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value

value

value Sentence Examples

  • Instead she accepted the entire package at face value.

  • That would increase the value of the house.

  • That was its value to him.

  • The level of interest everyone is showing in some remote acreage is all out of whack, given its questionable value.

  • The human named Deidre had to have it with her, a trinket or piece of jewelry with sentimental value that she never took off.

  • She left everything of value she owned at Wynn's.

  • I'm content to give them fair value for their bucks and try my best to see that they enjoy themselves.

  • I been meaning to check out their value on the computer.

  • I value my life too much.

  • Maybe it was time they started paying more attention to the aesthetic value of things.

  • He had no regard for the sentimental value of the farm where she grew up, nor any confidence that she was capable of running it.

  • Anyway, it has sentimental value.

  • His ragged voice held genuine warmth, though, so she took his words at face value.

  • But after two hours with Cynthia Byrne, he had to fight the inclination to take all of her comments at face value, thereby kissing off any degree of objectivity.

  • The realtor's estimate of the value of the property pleased her.

  • They were confident in their self worth and appeared to accept people at face value.

  • He understood the value of a gentle caress and a soft spoken word.

  • Those are the things that have true value.

  • I know it has sentimental value to you because your dad bought it new.

  • Nothing of any possible value to them, ikir.

  • It has no value to anyone but me.

  • Didn't he realize that your happiness had value too?

  • But I value life as well, Xander.

  • And, if to satisfy these we were forced to maintain the existence of a world of moral standards, it was, thirdly, necessary to form some opinion as to the relation of these moral standards of value to the forms and facts of phenomenal existence.

  • To comprehend the real position we are forced to the conviction that the world of facts is the field in which, and that laws are the means by which, those higher standards of moral and aesthetical value are being realized; and such a union can again only become intelligible through the idea of a personal Deity, who in the creation and preservation of a world has voluntarily chosen certain forms and laws, through the natural operation of which the ends of His work are gained.

  • In a series of repetitions of the experiment, by different observers, the following numbers were obtained for the ratio of the copper in the two chlorides: 1.98, 1.97, 2.03, 2.003, the mean value being 1.996.

  • The atomic theory has been of priceless value to chemists, but it has more than once happened in the history of science that a hypothesis, after having been useful in the discovery Present and the co-ordination of knowledge, has been aban- position doned and replaced by one more in harmony with later of the discoveries.

  • But how can we explain the formation of this poetic wisdom, which, albeit the work of ignorant men, has so deep and intrinsic a philosophic value?

  • To the last he believed that the attacking force would at least have spared his house, which contained official records of priceless value, but he was doomed to see his faith falsified.

  • The Venetian ambassador Gradenigo estimated the paying number of offices on Leo's death at 2150, with a capital value of nearly 3,000,000 ducats and a yearly income of 328,000 ducats.

  • In the first place, with a given size of particles, the direction of complete polarization indicated by (23) is a function of the colour of the light, the value of 0 being 3 or 4 times as large for the violet as for the red end of the spectrum.

  • In 1905 the total value of the factory products was $9 02, 75 8, 6 9.4% more than in 1900.

  • It is even somewhat precipitate to assume that a mean value deduced from a single year is fairly representative of average conditions.

  • The large difference between the means obtained at Potsdam and Kremsmtinster, as compared to the comparative similarity between the results for Kew and Karasjok, suggests that the mean value of the potential gradient may be much more dependent on local conditions than on difference of latitude.

  • In all cases the mean value for the 24 hours is taken as 100.

  • - as percentages of the mean value for the day.

  • So again, in the case of the Paris curves, the absolute value of the diurnal range in summer was much greater for the Eiffel Tower than for the Bureau Central, but the mean voltage was 2150 at the former station and only 134 at the latter.

  • The first line gives the mean value of the potential gradient, the second the mean excess of the largest over the smallest hourly value on individual days.

  • It will be noticed that the difference between the greatest and least hourly values is, in all but three winter months, actually larger than the mean value of the potential gradient for the day; it bears to the range of the regular diurnal inequality a ratio varying from 2.0 in May to 3.6 in November.

  • In this table, unlike Table IV., amplitudes are all expressed as decimals of the mean value of the potential gradient for the corresponding season.

  • Again, Kew is surrounded by a large park, not devoid of trees, and hardly the place where Exner's theory would suggest a large value for C2, and yet the summer value of c 2 at Kew is the largest in Table V.

  • Linke's mean value for dV/dh at the ground was 125.

  • Linss (6) found that an insulated conductor charged either positively or negatively lost its charge in the free atmosphere; the potential V after time t being connected with its initial value Vo by a formula of the type V = Voe - at where a is constant.

  • Thus results obtained for or a_ without the cover are of doubtful value for purposes of comparison with those found elsewhere with it on.

  • Value Being 42 Times That At I P.M.

  • And 6 A.M.; The Largest Hourly Value Was, However, Scarcely Double The Least.

  • And Least At 6 P.M., The Largest Value Being Double The Least; A Was Largest At 5 A.M.

  • And Least At 2 P.M., The Largest Value Being Fully 21 Times The Least.

  • And Noon, But The Largest Value Was Only 12 Times The Least.

  • Simpson found no certain temperature effect on the value of q.

  • The same observer from four weeks' observations at Hammerfest got the considerably lower mean value 58, with a maximum of 252.

  • When the ground was covered by snow the mean value of A was only 42, as compared with 81 when there was no snow.

  • His mean value for November and December was 129, while his mean for May and June was only 47.

  • In individual cases widely different values of a_ or I + are associated with the same value of A.

  • Gerdien himself makes I + -I_ considerably larger than Simpson, and concludes that the observed value of p is from 30 to 50 times that calculated.

  • Taking for a Townsend's value 1.2 +10-6, Mache finds n =1800.

  • The value of Joplin's factory product in 1905 was $3,006,203, an increase of 2 9.3% since 1900.

  • were produced with a value of $10,481; and there is a small output of bromine.

  • Pig iron is manufactured cheaply because of the low price of fuel; in 1907 the value of pig iron manufactured in the state was $6,454,000.

  • There are deposits of excellent clay, especially for pottery, and in 1907 ($2,159,132) and 1908 ($2,083,821) the state ranked after Ohio and New Jersey in the value of pottery.

  • The total value of all clay products in West Virginia was $3,261,736 in 1908.

  • The value of the factory product in 1905 was $99,040,676.

  • Natural facilities for transportation, afforded by the Ohio river and its branches, the Monongahela, at the northern end of the state, and the Little Kanawha and the Great Kanawha, are of special value for the shipment of lumber and coal.

  • Any parent or infant children of deceased parents may set apart personal estate not exceeding $200 in value which shall be exempt from execution.

  • A homestead not exceeding $1000 in value may be set apart, provided that it is recorded before the debt against which it was claimed was contracted.

  • The indebtedness of a county, municipality or school district is limited to 5% of the value of its taxable property.

  • Rice is the chief article of export, dried or salted fish, pepper and cotton ranking next in order of value.

  • In 1905 exports reached a value of £3,816,000, and imports a value of £4,834,000 (not including treasure and transit trade).

  • In 1900 the value of the factory products was $4,691,779; in 1905 it was $5,900,129, the city ranking third among the cities of the state in value of factory products.

  • With the rest of the north of England, Bridlington suffered from the ravages of the Normans, and decreased in value from £32 in the reign of Edward the Confessor, when it formed part of the possessions of Earl Morcar, to 8s.

  • The city has lumber and fishing interests (perch, whitefish, sturgeon, pickerel, bass, &c. being caught in Saginaw Bay), large machine shops and foundries (value of products in 1905, $ 1, 743, 1 55, or 31% of the total of the city's factory products), and various manufactures, including ships (wooden and steel), wooden ware, woodpipe, veneer, railroad machinery, cement, alkali and chicory.

  • A salt basin underlies the city, and, next to the lumber industry, the salt industry was the first to be developed, but its importance has dwindled; the product value in 1905 being $20,098 out of $5,620,866 for all factory products.

  • Two-fifths of the land belongs to the state, and two-fifths more to the various communes; the remaining fifth is minutely subdivided among a large number of small proprietors, many of whom have been expropriated from inability to pay the taxes, which, considering the low value of the land, are too heavy; while the state is unable to let a large proportion of its lands.

  • Nevertheless the idea of the value of improving breeds is gaining ground.

  • The total exports of the province of Cagliari in 1905 attained a value of £1,388,735, of which £J50,023 was foreign trade, while the imports amounted to £1,085,514, of which £360,758 was foreign trade.

  • The total value of the factory product in 1905 was $4,951,964, an increase of 82.3% since 1900.

  • The value of the city's factory products increased from $1,300,698 in 1900 to $1,918,362 in 1905, or 47 5%.

  • Lectures on the History of Ancient Philosophy by William Archer Butler (1814-1848;(1814-1848; lecturer on moral philosophy at Trinity College, Dublin), the value of which was greatly enhanced by Thompson's notes.

  • Hyphear is useful for fattening cattle if they are hardy enough to withstand the purgative effect it produces at first; viscum is medicinally of value as an emollient, and in cases of tumour, ulcers and the like.

  • This is the reassertion of a principle which the middle ages had lost sight of - that knowledge, if it is to have any value, must be intelligence, and not erudition.

  • And it is in guaranteeing the veracity of our clear and distinct conceptions that the value of his deduction of God seems in his own estimate to rest.

  • of Paris - its learned professors not more than the courtiers and the fair sex, flocked to hear the new doctrines explained, and possibly discuss their value.

  • This work is in its design apologetic, and is meant to bring within the range of Christian thought all that is of value in Mahommedan science.

  • In 1905 the capital invested in manufacturing was $7,625,864, and the value of the products was $19,132,455.

  • and xii.), who copied Ephorus, contains nothing of value.

  • 8d., while those possessed of lands of the yearly value of £ioo might obtain licences to play on their own private greens.

  • Religious judgments of value determine objects according to their bearing on our moral and spiritual welfare.

  • If Ritschl had clearly shown that judgments of value enfold and transform other types of knowledge, just as the "spiritual man" includes and transfigures but does not annihilate the "natural man," then within the compass of this spiritually conditioned knowledge all other knowledge would be seen to have a function and a home.

  • "Natural theology" has no value save where it leans on faith.

  • Again, Christ has for the religious life of the community the unique value of Founder and Redeemer.

  • They are united on the value of faithknowledge as opposed to "metaphysic."

  • For the pressure coefficient per degree, between o° and Ice C., they give the value 0036-6255, when the initial pressure is 700 mm.

  • The output is to-day relatively small in comparison with that of many other fields, but there are one or two permanent gold mines of great value working low-grade ore.

  • The value of manufactures produced in 1900 was $41,368,698 (increase 1890-1900, 41.5%).

  • The value of the factory product for 1905, however, was 3.3% less than that for 1900, though it represented 36.6% of the product of the state as a whole.

  • The value of the ore reduced annually is about $10,000,000.

  • The assessed valuation of property in the city in 1905 was $115,338,920 (about the true value), and the bonded debt $1,079,595.

  • In 1905 the value of Troy's factory product was $31,860,829.

  • Of this $11,271,708 was the value of collars and cuffs (89.5% of the value of the total American product), an industry which gave employment to 49.3% of the wage-earners in Troy, and paid 42.1% of the wages.

  • The total value of the city's factory products in 1905 was $2,326,552.

  • In Lombardy it has a breadth of 200 yds., and a depth of 10 to 16 ft., but the strength of the current renders its navigation very difficult, and lessens its value as a means of transit between Germany and Italy.

  • Originally the cattle were nearly all of the long-horned Spanish breed and of little value for their meat, except to the saladero establishments.

  • The results of these first experiments were not encouraging, owing mainly to the poor class of animals, but the exporters persevered, and the business steadily grew in value and importance, until in 1898 the number of live cattle shipped was 359,296, which then decreased to 119,189 in 1901, because of the foot-and-mouth disease.

  • The pastoral and agricultural industries have been hampered by fluctuations in the value of the currency, farm products being sold at a gold value for the equivalent in paper, while labourers are paid in currency.

  • The existing system of taxation also presses heavily upon the provinces, as may be seen from the fact that the national, provincial and municipal exactions together amount to £7 per head of population, while the total value of the exports in 1898 was only L6 in round numbers.

  • The constant fluctuations in the value of the currency, then much depreciated, intensified the distress and complicated the situation.

  • The Celman administration, in violation of the trust, then sold the specie and squandered the proceeds, leaving the provincial bank notes without guarantee and value.

  • As on previous occasions, the great depreciation in the value of the currency has led to a repudiation of part of its nominal value.

  • These measures have served to give greater stability to the value of the circulating medium, and to prevent the ruinous losses caused by a constant fluctuation in value, but the rate established prevents the further appreciation of the currency.

  • The official value of the dollar was fixed at 44 cents gold for all government purposes.

  • The violent fluctuations in the value of the paper dollar, which caused so much damage to trade and industry, were thus checked.

  • The capital value of land, which greatly decreased during the last twenty years of the i9th century, is estimated at 3,120,000,000, and that of stock, buildings, implements, &c., at 340,000,000.

  • The value per acre of land, which exceeds 48 in the departments of Seine, Rhne and those fringing the north-west coast from Nord to Manche inclusive, is on the average about 29, though it drops to 16 and less in Morbihan, Landes, Basses-Pyrnes, and parts of the Alps and the central plateau.

  • Iron.The iron-mines of France are more numerous than its coalmines, but they do not yield a sufficient quantity of ore for the needs of the metallurgical industries of the country; as will be seen in the table below the production of iron in France gradually increased during the 19th century; on the other hand, a decline in prices operated against a correspondingly marked increase in its annual value.

  • The products of the quarries of France for the five years 1901-1905 averaged 9,311,000 per annum in value, of which building material brought in over two-thirds.

  • Metallurgy.The average production and value of iron and steel manufactured in France in the last four decades of the I 9th century is shown below Cast Iron.

  • Value 1,083,000 386,000 526,000

  • The total value of the produce of fisheries increased from 4,537,000 in 1892 to f5,259,000 in 1902.

  • articles in the customs list; this value is estimated at the end of the year in accordance with the variations that have taken place and is applied provisionally to the following year.

  • The average value of the principal articles of import and export (special trade) over quinquennial periods following 1890 is shown in the two tables below.

  • The other chief customers of France were Switzerland and Italy, whose imports from France averaged in 1901-1905 nearly 10,000,000 and over 7,200,000 respectively in value.

  • The respective shares of the leading customs in the tfade of the country is approximately shown in the following table, which gives the value of their exports and imports (general trade) in 1905 in millions sterling.

  • It is collected in accordance with a register of property (cadastre) drawn up for the most part in the first half of the 19th century, dealing with every piece of property in France, and giving its extent and value and the name of the owner.

  • 9d.), the other levied on every occupier of a furnished house or of apartments in proportion to its rental value.

  • (2) An assessment on the letting value of the premises in which a business or profession is carried on.

  • The realization of the fact that the value to France of her colonies was mainly commercial, led at length to the abandonment of the attempt to impose on a great number of diverse peoples—some possessing (as in Indo-China and parts of West Africa) ancient and highly complex civilizations—French laws, habits of mind, tastes and manners.

  • 1 The Indo-China budget is reckoned in piastres, a silver coin of fluctuating value (is.

  • Commerce.The value of the external trade of the French possessions, exclusive of Algeria and Tunisia, increased in the ten years 1896-1905 from 18,784,060 to 34,957,479.

  • The value of the trade with British colonies and Great Britain in 1905 was over 7,200,000.

  • The total value of Winston's factory products increased from $4,887,649 in 1900 to $11,353,296 in 1905, or 132.3%.

  • A similar influence was exerted by him in other branches of the common law; and although, after his retirement, a reaction took place, and he was regarded for a while as one who had corrupted the ancient principles of English law, these prejudices passed rapidly away, and the value of his work in bringing the older law into harmony with the needs of modern society has long been fully recognized.

  • The Turks charged through the intervals between the galeasses, which proved to be of no value.

  • Thus it was the Aeginetans who, within thirty or forty years of the invention of coinage by the Lydians (c. 700 B.C.), introduced to the western world a system of such incalculable value to trade.

  • First (a), in the earlier biblical writings which describe the state of affairs under the Hebrew monarchy there is not this fundamental distinction among the Levites, and, although a list of Aaronite high-priests is preserved in a late source, internal details and the evidence of the historical books render its value extremely doubtful (1 Chron.

  • Lotze for the decision of the question lays down the broad principle, " All that has once come to be will eternally continue so soon as for the organic unity of the world it has an unchangeable value, but it will obviously again cease to be, when that is not the case " (Gr.

  • This view ignores that man has ideals of absolute value, truth, beauty, goodness, that he consciously communes with the God who is in all, and through all, and over all, that it is his mind which recognizes the vastness of the universe and thinks its universal law, and that the mind which perceives and conceives cannot be less, but must be greater than the object of its knowledge and thought.

  • " No endless duration is our goal, but complete repose in the perfect satisfaction which the will finds when it has reached the significance, the influence, and the value at which it is aiming " (p. 83).

  • 38) which have no excellence of workmanship, but have a certain evidential value as to the treatment of their original.

  • Among the sea fish, the schnapper is of great value as an article of food, and its weight comes up to 50 lb.

  • Baker and Smith of the Sydney Technical College, have brought to light many other valuable products likely to prove of commercial value.

  • During 1906 a more rational view of the value of immigration was adopted by the various state governments and by the federal government, and immigration to Australia is now systematically encouraged.

  • Numerically the flocks of Australia represent one-sixth of the world's sheep, and in just over half a century (1851-1905) the exports of Australian wool alone reached the value of £650,000,000.

  • The value of Australian wheat and flour exported in 1905 was £5,500,000.

  • For 1905 the total value of agricultural produce estimated at the place of production was 18,750,000 sterling, or about £4: 13: 4 per inhabitant.

  • Although the timbers of commercial value are confined practically to the eastern and a portion of the western coastal belt and a few inland tracts of Australia, they constitute an important national asset.

  • In Queensland waters there are about 300 vessels, and on the Western Australian coast about 450 licensed craft engaged in the industry, the annual value of pearl-shell and pearls raised being nearly half a million sterling.

  • From the date of its first discovery, up to the close of 1905, gold to the value of £460,000,000 sterling has been obtained in Australia.

  • For many years Western Australia was considered to be destitute of mineral deposits of any value, but it is now known that a rich belt of mineral country extends from north to south.

  • The fields of New South Wales have proved to be of immense value, the yield of silver and lead during 1905 being £2,500,000, and the total output to the end of the year named over £40,000,000.

  • Up to the end of 1904 Australia had produced silver to the value of £45,000,000.

  • The total value of copper produced in Australia up to the end of 1905 was £42,500,000 sterling, £24,500,000 having been obtained in South Australia, £7,500,000 in New South Wales, £6,400,000 in Tasmania and over £3,500,000 in Queensland.

  • The value of the output in 1905 was £226,110.

  • The total value of tin produced in Australia is nearly a million sterling per annum, and the total production to the end of 1905 was £22,500,000, of which Tasmania produced about 40%, New South Wales one-third, Queensland a little more than a fourth.

  • Magnetite occurs in great abundance in Western Australia, together with haematite, which would be of enormous value if cheap labour were available.

  • Goethite, limonite and haematite are found in New South Wales, at the junction of the Hawkesbury sandstone formation and the Wianamatta shale, near Nattai, and are enhanced in their value by their proximity to coal-beds.

  • The association of this metal with silver in the Broken Hill mines of New South Wales adds very greatly to the value of the product.

  • Cobalt occurs in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia, and efforts have been made in the former state to treat the ore, the metal having a high commercial value; but the market is small, and no attempt has been made up to 1907 to produce it on any large scale.

  • Zircon, tourmaline, garnet and other precious stones of little commercial value are found throughout Australia.

  • The value of the external trade was £95,188,000, viz.

  • In 1905 the value of the wool export regained the £20,000,000 level, and with the rapid recovery of the numerical II.

  • The population of Victoria was doubled in the first twelvemonth of the gold fever, and the value of imports and exports was multiplied tenfold between 1851 and 1853.

  • The total value of the factory products in 1905 was $3,886,833.

  • Modern mathematicians may find on reading this brilliant summary a good many dicta which they will call in question, but, whatever its defects may be, Peacock's report remains a work of permanent value.

  • The country which it waters, however, is not of any value, and it is not much used.

  • The value of the city's factory products increased from $2,873,334 in 1900 to $4,356,615 in 1905 or 51.6%.

  • The most valuable fish taken was walleyed pike, and the catch of this fish and of pickerel from Lake Champlain in 1902 exceeded in value that from any other body of fresh water in the United States excepting Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

  • In 1910 there were 495,000 neat cattle (285,000 milch cows), 94,000 horses (average value, $106), 229,000 sheep and 95,000 swine.

  • The value of the total amount of stone produced in 1908 in Vermont was $7,152,624.

  • The total value of the output of granite in the state in 1908 was $2,451,933.

  • In 1908 the value of slate produced was $1,710,491 (out of a total production for the United States of $6,316,817).

  • The value of sawmill products in 1905 was $5,888,441, and of planing-mill products $3,080,117.

  • Dairy industries have rapidly increased in value: in 1905 the value of butter and cheese was $6,416,434, more than any other single industry under the census classification.

  • The greatest development was between 1900 and 1905; the total value of textiles in the former year was $5,407,217 (woollen goods, $2,572,646; hosiery and knit goods, $1,834,685; cotton goods, $999,886) and in the latter was $7,773, 612 (woollen goods, $4,698,405; hosiery and knit goods, $1,988,685; and cotton goods, $1,086,522).

  • The homestead of a householder or head of a family to the value of $500 is, so long as it continues to be used as the homestead, exempt from levy or attachment other than upon causes existing at the time it was acquired and for taxes.

  • Ratz (Monats., 1905, 26, p. 1241) obtained the value [a] D = - 16 9.54° at 20°; its salts are dextro-rotatory.

  • Among later residents commemorated is Edward Lloyd, who was the first person to show the value of esparto grass for the manufacture of paper, and thus started an industry which is one of the most important in Algeria.

  • The value of oak bark depends upon the amount of tannin contained in it, which varies much, depending not only on the growth of the tree but on the care bestowed on the preparation of the bark itself, as it soon ferments and spoils by exposure to wet, while too much sun-heat is injurious.

  • The astringent principle is a peculiar kind of tannic acid, called by chemists quercitannic, which, yielding more stable compounds with gelatine than other forms, gives oak bark its high value to the tanner.

  • Common throughout the northern and middle states and Canada, the red oak attains a large size only on good soils; the wood is of little value, being coarse and porous, but it is largely used for cask-staves; the bark is a valuable tanning material.

  • Both these oaks grow well in British plantations, where their bright autumn foliage, though seldom so decided in tint as in their native woods, gives them a certain picturesque value.

  • In Spain the wood is of some value, being hard and close-grained, and the inner bark is used for tanning.

  • He appreciated, without overestimating, the value of England's insular position.

  • But before long he came to understand, as no other commander of the age save Gustavus understood it, the value of true "shock-action."

  • Upon Andrew Jackson's election to the presidency, the Telegraph became the principal mouthpiece of the administration, and received printing patronage estimated in value at $50,000 a year, while Green became one of the coterie of unofficial advisers of Jackson known as the "Kitchen Cabinet."

  • 181 letters of Theodoret have come down to us, partly in a separate collection, partly in the Acta of the councils, and partly in the Latin of Marius Mercator; they are of great value not only for the biography of the writer, but also for the history of his diocese and of the church in general.

  • When the consolidation of the Dominion by means of railway construction was under discussion in 1872, Grant travelled from the Atlantic to the Pacific with the engineers who surveyed the route of the Canadian Pacific railway, and his book Ocean to Ocean (1873) was one of the first things that opened the eyes of Canadians to the value of the immense heritage they enjoyed.

  • His writings include: Mathematical Investigations in the Theory of Value and Prices (1892); Elements of Geometry (with A.

  • It was well known during the middle ages, and was largely used by William, archbishop of Tyre, for the first six books of his Belli sacri historic. In modern times its historical value has been seriously impugned, but the verdict of the best scholarship seems to be that in general it forms a true record of the events of the first crusade, although containing some legendary matter.

  • In 1908 the value of the imports was.

  • This result was apparently confirmed by some independent experiments, but it Is very far from the truth, for it is now known that the actual ratio, or factor as it is commonly called, of the velocity of the wind to that of the cups depends very largely on the dimensions of the cups and arms, and may have almost any value between two and a little over three.

  • In cases where the density of the air is not of average value, as on a high mountain, or with an exceptionally low barometer for example, an allowance must be made.

  • Him succeeded, not only in showing that such a difference exists, but in measuring it, and hence determining a tolerably approximate value of the mechanical equivalent of heat.

  • He also determined a roughly approximate value for the mechanical equivalent of heat from the results of these experiments.

  • In allowing the air to expand from a pressure of 21 atmospheres to that of i atmosphere the value of the mechanical equivalent of heat obtained was 821.89 foot-pounds.

  • For a long time the final result deduced by Joule by these varied and careful investigations was accepted as the standard value of the mechanical equivalent of heat.

  • One of the tests by which Fichte discriminates the value of previous systems is the adequateness with which they interpret moral experience.

  • It was about one-tenth of the average value.

  • Pledges were often made where the intrinsic value of the article was equivalent to the amount of the debt; but antichretic pledge was more common, where the profit of the pledge was a set-off against the interest of the debt.

  • Even if he refloated the ship he had to pay a fine of half its value for sinking it.

  • The advantage of the high conducting power which copper possesses Over- is of especial value in moist climates (like that of the United Kingdom), since the effect of leakage over the surface of the damp insulators is much less noticeable when the conducting power of the wire is high than when it is low, especially when the line is a long one.

  • or more on each side of the mean value.

  • Since by international agreement the wilful damage of a cable has been constituted a criminal offence, and the cable companies have avoided crossing the fishing banks, or have adopted the wise policy of refunding the value of anchors lost on their cables, the number of such fractures has greatly diminished.

  • The average total inductive value of these bridges to received signals is about 40 henrys, and the coil is so arranged that the arms contain three sections or blocks of winding each, two of which are joined up to strap connexions, and the a p :?; .?

  • adjust the frequency so that it has the value of the normal time period of the circuit formed of the condenser and transformer secondary circuit, and thus it is possible to obtain condenser oscillatory discharges free from any admixture with alternating current arc. In this manner the condenser discharge can be started or stopped at pleasure, and long and short discharges made in accordance with the signals of the Morse FIG.

  • The thermal G G detectors are especially useful for the purpose of quantitative measurements, because they indicate the true effective or square root of mean square value of the current or train of oscillations passing through the hot wire.

  • Marconi's success in bridging the English Channel at Easter in 1899 with electric waves and establishing practical wireless telegraphy between ships and the shore by this means drew public attention to the value of the new means of communication.

  • From the known value of the capacity in that position and the inductance the frequency can be calculated.

  • The first real advance towards their interpretation was made by Otfried Muller (Die Etrusker, 1828), who pointed out that though their alphabet was akin to the Etruscan their language was Italic. Lepsius, in his essay De tabulis Eugubinis (1833), finally determined the value of the Umbrian signs and the received order of the Tables, pointing out that those in Latin alphabet were the latest.

  • The mean value obtained was 112.469 (Ag =107.93).

  • The mean value 112.467 was obtained by Baxter, Hines and Frevert (ibid., 1906, 28, p. 770) by analysing cadmium bromide.

  • Many circuits have been " loaded " in the manner proposed by Pupin during recent years, especially in underground cables, and it has been found in practice that the transmission value of these when loaded is approximately from three to four times their value unloaded.

  • The price is to be fixed by the Railway and Canal Commissioners as arbitrators on the basis of the " then value," exclusive of any allowance for past or future profits or any compensation for compulsory sale or other consideration.

  • The Postmaster-General agreed also to buy the private wire plant of the company at a value based upon three years' purchase of the net profits on the average of the three years ending 31st of December 1911.

  • The London County Council, according to the statement of its comptroller, was disturbed by the hope expressed by the manager of the company, that the holders of the company's ordinary shares would obtain the par value of their shares in 1911.

  • Boiamund proposed to assess the tax, not according to the old conventional valuation but on the true value of the benefices at the time of assessment.

  • The pope insisted upon the tax being collected according to the true value, and Boiamund returned to Scotland to superintend its collection.

  • The chestnut is of great value for its wood and ~ is furnished by the oak and beech, and pine and fir forests ~ S~ of the Alps and Apennines.

  • This repayment sometimes consists of half the estimated value of the standing crops.

  • The value of the output had, however, by 1902 risen to 1,600,000, representing a tonnage of about 10,000,000.

  • The value has, however, undoubtedly diminished, though the number of boats and crews increases.

  • The value of the product has, however, proportionately increased, so that the sum realized was little less, while less than half the number of men was employed.

  • Handlooms and small spinTextiles ning establishments have, in the silk industry, given place to large establishments with steam looms. The production of raw silk at least tripled itself between 1875 and 1900, and the value of the silks woven in Italy, estimated in 1890 to be 2,200,000, is now, on account of the development of the export trade calculated to be almost 4,000,000.

  • The value of the annual produce of the various branches of the cotton industry, which in 1885 was calculated to he 7,200,000, was in 1900, notwithstanding the fall in prices, about 12,000,000.

  • The capital value of the whole of the lines, rolling stock, &c., for 1 9081909 was calculated approximately at 1/2244,f 61,400, and the profits at 1/25,295,019, or 22%.

  • The parcel post and money order services have largely increased since 1887--1888, the number of parcels having almost doubled (those for abroad are more than trebled), while the number of money orders issued is trebled and their value doubled (about 40,000,000).

  • The value of the foreign orders paid in Italy increased from 1,280,000 to ~2,356,oo0owing to the increase of emigration and of the savings sent home by emigrants.

  • A third difficulty is the comparatively small tonnage and volume of Italian exports relatively to the imports, the former in 1907 being about one-fourth of the latter, and greatl out of proportion to the relative value; while a fourth is the lac of facilities for handling goods, especially in the smaller ports.

  • The value of the capital thus potentially freed was estimated at 12,000,000; though hitherto the ecclesiastical possessions in Lombardy, Emilia.

  • which were to be accepted at their nominal value as purchase money for the alienated property.

  • In March 1907 the Italian navy contained, excluding ships of no fighting value: Effective.

  • Capital value of annual payment to South Austrian Company 37,102,908

  • I For example, wheat, the price of which was in 1902 26 lire pe cwt., pays a tax of 74 lire; sugar pays four times its wholesale val,ii in tax; coffee twice its wholesale value.

  • The demands for reimbursement at par represented a sum of only 187,588 and the market value of the stock was hardly affected; while the saving to the Treasury was to be 800,000 per annum for the first five years and about double the amount afterwards.

  • Currency.The lira (plural lire) of 100 centesimi (centimes) is equal in value to the French franc. The total coinage (exclusive of Eritrean currency) from the 1st of January 1862 to the end of 1907 was 1,104,667,116 lire (exclusive of recoinage), divided as follows: gold, 427,516,970 lire; silver, 570,097,025 lire; nickel, 23,417,000 lire; bronze, 83,636,121 lire.

  • They were in January 1908 equal in value to the metallic currency of gold and silver.

  • Loans are repayable by Agrarian instalments, and are guaranteed by first mortgages not Credit greater in amount than half the value of the hypothecated flanks property.

  • The value of their land certificates or cartetle fondiarie (representing capital in circulation) rose from 10,420,000 in 1881 to 15,560,000 in 1886, and to 30,720,000 in 1891, but fell to 29,320,000 in 1896, to 27,360,000 in 1898, and to 24,360,000 in 1907; the amount of money lent increased from 1/2Io,44o,000 in 1881 to 15,600,000 in 1886, and 30,800,000 in 1891, but fell to 29,320,000 in 1896, to 27,360,000 in 1899, and to f2I,72o,000 in 1907.

  • These loans are regulated by special disposition, and are guaranteed by a share of the increased value of the land after the improvements have been carried out.

  • It was in Italy that the military value of a network of roads was first appreciated by the Romans, and the lesson stood them in good stead in the provinces.

  • He took public education out of the hands of the Jesuits, which, for the future development of manliness in his dominions, was a measure of incalculable value.

  • He ended by dominating the cabinet, but owing to his having negotiated a union of the Right Centre and the Left Centre (the Con nubio) in the conviction that the country needed the moderate elements of both parties, he quarrelled with DAzeglio (who, as an uncompromising conservative, failed to see the value of such a move) and resigned.

  • On the 3rd of September the news of Sedan reached Florence, and with the fall of Napoleons empire the September convention ceased to have any value.

  • Perceiving the advantage of a visit to the imperial and apostolic court after the Italian occupation of Rome and the suppression of the religious orders, and convinced of the value of more cordial intercourse with the German empire, Visconti-Venosta and Minghetti advised their sovereign to accept both the Austrian and the subsequent German invitations.

  • A French attempt to purchase the line was upset in the English courts, and the railway was finally secured by Italy at a price more than eight times its real value.

  • The value of French exports into Italy decreased immediately by one-half, while Italian exports to France decreased by nearly two-thirds.

  • In December 1898 he convoked a diplomatic conference in Rome to discuss secret means for the repression of anarchist propaganda and crime in view of the assassination of the empress of Austria by an Italian anarchist (Luccheni), but it is doubtful whether results of practical value were achieved.

  • The value of the factory products increased from $375,167 in 1900 to $784,248 in 1905, or 109%.

  • Still it has a value for him if taken not as an argument, but rather as the expression of an immediate conviction; viz.

  • Can you contrast " judgments of value " with " judgments of fact "?

  • Ritschl, " independent judgments of value "?

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