli, " (it is) there that thou wilt see me."

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  • The verb does not agree with its subject unless the latter is a personal pronoun; when the subject is a noun the verb is put in the third person singular; thus carant, " they love," can take a pronominal subject - carant hwy, " they love "; but " the men love " is car y dynion (not carant y dynion, which can only mean " they love the men ").

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  • In relative clauses the verb is sometimes made to agree; but in the oldest poetry we generally find the singular verb, as in the oft-repeated Gododin phrase Grvyr a aeth Gatraeth, " men who went (to) Catraeth " (not Gwyr a aethant).

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  • They usually begin: " our Masters taught," " it is taught," or " he taught," the verb te'na (cf.

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  • Derived from the verb ma, " to stretch out," her name denoted the ideas of right and rule, and covered the notions of order, law, justice and truth, which remained steadfast and unalterable.

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  • 29) is the necessary second verb: " Why doth a mortal complain?"

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  • The verb displays a like abundance of trf mary forms with Sanskrit, but the conjugation by periphrasis lit only slightly developed.

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  • In the verb ripound forms predominate.

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  • It is true that, as a matter of fact, the earliest uses of the word (the verb /xXoa04Eiv occurs in Herodotus and Thucydides) imply the idea of the pursuit of knowledge; but the distinction between the aogios, or wise man, and the 4nXoaoa50s, or lover of wisdom, appears first in the Platonic writings, and lends itself naturally to the so-called Socratic irony.

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  • For the passive voice, a fi is used, with the past participle of the required verb.

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  • The verb "to drain," with its substantives "drain" and "drainage," represents the 0.

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  • words 13arTCaµos and f367rTC6µa (both of which occur in the New Testament) signify " ceremonial washing," from the verb (3air-T4"w, the shorter form meaning " dip " without ritual significance (e.g.

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  • The name is a bad one, since it does not correspond with any ordinary meaning of the verb.

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  • The verb "to fold" (O.

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  • By the mythologists of Cicero's time the name was connected with the verb furere and the noun feria, which in the plural (not being used in the singular in this sense) was accepted as the equivalent of the Greek Erinyes.

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  • The following have been suggested: (I) augur (or augus) is a substantive originally meaning "increase" (related to augustus as robur to robustus, then transferred to the priest as the giver of increase or blessing; (2) = avi-gur, the second part of the word pointing to (a) garrire, " chatter," or (b) gerere, the augur being conceived as "carrying" or guiding the flight of the birds; (3) from a lost verb augo =" tell," "declare."

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  • The verb is used for the creaming or frothing of liquids and of the suffusing of the skin with blood.

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  • Almost any word may be made into a verb by using with it a verbal particle.

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  • ARGUMENT, a word meaning "proof," "evidence," corresponding in English to the Latin word argumentum, from which it is derived; the originating Latin verb arguere, to make clear, from which comes the English "argue," is from a root meaning bright, appearing in Greek ap-yin, white.

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  • The verb "to dress" has various applications which can be deduced from its original meaning.

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  • The Hebrew probably signifies literally "expanse," and is thus used of the expanse or vault of the sky, the verb from which it is derived meaning "to beat out."

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  • In Syriac the verb means "to make firm," and is the direct source of the Gr.

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  • Odin's name is connected with that of Wuotan, and referred to the Old High-German verb watan wuot = meare, cum impetu ferri (Grimm, Teut.

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  • 26 seq.), and although Jacob set up at Shechem an "altar," the verb suggests that the original object was a pillar (Gen.

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  • From the verb "to crop," i.e.

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  • The verb "to fathom," i.e.

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  • (2) As regards conjugation only two points need be noted here: (a) it employs the form known as the inchoative, that is to say, the lengthening of the radical of the present in verbs of the third conjugation by means of the syllable ex or ix, a proceeding common to Italian, Walachian, Provenal and French, but altogether unknown in Hispanic Romance; (b) the formation of a great number of past participles in which the termination is added; as in Provenal, not to the radical of the verb, but to that of the perfect: tingut from tinch, pogut from poch, conegut from conech, while in Castilian tenido (formerly also tenudo), podido, conocido, are participles formed from the infinitive.

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  • But the simple perfect is no longer employed in the spoken language, which has substituted for it a periphrastic perfect, composed of the infinitive o~ the verb and the present of the auxiliary anar: va-ig pendre, for example, does not mean I am going to take, but I have taken.

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  • antghi, aghi), has likewise served fur the forination not only of the past participle but also of the infinitive (agher, habere, can only be explained by ach, 3rd person of the perfect); the infinitives with r paragogic (viurer, seurer, plonrer) are not used (viure, seure, ploure ilistead); in the conjugation of the present of the verb essar or esser, the 2iid pers.

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  • The verb e s s e r a has been mixed, not as in the other Romance languages with s t a r a, but with s e d e r e, as is proved by older forms seer, siedes, sieden, seyendo, obviously derived from s e d e r e, and which have in the texts sometimes the meaning of to be seated, sometimes that of to be, and sometimes both.

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  • The verb ser gives yes (sometimes yeres) in the 2nd pers.

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  • Certain forms of the conjugation of the verb differ from the Castilian: dar, esiar, haver, saber, poner readily form their imperfects and imperfect subjunctives like the regular verbs in ar and erhavieron (Cast.

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  • In the inflexion of the verb there is nothing special to note, except some instances of 2nd pers.

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  • But Matarigvan was feigned to have brought Agni, fire, and "the fetching of the god was designated by the same verb mathnami as the proper earthly boring" of the firestick.

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  • "Now this verb, especially when compounded with the preposition pra, gained the signification to tear off, snatch to oneself, rob."

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  • This apple is really big: adjectives used like this after the verb to be are known as predicate adjectives.

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  • The word "be" is an imperative verb.

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  • The meanings of this verb is wide: from exhorting and appealing to comforting and consoling.

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  • An adverb may precede the verb.

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  • Does the verb govern the accusative or the dative?

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  • So the parser will create tokens for the following elements: The verb (GIVE ), modified by an adverb (QUICKLY ).

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  • The infinitive often functions as a verbal noun, and as such can be the complement of another verb. infix see affix.

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  • auxiliary verb do is not used: DIRECT: " Do you like Oasis?

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  • back-formation from the verb apretar.

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  • Media The Verb - BBC Radio 3's Saturday night word cabaret program.

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  • This change allowed us to isolate the implicit causality of the verb itself from the contribution of the connective.

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  • collocateond and third extracts show problems with the collocating verb, have, and give being used instead of show.

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  • conjugate a verb in simple present tense.

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  • Italian Verbs A Mac application for learning Italian verb conjugation.

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  • This dictionary contains 766 Spanish verbs, with all major regular and irregular verb conjugations in 13 tenses and moods.

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  • There's also a verb lookup as well with full conjugations, which is very handy.

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  • Producers of verb conjugation software, which include verb games which students can play across a local network or the Internet.

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  • In Hindi, the agreement feature provides an extra retrieval cue at the verb.

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  • When the OED adds the verb form of ' cargo cult ' to its corpus, remember where you read that first.

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  • These dictionaries include complete verb conjugation and grammar (agreements in gender and number of nouns and adjectives, german declensions ).

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  • deponent verb?

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  • ellipsis of the verb; each of the three parts forms an antithesis.

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  • endings for the verb " gweld " .

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  • Students are tested on verb endings of regular and irregular verbs.

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  • ergative case marker ne is required by perfect verb morphology.

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  • But the mutual exclusion in such cases need not survive the addition of a verb.

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  • finite verb.

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  • It does include a box on present tense verb conjugation (taking vowel harmony into account!

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  • Ice verb (ice, icing, iced) - To make something icy; to become icy.

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  • impersonal verb.

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  • implicit causality of the verb itself from the contribution of the connective.

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  • infinitive of this verb?

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  • Non-finite verb forms include infinitives and participles, plus some derived adjectives.

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  • infinitive verb form, e.g. They must leave.

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  • The verb infinitive appears in large print at the right or left corner of the page along with the English translation.

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  • inflected passive verb.

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  • It is fair to say that Portuguese grammar is more complex than English, mainly due to verb inflection.

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  • It includes a survey of grammar, with tables for verb conjugations and noun inflections.

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  • inflectional paradigm for a noun or a verb, e.g. walk, walks, walking, walked.

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  • intransitive verb.

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  • And then 3 vi (verb intransitive) meaning verbs which do not take a direct object.

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  • modal verb would, see our grammar archive.

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  • morphology of the verb in Basque.

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  • The section on verb morphology accounts for one third of the book.

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  • They were asked to use the present participle of the verb.

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  • It also has three participles which help to explain the main verb.

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  • The main part is the ' third part ' of a verb, which is properly called the past participle.

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  • All passive forms are made up of the verb be + past participle: active Somebody saw you.

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  • participle verb forms.

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  • The suffix -n is given to isolated nominal uses of adjectives, or to nominal uses of verb participles.

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  • participle of the verb.

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  • passive verb, the order is reversed: object then verb then agent.

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  • It is from the verb " sever " but it is past, passive, and adjectival, i.e. a perfective passive participle.

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  • past participle of the verb.

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  • perfective aspect verb you can only form the past tense and the future tense.

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  • perfective rather than perfective verb forms.

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  • phrasal verb ' ' .

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  • plural verb depending on the context.

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  • The verb " vouloir " is also use to give a command and still remain polite.

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  • present participle of the verb.

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  • They were asked to use the present participle of the verb.

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  • In declarative sentences, verb reduplication is associated with aspect which is assumed to have a strong feature.

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  • retrieval cue at the verb.

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  • separable verb also a little bit reform.

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  • You will encounter the verb ser (to be) and adjectives.

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  • The subject of a sentence must ' agree ' with its verb: e.g. a singular subject requires a singular verb.

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  • You'll learn about a new form of the verb called the subjunctive, some useful motoring terms and about exchanging currencies.

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  • Rule: If the verb in the main clause is present, future, or imperative, use the present or perfect subjunctive.

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  • subjunctive form of the verb.

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  • You can't add two suffixes to the same verb to create a different noun.

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  • These elements are verb suffixes, Prefixes, auxiliary verbs and roots.

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  • In compound tenses we need to include the direct object between the subject and the auxiliary verb.

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  • Time lines are also a great way of conveying the meaning of different verb tenses.

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  • transitive verb just lay there without an object.

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  • Less garden pathing for obligatorily transitive verbs was found only later, e.g. on the main verb.

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  • Further down you will find 2 vt (verb transitive) meaning verbs which take a direct object, with examples of usage.

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  • of dova, "I will"), like the Greek 6a, is prefixed without change to all persons of the verb: a similar usage in Servian and Bulgarian, as well as in Rumanian (especially the Macedonian dialect), is peculiar to these languages in the Slavonic and Latin groups.

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  • The verb presents a variety of conjugations, expressing nearly all the moods and tenses of the Greek.

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  • Other meanings of plant are derived from the verb to plant (Lat.

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  • The verb "to quill" is to fold lace, muslin or other light material into narrow flutes or pleats; when so pleated the material is called "quilling."

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  • It is a language of the isolating class, in which every word is a monosyllable, and may be employed either as a noun or as a verb according to its context and its position in a sentence.

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  • of the verb, e.g.

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  • The main grammatical distinction between Syriac and all the west Aramaic dialects is that in Syriac the 3rd person of the imperfect (singular and plural) of the verb begins with n, but in west Aramaic, as in the other Semitic languages, it begins with y.

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  • The Syriac verb is remarkable for having entirely lost the original passive forms, such as in Arabic can be formed in every conjugation and in Hebrew are represented by the Pual and Hophal.

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  • Whereas the Hebrew verb is devoid of real tenses, and only expresses an action as completed or as in process without indicating time past, present or future, Syriac has by the help of an auxiliary verb constructed a set of tenses.

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  • The original motive of the recipients of these favours was doubtless the taste of the time for outward display; St Bernard, zealous for the monastic ideal, de nounced abbots for wearing mitres and the like more pontificum, and Peter the Cantor roundly called the abbatial mitre " inane, superfluous and puerile " (Verb.

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  • GERMAN BAPTIST BRETHREN, or German Brethren, a sect of Anabaptist Pietists which originated in Germany, and whose members are popularly known in the United States as "Dunkers," "Dunkards" or "Tunkers," corruptions of the German verb tunken, " to dip," in recognition of the sect's continued adherence to the practice of trine immersion.

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  • 3 At the close of the Verb.

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  • The two main rules by which the order of the words in a sentence is regulated are - subject, verb, object; and qualifying words follow those which they qualify.

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  • The errors of common opinion arise to a great extent from the ambiguous use of the verb "to be," which may imply existence or be merely the copula which connects subject and predicate.

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  • The Semitic name of the symbol is shin; the Greek name sigma may mean merely the hissing letter and may be a genuine Greek derivative from the verb o-4co, hiss.

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  • In .other cases the pronunciation can be ascertained only from the context, as in use, unvoiced for the substantive, voiced for the verb.

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  • This advantage, recalled by an old though erroneous 1 Servus is not cognate with servare, as has often been supposed; it is really related to the Homeric E'lpepos and the verb Etpw, with which the Latin sero is to be connected.

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  • The derivation of the word has been obscured by a connexion in sense with the verb "cow," to instil fear into, which is derived from old Norse kuga, a word of similar meaning, and with the verb "cower," to crouch, which is also Scandinavian in origin.'

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  • Among the striking peculiarities of the language are the definite and indefinite forms of the active verb, e.g.

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  • " him," " her," " the man," &c.), ldtok, " I see " (indefinite); the insertion of the causative, frequentative, diminutive and potential syllables after the root of the verb, e.g.

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  • ver, " he beats "; veret, " he causes to beat "; vereget, " he beats repeatedly "; verint, " he beats a little "; verhet, " he can beat "; the mode of expressing possession by the tenses of the irregular verb lenni, " to be " (viz.

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  • The full title is ilm al jebr wa'l-mugabala, which contains the ideas of restitution and comparison, or opposition and comparison, or resolution and equation, jebr being derived from the verb jabara, to reunite, and mugabala, from gabala, to make equal.

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  • 1 The singular 1 is properly the infinitive or nomen verbi of 1 '7r1 a verb employed in the technical language of the Temple service for the execution of a jubilant song of praise to the accompaniment of music and the blare of the priestly trumpets (1 Chron.

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  • 21 the verb of which r.???

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  • 14, &c.), a derivative of the verb hitter (Pi.) or hiktir (Hiph.), which verb is used, not only in Ex.

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  • " Mine," both verb and substantive, come from the Fr., and is usually connected with Lat.

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  • Similarly in the case of the sign MU, which, besides signifying " name " as above pointed out, is also the Sumerian word for " give," and therefore may be read iddin, " he gave," from nadanu, or may be read nadin, " giver "; and when, as actually happens, a name occurs in which the first element is the name of a deity followed by MU-MU, a new element of doubt is introduced through the uncertainty whether the first MU is to be taken as a form of the verb nadanu and the second as the noun shumu, " name," or vice versa.

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  • As a verb, the word means to stifle or check; hence damped vibrations or oscillations are those which have been reduced or stopped, instead of being allowed to die out naturally; the "dampers" of the piano are small pieces of feltcovered wood which fall upon the strings and stop their vibrations as the keys are allowed to rise; and the "damper" of a chimney or flue, by restricting the draught, lessens the rate of combustion.

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  • As in Bantu, the verb presents a multiplicity of forms, including one present, three past and future tenses, with personal endings complete, passive, interrogative, conditional, elective, negative and other forms, each with its proper participial inflexions.

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  • of the verb.

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  • 14, thus seeming to connect the name Yahweh with the Hebrew verb hayah, " to become, to be."

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  • Another explanation, which appears first in Jewish authors of the middle ages and has found wide acceptance in recent times, derives the name from the causative of the verb; He (who) causes things to be, gives them being; or calls events into existence, brings them to pass; with many individual modifications of interpretation - creator, lifegiver, fulfiller of promises.

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  • A serious objection to this theory in every form is that the verb hayah, " to be," has no causative stem in Hebrew; to express the ideas which these scholars find in the name Yahweh the language employs altogether different verbs.

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  • This assumption that Yahweh is derived from the verb "to be," as seems to be implied in Exod.

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  • 16 The primary meaning is probably " sink down, fall," in which sense - common in Arabic - the verb appears in Job xxxvii.

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  • Finally, there is yet another story which attributes the flight of Hagar and Ishmael to Sarah's jealousy at the sight of Ishmael's "mocking" (rather dancing or playing, the intensive form of the verb "to laugh") on the feast day when Isaac was weaned (xxi.

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  • In the sense of "revere" or "respect," the verb "to worship" occurs in the English Prayer-book, in the phrase "with my body I thee worship" in the Marriage Service.

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  • The verb "to gouge" is used in the sense of scooping or forcing out.

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  • the verb almost regularly begins the sentence and object follows the verb, in xi.

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  • 1-13 the object frequently precedes the verb and the subject nearly always.

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  • 9 (J) an etymology was found for the name of Babylon in the Hebrew verb Mal," to confuse or confound," Babel being regarded as a contraction of Balbel.

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