Vapour-pressures sentence example

vapour-pressures
  • With Sydney Young and others he investigated the critical state and properties of liquids and the relationship between their vapour pressures and temperature, and with John Shields he applied measurements of the surface tension of liquids to the determination of their molecular complexity.
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  • The freezing points and vapour pressures of solutions of sugar are also in conformity with the theoretical numbers.
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  • Among other subjects at which he subsequently worked were the absorption of gases in blood (1837-1845), the expansion of gases by heat (1841-1844), the vapour pressures of water and various solutions (1844-1854), thermo-electricity (1851), electrolysis (1856), induction of currents (1858-1861), conduction of heat in gases (1860), and polarization of heat (1866-1868).
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  • If M 1, M2, and P 1, P 2 be the molecular weights and vapour pressures of the components A and B, then the ratio of A to B in the distillate is M 1 P 1 /M 2 P 2.
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  • The vapour pressure composition curve will be convex to the axis of compositions, the maximum vapour pressures corresponding to pure A and pure B, and the minimum to some mixture of A and B.
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  • In practice the time required to reach these various conditions of equilibrium would be too great for experimental demonstration, but the theoretical consideration of vapour pressures is of fundamental importance.
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  • The osmotic pressure (defined as the difference in the hydrostatic pressures of the solution and solvent when their vapour pressures are equal and they are consequently in equilibrium through a perfect semi-permeable membrane) may also depend on the absolute values of the hydrostatic pressures, as may the vapour pressure of the liquids.
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  • The osmotic pressure Po is the difference of the hydrostatic pressures P' and P of the solution and the solvent when their vapour pressures are equal.
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  • J p J where p and p' are the vapour pressures of solvent and solution each under its own vapour pressure only.
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  • Hartley, who also determined the vapour pressures by passing a current of air successively through weighed vessels containing solution and water respectively.
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  • The difference in the lowering of vapour pressures dp - dp' may be put equal to VdP/v, where P is the osmotic pressure, and V the specific volume of the solvent.
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  • Let us assume that the ratio p/p' of the vapour pressures of the solvent and solution is equal to the ratio of the number of free molecules of solvent to the whole number of molecules in the solution.
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  • If there are n molecules of solute to N of solvent originally, and each molecule of solute combines with a molecule of solvent, we get for the ratio of vapour pressures p/p'=(N - an)/(N - an+n), while the relative lowering of vapour pressure is (p - p')/p=n/(N - an).
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  • It can be easily seen that this ratio, according to Henry's law, must correspond to that of vapour-pressures, and so be independent of the solvent; in fact, in alcohol the figures are o 0066 and o o052.
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  • Lord Berkeley and Hartley have also verified the theory by direct measurements of the vapour-pressures of the same solutions.
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  • (20) from which we deduce that the ratio 0'/0" of the temperatures at which the vapour-pressures are the same is a linear function of the temperature 0' of one of the substances.
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  • 1887) to deduce the vapour-pressures of any substance from those of a standard substance by means of two observations.
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  • 1902), under Ramsay's direction, for comparing solubilities which are in many respects analogous to vapour-pressures.
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  • It is important as having been adopted by Regnault (and also by many subsequent calculators) for the expression of his observations on the vapour-pressures of steam and various other substances.
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  • He proceeds to calculate from this expression the difference of vapour-pressures of ice and water in the immediate neighbourhood of the melting-point, but does not observe that the vapour-pressures themselves may be more accurately calculated for a considerable interval of temperature by means of formula (23), by substituting the appropriate values of the latent heats and specific heats.
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  • 17, p. 1 77, 1882) in a slightly different form, and appropriately applied to the calculation of the vapour-pressures of mercury at ordinary temperatures, where they are much too small to be accurately measured.
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  • An immense mass of material has been collected on the subject of vapour-pressures and densities, the greater part of which will be found in Winkelmann's Handbook, in Landolt's and Bornstein's Tables, and in similar compendiums. The results vary greatly in accuracy, and are frequently vitiated by errors of temperature measurement, by chemical impurities and surface condensation, or by peculiarities of the empirical formulae employed in smoothing the observations; but it would not be within the scope of the present article to discuss these details.
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  • (iii.) If the vapour of A be readily soluble in liquid B, and the vapour of B sparingly soluble in liquid A, and if the vapour pressure of A be greater than that of B, then the vapour pressures of mixtures of A and B will continually diminish as one passes from 100% A to loo% B.
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