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valparaiso

valparaiso

valparaiso Sentence Examples

  • The Transandine line, designed to open railway communication between Buenos Aires and Valparaiso, was so far completed early in 1909 that on the Argentine side only the summit tunnel, 2 m.

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  • Communication with the United States is effected by land lines to Valparaiso, and thence by a cable along the west coast.

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  • VALPARAISO, a city and the county-seat of Porter (disambiguation)|Porter county, Indiana, U.S.A., about 40 m.

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  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).

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  • Valparaiso was settled about 1835, incorporated in 1856 as a village and chartered as a city in 1865.

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  • A transcontinental line was long ago undertaken across South America from Buenos Aires to Valparaiso, where the continent is only about goo m.

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  • Development of these lines has been primarily an extension from the large cities in the East to the agricultural districts in the West, but a change of great importance was brought about in 1910 by the completion of the last tunnel on the Argentine Transandine Railway, which serves to connect Santiago, Valparaiso and the other great cities of the west coast with Buenos Ayres, Montevideo, Bahia, Rio de Janeiro and the other great cities of the east coast.

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  • (incorporated 1840), but Valparaiso now occupies that position.

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  • of Valparaiso, in 20° 12' 15" S., 70° i i' 15" W.

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  • The nitre thus refined is exported chiefly from Valparaiso, whence the name of "Chile saltpetre."

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  • extending from Panama to Valparaiso, and the (British) West Coast Cable Co., subsidiary to the Eastern Telegraph Co., with a cable between Callao and Valparaiso.

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  • A fleet of armed ships was fitted out at Valparaiso in Chile, under the command of Lord Cochrane (afterwards earl of Dundonald) and officered by Englishmen.

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  • by Santiago and Valparaiso and W.

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  • north of Valparaiso.

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  • 30 he had sighted the lofty ranges of the Andes, and the " Prinz Eitel Friedrich," an armed merchantman, had been sent into Valparaiso to coal, while the squadron cruised at slow speed out of sight of the port.

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  • When the Germans at Valparaiso acclaimed him a naval hero, he shook his head.

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  • of Valparaiso.

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  • QUILLOTA, a town of Chile in the province of Valparaiso, on the left bank of the Aconcagua river, 20 m.

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  • of the city of Valparaiso.

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  • Quillota is situated on a railway between Valparaiso and Santiago, which passes through a mountainous, semi-barren country.

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  • of Valparaiso in 2 3° 3 8 ' 39" S.

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  • The first, under the command of Captain David Porter, went on to the Pacific, where she did great injury to British trade, till she was captured off Valparaiso by the British frigate "Phoebe" (38) and the sloop "Cherub" (24) on the 28th of March 1814.

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  • Suarez, Rasgos biogrdficos de hombres notables de Chile (Valparaiso, 1886).

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  • Valparaiso, Chile (Province) >>

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  • The department belongs partly to the arid coastal plain that extends from the Gull of Guayaquil southward nearly to Valparaiso, and partly to a broken mountainous region belonging to the Western Cordilleras.

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  • Unsuccessful attempts were made to acclimatize the alpaca goat in England, on the European continent and in Australia, and even to cross certain English breeds of sheep 1 Grown in Peru but shipped from Valparaiso.

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  • He upheld American rights in Samoa, pursued a vigorous diplomacy with Italy over the lynching of eleven Italians, all except three of them American naturalized citizens, in New Orleans on the 14th of May 1891, held a firm attitude during the strained relations between the United States and Chile (growing largely out of the killing and wounding of American sailors of the U.S. ship "Baltimore" by Chileans in Valparaiso on the 16th of October 1891), and carried on with Great Britain a resolute controversy over the seal fisheries of Bering Sea, - a difference afterwards settled by arbitration.

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  • The most famous of these is the " Vale of Quillota " between Valparaiso and Santiago.

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  • The great earthquake which partially destroyed Valparaiso in 1906, however, was not followed by a tidal wave.

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  • In this respect Chile may be divided into at least four great earthquake areas, two in the desert region, the third enclosing Valparaiso, and the fourth extending from Concepcion to Chiloe.

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  • Among the most frequented of these are Valparaiso, Coquimbo, Caldera, Iquique and Arica.

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  • In the shoal waters about Juan Fernandez are found a species of codfish (possibly Gadus macrocephalus), differing in some particulars from the Newfoundland cod, and a large crayfish, both of which are caught for the Valparaiso market.

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  • A large species of barnacle, Balanus psittacus, is found in great abundance from Concepcion to Puerto Montt, and is not only eaten by the natives, by whom it is called Pico, but is also esteemed a great delicacy in the markets of Valparaiso and Santiago.

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  • In Santiago and Valparaiso the death-rate sometimes rises to 42 and 60 per 1000, and infant mortality is very high, being 73% of the births in some of the provincial towns.

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  • The first railway to be constructed in central Chile was the government line from Valparaiso to Santiago, 115 m.

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  • A branch of the Valparaiso and Santiago line runs to Los Andes, and its extension across the Andes connects with the Argentine lines from Buenos Aires to Mendoza and the Chilean frontier-all sections together forming a transcontinental route about 850 m.

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  • Telegraphic communication between all the important towns of the republic, initiated in 1855 with a line between Santiago and Valparaiso, is maintained by the state, which in 1903 owned 93 06 m.

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  • Three or four foreign companies maintain a regular steamship service to Valparaiso and other Chilean ports.

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  • The development of the coal deposits in the provinces of Concepcion and Arauco has made possible other industries besides those of smelting mineral ores, and numerous small manufacturing establishments have resulted, especially in Santiago, Valparaiso, Copiapo and other places where no permanent water power exists.

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  • The breweries are generally worked by Germans and are situated chiefly in the south, though there are large establishments in Santiago and Valparaiso.

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  • The second most important mining industry in Chile, however, is that of copper, which is found in the provinces of Antofagasta, Atacama, Coquimbo, Aconcagua, Valparaiso, Santiago, O'Higgins, Colchagua, Curico and Talca, but the richest deposits are in the three desert provinces.

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  • The judicial power consists of a Supreme Court of Justice of seven members located in the national capital, which exercises supervisory and disciplinary authority over all the law courts of the republic; six courts of appeal, in Tacna, Serena, Valparaiso, Santiago, Talca and Concepcion; tribunals of first instance in the department capitals; and minor courts, or justices of the peace, in the subdelegacies and districts.

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  • The administration of the navy, under the president and minister of war and marine, is confided to a general naval staff, called the " Direccion jeneral de la Armada," with headquarters at Valparaiso.

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  • There is a military port at Talcahuano, in Concepcion Bay, strongly fortified, and provided with arsenal and repair shops, a large dry dock and a patent slip. The naval school, which occupies one of the noteworthy edifices of Valparaiso, is attended by 90 cadets and is noted for the thoroughness of its instruction.

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  • The School of Mechanic Arts and Trades (Escuela de Artes y Oficios) of Santiago has a high reputation for the practical character of its instruction, in which it is admirably seconded bya normal handicraft school (Sloyd system) and a night school of industrial drawing in the same city, and professional schools for girls in Santiago and Valparaiso, where the pupils are taught millinery, dress-making, knitting, embroidery and fancy needlework.

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  • At the end of the 17th century Santiago was a town of poor one-storeyed houses and had only 8000 inhabitants; the other towns, Valparaiso, Concepcion, La Serena, were only large villages.

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  • The Straits of Magellan were occupied; under an American engineer, William Wheelwright, a line of steamers was started on the coast, and, by a wise measure allowing merchandise to be landed free of duty for re-exportation, Valparaiso became a busy port and trading centre; while the demand for food-stuffs in California and Australia, following upon the rush for gold, gave a strong impetus to agriculture.

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  • The blockade of their ports and the bombardment of Valparaiso by a Spanish squadron impressed the Chileans with the necessity of possessing an adequate fleet to defend their long coast-line; and it was under President Errazuriz that the ships were obtained and the officers trained that did such good service in the great war with Peru.

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  • Ex-President Pinto died three years later in Valparaiso, leaving a memory respected and admired by all political parties in his country.

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  • Believing that he had now secured the support of the majority in congress on behalf of any measures he decided to put forward, the new president initiated a policy of heavy expenditure on public works, the building of schools, and the strengthening of the naval and military forces of the republic. Contracts were given out to the value of 6,000,000 for the construction of railways in the southern districts; some 10,000,000 dollars were expended in the erection of schools and colleges; three cruisers and two sea-going torpedo boats were added to the squadron; the construction of the naval port at Talcahuano was actively pushed forward; new armament was purchased for the infantry and artillery branches of the army, and heavy guns were acquired for the purpose of permanently and strongly fortifying the neighbourhoods of Valparaiso, Talcahuano and Iquique.

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  • A force of io,000 men was now raised by the junta of the revolution, and preparations were rapidly pushed forward for a move to the south with the object of attacking Valparaiso and Santiago.

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  • north of Valparaiso, and marched to Concon, where the Balmacedists were entrenched.

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  • Both the Balmacedist generals were killed and Valparaiso was at once occupied.

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  • "Baltimore" having been given liberty on shore, an argument arose between some of them and a group of Chilean sailors in a drinking den in Valparaiso.

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  • In 1904, however, both trade and revenue showed signs of improvement, and the sale of the warships " Esmeralda " and " Chambuco " for 1,000,000 furnished a surplus, which was devoted to the improvement of the port of Valparaiso.

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  • On the 27th of August 1906 a terrible earthquake visited Valparaiso and the surrounding district.

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  • The town of Valparaiso was almost entirely destroyed, while Santiago and earth- quake.

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  • The completion of the Trans-Andean railway between Valparaiso and Buenos Aires was bound to be of immense commercial and industrial value; and eventually the making of a longitudinal railway route uniting the nitrate province of the north with Santiago, and Santiago with Puerto Montt in the distant south, opened up further important prospects.

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  • Valdes Vergara, Historia de Chile (Valparaiso, 1898), written primarily for schools,but containing useful sketches of leading figures in Chilean history.

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  • Diego Portales (Valparaiso, 1863), a good account of the life and time of Portales, the famous minister of the Conservative party; P. B.

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  • It is a port of call for several lines of steamers, including those of the Pacific Mail running between Liverpool and Valparaiso.

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  • Ballivian remained in the presidency till 1848, when he retired to Valparaiso, and in the end of that year General Belzu, after leading a successful military revolution, took the chief power, and during his presidency endeavoured to promote agriculture, industry and trade.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Valparaiso discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • There are normal schools at Valparaiso, Angola, Marion and Danville, and a Teachers' College at Indianapolis, which are on the state's " accredited " list and belong to the normal school system.

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  • At the early age of nine he entered the navy, under the protection of his name-father, Captain David Porter, with whom he served in the "Essex" during her cruise in the Altantic in 1812, and afterwards in the Pacific, until her capture by the "Phoebe," in Valparaiso Bay, on the 28th of March 1814.

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  • Thursday 19 January An early breakfast was followed by our first pelagic of the trip, from Valparaiso, on board the Karina Masiel.

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  • JUAN FERNANDEZ ISLANDS, a small group in the South Pacific Ocean, between 33° and 34° S., 80° W., belonging to Chile and included in the province of Valparaiso.

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  • t.r RoSand, V.Maria G Rinde Quillo Valparaiso a1: „ago S A N Luis Cast/nos Sta.

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  • The Transandine line, designed to open railway communication between Buenos Aires and Valparaiso, was so far completed early in 1909 that on the Argentine side only the summit tunnel, 2 m.

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  • Communication with the United States is effected by land lines to Valparaiso, and thence by a cable along the west coast.

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  • VALPARAISO, a city and the county-seat of Porter (disambiguation)|Porter county, Indiana, U.S.A., about 40 m.

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  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).

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  • Valparaiso was settled about 1835, incorporated in 1856 as a village and chartered as a city in 1865.

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  • A transcontinental line was long ago undertaken across South America from Buenos Aires to Valparaiso, where the continent is only about goo m.

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  • Development of these lines has been primarily an extension from the large cities in the East to the agricultural districts in the West, but a change of great importance was brought about in 1910 by the completion of the last tunnel on the Argentine Transandine Railway, which serves to connect Santiago, Valparaiso and the other great cities of the west coast with Buenos Ayres, Montevideo, Bahia, Rio de Janeiro and the other great cities of the east coast.

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  • (incorporated 1840), but Valparaiso now occupies that position.

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  • of Valparaiso, in 20° 12' 15" S., 70° i i' 15" W.

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  • The nitre thus refined is exported chiefly from Valparaiso, whence the name of "Chile saltpetre."

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  • extending from Panama to Valparaiso, and the (British) West Coast Cable Co., subsidiary to the Eastern Telegraph Co., with a cable between Callao and Valparaiso.

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  • A fleet of armed ships was fitted out at Valparaiso in Chile, under the command of Lord Cochrane (afterwards earl of Dundonald) and officered by Englishmen.

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  • by Santiago and Valparaiso and W.

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  • The "Vale of Quillota," through which the railway passes between Valparaiso and Santiago, is celebrated for its gardens.

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  • north of Valparaiso.

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  • 30 he had sighted the lofty ranges of the Andes, and the " Prinz Eitel Friedrich," an armed merchantman, had been sent into Valparaiso to coal, while the squadron cruised at slow speed out of sight of the port.

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  • When the Germans at Valparaiso acclaimed him a naval hero, he shook his head.

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  • of Valparaiso.

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  • QUILLOTA, a town of Chile in the province of Valparaiso, on the left bank of the Aconcagua river, 20 m.

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  • of the city of Valparaiso.

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  • Quillota is situated on a railway between Valparaiso and Santiago, which passes through a mountainous, semi-barren country.

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  • of Valparaiso in 2 3° 3 8 ' 39" S.

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  • The first, under the command of Captain David Porter, went on to the Pacific, where she did great injury to British trade, till she was captured off Valparaiso by the British frigate "Phoebe" (38) and the sloop "Cherub" (24) on the 28th of March 1814.

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  • Suarez, Rasgos biogrdficos de hombres notables de Chile (Valparaiso, 1886).

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  • Valparaiso, Chile (Province) >>

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  • The department belongs partly to the arid coastal plain that extends from the Gull of Guayaquil southward nearly to Valparaiso, and partly to a broken mountainous region belonging to the Western Cordilleras.

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  • Unsuccessful attempts were made to acclimatize the alpaca goat in England, on the European continent and in Australia, and even to cross certain English breeds of sheep 1 Grown in Peru but shipped from Valparaiso.

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  • He upheld American rights in Samoa, pursued a vigorous diplomacy with Italy over the lynching of eleven Italians, all except three of them American naturalized citizens, in New Orleans on the 14th of May 1891, held a firm attitude during the strained relations between the United States and Chile (growing largely out of the killing and wounding of American sailors of the U.S. ship "Baltimore" by Chileans in Valparaiso on the 16th of October 1891), and carried on with Great Britain a resolute controversy over the seal fisheries of Bering Sea, - a difference afterwards settled by arbitration.

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  • The most famous of these is the " Vale of Quillota " between Valparaiso and Santiago.

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  • The great earthquake which partially destroyed Valparaiso in 1906, however, was not followed by a tidal wave.

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  • In this respect Chile may be divided into at least four great earthquake areas, two in the desert region, the third enclosing Valparaiso, and the fourth extending from Concepcion to Chiloe.

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  • Among the most frequented of these are Valparaiso, Coquimbo, Caldera, Iquique and Arica.

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  • In the shoal waters about Juan Fernandez are found a species of codfish (possibly Gadus macrocephalus), differing in some particulars from the Newfoundland cod, and a large crayfish, both of which are caught for the Valparaiso market.

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  • A large species of barnacle, Balanus psittacus, is found in great abundance from Concepcion to Puerto Montt, and is not only eaten by the natives, by whom it is called Pico, but is also esteemed a great delicacy in the markets of Valparaiso and Santiago.

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  • In Santiago and Valparaiso the death-rate sometimes rises to 42 and 60 per 1000, and infant mortality is very high, being 73% of the births in some of the provincial towns.

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  • The first railway to be constructed in central Chile was the government line from Valparaiso to Santiago, 115 m.

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  • A branch of the Valparaiso and Santiago line runs to Los Andes, and its extension across the Andes connects with the Argentine lines from Buenos Aires to Mendoza and the Chilean frontier-all sections together forming a transcontinental route about 850 m.

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  • Telegraphic communication between all the important towns of the republic, initiated in 1855 with a line between Santiago and Valparaiso, is maintained by the state, which in 1903 owned 93 06 m.

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  • Three or four foreign companies maintain a regular steamship service to Valparaiso and other Chilean ports.

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  • The development of the coal deposits in the provinces of Concepcion and Arauco has made possible other industries besides those of smelting mineral ores, and numerous small manufacturing establishments have resulted, especially in Santiago, Valparaiso, Copiapo and other places where no permanent water power exists.

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  • The breweries are generally worked by Germans and are situated chiefly in the south, though there are large establishments in Santiago and Valparaiso.

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  • The second most important mining industry in Chile, however, is that of copper, which is found in the provinces of Antofagasta, Atacama, Coquimbo, Aconcagua, Valparaiso, Santiago, O'Higgins, Colchagua, Curico and Talca, but the richest deposits are in the three desert provinces.

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  • The judicial power consists of a Supreme Court of Justice of seven members located in the national capital, which exercises supervisory and disciplinary authority over all the law courts of the republic; six courts of appeal, in Tacna, Serena, Valparaiso, Santiago, Talca and Concepcion; tribunals of first instance in the department capitals; and minor courts, or justices of the peace, in the subdelegacies and districts.

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  • The administration of the navy, under the president and minister of war and marine, is confided to a general naval staff, called the " Direccion jeneral de la Armada," with headquarters at Valparaiso.

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  • There is a military port at Talcahuano, in Concepcion Bay, strongly fortified, and provided with arsenal and repair shops, a large dry dock and a patent slip. The naval school, which occupies one of the noteworthy edifices of Valparaiso, is attended by 90 cadets and is noted for the thoroughness of its instruction.

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  • The School of Mechanic Arts and Trades (Escuela de Artes y Oficios) of Santiago has a high reputation for the practical character of its instruction, in which it is admirably seconded bya normal handicraft school (Sloyd system) and a night school of industrial drawing in the same city, and professional schools for girls in Santiago and Valparaiso, where the pupils are taught millinery, dress-making, knitting, embroidery and fancy needlework.

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  • At the end of the 17th century Santiago was a town of poor one-storeyed houses and had only 8000 inhabitants; the other towns, Valparaiso, Concepcion, La Serena, were only large villages.

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  • The Straits of Magellan were occupied; under an American engineer, William Wheelwright, a line of steamers was started on the coast, and, by a wise measure allowing merchandise to be landed free of duty for re-exportation, Valparaiso became a busy port and trading centre; while the demand for food-stuffs in California and Australia, following upon the rush for gold, gave a strong impetus to agriculture.

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  • The blockade of their ports and the bombardment of Valparaiso by a Spanish squadron impressed the Chileans with the necessity of possessing an adequate fleet to defend their long coast-line; and it was under President Errazuriz that the ships were obtained and the officers trained that did such good service in the great war with Peru.

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  • Ex-President Pinto died three years later in Valparaiso, leaving a memory respected and admired by all political parties in his country.

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  • Believing that he had now secured the support of the majority in congress on behalf of any measures he decided to put forward, the new president initiated a policy of heavy expenditure on public works, the building of schools, and the strengthening of the naval and military forces of the republic. Contracts were given out to the value of 6,000,000 for the construction of railways in the southern districts; some 10,000,000 dollars were expended in the erection of schools and colleges; three cruisers and two sea-going torpedo boats were added to the squadron; the construction of the naval port at Talcahuano was actively pushed forward; new armament was purchased for the infantry and artillery branches of the army, and heavy guns were acquired for the purpose of permanently and strongly fortifying the neighbourhoods of Valparaiso, Talcahuano and Iquique.

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  • The majority of the members of the chambers sided with this movement, and on the 7th of January Senores Waldo Silva, Barros Luco and a number of senators and deputies embarked on board the Chilean warship " Blanco Encalada," accompanied by the " Esmeralda " and " O'Higgins " and other vessels, sailing out of Valparaiso harbour and proceeding northwards to Tarapaca to organize armed resistance against the president (see Chilean Civil War).

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  • A force of io,000 men was now raised by the junta of the revolution, and preparations were rapidly pushed forward for a move to the south with the object of attacking Valparaiso and Santiago.

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  • north of Valparaiso, and marched to Concon, where the Balmacedists were entrenched.

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  • Both the Balmacedist generals were killed and Valparaiso was at once occupied.

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  • "Baltimore" having been given liberty on shore, an argument arose between some of them and a group of Chilean sailors in a drinking den in Valparaiso.

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  • In 1904, however, both trade and revenue showed signs of improvement, and the sale of the warships " Esmeralda " and " Chambuco " for 1,000,000 furnished a surplus, which was devoted to the improvement of the port of Valparaiso.

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  • On the 27th of August 1906 a terrible earthquake visited Valparaiso and the surrounding district.

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  • The town of Valparaiso was almost entirely destroyed, while Santiago and earth- quake.

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  • The completion of the Trans-Andean railway between Valparaiso and Buenos Aires was bound to be of immense commercial and industrial value; and eventually the making of a longitudinal railway route uniting the nitrate province of the north with Santiago, and Santiago with Puerto Montt in the distant south, opened up further important prospects.

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  • Valdes Vergara, Historia de Chile (Valparaiso, 1898), written primarily for schools,but containing useful sketches of leading figures in Chilean history.

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  • Diego Portales (Valparaiso, 1863), a good account of the life and time of Portales, the famous minister of the Conservative party; P. B.

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  • It is a port of call for several lines of steamers, including those of the Pacific Mail running between Liverpool and Valparaiso.

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  • Ballivian remained in the presidency till 1848, when he retired to Valparaiso, and in the end of that year General Belzu, after leading a successful military revolution, took the chief power, and during his presidency endeavoured to promote agriculture, industry and trade.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Valparaiso discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • There are normal schools at Valparaiso, Angola, Marion and Danville, and a Teachers' College at Indianapolis, which are on the state's " accredited " list and belong to the normal school system.

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  • At the early age of nine he entered the navy, under the protection of his name-father, Captain David Porter, with whom he served in the "Essex" during her cruise in the Altantic in 1812, and afterwards in the Pacific, until her capture by the "Phoebe," in Valparaiso Bay, on the 28th of March 1814.

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