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veins

veins Sentence Examples

  • While such minute and gradual variations are harmless for most optical purposes, sudden variations which generally take the form of striae or veins are fatal defects in all optical glass.

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  • With changes of the pressures of the blood in arteries, veins or capillaries, and in the heart itself and its respective chambers, static changes are apt to follow in these parts; such as degeneration of the coats of the arteries, due either to the silent tooth of time, to persistent high blood pressures, or to the action of poisons such as lead or syphilis.

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  • His face was livid, the veins standing out on his neck.

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  • She traced the veins on his hand and caressed his arm.

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  • A moment later, veins of light threaded through dark low clouds.

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  • He had enough alcohol in his veins to believe he could drive, and too much pride to leave the party in the passenger seat.

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  • Veins of antimony are worked in the Battle Mountain District and in Bullion Canyon, 15 m.

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  • As the grandson of St Ladislaus, Manuel had Hungarian blood in his veins; his court was the ready and constant refuge of the numerous Magyar malcontents, and he aimed not so much at the conquest as at the suzerainty of Hungary, by placing one of his Magyar kinsmen on the throne of St Stephen.

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  • Shrunk and cold, As if her veins were sapless and old, And she rose up decrepitly For a last dim look at earth and sea.

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  • As the grandson of St Ladislaus, Manuel had Hungarian blood in his veins; his court was the ready and constant refuge of the numerous Magyar malcontents, and he aimed not so much at the conquest as at the suzerainty of Hungary, by placing one of his Magyar kinsmen on the throne of St Stephen.

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  • Xander's muscular frame was tense enough that she saw the veins on his biceps.

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  • Galena occurs in veins in the Cambrian clay-slate, accompanied by copper and iron pyrites, zinc-blende, quartz, calcspar, iron-spar, &c.; also in beds or nests within sandstones and rudimentary limestones, and in a great many other geological formations.

    8
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  • Galena occurs in veins in the Cambrian clay-slate, accompanied by copper and iron pyrites, zinc-blende, quartz, calcspar, iron-spar, &c.; also in beds or nests within sandstones and rudimentary limestones, and in a great many other geological formations.

    8
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  • There are likewise two pulmonary veins, entering the left atrium by one orifice.

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  • He'd forced her to stay awake through it all despite her fainting spells, tearing open her veins and feeding until she was too weak to fight him.

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  • veins and flat deposits below the general level Boring of the country; or the outcrop lies beyond the limits of the property or under water or water-bearing formations, or is covered by quicksand, or is deeply buried.

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  • Their movement in an upward or downward direction in Limulus and Mygale must exert a pumping action on the blood contained in the dorsal arteries and the ventral veins respectively.

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  • Besides the alluvial deposits a little mining is carried on, gold being present in the thin veins of quartz which cross the sandstone.

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  • She rested her head against the steering wheel, frustration making her veins swell.

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  • The hornsilvers all occur under similar conditions and are often associated together; they are found in metalliferous veins with native silver and ores of silver, and are usually confined to the upper oxidized parts of the lodes.

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  • The deposits are superficial, resulting from the opening out of veins at the surface, and consist chiefly of haematite.

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  • It occurs in its matrix, either in or closely associated with fissure veins or disseminated through rock masses.

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  • Drain the blood from men's veins and put in water instead, then there will be no more war!

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  • She wore those half-stockings that were supposed to be hidden by something far longer than what covered her pudgy legs, which were streaked with the stark blue of veins looking like a map of a very congested and curvy area.

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  • A wave of anger came out of nowhere, surging through her veins and washing the resentment to the surface of her consciousness.

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  • The veins of the leaves are next impressed by means of a die, and the petals are given their natural rounded forms by goffering irons of various shapes.

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  • John Norquay, in whose veins ran a large admixture of Indian blood.

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  • Lastly, to pass over unnecessary details, the markings of various kinds to be observed on the lobes of the livers of freshly-slaughtered animals, which are due mainly to the traces left by the subsidiary hepatic ducts and hepatic veins on the liver surface, were described as "holes," "paths," "clubs" and the like.

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  • The chestnut oaks of America represent a section distinguished by the merely serrated leaves, with parallel veins running to the end of the serratures.

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  • A wave of anger came out of nowhere, surging through her veins and washing the resentment to the surface of her consciousness.

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  • In the larger veins of the leaf especially in the midrib, in the petiole, and in the young stem, a1 extremely frequent type of mechanical tissue is collenchyma.

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  • "Nonsense!" he cried, and the veins on his forehead and neck stood out like cords.

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  • The main mineral deposits are the nickel ores, occurring as veins of garnierite, associated with peridotite dikes, in the ancient rocks of the eastern slope of the island.

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  • He was lying on his back propped up high, and his small bony hands with their knotted purple veins were lying on the quilt; his left eye gazed straight before him, his right eye was awry, and his brows and lips motionless.

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  • A characteristic feature of cancer is the carrying of the epithelial cells (which are the essential element of the growth) to the nearest lymphatic glands, and in cancer of the stomach the secondary implication of the glands may cause the formation of large masses between the stomach and the liver, which may press upon the large veins and give rise to dropsy.

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  • She boasts of the royal blood which ran through her veins, and disregarding the bar sinister she claims affinity with Charles X.

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  • Pharmacosiderite is a mineral of secondary origin, the crystals occurring attached to gozzany quartz in the upper part of veins of copper ore.

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  • 33) These festivals formed the veins and arteries of ancient Hebrew Internat.

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  • I shall never forget how the fury of battle throbbed in my veins--it seemed as if the tumultuous beating of my heart would stop my breath.

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  • His most important work was 11Epi cuo ew (De natura), of which considerable fragments are extant (chiefly in Simplicius); it is possible that he wrote also Against the Sophists and On the Nature of Man, to which the well-known fragment about the veins would belong; possibly these discussions were subdivisions of his great work.

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  • Veins of amethystine quartz are apt to lose their colour on the exposed outcrop.

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  • - To its mineral wealth Nevada owes its existence as a state; but for the richness of its veins of gold and silver ore it would be still little more than an arid waste.

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  • Copper, lead and zinc are produced in small quantities, being found in fissure veins with gold and silver.

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  • Beautiful rock crystals occur in veins in the corries.

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  • His most important work was 11Epi cuo ew (De natura), of which considerable fragments are extant (chiefly in Simplicius); it is possible that he wrote also Against the Sophists and On the Nature of Man, to which the well-known fragment about the veins would belong; possibly these discussions were subdivisions of his great work.

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  • The wings in nearly all species have a dappled or speckled appearance, owing to the occurrence of blotches on the front margin and to the arrangement of the scales covering the veins in alternating light and dark patches (Austen).

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  • The lymph vessels of the tail and hinder parts of the body enter the hypogastric veins; and at the point of junction, on either side, lies a small lymph heart, which often persists until maturity.

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  • This collateral supply not being sufficient to keep up the proper flow of blood through the part the veins tend to become thrombosed, thus increasing the engorgement.

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  • On the other hand, in the case of less regular deposits, including most metalliferous veins, and especially those of the precious metals, the uncertainty is often very great, and it is sometimes necessary to work on a small scale for months before any considerable expenditure of money is justified.

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  • The examination of small test-pieces of the glass withdrawn from the crucible by means of an iron rod having shown that the molten mass is free from bubbles, the stirring process may be begun, the object of this manipulation being to render the glass as homogeneous as possible and to secure the absence of veins or striae in the product.

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  • The lymph vessels of the tail and hinder parts of the body enter the hypogastric veins; and at the point of junction, on either side, lies a small lymph heart, which often persists until maturity.

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  • From the cephalic part of this primary diverticulum solid rods of cells called the hepatic cylinders grow out, and these branch again and again until a cellular network is formed surrounding and breaking up the umbilical and vitelline veins.

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  • The mountains consist here of an ancient laminated micaceous quartzite, which is in parts a flexible sandstone known as itacolumite, and in parts a conglomerate; it is interbedded with clay-slate, mica-schist, hornblende-schist and haematite-schist, and intersected by veins of quartz.

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  • At Sao Joao da Chapada, in Minas Geraes, diamonds occur in a clay interstratified with the itacolumite, and are accompanied by sharp crystals of rutile and haematite in the neighbourhood of decomposed quartz veins which intersect the itacolumite.

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  • It has been suggested that these three minerals were originally formed in the quartz veins.

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  • In some leaves, as in the barberry, the veins are hardened, producing spines without any parenchyma.

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  • 3); it gives off veins laterally (primary veins).

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  • 4), in place of there being only a single midrib there are several large veins (ribs) of nearly equal size, which diverge from the point where the blade joins the petiole or stem, giving off lateral veins.

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  • The primary veins give off secondary veins, and these in their turn give off tertiary veins, and so on until a complete network of vessels is produced, and those veins usually project on the under surface of the leaf.

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  • To a distribution of veins such as this the name of reticulated or netted venation has been applied.

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  • 5); or with veins diverging from the base of the lamina in more or less FIG.

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  • (Reticulated venation; primary veins going to the margin, which is serrated.

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  • Some leaves possess veins in parallel lines, as in fan palms (fig.

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  • 6), or with veins coming off from it throughout its whole course, and running parallel to each other in a straight or curved direction towards the margin of the leaf, as in plantain and banana.

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  • In these cases the veins are often united by cross veinlets, which do not, however, form an angular network.

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  • Holmes (Caesar's Conquest of Gaul, 1899), who comes to the conclusion that "when the Reman delegates told Caesar that the Belgae were descended from the Germans, they probably only meant that the ancestors of the Belgic conquerors had formerly dwelt in Germany, and this is equally true of the ancestors of the Gauls who gave their name to the Celtae; but, on the other hand, it is quite possible that in the veins of some of the Belgae flowed the blood of genuine German forefathers."

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  • Opening in pairs in each somite, right and left into the pericardial sinus are large veins, which bring the blood respectively from the gill-books and the lungbooks to that chamber, whence it passes by the ostia into the heart.

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  • Holmes (Caesar's Conquest of Gaul, 1899), who comes to the conclusion that "when the Reman delegates told Caesar that the Belgae were descended from the Germans, they probably only meant that the ancestors of the Belgic conquerors had formerly dwelt in Germany, and this is equally true of the ancestors of the Gauls who gave their name to the Celtae; but, on the other hand, it is quite possible that in the veins of some of the Belgae flowed the blood of genuine German forefathers."

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  • ANT-LION, the name given to neuropterous insects of the family Myrmeleonidae, with relatively short and apically clubbed antennae and four large densely reticulated wings in which the apical veins enclose regular oblong spaces.

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  • Ethnologically the Bulgarians ought perhaps to come here; but, as a large admixture of Slav blood flows in their veins and they speak a distinctly Slav language, they have in this table been grouped with the Slays.

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  • There are veins of bismuth near Sodaville.

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  • (After Lankester and Boerne from Parker and Haswell's Textbook of Zoology, Macmillan & Co.) these open into irregular swollen vessels which are the veins or venous sinuses.

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  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.

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  • He couldn't yet understand the magic in his veins, unleashed by the vamp without any explanation of its depths.

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  • My blood runs through your veins.

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  • It usually occurs in association with other minerals in veins.

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  • The left hepatica magna receives also the umbilical vein, which persists on the visceral surface of the abdominal wall, often anastomosing with the epigastric veins.

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  • This increased his anxiety to temporize, which he did with signal success for more than two years, making ' The grave doubt as to the paternity of Matthew involved a doubt whether the great earl of Tyrone and his equally famous nephew Owen Roe had in fact any O'Neill blood in their veins.

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  • 72, had Seleucid blood in its veins through the marriage of a Seleucid princess with Mithradates Callinicus, and regarded itself as being a continuation of the Seleucid dynasty.

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  • Conrad Weiser, a well-known Indian interpreter, and herself said to have had Indian blood in her veins; by her he had eleven children.

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  • Pectolite is a secondary mineral occurring as white masses with a radially fibrous structure in the veins and cavities of basic igneous rocks.

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  • Large sheets of muscovite, such as are of commercial value, are found only in the very coarsely crystallized pegmatite veins traversing granite, gneiss or micaschist.

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  • These veins consist of felspar, quartz and mica, often with smaller amounts of other crystallized minerals, such as tourmaline, beryl and garnet; they are worked for mica in India, the United States (South Dakota, Colorado and Alabama), and Brazil (Goyaz, Bahia and Minas Geraes).

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  • Since the mineral occurs in definite veins, a more satisfactory and economical method of working would be that adopted in metalliferous mines, with a vertical shaft, cross-cuts, and levels running along the strike of the vein: the mica could then be extracted by overhead stopping, and the waste material used for filling up the worked-out excavations.

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  • Gold, lead, copper and iron ores occur as veins.

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  • It spreads forwards, affecting the supporting fibres outside the epithelium of the capillaries, and then passes to the connective-tissue fibrils of the veins.

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  • The outcrop of a metalliferous vein frequently manifests itself as a line of rocks stained with oxide of iron, often honeycombed and porous, the " gossan " or " eisen-hut," the iron oxide of which results from the decomposition of the pyrites, usually present as a constituent of such veins.

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  • Electric and compressed air locomotives are durable, easily operated, and can be built to run under the low roofs of thin veins.

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  • Recently, shade-grown tobacco in some localities has suffered considerably from the attacks of small sucking insects known as thrips, which produce " white veins " in the leaf.

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  • Too rapid drying of the outer tissue of the leaf leads to the formation of " white veins," which injure leaves required for wrapper purposes, otherwise it is not important.

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  • The oldest rocks of Barbados, known as the Scotland series, are of shallow water origin, consisting of coarse grits, brown sandstones and sandy clays, in places saturated with petroleum and traversed by veins of manjak.

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  • The richer veins had evidently been long ago worked out, and nothing of sufficient value to justify further outlay was discovered.

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  • (2) The presence of variously formed scales on the body and its appendages: the head is clothed with scales, the thorax with hairs or scales, and the abdomen with either hairs or scales, or both; the legs and veins of the wings are always covered with scales, and the palpi are often (as in some Anophelinae) conspicuously scaly.

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  • The wings exhibit six longitudinal veins (seven in Heptaphlebomyia), two of which are characteristically forked.

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  • It has been sought to work again the ancient quarries of Shemtu, but it was found that the marble had been spoilt by ferruginous and calcareous veins.

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  • The Eastern Andes is a magnificent range in the southern part of Peru, of Silurian formation, with talcose and clay slates, many quartz veins and eruptions of granitic rocks.

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  • The claims measure 100 X200 metres (about 5 acres) in the case of mineral veins or lodes, and 200 X 200 metres (about 10 acres) for coal, alluvial gold and other deposits.

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  • His knowledge of anatomy, physiology and pathology was necessarily defective, the respect in which the dead body was held by the Greeks precluding him from practising dissection; thus we find him writing of the tissues without distinguishing between the various textures of the body, confusing arteries, veins and nerves, and speaking vaguely of the muscles as " flesh."

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  • The leaves, which show great variety in size and form, are generally broad and net-veined, but in sweet-flag (Acorus Calamus) are long and narrow with parallel veins.

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  • The association and distribution of gold may be considered under two different heads, namely, as it occurs in mineral veins - " reef gold," and in alluvial or other superficial deposits which are derived from the waste of the former - " alluvial gold."

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  • Four distinct types of reef gold deposits may be distinguished: (I) Gold may occur disseminated through metalliferous veins, generally with sulphides and more particularly with pyrites.

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  • (2) More common are the auriferous quartz-reefs - veins or masses of quartz containing gold in flakes visible to the naked eye, or so finely divided as to be invisible.

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  • The genesis of the last three types of deposit is generally assigned to the simultaneous percolation of solutions of gold and silica, the auriferous solution being formed during the disintegration of the gold-bearing metalliferous veins.

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  • The various deposits of gold may be divided into two classes- " veins " and " placers."

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  • It is a singularly beautiful substance, being of pink, greenish, or milk-white colour, streaked with reddish, copper-coloured veins.

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  • Bismuth occurs in metalliferous veins traversing gneiss or clay-slate, and is usually associated with ores of silver and cobalt.

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  • They lay their parthenogenetically produced eggs in the angles of the veins of the leaves, in the buds, or, if the season is already far advanced, in the bark.

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  • The areas containing productive coal measures are usually known as coalfields or basins, within which coal occurs in more or less regular beds, also called seams or veins, which can often be followed over a considerable length of country without change of character, although, like all stratified rocks, their continuity may be interrupted by faults or dislocations, also known as slips, hitches, heaves or troubles.

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  • Mispickel occurs in metalliferous veins with ores of tin, copper, silver, &c. It is occasionally found as embedded crystals, for example, in serpentine at Reichenstein, Silesia.

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  • The rocks in the Arakan range and its spurs are metamorphic, and comprise clay, slates, ironstone and indurated sandstone; towards the S., ironstone, trap and rocks of basaltic character are common; veins of steatite and white fibrous quartz are also found.

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  • The mineral is also met with in metalliferous veins, though much less frequently than pyrites; for example the "cockscomb pyrites" of the lead mines of Derbyshire and Cumberland.

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  • They occur (a) in crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks as an original constituent, (b) in veins associated with igneous rocks, and (c) in sedimentary rocks either as organic fragments or in secondary concretionary forms.

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  • Another group of phosphatic deposits connected with igneous rocks comprises the apatite veins of south Norway, Ottawa and other districts in Canada.

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  • Veins of this type occur at Oedegarden in Norway and Dundret in Lapland.

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  • From 1500 to 3500 tons of apatite are obtained yearly in Norway from these veins.

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  • Larger deposits of serpentine occur at several places in St Lawrence county; and at Warwick, in Orange county, is some beautiful marble of a carmine-red colour occasionally mottled with white or showing white veins.

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  • The copper is mostly a copper glance passing into chalcopyrite; it is found in fissure veins with granite.

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  • In other cases, especially near mineral veins, slates are filled with black needles of tourmaline or are bleached to pale grey and white colours, or are silicified and impregnated with mineral ores.

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  • Frequently in districts where slates are much crumpled they are traversed by numerous quartz veins, which have a thickness varying from several inches up to many feet, and may occasionally be auriferous.

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  • Graphite occurs mainly in the older crystalline rocks - gneiss, granulite, schist and crystalline limestone - and also sometimes in granite: it is found as isolated scales embedded in these rocks, or as large irregular masses or filling veins.

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  • The graphite found in granite and in veins in gneiss, as well as that contained in meteoric irons, cannot have had such an origin.

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  • The graphite veins in the older crystalline rocks are probably akin to metalliferous veins and the material derived from deep-seated sources; the decomposition of metallic carbides by water and the reduction of hydrocarbon vapours have been suggested as possible modes of origin.

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  • Such veins often attain a thickness of several feet, and sometimes possess a columnar structure perpendicular to the enclosing walls; they are met with in the crystalline limestones and other Laurentian rocks of New York and Canada, in the gneisses of the Austrian Alps and the granulites of Ceylon.

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  • The ores are almost exclusively gold, tellurides being the most characteristic form, and occur in fissure veins.

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  • Outcroppings were very rare, as the veins were covered with loose wash, and this accounted for the late opening of the field.

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  • Some of the marble has the rich purple veins in which poets saw the blood of Atys.

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  • Galena is of wide distribution, and occurs usually in metalliferous veins traversing crystalline rocks, clay-slates and limestones, and also as pockets in limestones.

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  • In the lead-mining districts of Derbyshire and the north of England the ore occurs as veins and flats in the Carboniferous Limestone series, whilst in Cornwall the veins traverse clay-slates.

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  • Wellhausen remarks,' a better cement that the bread, because through the drinking of it the very blood of Jesus coursed through the veins of the disciples, and that is why more stress is laid on it than on the bread.

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  • Outcasts alone, the offspring of irregular unions, could be ignorant of the blood which ran in their veins, of the unseen ancestors to be fed and tended in family and gentile rites.'

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  • Gold occurs in quartz veins traversing various formations (some as young as Jurassic), and also in gravels, which were for the most part deposited previous to the uplift of the Sierra block.

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  • Veins of cinnabar are known elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain and Sierra Nevada regions but not in workable quantities.

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  • A series of quartzites and slates referred to the Cambrian, and holding numerous and important veins of auriferous quartz, characterize its Atlantic or southeastern side, while valuable coal-fields occur in Cape Breton and on parts of its shores on the Gulf of St Lawrence.

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  • The discovery of large deposits of nickel at Sudbury; of extremely rich gold mines on the head-waters of the Yukon, in a region previously considered well-nigh worthless for human habitation; of extensive areas of gold, copper and silver ores in the mountain regions of British Columbia; of immense coal deposits in the Crow's Nest Pass of the same province and on the prairies; of veins of silver and cobalt of extraordinary richness in northern Ontario - all deeply affected the industrial condition of the country and illustrated the vastness of its undeveloped resources.

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  • This is bounded on the left by the inferior vena cava, which is sunk into a deep groove in the liver, and into the upper part of this the hepatic veins open.

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  • From the cephalic part of this primary diverticulum solid rods of cells called the hepatic cylinders grow out, and these branch again and again until a cellular network is formed surrounding and breaking up the umbilical and vitelline veins.

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  • i, Interlobular veins ending in the intralobular capillaries.

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  • c, c, Central veins joined by the intralobular capillaries.

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  • c, c, Central veins receiving the intralobular capillaries.

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  • i, 1, Interlobular veins.

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  • A surgical operation is sometimes undertaken with success for enabling the engorged veins to empty themselves into the blood-stream in a manner so as to avoid the liver-route.

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  • Inflammation of the Liver (hepatitis) may also be caused by an attack of micro-organisms which have reached it through the veins coming from the large intestine, or through the main arteries.

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  • The blood makes its way by large veins to a venous sinus which lies in the middle line below the heart, having the paired renal organs (nephridia) placed between it and that organ.

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  • Later he issued an authoritative work on mineral veins, Untersuchungen fiber Erzgange (1882-1885).

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  • The mucous membrane is raised into a series of transverse folds or rugae, and between it and the muscular wall are plexuses of veins forming erectile tissue.

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  • It is enclosed in a fibrous capsule from which it is separated by the prostatic plexus of veins anteriorly.

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  • The structure of the corpora cavernosa consists of a strong fibrous coat, the tunica albuginea, from the deep surface of which numerous fibrous trabeculae penetrate the interior and divide it into a number of spaces which are lined with endothelium and communicate with the veins.

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  • It consists of arteries, veins and sinuses, but ramified capillaries are usually absent except in the integuments of Cephalopods.

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  • The arteries and veins have proper endothelial walls; they pass abruptly into the sinuses and in some cases communication is effected by orifices in the walls of the vessels, as for example in the vena cava of Nautilus.

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  • long with a rounded crenate outer edge and repeatedly forked veins; the sori (or masses of spore-capsules) are in the crenatures of the pinnules, and are protected by a kidney-shaped involucre.

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  • Gloxinias, begonias, &c., grow readily from fragments of the leaves cut clean through the thick veins and ribs, and planted edgewise like cuttings.

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  • Such a change is very common on the outcrop of mineral veins, forming what miners call "gozzan."

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  • The mountains consist here of an ancient laminated micaceous quartzite, which is in parts a flexible sandstone known as itacolumite, and in parts a conglomerate; it is interbedded with clay-slate, mica-schist, hornblende-schist and haematite-schist, and intersected by veins of quartz.

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  • At Sao Joao da Chapada, in Minas Geraes, diamonds occur in a clay interstratified with the itacolumite, and are accompanied by sharp crystals of rutile and haematite in the neighbourhood of decomposed quartz veins which intersect the itacolumite.

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  • It has been suggested that these three minerals were originally formed in the quartz veins.

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  • In some leaves, as in the barberry, the veins are hardened, producing spines without any parenchyma.

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  • 3); it gives off veins laterally (primary veins).

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  • 4), in place of there being only a single midrib there are several large veins (ribs) of nearly equal size, which diverge from the point where the blade joins the petiole or stem, giving off lateral veins.

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  • The primary veins give off secondary veins, and these in their turn give off tertiary veins, and so on until a complete network of vessels is produced, and those veins usually project on the under surface of the leaf.

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  • To a distribution of veins such as this the name of reticulated or netted venation has been applied.

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  • 5); or with veins diverging from the base of the lamina in more or less FIG.

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  • (Reticulated venation; primary veins going to the margin, which is serrated.

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  • Some leaves possess veins in parallel lines, as in fan palms (fig.

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  • 6), or with veins coming off from it throughout its whole course, and running parallel to each other in a straight or curved direction towards the margin of the leaf, as in plantain and banana.

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  • In these cases the veins are often united by cross veinlets, which do not, however, form an angular network.

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  • The sheaths (Chamaerops), showing the veins ending in a process 1, called running from the base to the mara ligule; the blade of the gin, and not forming an angular leaf, f.

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  • Most veins are usually easily traced, but in the case of succulent plants, as Hoya, agave, stonecrop and mesembryanthemum, the veins are obscure.

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  • The function of the veins which consist of vessels and fibres is to form a rigid framework for the leaf and to conduct liquids.

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  • The wood-vessels form part of the fibro-vascular bundles or veins of the leaf and are continuous throughout the leaf-stalk and stem with the root by which water is absorbed from the soil.

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  • They have usually no fibro-vascular system, but consist of a congeries of cells, which sometimes become elongated and compressed so as to resemble veins.

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  • In all the instances already alluded to the leaves have been considered as flat expansions, in which the ribs or veins spread out on the same plane with the stalk.

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  • When the development of parenchyma is such that it more than fills up the spaces between the veins, the margins become wavy, crisp or undulated, as in Rumex crispus and Rheum undulatum.

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  • The fall is directly caused by the formation of a layer of tissue across the base of the leaf-stalk; the cells of this layer separate from one another and the leaf remains attached only by the fibres of the veins until it becomes finally detached by the wind or frost.

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  • He protested that the king of Denmark was bound to defend Schleswig "so long as there was a sword in Denmark and a drop of blood in the veins of the Danish people."

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  • Blende occurs in metalliferous veins, often in association with galena, also with chalcopyrite, barytes, fluorspar, &c. In oredeposits containing both lead and zinc, such as those filling cavities in the limestones of the north of England and of Missouri, the galena is usually found in the upper part of the deposit, the blende not being reached until the deeper parts are worked.

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  • Whenever he was so fortunate as to have near him a hare that had been kept too long, or a meat pie made with rancid butter, he gorged himself with such violence that his veins swelled and the moisture broke out on his forehead.

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  • Chalcedony occurs as a secondary mineral in volcanic rocks, representing usually the silica set free by the decomposition of various silicates, and deposited in cracks, forming veins, or in vesicular hollows, forming amygdales.

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  • The veins are small, but contain native silver and other rich silver ores running sometimes several thousand ounces per ton, the output being 5,500,000 oz.

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  • Considerable veins of haematite of good quality occur both in the Red Sea hills and in Sinai.

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  • It was worked for about a hundred years in only its upper bed, but in 1781, after traversing a layer of indurated clay intersected with small veins of salt 102 yds.

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  • In Iridaea the thallus is an entire lamina; in Callophyllis a lobed lamina; in Delesseria it is provided with midrib and veins, simulating the appearance of a leaf of the higher plants; in Constantinea the axis remains cylindrical, and the lateral branches assume the form of leaves.

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  • The varying texture of this rock, its irregular foliation and jointing, and its ramifying veins of pegmatite give it very unequal powers of resistance.

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  • The " Scottish prejudice " which Burns tells us was " poured " into his veins from the Wallace is not obvious to the dispassionate reader of the Brus.

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  • Thus a series of arrays of beech leaves, gathered, subject to the precautions indicated, from each of loo beech trees in Buckinghamshire by Professor Pearson, gave 16.1 as the mean number of veins per leaf, the standard deviation of the veins in the series being 1.735.

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  • The number of leaves gathered from each tree was 26, and the frequency of leaves with any observed number of veins in the whole series of 2600 leaves was.

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  • If a leaf from this series be chosen at random, it is clearly more likely to have sixteen veins than to have any other assigned number; but if a first leaf chosen at random should prove to have some number of veins other than sixteen, a second leaf, chosen at random from the same series, is still more likely to have sixteen veins than to have any other assigned number.

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  • If, however, a series of leaves from the same tree be examined in pairs, the fact that one leaf from the tree is known to possess an abnormal number of veins makes it probable that the next leaf chosen from the same tree will also be abnormal-or, in other words, the fact that leaves are borne by the same tree establishes a correlation between them.

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  • We see therefore that while leaves, gathered in equal numbers from each of loo trees, are distributed about their mean with a standard deviation of 1.735 veins, the leaves gathered from a single tree are distributed about their mean with a standard deviation of 1.426 veins, the ratio between variability of the race and variability of the individual tree being 1 - (0-5699)1=0.822.

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  • The veins of Charles were full of German blood, but he was his mother's son.

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  • Quartz veins are very often as good at a depth of 3000 ft.

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  • It occurs in metalliferous veins, often in association with iron-pyrites, chalybite, blende, &c., and in Cornwall and Devon, where it is abundant, with cassiterite.

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  • By certain persons, who for different metals used rods of various materials, rods of hazel, he says, were held serviceable simply for silver lodes, and by the skilled miner, who trusted to natural signs of mineral veins, they were regarded as of no avail at all.

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  • In nearly every county there are veins of iron ore of varying extent and quality, the most important being at Hartville, Laramie county, Iron Mountain, Albany (disambiguation)|Albany county, the Seminole and Rawlins in Carbon county.

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  • The traditions of the Malays and Dyaks seem to confirm the statements, and many of the leading families of Brunei in north-west Borneo claim to have Chinese blood in their veins, while the annals of Sulu record an extensive Chinese immigration about 1575.

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  • It is not infrequently found in serpentine, and in basic eruptive rocks, where it occurs as veins and in amygdales.

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  • The wrongs of Hilderic, a Catholic, and with the blood of Theodosius in his veins, afforded to Justinian a long-coveted pretext for overthrowing the Vandal dominion, the latent weakness of which was probably known to the statesmen of Constantinople.

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  • Of late years enormous impulse has been given to our knowledge of the causation of disease by microbes, through the works of Gaspard, who injected putrid matter into the veins of a living animal; by Villemin, who discovered that tuberculosis is infective; by Davaine; and especially by Pasteur, Koch and others too numerous to mention, who have worked, and are still working, at the microbic causation of disease with marvellous success.

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  • Bier increases the blood in a part by compressing the veins and thus producing passive instead of active congestion.

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  • By raising the hand nearly to a level with the head both the constant pain and the severity of the throbs may be relieved, as the blood is not sent with such great force into the arteries and returns more readily through the veins.

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  • It usually occurs as lamellar or glanular masses, with a tin-white colour and metallic lustre, in limestone or in mineral veins often in association with ores of silver.

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  • In the time of Alexander the Great Praxagoras discovered the distinction between the arteries and the veins.

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  • The Cintra granite sends veins into the base of the Upper Jurassic, and is very probably of Tertiary age.

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  • The ores of the Altai proper nearly always appear in irregular veins, containing silver, lead, copper and gold - sometimes all together, - and they are, or were, worked chiefly by Zmeinogorsk (or Zmeiev), Zyryanovsk, Ust-Kamenogorsk and Riddersk (abandoned in 1861).

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  • He had French as well as English blood in his veins, but he appears to have spent his whole life in England, and the best years of it as a monk at Malmesbury.

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  • Native silver is occasionally met with in metalliferous veins, where it has been formed by the alteration of silver-bearing minerals.

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  • Granites and granodiorites were intruded at this period into the older rocks, and altered the adjacent Devonian beds into slates and quartzites, and formed gold-quartz veins, which have been worked in the Devonian rocks at Yalwal.

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  • The gold-quartz veins are mainly in the Ordovician and Silurian rocks; but some also occur in the Devonian, and there are impregnations of gold in tufas of Devonian age.

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  • broad; they spread horizontally beneath the surface of the water, and are reduced to little more than a lattice-like network of veins.

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  • When the news was brought to Thrasea at his house, where he was entertaining a number of friends, he retired to his chamber, and had the veins of both his arms opened.

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  • In Anomochloa there are several nearly equal ribs and in some broad-leaved grasses (Bambuseae, Pharus, Leptaspis) the venation becomes tesselated by transverse connecting veins.

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  • The tissue is often raised above the veins, form - - ?

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  • The thick prominent veins in Agropyrum occupy the whole upper surface of the leaf.

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  • In the Wallega district are veins of gold-bearing quartz, mined to a certain extent.

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  • It is from the Galla that the Abyssinian army is largely recruited, and, indeed, there are few of the chiefs who have not an admixture of Galla blood in their veins.

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  • The title of negus negusti has been to a considerable extent based on the blood in the veins of the claimant.

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  • - The pinnae are traversed by several parallel veins.

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  • 5); the segments, which are broadly ovate or rhomboidal, have several forked spreading veins, and resemble the large pinnules of some species of Adiantum.

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  • Secretory sacs occur abundantly in the leaflamina, where they appear as short lines between the veins; they are abundant also in the cortex and pith of the shoot, in the fleshy integument of the ovule, and elsewhere.

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  • Bidwillii, and some species of the southern genus Podocarpus are traversed by several parallel veins, as are also the still larger leaves of Agathis, which may reach a length of several inches.

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  • The occurrence of short tracheids in close proximity to the veins is a characteristic of coniferous leaves; these elements assume two distinct forms - (I) the short isodiametric tracheids (transfusion-tracheids) closely associated with the veins; (2) longer tracheids extending across the mesophyll at right angles to the veins, and no doubt functioning as representatives of lateral veins.

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  • It has been suggested that transfusion-tracheids represent, in part at least, the centripetal xylem, which forms a distinctive feature of cycadean leaf-bundles; these short tracheids form conspicuous groups laterally attached to the veins in Cunninghamia, abundantly represented in a similar position in the leaves of Sequoia, and scattered through the so-called pericycle in Pinus, Picea, &c. It is of interest to note the occurrence of precisely similar elements in the mesophyll of Lepidodendron leaves.

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  • An anatomical peculiarity in the veins of Pinus and several other genera is the continuity of the medullary rays, which extend as continuous plates from one end of the leaf to the other.

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  • In the leaves of Araucaria imbricata, in which palisade-tissue occurs in both the upper and lower part of the mesophyll, the resin-canals are placed between the veins; in some species of Podocarpus (sect.

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  • Extensive veins of quartz are especially frequent in schistose rocks.

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  • In mineral veins and lodes crystallized quartz is usually the most abundant gangue mineral; the crystals are often arranged perpendicular to the walls of the lode, giving rise to a "comby" structure.

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  • 20 it occurs with zinc in reticulated deposits and fissure veins in clays and clastic limestones; and in the third, of which Jasper county is much the most important county, the two metals occur in pockets and joints in the Burlington-Keokuk beds of the sub-Carboniferous.

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  • 23 and their blood flows in the veins of the mestizos of the Bogota plateau.

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  • The larger and older of these veins was 441 ft.

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  • Imagine a hilly town with a high-pressure water supply, the water issuing at numerous points, sometimes only in exceedingly small veins, from the pipes into the sub-soil.

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  • The deposits consist of workable veins, 50 to 220 ft.

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  • The leader was a gentleman named Owen ~ Glendower, who had the blood of the ancient kings of Gwynedd in his veins.

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  • The story of Hastings's crimes, as Macaulay says, made the blood of Burke boil in his veins.

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  • Metalliferous veins are common, amongst the best-known being the silver-bearing lead veins of Klausthal, which occur in the Culm or Lower Carboniferous.

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  • He fed them on the blood taken from their own veins daily, depriving them of all other food, and he found that the fatal cooling incident to starvation was thus postponed, and existence prolonged.

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  • - Diagram to show the gradual formation of the Arthropod pericardial blood-sinus and "ostiate " heart by the swelling up (phleboedesis) of the veins entering the dorsal vessel or heart of a Chaetopod-like ancestor.

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  • On the other side of the flower and at a slightly higher level is the "palea," of thinner texture than the other glumes, with infolded margins and with two ribs or veins.

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  • The Shumadia is mainly occupied by rocks of Tertiary age, with intervening patches of older strata; and the Rudnik Mountains are traversed by metalliferous veins of syenite.

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  • The corollas are obliquely funnel-shaped, of a dirty yellow or buff, marked with a close reticulation of purple veins.

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  • Native arsenic occurs usually in metalliferous veins in association with ores of antimony, silver, &c.; the silver mines of Freiberg in Saxony, St Andreasberg in the Harz, and Chanarcillo in Chile being well-known localities.

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  • These emigrants, already affected by the Hamitic pastoral culture, and with a strain of Hamitic blood in their veins, passed rapidly down the open tract in the east, doubtless exterminating their predecessors, except such few as took refuge in the mountains and swamps.

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  • when the Cowpers were Sussex landowners, while his mother, Ann, daughter of Roger Donne of Ludham Hall, Norfolk, was of the same race as the poet Donne, and the family claimed to have Plantagenet blood in its veins.

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  • Many of the dark-coloured horses of Europe have Barb or Arab blood in their veins, this being markedly the case with the Old English black or Shire horse, the skull of which shows a distinct depression in front of the eye-socket.

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  • There is one anterior vena cava, formed by the union of the two jugular and two axillary veins.

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  • According to Ridgeway, the original source of the finest equine blood is Africa, still the home of the largest variety of wild Equidae; he concludes that thence it passed into Europe at an early time, to be blended with that of the indigenous Celtic species, and thence into western Asia into the veins of an indigenous Mongolian species, still represented by " Przewalski's horse "; not till a comparatively late period did it reach Arabia, though the " Arab " now represents the purest form of the Libyan blood.

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  • The skin and hair of the throughbred are finer, and the veins which underlie the skin are larger and more prominent than in other horses.

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  • The mineral occurs in metalliferous veins in the lead mines of Strontian in Argyllshire, Pateley Bridge in Yorkshire, Braunsdorf near Freiberg in Saxony; abundantly in veins in calcareous marl near Minster and Hamm in Westphalia; and in limestone at Schoharie in New York.

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  • According to the development of veins and the growth of cellular tissue, petals present varieties similar to those of leaves.

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  • Two leaf-trace bundles started from each angle of the stele, and forked, in passing through the cortex, to supply the veins of the leaf, or its subdivisions.

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  • the change in the character of the vegetation was con which have generally been regarded as the fronds of ferns characterized by a central midrib giving off lateral veins which repeatedly anastomose and form a network, like that in the leaves of Antrophyum, an existing member of the Polypodiaceae.

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  • As examples of these doubtful forms may be mentioned Thinnfeldia, characteristic of Rhaetic and Lower Jurassic rocks; Dichopteris, represented by some exceptionally fine Jurassic specimens, described by Zigno, from Italy; and Ctenis, a genus chiefly from Jurassic beds, founded on pinnate fronds like those of Zamia and other Cycads, with linear pinnae characterized by anastomosing veins.

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  • This type is distinguished by its large bipinnate fronds bearing long and narrow pinnae with close-set pinnules, characterized by the anastomosing secondary veins.

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  • Similarly, the genus Sagenopteris, characterized by a habit like that of Marsilia, and represented by fronds consisting of a few spreading broadly oval or narrow segments, with anastomosing veins, borne on the apex of a common petiole, is abundant in rocks ranging from the Rhaetic to the Wealden, but has not so far been satisfactorily placed.

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  • Professor Nathorst, as the result of a more recent examination of Heer's specimen, found that the segments of the frond are characterized by the presence of two parallel veins instead of a single midrib, with a row of stomata between them; for this type of Cycadean leaf he proposed the generic name Pseudocycas.

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  • Howes (39), dealing with the azygous (posterior) cardinal veins in salamanders and some of the Ecaudata.

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  • The bulk of the inhabitants are of unmixed German stock, but many of those in the east part have Wendish blood in their veins.

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  • A moment later, veins of light threaded through dark low clouds.

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  • He had enough alcohol in his veins to believe he could drive, and too much pride to leave the party in the passenger seat.

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  • The familiar voice sent a thrill of excitement coursing through her veins.

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  • His face was livid, the veins standing out on his neck.

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  • He couldn't yet understand the magic in his veins, unleashed by the vamp without any explanation of its depths.

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  • My blood runs through your veins.

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  • She rested her head against the steering wheel, frustration making her veins swell.

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  • He'd forced her to stay awake through it all despite her fainting spells, tearing open her veins and feeding until she was too weak to fight him.

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  • She wore those half-stockings that were supposed to be hidden by something far longer than what covered her pudgy legs, which were streaked with the stark blue of veins looking like a map of a very congested and curvy area.

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  • Her scent became intoxicating as she drew closer, and he could hear the blood rushing through her veins.

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  • He could feel the blood flowing through her veins, and hear her heart pound.

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  • He forced himself to be patient, to ignore the blood pulsing through his veins at the thought of leaving Memon's lifeless body on the dirt floor and walking away.

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  • She did not feel ice at her core or the coldness in her veins.

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  • She traced the veins on his hand and caressed his arm.

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  • Xander's muscular frame was tense enough that she saw the veins on his biceps.

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  • Each tiny alveolus is surrounded by a network of capillaries that joins veins and arteries.

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  • Early blight shows as distinctive dark brown spots, somewhat angular, with concentric rings and bounded by the leaf veins.

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  • The color is shaded, paler pink at the circumference becoming deeper magenta toward the center, with dark veins and red anthers.

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  • They contain anthocyanins, which can help to avoid spider veins.

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  • The blood arrives back to the left atrium of the heart via the pulmonary veins.

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  • atrium of the heart via the pulmonary veins.

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  • Vertical and horizontal veins of green malachite and blue azurite are still visible in the Great Orme Mines.

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  • barite veins are far more common.

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  • A simple example of different methods of harvesting veins for use in coronary artery bypass surgery makes the point.

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  • Capacitance vessels In the systemic circulation, veins are the main capacitance vessels In the systemic circulation, veins are the main capacitance vessels.

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  • With more than admiration he admired Her azure veins, her alabaster skin, Her coral lips, her snow-white dimpled chin.

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  • cirrhosis results in jaundice, abdominal swelling and a propensity to bleed from dilated veins (varices) in the gullet and stomach.

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  • clots in veins or arteries.

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  • Pink and white pegmatite typically occurs in veins and contains coarse grained quartz and feldspar.

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  • We know, you Western people have the youthful blood coursing through your veins.

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  • distend the veins and select the best one.

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  • dowseh a dowsing rod it is easy to find the subterranean water veins under a standing stone.

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  • dowseh a dowsing rod it is easy to find the subterranean water veins under a standing stone.

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  • drip into the veins.

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  • Fluid can then be given to you through an intravenous drip where a needle is placed into one of your veins.

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  • eatable parts of the plants are the leaf blades with the smaller veins.

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  • The exact reason that the veins cause varicose eczema is not known.

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  • But whether it is blood or sand in their veins one thing remains unchanged: ALL creatures on the Island serve The empress.

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  • engorged purple veins.

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  • Everyman tales of romantic and relational plight immediately resonate within anyone who has warm blood circulating in their veins.

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  • faded into the shadows of the hospital room like mist in the morning sun while the antibiotics were poured down my veins.

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  • felspar rock, traversed by metalliferous veins.

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  • Sometimes, the surgeon will not be able to create a fistula from the veins in your child's arm.

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  • forehead veins realizes the impact few people who.

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  • Trivia: Plummer has the blood of a notorious highwayman in his veins.

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  • horse chestnut seed extract can alleviate the symptoms of varicose veins.

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  • The directional growth of germ tubes in relation to stomata and veins, and of intercellular hyphae in relation to veins, were recorded.

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  • iliac veins bleed: Control them with 5 minutes of pressure.

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  • involves injecting anticonvulsant drugs either into the muscles or the veins in order to halt seizure activity.

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  • The largest veins were cut, and the external jugular was also cut, but no great artery beside.

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  • leathery texture and often have a purple tinge to the veins on their underside.

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  • Vertical and horizontal veins of green malachite and blue azurite are still visible in the Great Orme Mines.

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  • metalliferous ore, there being several veins of copper intersecting its eastern side.

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  • mineralized veins which tend to decrease in ore grade to the northwest.

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  • mudstone A degree of rehydration is noted in certain of the mudstone horizons, particularly where they are intersected by mineral veins.

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  • The veins can be made more prominent by using appropriate means of venous occlusion.

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  • The mountain is rich in metalliferous ore, there being several veins of copper intersecting its eastern side.

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  • In addition, affected plants may develop leaf-like outgrowths from the veins on the undersides of leaves.

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  • A virtually painless treatment, it involves injecting hand veins in a similar way to varicose veins in the legs.

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  • pegmatite veins.

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  • perforate systems are linked periodically by perforating veins.

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  • The leaves are fan-shaped with parallel veins on long slender petioles.

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  • The lines should be in large veins, as many AEDs cause phlebitis and thrombosis at the site of infusion.

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  • pulsations in forehead veins realizes the impact few people who.

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  • pulsations in forehead veins she chewed out compromise find creative.

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  • Both the shales and the quartz veins are impregnated with the common sulfide minerals pyrite and arsenopyrite.

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  • pyromorphite crystals 25 mm tall from the Knapside veins, Hard Rigg Edge, Alston, Cumbria.

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  • roused up in his young veins.

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  • As with all truly sacred places, the points where veins of primary water exited the Medicine Wheel were clearly marked.

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  • Soon they heard shrieks of terror, which made the blood run cold in their veins.

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  • shrieks of terror, which made the blood run cold in their veins.

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  • spider veins occur.

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  • spidery veins, Pour in the contents of odorous drains.

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  • splenic veins to form the hepatic portal vein.

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  • You're the varicose veins, I'm the elastic stocking.

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  • Veins of semi-precious stones and metals were created including copper, lead, silver and iron.

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  • suggest a natural alternative to stripping varicose veins?

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  • superficial veins carry venous blood under low pressure.

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  • Atrial tachycardia is focal in origin, commonly from muscle sleeves within the pulmonary veins.

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  • Nutrition Tips for Healthy Veins Keeping blood thinned and flowing is a priority.

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  • Major artery thrombosis is less common than in the veins.

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  • thrombosis of deep veins.

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  • thrombus forms mainly in the deep veins of the legs.

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  • tortuous veins are the varicose veins you can see just under the skin.

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  • The aim of applying a tourniquet is to block the flow of blood in the veins going back to the heart.

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  • trident passage - pierces passage junction you come across two parallel quartz veins.

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  • On arrival, lower limb compression ultrasonography of the deep veins was performed.

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  • unidirectional flow the large veins have a series of valves.

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  • Thus more blood enters the uterus via the arteries than can be carried away by the veins.

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  • The enlarged uterus also puts more pressure on the veins.

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  • Deciding on varicose vein surgery Removing varicose vein surgery Removing varicose veins is generally a safe surgical procedure.

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  • varicose veins operations per year are performed, mainly for mild disease.

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  • Once the veins have become varicose, the legs can start to ache.

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  • veins of ore crossed this area.

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  • They are long tortuous defects suggestive of dilated veins.

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  • The two systems are linked periodically by perforating veins.

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  • You're the varicose veins, I'm the elastic stocking.

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  • Normally their valves should allow blood to flow only inwards from the superficial veins to the deep veins.

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  • Retinal vein occlusion The retinal vein occlusion The retinal veins drain away the used blood from the retinal cells.

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  • Scientific research has not come up with all the reasons why spider veins occur.

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  • Pulsations in forehead veins popping up between people who are about the agreementwhen.

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  • woody climber, it has bright green leaves that turn a bronze red in autumn, keeping their green veins.

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  • Iâve no doubt that during that month xenophobia will be running through everyoneâs veins at some point or another.

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  • She boasts of the royal blood which ran through her veins, and disregarding the bar sinister she claims affinity with Charles X.

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  • The veins of the leaves are next impressed by means of a die, and the petals are given their natural rounded forms by goffering irons of various shapes.

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  • John Norquay, in whose veins ran a large admixture of Indian blood.

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  • Pharmacosiderite is a mineral of secondary origin, the crystals occurring attached to gozzany quartz in the upper part of veins of copper ore.

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  • It usually occurs in association with other minerals in veins.

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  • Lastly, to pass over unnecessary details, the markings of various kinds to be observed on the lobes of the livers of freshly-slaughtered animals, which are due mainly to the traces left by the subsidiary hepatic ducts and hepatic veins on the liver surface, were described as "holes," "paths," "clubs" and the like.

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  • The chestnut oaks of America represent a section distinguished by the merely serrated leaves, with parallel veins running to the end of the serratures.

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  • The deposits are superficial, resulting from the opening out of veins at the surface, and consist chiefly of haematite.

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  • In the larger veins of the leaf especially in the midrib, in the petiole, and in the young stem, a1 extremely frequent type of mechanical tissue is collenchyma.

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  • There are likewise two pulmonary veins, entering the left atrium by one orifice.

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  • The left hepatica magna receives also the umbilical vein, which persists on the visceral surface of the abdominal wall, often anastomosing with the epigastric veins.

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  • Veins of amethystine quartz are apt to lose their colour on the exposed outcrop.

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  • ANT-LION, the name given to neuropterous insects of the family Myrmeleonidae, with relatively short and apically clubbed antennae and four large densely reticulated wings in which the apical veins enclose regular oblong spaces.

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  • Ethnologically the Bulgarians ought perhaps to come here; but, as a large admixture of Slav blood flows in their veins and they speak a distinctly Slav language, they have in this table been grouped with the Slays.

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  • 33) These festivals formed the veins and arteries of ancient Hebrew Internat.

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  • - To its mineral wealth Nevada owes its existence as a state; but for the richness of its veins of gold and silver ore it would be still little more than an arid waste.

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  • Copper, lead and zinc are produced in small quantities, being found in fissure veins with gold and silver.

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  • Veins of antimony are worked in the Battle Mountain District and in Bullion Canyon, 15 m.

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  • There are veins of bismuth near Sodaville.

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  • Beautiful rock crystals occur in veins in the corries.

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  • The wings in nearly all species have a dappled or speckled appearance, owing to the occurrence of blotches on the front margin and to the arrangement of the scales covering the veins in alternating light and dark patches (Austen).

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  • This increased his anxiety to temporize, which he did with signal success for more than two years, making ' The grave doubt as to the paternity of Matthew involved a doubt whether the great earl of Tyrone and his equally famous nephew Owen Roe had in fact any O'Neill blood in their veins.

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  • Galena and other lead ores are abundant in veins in the limestone, but they are now only worked on a large scale at Mill Close, near Winster; calamine, zinc blende, barytes, calcite and fluor-spar are common.

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  • A curd soap prepared from kitchen fat or bone grease always carries with it into the cooling frame a considerable amount of coloured impurity, such as iron sulphate, &c. When it is permitted to cool rapidly the colouring matter remains uniformly disseminated throughout the mass; but when means are taken to cause the soap to cool and solidify slowly a segregation takes place: the stearate and palmitate form a semi-crystalline solid, while the oleate, solidifying more slowly, comes by itself into translucent veins, in which the greater part of the coloured matter is drawn.

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  • The hornsilvers all occur under similar conditions and are often associated together; they are found in metalliferous veins with native silver and ores of silver, and are usually confined to the upper oxidized parts of the lodes.

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  • 72, had Seleucid blood in its veins through the marriage of a Seleucid princess with Mithradates Callinicus, and regarded itself as being a continuation of the Seleucid dynasty.

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  • The results of his observations were embodied in his Treatise on Primary Geology (1834), a work of considerable merit in regard to the older crystalline and igneous rocks and the subject of mineral veins.

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  • Conrad Weiser, a well-known Indian interpreter, and herself said to have had Indian blood in her veins; by her he had eleven children.

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  • Pectolite is a secondary mineral occurring as white masses with a radially fibrous structure in the veins and cavities of basic igneous rocks.

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  • Large sheets of muscovite, such as are of commercial value, are found only in the very coarsely crystallized pegmatite veins traversing granite, gneiss or micaschist.

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  • These veins consist of felspar, quartz and mica, often with smaller amounts of other crystallized minerals, such as tourmaline, beryl and garnet; they are worked for mica in India, the United States (South Dakota, Colorado and Alabama), and Brazil (Goyaz, Bahia and Minas Geraes).

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  • Since the mineral occurs in definite veins, a more satisfactory and economical method of working would be that adopted in metalliferous mines, with a vertical shaft, cross-cuts, and levels running along the strike of the vein: the mica could then be extracted by overhead stopping, and the waste material used for filling up the worked-out excavations.

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  • Their movement in an upward or downward direction in Limulus and Mygale must exert a pumping action on the blood contained in the dorsal arteries and the ventral veins respectively.

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  • (After Lankester and Boerne from Parker and Haswell's Textbook of Zoology, Macmillan & Co.) these open into irregular swollen vessels which are the veins or venous sinuses.

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  • Opening in pairs in each somite, right and left into the pericardial sinus are large veins, which bring the blood respectively from the gill-books and the lungbooks to that chamber, whence it passes by the ostia into the heart.

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  • In any case it is clear that we have in these muscles an apparatus'for causing the blood to flow differentially in increased volume into either the pericardium, through the veins leading from the respiratory organs, or from the body generally into the great sinuses which bring the blood to the respiratory organs.

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  • A characteristic feature of cancer is the carrying of the epithelial cells (which are the essential element of the growth) to the nearest lymphatic glands, and in cancer of the stomach the secondary implication of the glands may cause the formation of large masses between the stomach and the liver, which may press upon the large veins and give rise to dropsy.

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  • Gold, lead, copper and iron ores occur as veins.

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  • Besides the alluvial deposits a little mining is carried on, gold being present in the thin veins of quartz which cross the sandstone.

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  • It occurs in its matrix, either in or closely associated with fissure veins or disseminated through rock masses.

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  • Over five-sixths of the world's total production is derived from secondary alluvial deposits, but all the tin obtained in Cornwall (the alluvial deposits having been worked out) and Bolivia is from vein mining, while a small portion of that yielded by Australasia comes from veins and from granitic rocks carrying disseminated tinstone.

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  • This collateral supply not being sufficient to keep up the proper flow of blood through the part the veins tend to become thrombosed, thus increasing the engorgement.

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  • It spreads forwards, affecting the supporting fibres outside the epithelium of the capillaries, and then passes to the connective-tissue fibrils of the veins.

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  • In the dropsy of cardiac disease, owing to the deficient oxidation from stagnation of blood, metabolic products must accumulate in the tissues; also lymph return must be impeded by the increased pressure in the veins and so dropsy results (Wells).

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  • With changes of the pressures of the blood in arteries, veins or capillaries, and in the heart itself and its respective chambers, static changes are apt to follow in these parts; such as degeneration of the coats of the arteries, due either to the silent tooth of time, to persistent high blood pressures, or to the action of poisons such as lead or syphilis.

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  • The outcrop of a metalliferous vein frequently manifests itself as a line of rocks stained with oxide of iron, often honeycombed and porous, the " gossan " or " eisen-hut," the iron oxide of which results from the decomposition of the pyrites, usually present as a constituent of such veins.

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  • On the other hand, in the case of less regular deposits, including most metalliferous veins, and especially those of the precious metals, the uncertainty is often very great, and it is sometimes necessary to work on a small scale for months before any considerable expenditure of money is justified.

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  • veins and flat deposits below the general level Boring of the country; or the outcrop lies beyond the limits of the property or under water or water-bearing formations, or is covered by quicksand, or is deeply buried.

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  • Electric and compressed air locomotives are durable, easily operated, and can be built to run under the low roofs of thin veins.

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  • While such minute and gradual variations are harmless for most optical purposes, sudden variations which generally take the form of striae or veins are fatal defects in all optical glass.

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  • The examination of small test-pieces of the glass withdrawn from the crucible by means of an iron rod having shown that the molten mass is free from bubbles, the stirring process may be begun, the object of this manipulation being to render the glass as homogeneous as possible and to secure the absence of veins or striae in the product.

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  • The main mineral deposits are the nickel ores, occurring as veins of garnierite, associated with peridotite dikes, in the ancient rocks of the eastern slope of the island.

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  • Recently, shade-grown tobacco in some localities has suffered considerably from the attacks of small sucking insects known as thrips, which produce " white veins " in the leaf.

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  • Too rapid drying of the outer tissue of the leaf leads to the formation of " white veins," which injure leaves required for wrapper purposes, otherwise it is not important.

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  • The oldest rocks of Barbados, known as the Scotland series, are of shallow water origin, consisting of coarse grits, brown sandstones and sandy clays, in places saturated with petroleum and traversed by veins of manjak.

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  • The richer veins had evidently been long ago worked out, and nothing of sufficient value to justify further outlay was discovered.

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  • (2) The presence of variously formed scales on the body and its appendages: the head is clothed with scales, the thorax with hairs or scales, and the abdomen with either hairs or scales, or both; the legs and veins of the wings are always covered with scales, and the palpi are often (as in some Anophelinae) conspicuously scaly.

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  • The wings exhibit six longitudinal veins (seven in Heptaphlebomyia), two of which are characteristically forked.

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  • It has been sought to work again the ancient quarries of Shemtu, but it was found that the marble had been spoilt by ferruginous and calcareous veins.

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  • The Eastern Andes is a magnificent range in the southern part of Peru, of Silurian formation, with talcose and clay slates, many quartz veins and eruptions of granitic rocks.

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  • The claims measure 100 X200 metres (about 5 acres) in the case of mineral veins or lodes, and 200 X 200 metres (about 10 acres) for coal, alluvial gold and other deposits.

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  • His knowledge of anatomy, physiology and pathology was necessarily defective, the respect in which the dead body was held by the Greeks precluding him from practising dissection; thus we find him writing of the tissues without distinguishing between the various textures of the body, confusing arteries, veins and nerves, and speaking vaguely of the muscles as " flesh."

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  • The leaves, which show great variety in size and form, are generally broad and net-veined, but in sweet-flag (Acorus Calamus) are long and narrow with parallel veins.

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  • The association and distribution of gold may be considered under two different heads, namely, as it occurs in mineral veins - " reef gold," and in alluvial or other superficial deposits which are derived from the waste of the former - " alluvial gold."

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  • Four distinct types of reef gold deposits may be distinguished: (I) Gold may occur disseminated through metalliferous veins, generally with sulphides and more particularly with pyrites.

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  • (2) More common are the auriferous quartz-reefs - veins or masses of quartz containing gold in flakes visible to the naked eye, or so finely divided as to be invisible.

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  • The genesis of the last three types of deposit is generally assigned to the simultaneous percolation of solutions of gold and silica, the auriferous solution being formed during the disintegration of the gold-bearing metalliferous veins.

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  • The average annual product of India for the period 1886 to 1899 inclusive was £698,208, and its present annual product averages about 550,000 oz., or about £2,200,000, obtained almost wholly from the free-milling quartz veins of the Colar goldfields in Mysore, southern India.

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  • The various deposits of gold may be divided into two classes- " veins " and " placers."

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  • It is a singularly beautiful substance, being of pink, greenish, or milk-white colour, streaked with reddish, copper-coloured veins.

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  • Bismuth occurs in metalliferous veins traversing gneiss or clay-slate, and is usually associated with ores of silver and cobalt.

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  • They lay their parthenogenetically produced eggs in the angles of the veins of the leaves, in the buds, or, if the season is already far advanced, in the bark.

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  • The areas containing productive coal measures are usually known as coalfields or basins, within which coal occurs in more or less regular beds, also called seams or veins, which can often be followed over a considerable length of country without change of character, although, like all stratified rocks, their continuity may be interrupted by faults or dislocations, also known as slips, hitches, heaves or troubles.

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  • Mispickel occurs in metalliferous veins with ores of tin, copper, silver, &c. It is occasionally found as embedded crystals, for example, in serpentine at Reichenstein, Silesia.

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  • Boyd Dawkins and Brinton, that the French cave man came hither by way of Iceland; or with Keane, that two subvarieties, the long-headed Eskimo-Botocudo type and the Mexican roundheaded type, prior to all cultural developments, reached the New World, one by Iceland, the other by Bering Sea; or that Malayoid wanderers were stranded on the coast of South America; or that no breach of continuity has occurred since first the march of tribes began this way - ethnologists agree that the aborigines of the western came from the eastern hemisphere,and there is lacking any biological evidence of Caucasoid or Negroid blood flowing in the veins of Americans before the invasions of historic times.

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  • The rocks in the Arakan range and its spurs are metamorphic, and comprise clay, slates, ironstone and indurated sandstone; towards the S., ironstone, trap and rocks of basaltic character are common; veins of steatite and white fibrous quartz are also found.

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  • The mineral is also met with in metalliferous veins, though much less frequently than pyrites; for example the "cockscomb pyrites" of the lead mines of Derbyshire and Cumberland.

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  • They occur (a) in crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks as an original constituent, (b) in veins associated with igneous rocks, and (c) in sedimentary rocks either as organic fragments or in secondary concretionary forms.

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  • Another group of phosphatic deposits connected with igneous rocks comprises the apatite veins of south Norway, Ottawa and other districts in Canada.

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  • Veins of this type occur at Oedegarden in Norway and Dundret in Lapland.

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  • From 1500 to 3500 tons of apatite are obtained yearly in Norway from these veins.

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  • Larger deposits of serpentine occur at several places in St Lawrence county; and at Warwick, in Orange county, is some beautiful marble of a carmine-red colour occasionally mottled with white or showing white veins.

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  • The copper is mostly a copper glance passing into chalcopyrite; it is found in fissure veins with granite.

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  • In other cases, especially near mineral veins, slates are filled with black needles of tourmaline or are bleached to pale grey and white colours, or are silicified and impregnated with mineral ores.

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  • Frequently in districts where slates are much crumpled they are traversed by numerous quartz veins, which have a thickness varying from several inches up to many feet, and may occasionally be auriferous.

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  • Graphite occurs mainly in the older crystalline rocks - gneiss, granulite, schist and crystalline limestone - and also sometimes in granite: it is found as isolated scales embedded in these rocks, or as large irregular masses or filling veins.

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  • The graphite found in granite and in veins in gneiss, as well as that contained in meteoric irons, cannot have had such an origin.

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  • The graphite veins in the older crystalline rocks are probably akin to metalliferous veins and the material derived from deep-seated sources; the decomposition of metallic carbides by water and the reduction of hydrocarbon vapours have been suggested as possible modes of origin.

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  • Such veins often attain a thickness of several feet, and sometimes possess a columnar structure perpendicular to the enclosing walls; they are met with in the crystalline limestones and other Laurentian rocks of New York and Canada, in the gneisses of the Austrian Alps and the granulites of Ceylon.

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  • The ores are almost exclusively gold, tellurides being the most characteristic form, and occur in fissure veins.

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  • Outcroppings were very rare, as the veins were covered with loose wash, and this accounted for the late opening of the field.

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  • Some of the marble has the rich purple veins in which poets saw the blood of Atys.

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  • Galena is of wide distribution, and occurs usually in metalliferous veins traversing crystalline rocks, clay-slates and limestones, and also as pockets in limestones.

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  • In the lead-mining districts of Derbyshire and the north of England the ore occurs as veins and flats in the Carboniferous Limestone series, whilst in Cornwall the veins traverse clay-slates.

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  • Wellhausen remarks,' a better cement that the bread, because through the drinking of it the very blood of Jesus coursed through the veins of the disciples, and that is why more stress is laid on it than on the bread.

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  • Outcasts alone, the offspring of irregular unions, could be ignorant of the blood which ran in their veins, of the unseen ancestors to be fed and tended in family and gentile rites.'

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  • Gold occurs in quartz veins traversing various formations (some as young as Jurassic), and also in gravels, which were for the most part deposited previous to the uplift of the Sierra block.

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  • Veins of cinnabar are known elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain and Sierra Nevada regions but not in workable quantities.

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  • A series of quartzites and slates referred to the Cambrian, and holding numerous and important veins of auriferous quartz, characterize its Atlantic or southeastern side, while valuable coal-fields occur in Cape Breton and on parts of its shores on the Gulf of St Lawrence.

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  • The discovery of large deposits of nickel at Sudbury; of extremely rich gold mines on the head-waters of the Yukon, in a region previously considered well-nigh worthless for human habitation; of extensive areas of gold, copper and silver ores in the mountain regions of British Columbia; of immense coal deposits in the Crow's Nest Pass of the same province and on the prairies; of veins of silver and cobalt of extraordinary richness in northern Ontario - all deeply affected the industrial condition of the country and illustrated the vastness of its undeveloped resources.

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  • This is bounded on the left by the inferior vena cava, which is sunk into a deep groove in the liver, and into the upper part of this the hepatic veins open.

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  • If the portal vein is followed from the transverse fissure, it will be seen to branch and rebranch until minute twigs called interlobular veins (fig.

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  • i, Interlobular veins ending in the intralobular capillaries.

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  • c, c, Central veins joined by the intralobular capillaries.

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  • c, c, Central veins receiving the intralobular capillaries.

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  • i, 1, Interlobular veins.

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  • A surgical operation is sometimes undertaken with success for enabling the engorged veins to empty themselves into the blood-stream in a manner so as to avoid the liver-route.

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  • Inflammation of the Liver (hepatitis) may also be caused by an attack of micro-organisms which have reached it through the veins coming from the large intestine, or through the main arteries.

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  • The commonest form of malignant tumour is the result of the growth of cancerous elements which have been brought to the liver by the veins coming up from a primary focus of the large intestine.

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  • The blood makes its way by large veins to a venous sinus which lies in the middle line below the heart, having the paired renal organs (nephridia) placed between it and that organ.

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  • Later he issued an authoritative work on mineral veins, Untersuchungen fiber Erzgange (1882-1885).

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  • The mucous membrane is raised into a series of transverse folds or rugae, and between it and the muscular wall are plexuses of veins forming erectile tissue.

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  • It is enclosed in a fibrous capsule from which it is separated by the prostatic plexus of veins anteriorly.

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  • The structure of the corpora cavernosa consists of a strong fibrous coat, the tunica albuginea, from the deep surface of which numerous fibrous trabeculae penetrate the interior and divide it into a number of spaces which are lined with endothelium and communicate with the veins.

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  • It consists of arteries, veins and sinuses, but ramified capillaries are usually absent except in the integuments of Cephalopods.

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  • The arteries and veins have proper endothelial walls; they pass abruptly into the sinuses and in some cases communication is effected by orifices in the walls of the vessels, as for example in the vena cava of Nautilus.

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  • long with a rounded crenate outer edge and repeatedly forked veins; the sori (or masses of spore-capsules) are in the crenatures of the pinnules, and are protected by a kidney-shaped involucre.

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  • Gloxinias, begonias, &c., grow readily from fragments of the leaves cut clean through the thick veins and ribs, and planted edgewise like cuttings.

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  • Such a change is very common on the outcrop of mineral veins, forming what miners call "gozzan."

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  • In the leaves of some plants there exists a midrib with large veins running nearly parallel to it from the base to the apex of the lamina, as in grasses (fig.

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  • The sheaths (Chamaerops), showing the veins ending in a process 1, called running from the base to the mara ligule; the blade of the gin, and not forming an angular leaf, f.

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  • Most veins are usually easily traced, but in the case of succulent plants, as Hoya, agave, stonecrop and mesembryanthemum, the veins are obscure.

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  • The function of the veins which consist of vessels and fibres is to form a rigid framework for the leaf and to conduct liquids.

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  • The wood-vessels form part of the fibro-vascular bundles or veins of the leaf and are continuous throughout the leaf-stalk and stem with the root by which water is absorbed from the soil.

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  • They have usually no fibro-vascular system, but consist of a congeries of cells, which sometimes become elongated and compressed so as to resemble veins.

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  • In all the instances already alluded to the leaves have been considered as flat expansions, in which the ribs or veins spread out on the same plane with the stalk.

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  • In some cases, however, the veins spread at right angles to the stalk, forming a peltate leaf as in Indian cress (fig.

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  • When the development of parenchyma is such that it more than fills up the spaces between the veins, the margins become wavy, crisp or undulated, as in Rumex crispus and Rheum undulatum.

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  • The fall is directly caused by the formation of a layer of tissue across the base of the leaf-stalk; the cells of this layer separate from one another and the leaf remains attached only by the fibres of the veins until it becomes finally detached by the wind or frost.

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  • He protested that the king of Denmark was bound to defend Schleswig "so long as there was a sword in Denmark and a drop of blood in the veins of the Danish people."

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  • Blende occurs in metalliferous veins, often in association with galena, also with chalcopyrite, barytes, fluorspar, &c. In oredeposits containing both lead and zinc, such as those filling cavities in the limestones of the north of England and of Missouri, the galena is usually found in the upper part of the deposit, the blende not being reached until the deeper parts are worked.

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  • Whenever he was so fortunate as to have near him a hare that had been kept too long, or a meat pie made with rancid butter, he gorged himself with such violence that his veins swelled and the moisture broke out on his forehead.

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  • Chalcedony occurs as a secondary mineral in volcanic rocks, representing usually the silica set free by the decomposition of various silicates, and deposited in cracks, forming veins, or in vesicular hollows, forming amygdales.

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  • The veins are small, but contain native silver and other rich silver ores running sometimes several thousand ounces per ton, the output being 5,500,000 oz.

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  • Considerable veins of haematite of good quality occur both in the Red Sea hills and in Sinai.

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  • It was worked for about a hundred years in only its upper bed, but in 1781, after traversing a layer of indurated clay intersected with small veins of salt 102 yds.

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  • In Iridaea the thallus is an entire lamina; in Callophyllis a lobed lamina; in Delesseria it is provided with midrib and veins, simulating the appearance of a leaf of the higher plants; in Constantinea the axis remains cylindrical, and the lateral branches assume the form of leaves.

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  • The varying texture of this rock, its irregular foliation and jointing, and its ramifying veins of pegmatite give it very unequal powers of resistance.

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