This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

valencia

valencia

valencia Sentence Examples

  • Albufera de Valencia >>

  • SUECA, a town of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia, near the left bank of the river Jucar, and on the Silla-Cullera railway.

  • He was born at Rome while his father was cardinal, and on the latter's elevation to the papacy (1492) he was created archbishop of Valencia, and a year later cardinal.

  • The university of Orihuela, founded in 1568 by the archbishop of Valencia, was closed in 1835, part of the revenue being applied to the support of a college affiliated to the university of Valencia.

  • of Valencia, close to the coast.

  • The city is connected with Barcelona and Valencia by the coast railway, and with Saragossa by the Ebro valley line; it is also the terminus of a railway to San Carlos de la Rapita on the Mediterranean.

  • Among the enterprises of the Cid the most famous was that against Valencia, then the richest and most flourishing city of the peninsula, and an object of cupidity to both Christian and Moslem.

  • In defiance of an army which marched to the relief of the beleaguered city under Yusef the Almoravide, the Cid took Valencia after a siege of nine months, on the 15th of June 10 94 - the richest prize which up to that time had been recovered from the Moors.

  • In other respects the Cid appears to have used his victory mildly, ruling his kingdom, which now embraced nearly the whole of Valencia and Murcia, for four years with vigour and justice.

  • His widow maintained Valencia for three years longer against the Moors, but was at last compelled to evacuate the city, taking with her the body of the Cid to be buried in the monastery of San Pedro at Cardena, in the neighbourhood of Burgos.

  • Then, sailing from Valencia to Genoa, he made his way to Venice, where he arrived during the last days of 1535.

  • The best modern critical account in Spanish is Salvador Brau, Puerto Rico y su historia (Valencia, 1894).

  • He was born (January 1, 1431) at Xativa, near Valencia in Spain, and his father's surname was Lanzol or Llancol; that of his mother's family, Borgia or Borja, was assumed by him on the elevation of his maternal uncle to the papacy as Calixtus III.

  • Cesare, then a youth of sixteen and a student at Pisa, was made archbishop of Valencia, his nephew Giovanni received a cardinal's hat, and for the duke of Gandia and Giuffre the pope proposed to carve fiefs out of the papal states and the kingdom of Naples.

  • Moncey (7000) had marched towards the city of Valencia, but been repulsed in attempting to storm it (June 28); Bessieres had defeated the Spanish general Joachim Blake at Medina de Rio Seco (June 14, 1808) and Dupont (13,000) had been detached (May 24) from Madrid to reduce Seville and Cadiz in Andalusia.

  • Spanish levies, numbering nearly ioo,000 regulars and militia, brave and enthusiastic, but without organization, sufficient training, or a commander-in-chief, had collected together; 30,000 being in Andalusia, a similar number in Galicia, and others in Valencia and Estremadura, but few in the central portion of Spain.

  • 26), defeating Blake's relieving force, which then took refuge in Valencia.

  • Wellington had insufficient siege equipment and transport for heavy guns; five assaults failed, and Soult (having left Suchet in Valencia) and also the Army of Portugal were both approaching, so Wellington withdrew on the night of the Retreat 21st of October, and, directing the evacuation of from Madrid, commenced the "Retreat from Burgos."

  • Early in January also the French had abandoned the siege of Tarifa, though Valencia had surrendered to them (Jan.

  • At the opening of 1813, Suchet, with 63,000 men, had been left to hold Valencia, Aragon and Catalonia; and the remainder of the French (about 13 7,000) occupied Leon, the central provinces and Biscay, guarding also the communications with France.

  • a few days Madrid was evacuated, and all the French forces, with the exception of the garrisons of San Sebastian (3000), Pampeluna (3000), Santona (1500), and the troops under Suchet holding posts in Catalonia and Valencia, had retired across the Pyrenees into France.

  • Peniscola, often called the Gibraltar of Valencia, is a fortified seaport, with a lighthouse, built on a rocky headland about 220 ft.

  • Gandia, a seaport of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia; on the Gandia-Alcoy and Alcira-Denia railways.

  • of Maracaibo among a large number of lakes, lagoons and swamps; Valencia, near the city of that name, in the Maritime Andes, about 1350 ft.

  • The longest of these is the German line from Caracas to Valencia (111 m.), and the next longest the Great Tachira, running from Encontrada on Lake Maracaibo inland to Uraca (71 m.), with a projected extension to San Cristobal.

  • The Puerto Cabello and Valencia line (34 m.) is another British undertaking and carries a good traffic. A part of this line is built with a central cog-rail.

  • A regular service is maintained on Lake Maracaibo, one on Lake Valencia, and another on the Orinoco, Apure and Portuguesa rivers, starting from Ciudad Bolivar.

  • The plants using steam for motive power are at Caracas, Maracaibo, Valencia and Puerto Cabello.

  • Traces of Roman glass manufactories have been found in Valencia and Murcia, in the valleys which run down to the coast of Catalonia, and near the mouth of the Ebro.

  • At the end of the year, when Marshal Serrano left Madrid to take command of the northern army, General Martinez Campos, who had long been working more or less openly for the king, carried off some battalions of the central army to Sagunto, rallied to his own flag the troops sent against him, and entered Valencia in the king's name.

  • In the course of a few days the king arrived at Madrid, passing through Barcelona and Valencia, and was received everywhere with acclamation (1875).

  • CULLERA, a seaport of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia; on the Mediterranean Sea, at the mouth of the river Jucar, and at the southern terminus of the Valencia-Silla-Cullera railway.

  • He visited Spain in 1799, was exiled, and returned in 1815, dying at Valencia on the 11th of April 1817.

  • Current special periodicals are: Euskal-erria, revista bascongada (1880, San Sebastian); Monumenta historica societatis Jesu (1894); El Progreso matematico, afterwards Revista de matematicas Auras y aplicadas (1891); Revista de bibliografia Catalano (Catalunya, Baleares, Rosselo, Valencia, 1901); La Naturaleza, fortnightly; La Energia electrica, fortnightly; Revista minera, weekly; Revista de medicina, weekly; Bibliografia espanola, fortnightly; La Lectura; Espana y America, monthly.

  • It was followed in Catalonia till the year i i 80, in the kingdom of Aragon till 1350, in Valencia till 1358, and in Castile till 1382.

  • The last remains of it were crushed in Valencia, where the Mahommedans were furiously attacked by the Christian peasantry during the great agrarian revolt known as the Germania, 1520-1521.

  • Afterwards he went to Valencia, then to Saragossa.

  • of France, third daughter of Alphonso VIII., king of Castile, and of Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II., was born at Valencia.

  • In Catalonia and Valencia the "germanias" were combinations of the peasantry to resist the exactions of the feudal lords.

  • This movement brought the Americans to the hill of Contreras, which was held by General Valencia with a force of some 7000 and 22 pieces of artillery, while President Santa Anna was in the neighbourhood with reinforcements numbering 12,000 or more.

  • by Catalonia and Valencia, S.

  • by Valencia, and W.

  • As the mountains of Valencia and Catalonia effectually bar out the fertilizing moisture of the sea-winds, much of the province is a sheer wilderness, stony, ash-coloured, scarred with dry watercourses, and destitute of any vegetation except thin grass and heaths.

  • In contrast with the splendid fertility of Valencia or the south of France, the landscape of this region, like the rest of central Spain, seems almost a continuation of the north African desert area.

  • (1213-1276), the kingdom included Valencia, Catalonia, the Balearic Islands and the considerable territory of Montpellier in France; while Peter III.

  • JUAN LUIS VIVES (1492-1540), Spanish scholar, was born at Valencia on the 6th of March 1492.

  • A complete edition of his works was published by Gregorio Mayans y Siscar (Valencia, 1782).

  • It is indigenous to the south of Spain and the north of Africa (where it is known as Halfa or Alfa), and is especially abundant in the sterile and rugged parts of Murcia and Valencia, and in Algeria, flourishing best in sandy, ferruginous soils, in dry, sunny situations on the sea coast.

  • Palma has frequent and regular communication by steamer with Barcelona, Valencia and Alicante.

  • west-south-west of Caracas near the north-east shore of Lake Valencia.

  • The last two towns are on the railway between Caracas and Valencia.

  • by Valencia, and E.

  • Reig y Vilardell (Barcelona, 1890); Historia del derecho en Catalonia, Mallorca y Valencia, by B.

  • G.*) Marti, Juan Jose (1570?-1604), Spanish novelist, was born at Orihuela (Valencia) about 1570.

  • He graduated as bachelor of canon law at Valencia in 1591, and in 1598 took his degree as doctor of canon law; in the latter year he was appointed co-examiner in canon law at Valencia University, and held the post for six years.

  • He died at Valencia, and was buried in the cathedral of that city on the 22nd of December 1604.

  • by Valencia and Alicante, S.

  • by Valencia and Murcia, S.

  • He next took to medicine, which he studied at the universities of Valencia and Barcelona with such success that the local authorities of the latter city made him a grant to enable him to follow his studies at Madrid and Paris, preparatory to appointing him professor.

  • kept a diary during the troubled years 1820-1823, which has been published by the count de Casa Valencia.

  • Ezra 2 about thirty, but Abraham Zaccuto 3 states that he died (at Valencia) in 1070.

  • VALENCIA, a city of Venezuela and capital of the state of Carabobo, 111 m.

  • There is railway connexion with Caracas by the Great Venezuela line (German) and with Puerto Cabello by the Puerto Cabello and Valencia line (English), which crosses the N.

  • There is also a steamboat service on Lake Valencia.

  • border of a lacustrine plain occupied in great part by Lake Tacarigua, or Valencia,' and nearly 2 m.

  • 1 Lake Valencia occupies one of the so-called Aragua valleys, enclosed between the parallel ranges of the Maritime Andes.

  • Near Valencia on the Puerto Cabello railway are the Las Trincheras thermal springs.

  • Among Valencia's public edifices and institutions are some good churches, the government palace, a university, a national college for women, a normal school for men and a public library.

  • Valencia was founded in 1555 and is older than Caracas.

  • Valencia de Alcantara >>

  • By 1094 he had removed them all, and though he regained little from the Christians except Valencia, he reunited the Mahommedan power and gave a check to the reconquest of the country by the Christians.

  • After entering Valencia, it receives on the left its chief tributary the Cabriel, which also rises near the Cerro de San Felipe, in the Montes Universales.

  • Agostino (1470-1536) was born at Genoa, and spent some wild years in Valencia, Spain.

  • ST VINCENT FERRER (1355-1419), Spanish Dominican preacher, was born of respectable parentage at Valencia on the 23rd of January 1355.

  • He graduated as doctor of theology at Lerida in 1374, and his sermons in the cathedral of Valencia from 1385 onwards soon became famous.

  • VILLENA, a town of eastern Spain, in the province of Alicante; on the right bank of the river Vinalapo, and at the junction of railways from Valencia, Alicante, Albacete and Yecla.

  • There is more than one meaning of Valencia discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • On the 28th of September 1238 the town of Valencia surrendered, and the whole territory was conquered in the ensuing years.

  • The king fell very ill at Alcira, and resigned his crown, intending to retire to the monastery of Poblet, but died at Valencia on the 27th of July 1276.

  • ALBUFERA DE VALENCIA, a lagoon, 7 m.

  • of Valencia in Spain, about 12 m.

  • In 1812 Marshal Suchet was created duke of Albufera by Napoleon for his conquest of Valencia, and invested with the domain; but the battle of Vittoria in 1813 deprived him of his possession, though he still retained the title.

  • Such beds, locally known as " alkali flats," are especially numerous in Valencia, Socorro, Dona Ana and Otero counties, and a number of them furnish all the salt needed by the cattle ranges in their vicinity.

  • A notable example is the mesa of Acoma, in Valencia county, capped with volcanic rocks; upon its summit, about 350 ft.

  • The hills and mesas covered with the nutritious grama grass form excellent grazing grounds, which are most extensive in Bernalillo, Guadalupe, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Union and Valencia counties.

  • by Valencia, W.

  • Alicante was formed in 1833 of districts taken from the ancient provinces of Valencia and Murcia, Valencia contributing by far the larger portion.

  • There is regular communication with Marseilles, Cette, Barcelona, Valencia, Cartagena, Malaga, Gibraltar, and the various ports on the Barbary coast.

  • Such a statesman was sure to clash with the doctrinaires, like Salmeron, who wanted to imitate French methods; with Pi y Margall, who wanted a federal republic after purely Spanish ideas of decentralization; and above all with the intransigent and gloomy fanatics who became the leaders of the cantonal insurrections at Cadiz, Seville, Valencia, Malaga and Cartagena in 1873.

  • to approve his selection of two dignitaries to occupy vacant sees as well as his nominee for the vacant archbishopric of Valencia, a prelate who afterwards became archbishop of Toledo, and remained to the end a close friend of Castelar.

  • Castelar kept apart from active politics during the twelve months that Serrano acted as president of the republic. Another pronunciamiento finally put an end to it in the last week of December 1874, when Generals Campos at Sagunto, Jovellar at Valencia, Primo de Rivera at Madrid, and Laserna at Logrono, proclaimed Alphonso XII.

  • The Portuguese] railways meet the Spanish at Valenta do 1Vlinho on the northern frontier, at Barca d'Alva, at Villar Formoso, near Valencia de Alcantara, and near Badajoz on the eastern frontier.

  • The Spaniards were at first successful, and captured Braganza and Almeida; but they were subsequently defeated at Villa Velha and Valencia de Alcantara, and the Portuguese fully held their own up to the signature of peace at Fontainebleau, in February 1763.

  • JUAN ANDRES (1740-18r7), Spanish Jesuit, was born at Planes in the province of Valencia, and became professor of literature at Gandia and finally royal librarian at Naples.

  • of Valencia, the capital of the state.

  • Puerto Cabello has railway connexions with Valencia and Caracas.

  • A native of Xativa, he gained a great reputation as a jurist, becoming professor at Lerida; in 1429 he was made bishop of Valencia, and in 1444 a cardinal, owing his promotion mainly to his close friendship with Alphonso V., king of Aragon and Sicily.

  • ALCIRA, a town of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia; on the left bank of the river Jucar, and on the Valencia-Alicante railway.

  • Important lines radiate from the city of Barcelona north-east along the coast to Gerona and to Perpignan in France; south-west along the coast to Tarragona and Valencia; and west to Saragossa and Madrid.

  • Exceptions, however, are Tory Island and North Aran off the Donegal coast, Achill and Clare off Mayo, the South Arans guarding Galway Bay, the Blasquets and Valencia off the Kerry coast.

  • The whole coast of the Bay of Valencia is low and ill provided with harbours; and along the east of Catalonia stretches of steep and rocky coast alternate with others of an opposite character.

  • In other parts, as in the Basque country, in Galicia, in the Serrania de Cuenca (between the headwaters of the Tagus and those of the Jiicar), in the Sierra de Albarracin (between the headwaters of the Tagus and those of the Guadalaviar), there are extensive tracts of undulating forest-clad hill country, and almost contiguous to these there are apparently boundless plains, or tracts of level table-land, some almost uninhabitable, and some streaked with irrigation canals and richly cultivatedlike the Rcquena of Valencia.

  • While, again, continuous mountain ranges and broad plains and table-lands give the prevailing character to the scenery, there are, on the one hand, lofty isolated peaks, such as Monseny, Montserrat and Mont Sant in Catalonia, the Pea Golosa in Valencia, Moncayo on the borders of Aragon and Old Castile, and, on the other hand, small secluded valleys, such as those of Vich and Olot among the Catalonian Pyrenees.

  • On the north-east and east, where the edge of the table-land sweeps round in a wide curve, the surface sinks in broad terraces to the valley of the Ebro and the Bay of Valencia, and is crowned by more or less isolated mountains, some of which have been already mentioned.

  • Farther south the mountains clustered on the east of the table-land (Sierra de Albarracin, Serrania de Cuenca) long rendered direct communication between Valencia and Madrid extremely difficult, and the principal communications with the east and south-east are effected where the southern table-land of La Mancha merges in the hill country which connects the interior of Spain with the Sierra Nevada.

  • The Cretaceous system is distributed in four great districts: the largest of these extends through the kingdoms of Murcia and Valencia; a second stretches between the two Castiles; a third is found in the Basque Provinces and in Asturias; and a fourth spreads Out along the southern slopes of the P renees from Navarre to the Mediterranean.

  • These strata are developed in the basin of the Ebro, and in a belt which extends from Valencia through Murcia and Andalusia to Cadiz.

  • Marine Miocene deposits occupy some small tracts, especially on the coast of Valencia, But most of the sandy Tertiary rocks of that district are Pliocene.

  • the total was found to be 10,268,150; and Valencia -

  • Valencia -

  • The Spanish railway system at this time communicated with the French at Irun and Portbou, west and east respectively of the Pyrenees; and with the Portuguese at or near Tuy on the northern frontier of Portugal, and near La Fregeneda, Ciudad Rodrigo, Valencia de Alcntara and Badajoz on the E.

  • The provinces in which agriculture is most advanced are those of Valencia and Catalonia, in both of which the river valleys are thickly seamed with irrigation canals and the hill-slopes carefully terraced for cultivation.

  • Such plains in Valencia and Murcia are known by the Spanish name of huertas (gardens), in Andalusia by the Arabic name of Vegas, which has the same meaning.

  • Rice is cultivated on a large scale only in the swampy lowlands of Valencia.

  • The export of wines of the southJerez, Malaga and other fullbodied wines styled generosodid not suffer so much, and England and France continued to take much the same quantities of such wines- There is also a large export of grapes and raisins, especially from Malaga, Valencia, AlmerIa and Alicante.

  • Among the vegetable products not yet mentioned the most important are the mulberry, grown in almost all provinces, but principally in those bordering on the Mediterranean, and above all in Valencia, the chief seat of the Spanish silk production and manufacture; tobacco, which is also imported, hemp and flax, grown chiefly in Galicia and other northern provinces; among dye-plants, madder, saffron, woad (Isatis tinctoria), and wild woad or dyers weed (Reseda luteola); ground-nuts (Arachis hypogaea), grown for their oil, for the preparation of which the nuts are exported in considerable quantity to France; liquorice, cummin, colocynth, &c. Esparto, chiefly from the arid lands of the south-east, is largely exported to Great Britain.

  • Their winter quarters are in the lower parts of Leon and Estremadura, La Mancha, and the lowlands of Andalusia, their summer quarters the more mountainous districts to the east and north (Plasencia in the province of Cceres, Avila, Segovia, Cuenca, Valencia), which are not so much affected by the summer droughts of the Peninsula.

  • The silk industry, though inadequate to meet the home demands, is active in Valencia, Murcia and Seville.

  • There are ten archbishoprics (Toledo, Madrid, Burgos, Granada, Santiago, Saragossa, Seville, Tarragona, Valencia and Valladolid) and fortyfive bishoprics.

  • Spain has nine universities: Madrid, the most numerotisly attended; Salamanca, the most ancient; Granada, Seville, Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago, Saragossa and Valladolid.

  • de Oloriz, La Constiiucin espanola comparada con las de Inglaterra, Estados-Unidos, Francia y Alemania (Valencia, 1904); T.

  • The Council of Coyanza, now Valencia de Don Juan (1050), at Counciiof which he confirmed the charters of Aiphonso V., Coyanza, is a leading date in the constitutional history of ~

  • Under Fernando, they advanced to of the the banks of the Tagus in the south, and into Valencia Christian on the south-east.

  • Alphonso was compelled to withdraw a garrison he had placed in Murcia, and Valencia was, by his decision, given up by the widow of the Cid.

  • Aiphonso had conquered Cuenca, in the hill country between Castile and Valencia, in 1177, with the help of the king of Aragon, also an Alphonso, the son of Petronilla and of Ramon Berenguer of Barcelona.

  • Aragon was left free to R~ro~ftion conquer the Balearic Islands and Valencia, while of the lade- Murcia and Ardalusia were to fall to Castile.

  • He conquered the Balearic Islands in 1229 and Valencia in 1238.

  • Its king was also a ruler of many titlesking in Aragon, in Valencia, and the Balearic Isles (with one interval of separation), count of Barcelona, and in Provence.

  • In Valencia emancipation was finally brought by a measure which in itself was cruelthe expulsion.

  • The prevalence of predial slavery in Aragon and Valencia can be largely explained by the number of Mudjares, that is Mahommedans living under Christian rule, and of Moriscoes converted Mohammedans.

  • e Catalpnia and Valencia, together with the Balearic Islands, spoke, and speak, dialects of the southern French, the so-called Limos, though it was not the language of the Limousin.

  • It, Catalonia and Valencia had each their Cortes, which never united.

  • Their second task was to reduce their turbulent barons, in Aragon, Catalonia and Valencia alike, to the position of obedient subjects.

  • The barons of Aragon and Valencia had extorted from his weak father the charter known Peter IV.

  • The outbreak of the Comuneros in Castile coincided with the social and agrarian revolt in Valencia known as the Germania or brotherhood, from the name of the directing committee appointed by the insurgents.

  • It was in no sense a movement for political rights, but an attack by Rising of the the sailors, the workmen of the towns, and the Uermania in Christian peasants on the landowners and their Valencia.

  • After desolating Valencia for some three years it was put down by the help of troops from Castile.

  • Aragon, which was poor and tenacious of its rights, would give little; Catalonia and Valencia afforded small help. The Flemish revenue was destroyed by the revolt.

  • Andalusia, Murcia, Valencia, Catalonia and the Balearic Islands were subject to their raids throughout the whole of the 16th and 17th centuries.

  • was forced to reduce Aragon, Catalonia and Valencia by arms. Barcelona was only taken in 1714, the year after the signing of the treaty of Utrecht.

  • The French were repulsed from Valencia; and Dupont, who had advanced into the heart of Andalusia, was compelled to retreat and ultimately to capitulate with all his forces at Baylen (July 10).

  • 12), and Joseph retreated to Valencia.

  • But the Conservatives preferred to support the late kings brother Don Carlos, and they had the active aid of the Basques, who feared for their local franchises, and of the mountaineers of Navarre, Aragon, Catalonia and Valencia, who were either quite clerical, or who had become attached, during the French invasion and the troubles of the reign of Ferdinand, to a life of guerrillero adventure.

  • arils Their leaders, Tomas Zumalacarregui in Biscay and Navarre, and Ramon Cabrera in Valencia, were the ablest Spaniards of their time.

  • The government was then able to expel Cabrera from Valencia and Catalonia.

  • The epidemic spread rapidly over the Peninsula, causing great havoc in important cities like Granada, Saragossa and Valencia.

  • A civil code was carefully drawn up by Seor Alonzo Martinez, in order to consolidate the very heterogeneous ancient legislation of the monarchy and the local laws of many provinces, especially Catalonia; Aragon, Valencia, Navarre, and the Basque territory.

  • He had to proclaim not only such important provinces as Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao, but even the capital of Spain itself, in order to check a widespread agitation which had assumed formidable proportions under the direction of the chambers of commerce, industry, navigation and agriculture, combined with, about 300 middle-class corporations and associations, and supported by the majority of the gilds and syndicates of taxpayers in Madrid and the large towns.

  • see of Valencia.

  • Alphonso was now shaking himself loose from the deadening influence of the reactionary court, and was beginning to display a disconcerting interest in affairs, information about which he was apt to seek at first hand., The resignation of the see of Valencia by Archbishop Nozaleda was a symptom of the new spirit.

  • The price of corn rose, owing to the reimposition by the government, before the elections, of the import duties on corn and flour; and in November there was serious rioting in Seville, Granada, Oviedo, Bilbao and Valencia, M

  • Islands and Valencia.

  • Barcelona, Tarragona and Lrida (the old principality of Catalonia), and of Castellon de la Plana, Valencia and Alicante (the old kingdom of Valencia), and, in the Mediterranean, that of the Balearic Islands (the old kingdom of li.Iajorca).

  • aeroplanend 23 March all foreigners employed at the airplane factory in Sabadell 1 were imprisoned and removed to Valencia.

  • coveted by collectors around the world are produced in Valencia.

  • joey boat on the bank at Valencia Wharf undergoing repair.

  • Valencia Further along the coast from the Costa Blanca lies Spain's largest city, the cosmopolitan metropolis of Valencia.

  • Valencia has stunning beaches and a magnificent selection of food including paella, fish and stew.

  • However, the poor condition of the newly resurfaced track in Barcelona meant that the test team decided to move south to Valencia instead.

  • Valencia Just inland from Spain's most busy seaport are the fruit groves of Valencia.

  • yachting enthusiasts were also visiting Valencia, which is staging warm-up races for the Americas Cup.

  • Albufera de Valencia >>

  • SUECA, a town of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia, near the left bank of the river Jucar, and on the Silla-Cullera railway.

  • Another line (the Gran Ferrocarril de Venezuela) passes through the mountains to Valencia, III m.

  • He was born at Rome while his father was cardinal, and on the latter's elevation to the papacy (1492) he was created archbishop of Valencia, and a year later cardinal.

  • The university of Orihuela, founded in 1568 by the archbishop of Valencia, was closed in 1835, part of the revenue being applied to the support of a college affiliated to the university of Valencia.

  • of Valencia, close to the coast.

  • The city is connected with Barcelona and Valencia by the coast railway, and with Saragossa by the Ebro valley line; it is also the terminus of a railway to San Carlos de la Rapita on the Mediterranean.

  • Among the enterprises of the Cid the most famous was that against Valencia, then the richest and most flourishing city of the peninsula, and an object of cupidity to both Christian and Moslem.

  • In defiance of an army which marched to the relief of the beleaguered city under Yusef the Almoravide, the Cid took Valencia after a siege of nine months, on the 15th of June 10 94 - the richest prize which up to that time had been recovered from the Moors.

  • In other respects the Cid appears to have used his victory mildly, ruling his kingdom, which now embraced nearly the whole of Valencia and Murcia, for four years with vigour and justice.

  • His widow maintained Valencia for three years longer against the Moors, but was at last compelled to evacuate the city, taking with her the body of the Cid to be buried in the monastery of San Pedro at Cardena, in the neighbourhood of Burgos.

  • Then, sailing from Valencia to Genoa, he made his way to Venice, where he arrived during the last days of 1535.

  • The best modern critical account in Spanish is Salvador Brau, Puerto Rico y su historia (Valencia, 1894).

  • He was born (January 1, 1431) at Xativa, near Valencia in Spain, and his father's surname was Lanzol or Llancol; that of his mother's family, Borgia or Borja, was assumed by him on the elevation of his maternal uncle to the papacy as Calixtus III.

  • Cesare, then a youth of sixteen and a student at Pisa, was made archbishop of Valencia, his nephew Giovanni received a cardinal's hat, and for the duke of Gandia and Giuffre the pope proposed to carve fiefs out of the papal states and the kingdom of Naples.

  • Moncey (7000) had marched towards the city of Valencia, but been repulsed in attempting to storm it (June 28); Bessieres had defeated the Spanish general Joachim Blake at Medina de Rio Seco (June 14, 1808) and Dupont (13,000) had been detached (May 24) from Madrid to reduce Seville and Cadiz in Andalusia.

  • Spanish levies, numbering nearly ioo,000 regulars and militia, brave and enthusiastic, but without organization, sufficient training, or a commander-in-chief, had collected together; 30,000 being in Andalusia, a similar number in Galicia, and others in Valencia and Estremadura, but few in the central portion of Spain.

  • 26), defeating Blake's relieving force, which then took refuge in Valencia.

  • Wellington had insufficient siege equipment and transport for heavy guns; five assaults failed, and Soult (having left Suchet in Valencia) and also the Army of Portugal were both approaching, so Wellington withdrew on the night of the Retreat 21st of October, and, directing the evacuation of from Madrid, commenced the "Retreat from Burgos."

  • Early in January also the French had abandoned the siege of Tarifa, though Valencia had surrendered to them (Jan.

  • At the opening of 1813, Suchet, with 63,000 men, had been left to hold Valencia, Aragon and Catalonia; and the remainder of the French (about 13 7,000) occupied Leon, the central provinces and Biscay, guarding also the communications with France.

  • a few days Madrid was evacuated, and all the French forces, with the exception of the garrisons of San Sebastian (3000), Pampeluna (3000), Santona (1500), and the troops under Suchet holding posts in Catalonia and Valencia, had retired across the Pyrenees into France.

  • Peniscola, often called the Gibraltar of Valencia, is a fortified seaport, with a lighthouse, built on a rocky headland about 220 ft.

  • Gandia, a seaport of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia; on the Gandia-Alcoy and Alcira-Denia railways.

  • Gandia is on the left bank of the river Alcoy or Set-pis, which waters one of the richest and most populous plains of Valencia and enters the Mediterranean Sea at the small harbour of Gandia (El Grao), 3 m.

  • of Maracaibo among a large number of lakes, lagoons and swamps; Valencia, near the city of that name, in the Maritime Andes, about 1350 ft.

  • At La Guaira the mean temperature for the year is 85° F., at Caracas (3025 ft.) it is 71.2° (or 66.2° according to an official return), at Cumana it is 83°, at Valencia 76°, Coro 82°, Barquisimeto 78°, Yaritagua 80 6°, Merida 61°, Trujillo 72°,72°, and Maracaibo 81°.

  • Under the constitution of the 27th of April 1904, the republic was divided into 13 states, 1 federal district and 5 territories, the names of which are as follows, those of the capital cities being given in brackets: Federal District (Caracas and La Asuncion); Aragua (La Victoria); Bermudez (Cumana); Bolivar (Ciudad Bolivar); Carabobo (Valencia); Falcon (Coro); Guarico (Calabozo); Lara (Barquisimeto); Merida (Merida); Miranda (Ocumare); Tachira (San Cristobal); Trujillo (Trujillo); Zamora (San Carlos); Zulia (Maracaibo), with the following territories: Amazonas (San Fernando de Atabapo); Colon (Gran Roque);; Cristobal Colon (Cristobal Colon); Delta-Amacuro (San Jose de Amacuro); Yaruari (Guacipati).

  • The division was as follows: Federal District (Caracas); Anzoategui (Barcelona); Apure (San Fernando de Apure); Aragua (La Victoria); Bolivar (Ciudad Bolivar); Carabobo (Valencia); Cojedes (San Carlos); Falcon (Coro); Guarico (Calabozo); Lara (Barquisimeto); Merida (Merida); Miranda (Ocumare); Monagas (M'Iaturin); Nueva Esparta (La Asuncion); Portuguesa (Guanare); Sucre (Cumana); Tachira (San Cristobal); Trujillo (Trujillo); Yaracuy (San Felipe); Zamora (Barinas); Zulia (Maracaibo), with the following territories: Amazonas (San Fernando de Atabapo); Delta-Amacuro (Tucupita).

  • The longest of these is the German line from Caracas to Valencia (111 m.), and the next longest the Great Tachira, running from Encontrada on Lake Maracaibo inland to Uraca (71 m.), with a projected extension to San Cristobal.

  • The Puerto Cabello and Valencia line (34 m.) is another British undertaking and carries a good traffic. A part of this line is built with a central cog-rail.

  • A regular service is maintained on Lake Maracaibo, one on Lake Valencia, and another on the Orinoco, Apure and Portuguesa rivers, starting from Ciudad Bolivar.

  • The plants using steam for motive power are at Caracas, Maracaibo, Valencia and Puerto Cabello.

  • Traces of Roman glass manufactories have been found in Valencia and Murcia, in the valleys which run down to the coast of Catalonia, and near the mouth of the Ebro.

  • At the end of the year, when Marshal Serrano left Madrid to take command of the northern army, General Martinez Campos, who had long been working more or less openly for the king, carried off some battalions of the central army to Sagunto, rallied to his own flag the troops sent against him, and entered Valencia in the king's name.

  • In the course of a few days the king arrived at Madrid, passing through Barcelona and Valencia, and was received everywhere with acclamation (1875).

  • CULLERA, a seaport of eastern Spain, in the province of Valencia; on the Mediterranean Sea, at the mouth of the river Jucar, and at the southern terminus of the Valencia-Silla-Cullera railway.

  • He visited Spain in 1799, was exiled, and returned in 1815, dying at Valencia on the 11th of April 1817.

  • Current special periodicals are: Euskal-erria, revista bascongada (1880, San Sebastian); Monumenta historica societatis Jesu (1894); El Progreso matematico, afterwards Revista de matematicas Auras y aplicadas (1891); Revista de bibliografia Catalano (Catalunya, Baleares, Rosselo, Valencia, 1901); La Naturaleza, fortnightly; La Energia electrica, fortnightly; Revista minera, weekly; Revista de medicina, weekly; Bibliografia espanola, fortnightly; La Lectura; Espana y America, monthly.

  • It was followed in Catalonia till the year i i 80, in the kingdom of Aragon till 1350, in Valencia till 1358, and in Castile till 1382.

  • The last remains of it were crushed in Valencia, where the Mahommedans were furiously attacked by the Christian peasantry during the great agrarian revolt known as the Germania, 1520-1521.

  • Afterwards he went to Valencia, then to Saragossa.

  • of France, third daughter of Alphonso VIII., king of Castile, and of Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II., was born at Valencia.

  • In Catalonia and Valencia the "germanias" were combinations of the peasantry to resist the exactions of the feudal lords.

  • This movement brought the Americans to the hill of Contreras, which was held by General Valencia with a force of some 7000 and 22 pieces of artillery, while President Santa Anna was in the neighbourhood with reinforcements numbering 12,000 or more.

  • by Catalonia and Valencia, S.

  • by Valencia, and W.

  • As the mountains of Valencia and Catalonia effectually bar out the fertilizing moisture of the sea-winds, much of the province is a sheer wilderness, stony, ash-coloured, scarred with dry watercourses, and destitute of any vegetation except thin grass and heaths.

  • In contrast with the splendid fertility of Valencia or the south of France, the landscape of this region, like the rest of central Spain, seems almost a continuation of the north African desert area.

  • (1213-1276), the kingdom included Valencia, Catalonia, the Balearic Islands and the considerable territory of Montpellier in France; while Peter III.

  • JUAN LUIS VIVES (1492-1540), Spanish scholar, was born at Valencia on the 6th of March 1492.

  • A complete edition of his works was published by Gregorio Mayans y Siscar (Valencia, 1782).

  • It is indigenous to the south of Spain and the north of Africa (where it is known as Halfa or Alfa), and is especially abundant in the sterile and rugged parts of Murcia and Valencia, and in Algeria, flourishing best in sandy, ferruginous soils, in dry, sunny situations on the sea coast.

  • Palma has frequent and regular communication by steamer with Barcelona, Valencia and Alicante.

  • west-south-west of Caracas near the north-east shore of Lake Valencia.

  • The last two towns are on the railway between Caracas and Valencia.

  • by Valencia, and E.

  • Reig y Vilardell (Barcelona, 1890); Historia del derecho en Catalonia, Mallorca y Valencia, by B.

  • G.*) Marti, Juan Jose (1570?-1604), Spanish novelist, was born at Orihuela (Valencia) about 1570.

  • He graduated as bachelor of canon law at Valencia in 1591, and in 1598 took his degree as doctor of canon law; in the latter year he was appointed co-examiner in canon law at Valencia University, and held the post for six years.

  • He died at Valencia, and was buried in the cathedral of that city on the 22nd of December 1604.

  • by Valencia and Alicante, S.

  • by Valencia and Murcia, S.

  • He next took to medicine, which he studied at the universities of Valencia and Barcelona with such success that the local authorities of the latter city made him a grant to enable him to follow his studies at Madrid and Paris, preparatory to appointing him professor.

  • kept a diary during the troubled years 1820-1823, which has been published by the count de Casa Valencia.

  • Ezra 2 about thirty, but Abraham Zaccuto 3 states that he died (at Valencia) in 1070.

  • VALENCIA, a city of Venezuela and capital of the state of Carabobo, 111 m.

  • There is railway connexion with Caracas by the Great Venezuela line (German) and with Puerto Cabello by the Puerto Cabello and Valencia line (English), which crosses the N.

  • There is also a steamboat service on Lake Valencia.

  • border of a lacustrine plain occupied in great part by Lake Tacarigua, or Valencia,' and nearly 2 m.

  • 1 Lake Valencia occupies one of the so-called Aragua valleys, enclosed between the parallel ranges of the Maritime Andes.

  • Near Valencia on the Puerto Cabello railway are the Las Trincheras thermal springs.

  • Among Valencia's public edifices and institutions are some good churches, the government palace, a university, a national college for women, a normal school for men and a public library.

  • Valencia was founded in 1555 and is older than Caracas.

  • Valencia de Alcantara >>

  • By 1094 he had removed them all, and though he regained little from the Christians except Valencia, he reunited the Mahommedan power and gave a check to the reconquest of the country by the Christians.

  • After entering Valencia, it receives on the left its chief tributary the Cabriel, which also rises near the Cerro de San Felipe, in the Montes Universales.

  • Agostino (1470-1536) was born at Genoa, and spent some wild years in Valencia, Spain.

  • ST VINCENT FERRER (1355-1419), Spanish Dominican preacher, was born of respectable parentage at Valencia on the 23rd of January 1355.

  • He graduated as doctor of theology at Lerida in 1374, and his sermons in the cathedral of Valencia from 1385 onwards soon became famous.

  • VILLENA, a town of eastern Spain, in the province of Alicante; on the right bank of the river Vinalapo, and at the junction of railways from Valencia, Alicante, Albacete and Yecla.

  • There is more than one meaning of Valencia discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

  • He wisely turned to the more feasible course of extending his dominions at the expense of the decadent Mahommedan princes of Valencia.

  • On the 28th of September 1238 the town of Valencia surrendered, and the whole territory was conquered in the ensuing years.

  • The king fell very ill at Alcira, and resigned his crown, intending to retire to the monastery of Poblet, but died at Valencia on the 27th of July 1276.

  • ALBUFERA DE VALENCIA, a lagoon, 7 m.

  • of Valencia in Spain, about 12 m.

  • In 1812 Marshal Suchet was created duke of Albufera by Napoleon for his conquest of Valencia, and invested with the domain; but the battle of Vittoria in 1813 deprived him of his possession, though he still retained the title.

  • Such beds, locally known as " alkali flats," are especially numerous in Valencia, Socorro, Dona Ana and Otero counties, and a number of them furnish all the salt needed by the cattle ranges in their vicinity.

Browse other sentences examples →