This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

valdemar

valdemar

valdemar Sentence Examples

  • The coronation of Birger Jarlsson Valdemar took place in the cathedral in 1251; and in the reign of Gustavus Vasa several important diets were held in the town.

    0
    0
  • The chronicler Saxo Grammaticus mentions in his Gesta Danorum the "rampart of Jutland" (Jutiae moenia) as having been once more extended by Valdemar the Great (1157-1182), which has been cited among the proofs that Schleswig (S4 nderjylland) forms an integral part of Jutland (Manuel hist.

    0
    0
  • VALDEMAR II., king of Denmark (1170-1241), was the second son of Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • Already during his brother's lifetime, as duke of Schleswig, Valdemar had successfully defended Denmark against German aggression.

    0
    0
  • Immediately after his coronation, he hastened to his newly won territories, accompanied by the principal civil and ecclesiastical dignitaries of Denmark, and was solemnly acknowledged lord of Northalbingia (the district lying between the Eider and the Elbe) at Lubeck, Otto IV., then in difficulties, voluntarily relinquishing all German territory north of the Elbe to Valdemar, who in return recognized Otto as German emperor.

    0
    0
  • By closing Lubeck Valdemar had German trade and the German over-seas settlements entirely at his mercy.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's position was still further strengthened when Frederick II., the successful rival of Otto IV., was, in 1215, crowned at Aix-la-Chapelle.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar at once cultivated the friendship of the new emperor; and Frederick, by an imperial brief, issued in December 1214 and subsequently confirmed by Innocent III.

    0
    0
  • and Honorius III., formally renounced all the German lands north of the Elbe and Elde, as well as the Wendish lands on the Baltic, in favour of Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • An attempt by Otto in 1215 to recover Northalbingia was easily frustrated by Valdemar, who henceforth devoted himself to the extension of the Danish empire over the eastern Baltic shores.

    0
    0
  • Two years later Valdemar, urged by Archbishop Anders Suneson, also appeared off the Esthonian coast and occupied the isle of Oesel.

    0
    0
  • In 1210 Valdemar led a second expedition eastwards, this time directed against heathen Prussia and Samland, the chief result of which was the subjection of Mestwin, duke of Pomerania, the leading chieftain in those parts.

    0
    0
  • Despite its superior weapons and mode of warfare, the German east Baltic colony was constantly in danger of being overborne by the endless assaults of the dogged aborigines, whose hatred of the religion of the Cross as preached by the knights is very intelligible; and in 1218 Bishop Albert of Riga was driven to appeal for assistance to King Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar cheerfully undertook a new crusade "for the honour of the Blessed Virgin and the remission of my own sins."

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was now, after the king of England, the most powerful potentate in the north of Europe.

    0
    0
  • It is doubtful whether even the genius of Valdemar would have proved equal to such a stupendous task.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand Valdemar, by prudent diplomacy, contrived to retain the greater portion of Danish Esthonia (compact of Stensby, 1238).

    0
    0
  • With rare resignation Valdemar devoted the remainder of his life to the great work of domestic reform.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was twice married, his first consort being Dragomir (Dagmar) of Bohemia, his second Berengaria of Portugal.

    0
    0
  • All his four sons, Valdemar, Eric, Abel and Christopher became kings of Denmark.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar IV >>

    0
    0
  • In 1201 the city submitted to Valdemar of Schleswig, after his victory over the count of Holstein, but in 1225, owing to the capture of King Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar had no longer a competitor.

    0
    0
  • We may form some idea of the extent and the severity of their incursions from the fact that at the beginning of the reign of Valdemar the whole of the Danish eastern coast lay wasted and depopulated.

    0
    0
  • Both places were captured in 1169 by a great expedition under the command of Valdemar and Absalon; the hideous colossal idol of Riigievit was chopped into firewood for the Danish caldrons, and the Wends were christened at the point of the sword and placed beneath the jurisdiction of the see of Roskilde.

    0
    0
  • For at the beginning of his reign Valdemar leaned largely upon the Germans and even went the length, against the advice of Absalon, of acknowledging the overlordship of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa at the reichstag of Dole, 1162.1162.

    0
    0
  • Very different was Valdemar's second conference with Barbarossa, on the banks of the Eider, in 1182, when the two monarchs met as equals in the presence of their respective armies, and a double marriage was arranged between two of Valdemar's daughters and two of the emperor's sons.

    0
    0
  • The only serious domestic trouble during Valdemar's reign was the rebellion of the Scanian provinces, which objected to the establishment of a strong monarchy inimical to local pretensions and disturbances, and especially to the heavy taxes and tithes necessary to support the new reign of law and order.

    0
    0
  • In the following year died King Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's worst faults were a certain aloofness and taciturnity.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar II >>

    0
    0
  • On Erik's death (1250) Birger's son Valdemar was elected king while his father acted as regent.

    0
    0
  • The duke was aided in this work by the alliance of Valdemar I., king of Denmark, and, it is said, by engines of war brought from Italy.

    0
    0
  • A war with Valdemar of Denmark, caused by a quarrel over the booty obtained from 1 The see was transferred to Schwerin by Henry in 1167.

    0
    0
  • VALDEMAR IV., king of Denmark (c. 1 3 20 - 1 375), was the youngest son of Christopher II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was brought up at the court of the German emperor, Louis of Bavaria, during those miserable years when the realm of Denmark was partitioned among Holstein counts and German Ritter, while Scania, "the bread-basket" of the monarchy, sought deliverance from anarchy under the protection of Magnus of Sweden.

    0
    0
  • (1340), who for nine years had held Jutland and Funen and dominated the rest of Denmark, first opened Valdemar's way to the throne, and on midsummer day 1340 he was elected king at a Landsting held at Viborg, after consenting to espouse Helveg, the sister of his most important confederate, Valdemar, duke of Schleswig.

    0
    0
  • Neither the time nor the place of Valdemar's birth is known, but he could not have been more than twenty when he became the nominal king of Denmark, though, as a matter of fact, his territory was limited to the northernmost county of Jutland.

    0
    0
  • First Valdemar aimed at the recovery of Zealand, which was actually partitioned among a score of Holstein mortgagees who ruled their portions despotically from their strong castles, and sucked the people dry.

    0
    0
  • The oppressed clergy and peasantry regarded Valdemar as their natural deliverer; but so poor and friendless was he that the work of redemption proved painfully slow.

    0
    0
  • In 1349, at the Landsting of Ringsted, Valdemar proudly rendered an account of his stewardship to the Estates of Zealand, and the bishop of Roskilde congratulated him on having so miraculously delivered his people from foreign thraldom.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar now gave full play to his endless energy.

    0
    0
  • In north German politics he interfered vigorously to protect his brotherin-law the Margrave Louis of Brandenburg against the lords of Mecklenburg and the dukes of Pomerania, with such success that the emperor, Charles IV., at the conference of Bautzen, was reconciled to the Brandenburger and allowed Valdemar an annual charge of 16,000 silver marks on the city of Lubeck (1349) Some years later Valdemar seriously thought of reviving the ancient claims of Denmark upon England, and entered into negotiations with the French king, John, who in his distress looked to this descendant of the ancient Vikings for help. A matrimonial alliance between the two crowns was even discussed, and Valdemar offered, for the huge sum of 600,000 gulden, to transport 12,000 men to England.

    0
    0
  • But the chronic state of rebellion in western Denmark, which, fomented by the discontented Jutish magnates, lasted with short intervals from 1350 to 1360, compelled Valdemar to renounce these farreaching and fantastic designs.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar now turned his eyes from the west to the east, where lay the "kingdom of Scania."

    0
    0
  • Valdemar had indeed pledged it solemnly and irrevocably to King Magnus of Sweden, who had held it for twenty years; but profiting by the difficulties of Magnus with his Norwegian subjects, after skilfully securing his own position by negotiations with Albert of Mecklenburg and the Hanseatic League, Valdemar suddenly and irresistibly invaded Scania, and by the end of 1361 all the old Danish lands, except North Holland, were recovered.

    0
    0
  • By the recovery of Scania Valdemar had become the lord of the great herring-fishery market held every autumn from St Bartholomew's day (24th of August) to St Denis's day (9th of October) on the hammer-shaped peninsula projecting from the S.W.

    0
    0
  • In July 1361 Valdemar set sail from Denmark at the head of a great fleet, defeated a peasant army before Visby, and a few days later the burgesses of Visby made a breach in their walls through which the Danish monarch passed in triumph.

    0
    0
  • The conquest of Gotland at once led to a war between Valdemar and Sweden allied with the Hanseatic towns; but in the spring of 1362 Valdemar repulsed from the fortress of Helsingborg a large Hanseatic fleet provided with "shooting engines" (cannon) and commanded by Johan Wittenburg, the burgomaster of Lubeck.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was now at the height of his power.

    0
    0
  • At a Hansetag held at Cologne on the 11th of November 1367, three groups of the towns, seventy in number, concerted to attack Denmark, and in January 1368 Valdemar's numerous domestic enemies, especially the Jutlanders and the Holstein counts, acceded to the league, with the object of partitioning the realm among them.

    0
    0
  • At Easter-tide 1368, on the very eve of this general attack, Valdemar departed for three years to Germany, leaving his realm in the capable hands of the earl-marshal Henning Podbusk.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's skilful diplomacy, reinforced by golden arguments, did indeed induce the dukes of Brunswick, Brandenburg and Pomerania to attack the confederates in the rear; but fortune was persistently unfriendly to the Danish king, 1 Rostock, Greifswald, Wismar and Stralsund.

    0
    0
  • The conditions of peace were naturally humiliating for Valdemar,' though, ultimately, he contrived to render illusory many of the inordinate privileges he was obliged to concede.

    0
    0
  • ABSALON (c. 1128-1201), Danish archbishop and statesman, was born about 1128, the son of Asser Rig of Fjenneslev, at whose castle he and his brother Esbjorn were brought up along with the young prince Valdemar, afterwards Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • Absalon first appears in Saxo's Chronicle as a fellow-guest at Roskilde, at the banquet given, in 1157, by King Sweyn to his rivals Canute and Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Both Absalon and Valdemar narrowly escaped assassination at the hands of their treacherous host on this occasion, but at length escaped to Jutland, whither Sweyn followed them, but was defeated and slain at the battle of Grathe Heath.

    0
    0
  • The same year (1158) which saw Valdemar ascend the Danish throne saw Absalon elected bishop of Roskilde.

    0
    0
  • Henceforth Absalon was the chief counsellor of Valdemar, and the promoter of that imperial policy which, for three generations, was to give Denmark the dominion of the Baltic. Briefly, it was Absalon's intention to clear the northern sea of the Wendish pirates, who inhabited that portion of the Baltic littoral which we now call Pomerania, and ravaged the Danish coasts so unmercifully that at the accession of Valdemar one-third of the realm of Denmark lay wasted and depopulated.

    0
    0
  • He was now but fifty-seven, but his strenuous life had aged him, and he was content to resign the command of fleets and armies to younger men, like Duke Valdemar, afterwards Valdemar and to confine himself to the administration of the empire which his genius had created.

    0
    0
  • It was contrary to his advice and warnings that Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • (1163-1202), king of Denmark, eldest son of Valdemar was crowned in his seventh year (1170), as his father's co-regent, so as to secure the succession.

    0
    0
  • During his twenty years' reign Denmark advanced steadily along the path of greatness and prosperity marked out for her by Valdemar I., consolidating and extending her dominion over the North Baltic coast and adopting a more and more independent attitude towards Germany.

    0
    0
  • The war continued intermittently till 1201, when Duke Valdemar, Canute's younger brother, conquered the whole of Holstein, and Duke Adolf was subsequently captured at Hamburg and sent in chains to Denmark.

    0
    0
  • Undoubtedly he owed the triumphs of his reign very largely to the statesmanship of Absalon and the valour of Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • The Order of the Dannebrog is, according to Danish tradition, of miraculous origin, and was founded by Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • It was then only a fishing village, and remained so until about the middle of the 12th century, when Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • In 1306 it managed to repel the Norwegians, but in 1362, and again in 1368, it was captured by the opponents of Valdemar Atterdag.

    0
    0
  • In 1230 the conquest of Prussia was begun by the Order, although not under his immediate leadership. In 1225 he reconciled Valdemar II., king of Denmark, with Henry I., count of Schwerin, and thus won again the land on the right bank of the Elbe for the Empire, and the recognition of imperial superiority over Denmark.

    0
    0
  • After Bouvines he purchased the assistance of Valdemar II., king of Denmark, by ceding to him a large stretch of land along the Baltic coast; and, promising to go on crusade, he secured his coronation at Aix-la-Chapelle in July 1215.

    0
    0
  • There was, moreover, a struggle between Valdemar of Denmark and some neighboring German nobles.

    0
    0
  • The Hanseatic League carried on war with Valdemar V., king of Denmark, and his ally, the king of Norway, seventy-seven towns declaring war on these monarchs in 1367, and emerged victorious from the struggle, while its commerce extended to nearly all parts of the known world.

    0
    0
  • The period between the death of Canute the Great and the accession of Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • The third archbishop of Lund was Absalon (1128-1201), Denmark's first great statesman, who so materially assisted Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • The policy of Absalon was continued on a still vaster scale by Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • (See Valdemar I., Ii., and Absalon.) Yet the age of the Valdemars was one of the most glorious in Danish history, and it is of political importance as marking a.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's son, Eric Plovpenning, succeeded him as king; but his near kinsfolk also received huge appanages, and Period of family discords led to civil wars.

    0
    0
  • It was reserved for another Valdemar (Valdemar IV., q.v.) to reunite and weld together the scattered members of his heritage.

    0
    0
  • To make an end of this universal lawlessness Valdemar IV.

    0
    0
  • Throughout his reign Valdemar laboured incessantly to acquire as much land as possible.

    0
    0
  • Everywhere indeed Valdemar intervened personally.

    0
    0
  • The popular tribunals regained their authority, and a supreme court of justice, Det Kongelige Retterting, presided over by Valdemar himself, not only punished the unruly and guarded the prerogatives of the crown, but also protected the weak and defenceless from the tyranny of the strong.

    0
    0
  • Nor did Valdemar hesitate to meet his people in public and periodically render an account of his stewardship. He voluntarily resorted to the old practice of summoning national assemblies, the so-called Danehof.

    0
    0
  • At the first of these assemblies held at Nyborg, Midsummer Day 1314, the bishops and councillors solemnly promised that the commonalty should enjoy all the ancient rights and privileges conceded to them by Valdemar II., and the wise provision that the Danehof should meet annually considerably strengthened its authority.

    0
    0
  • The work of Valdemar was completed and consolidated by his illustrious daughter Margaret (1 375 - 1 4 12), whose crowning achievement was the Union of Kalmar (1397), whereby she sought to combine the three northern kingdoms The Union f o into a single state dominated by Denmark.

    0
    0
  • 1852) must also be mentioned as a poet and critic. Valdemar Rordam, whose The Danish Tongue was the lyrical success of 1901, may also be named.

    0
    0
  • In 1219 the Danish king Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar III.

    0
    0
  • After her death he married Ingibjorg or Ingeborg (q.v.), daughter of Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • In the Danish code of Valdemar II., which was in force from 1280 to 1683, it was provided that a concubine kept openly for three years shall thereby become a legal wife; this was the custom of hand vesten, the "handfasting" of the English and Scottish borders, which appears in Scott's Monastery.

    0
    0
  • The Lives of King Valdemar and his Son, written c. 1185, by a contemporary of Abbot Karl's, are the last of this series.

    0
    0
  • The whole were edited and compiled into one book, often quoted as Skioldunga, by a 13th-century editor, possibly Olaf, the White Poet, Sturla's brother, guest and friend of King Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • The great religious poet of Iceland, Hallgrimr Petursson, has found a worthy successor in Valdemar Briem (b.

    0
    0
  • MARGARET (1353-1412), queen of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, the daughter of Valdemar IV.

    0
    0
  • Margaret also recovered for the Crown all the landed property which had been alienated during the troublous days of Valdemar IV.

    0
    0
  • Otto was succeeded in 1309 by his nephew, Valdemar, who, assisted by other members of his family, conquered Pomerellen, which he shared with the Teutonic order in 1310, and held his own in a struggle with the kings of Poland, Sweden and Denmark and others, over the possession of Stralsund.

    0
    0
  • Hermann's daughter Agnes married the elector Valdemar, and on the death of her only brother, John VI., in 1317, the possessions of the Saltzwedel branch of the family passed to Valdemar, together with Landsberg and the Saxon Palatinate, which had been purchased from Albert the Degenerate, landgrave of Thuringia.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar thus gathered the whole of the mark under his rule, together with upper and lower Lusatia, and various outlying districts.

    0
    0
  • Upper and lower Lusatia, Landsberg, and the Saxon Palatinate had been inherited by female members of the family, and passed into the hands of other princes, the old mark was retained by Agnes, the widow of Valdemar, who was married again to Otto II., duke of Brunswick, and the king was forced to acknowledge these claims, and to cede districts to Mecklenburg and Bohemia.

    0
    0
  • During the struggle between the families of Wittelsbach and Luxemburg, which began in 1342, there appeared in Brandenburg an old man who claimed to be the margrave Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • This step compelled Louis to make peace with Charles, who abandoned the false Valdemar, invested Louis and his step-brothers with Brandenburg, and in return was recognized as king.

    0
    0
  • Louis, who then undertook the government, made peace with his neighbours, finally defeated the false Valdemar, and was recognized by the Golden Bull of 1356 as one of the seven electors.

    0
    0
  • The coronation of Birger Jarlsson Valdemar took place in the cathedral in 1251; and in the reign of Gustavus Vasa several important diets were held in the town.

    0
    0
  • The chronicler Saxo Grammaticus mentions in his Gesta Danorum the "rampart of Jutland" (Jutiae moenia) as having been once more extended by Valdemar the Great (1157-1182), which has been cited among the proofs that Schleswig (S4 nderjylland) forms an integral part of Jutland (Manuel hist.

    0
    0
  • A method of producing these oscillations devised by Valdemar Poulsen is based upon the employment of what is called a musical arc. W.

    0
    0
  • VALDEMAR II., king of Denmark (1170-1241), was the second son of Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • Already during his brother's lifetime, as duke of Schleswig, Valdemar had successfully defended Denmark against German aggression.

    0
    0
  • Immediately after his coronation, he hastened to his newly won territories, accompanied by the principal civil and ecclesiastical dignitaries of Denmark, and was solemnly acknowledged lord of Northalbingia (the district lying between the Eider and the Elbe) at Lubeck, Otto IV., then in difficulties, voluntarily relinquishing all German territory north of the Elbe to Valdemar, who in return recognized Otto as German emperor.

    0
    0
  • By closing Lubeck Valdemar had German trade and the German over-seas settlements entirely at his mercy.

    0
    0
  • This state of things was clearly recognized by German statesmen, and in 1208, when the Emperor Otto felt more secure upon his unstable throne, he became overtly hostile to Denmark and would have attempted the recovery of the lost German territory but for the interposition of Pope Innocent III., who threatened to excommunicate any German prince who should attack Valdemar, the equally pious and astute Danish king having undertaken, at the bidding of the holy see, to lead a crusade against the heathen Esthonians.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's position was still further strengthened when Frederick II., the successful rival of Otto IV., was, in 1215, crowned at Aix-la-Chapelle.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar at once cultivated the friendship of the new emperor; and Frederick, by an imperial brief, issued in December 1214 and subsequently confirmed by Innocent III.

    0
    0
  • and Honorius III., formally renounced all the German lands north of the Elbe and Elde, as well as the Wendish lands on the Baltic, in favour of Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • An attempt by Otto in 1215 to recover Northalbingia was easily frustrated by Valdemar, who henceforth devoted himself to the extension of the Danish empire over the eastern Baltic shores.

    0
    0
  • Two years later Valdemar, urged by Archbishop Anders Suneson, also appeared off the Esthonian coast and occupied the isle of Oesel.

    0
    0
  • In 1210 Valdemar led a second expedition eastwards, this time directed against heathen Prussia and Samland, the chief result of which was the subjection of Mestwin, duke of Pomerania, the leading chieftain in those parts.

    0
    0
  • Despite its superior weapons and mode of warfare, the German east Baltic colony was constantly in danger of being overborne by the endless assaults of the dogged aborigines, whose hatred of the religion of the Cross as preached by the knights is very intelligible; and in 1218 Bishop Albert of Riga was driven to appeal for assistance to King Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar cheerfully undertook a new crusade "for the honour of the Blessed Virgin and the remission of my own sins."

    0
    0
  • Landing at Lyndantse (the modern Reval) in north Esthonia, Valdemar at once received the submission of the inhabitants, but three days later was treacherously attacked in his camp and only saved from utter destruction by his own personal valour and the descent from heaven, at the critical moment, of a red banner with a white cross on it, the Dannebrog (Danes' Cloth), of which we now hear for the first time, and which henceforth was to precede the Danish armies to victory till its capture by the Ditmarshers, three hundred years later.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was now, after the king of England, the most powerful potentate in the north of Europe.

    0
    0
  • It is doubtful whether even the genius of Valdemar would have proved equal to such a stupendous task.

    0
    0
  • On his release Valdemar attempted to retrieve his position by force of arms, but was utterly defeated at the battle of Bornhoved (22nd of July 1227), which deserves a place among the decisive battles of history, for it destroyed at once and for ever the Danish dominion of the Baltic and established the independence of Lubeck, to the immense detriment in the future of all the Scandinavian states.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand Valdemar, by prudent diplomacy, contrived to retain the greater portion of Danish Esthonia (compact of Stensby, 1238).

    0
    0
  • With rare resignation Valdemar devoted the remainder of his life to the great work of domestic reform.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was twice married, his first consort being Dragomir (Dagmar) of Bohemia, his second Berengaria of Portugal.

    0
    0
  • All his four sons, Valdemar, Eric, Abel and Christopher became kings of Denmark.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar IV >>

    0
    0
  • In 1201 the city submitted to Valdemar of Schleswig, after his victory over the count of Holstein, but in 1225, owing to the capture of King Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • VALDEMAR I., king of Denmark (1131-1182), the son of the chivalrous and popular Canute Lavard and the Russian princess Ingeborg, was born a week after his father's murder, and was carefully brought up in the religious and relatively enlightened household of Asser Rig, whose sons Absalon and EsbjSrn Snare, or "the Swift," were his playmates.

    0
    0
  • On the death of King Eric Lam in 1147 Valdemar came forward as one of the three pretenders to the Danish crown, Jutland falling to his portion (compact of Roskilde, 9th of August 1157).

    0
    0
  • Valdemar had no longer a competitor.

    0
    0
  • We may form some idea of the extent and the severity of their incursions from the fact that at the beginning of the reign of Valdemar the whole of the Danish eastern coast lay wasted and depopulated.

    0
    0
  • Both places were captured in 1169 by a great expedition under the command of Valdemar and Absalon; the hideous colossal idol of Riigievit was chopped into firewood for the Danish caldrons, and the Wends were christened at the point of the sword and placed beneath the jurisdiction of the see of Roskilde.

    0
    0
  • For at the beginning of his reign Valdemar leaned largely upon the Germans and even went the length, against the advice of Absalon, of acknowledging the overlordship of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa at the reichstag of Dole, 1162.1162.

    0
    0
  • Very different was Valdemar's second conference with Barbarossa, on the banks of the Eider, in 1182, when the two monarchs met as equals in the presence of their respective armies, and a double marriage was arranged between two of Valdemar's daughters and two of the emperor's sons.

    0
    0
  • The only serious domestic trouble during Valdemar's reign was the rebellion of the Scanian provinces, which objected to the establishment of a strong monarchy inimical to local pretensions and disturbances, and especially to the heavy taxes and tithes necessary to support the new reign of law and order.

    0
    0
  • In the following year died King Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's worst faults were a certain aloofness and taciturnity.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar II >>

    0
    0
  • On Erik's death (1250) Birger's son Valdemar was elected king while his father acted as regent.

    0
    0
  • The duke was aided in this work by the alliance of Valdemar I., king of Denmark, and, it is said, by engines of war brought from Italy.

    0
    0
  • A war with Valdemar of Denmark, caused by a quarrel over the booty obtained from 1 The see was transferred to Schwerin by Henry in 1167.

    0
    0
  • VALDEMAR IV., king of Denmark (c. 1 3 20 - 1 375), was the youngest son of Christopher II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was brought up at the court of the German emperor, Louis of Bavaria, during those miserable years when the realm of Denmark was partitioned among Holstein counts and German Ritter, while Scania, "the bread-basket" of the monarchy, sought deliverance from anarchy under the protection of Magnus of Sweden.

    0
    0
  • (1340), who for nine years had held Jutland and Funen and dominated the rest of Denmark, first opened Valdemar's way to the throne, and on midsummer day 1340 he was elected king at a Landsting held at Viborg, after consenting to espouse Helveg, the sister of his most important confederate, Valdemar, duke of Schleswig.

    0
    0
  • Neither the time nor the place of Valdemar's birth is known, but he could not have been more than twenty when he became the nominal king of Denmark, though, as a matter of fact, his territory was limited to the northernmost county of Jutland.

    0
    0
  • First Valdemar aimed at the recovery of Zealand, which was actually partitioned among a score of Holstein mortgagees who ruled their portions despotically from their strong castles, and sucked the people dry.

    0
    0
  • The oppressed clergy and peasantry regarded Valdemar as their natural deliverer; but so poor and friendless was he that the work of redemption proved painfully slow.

    0
    0
  • In 1349, at the Landsting of Ringsted, Valdemar proudly rendered an account of his stewardship to the Estates of Zealand, and the bishop of Roskilde congratulated him on having so miraculously delivered his people from foreign thraldom.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar now gave full play to his endless energy.

    0
    0
  • In north German politics he interfered vigorously to protect his brotherin-law the Margrave Louis of Brandenburg against the lords of Mecklenburg and the dukes of Pomerania, with such success that the emperor, Charles IV., at the conference of Bautzen, was reconciled to the Brandenburger and allowed Valdemar an annual charge of 16,000 silver marks on the city of Lubeck (1349) Some years later Valdemar seriously thought of reviving the ancient claims of Denmark upon England, and entered into negotiations with the French king, John, who in his distress looked to this descendant of the ancient Vikings for help. A matrimonial alliance between the two crowns was even discussed, and Valdemar offered, for the huge sum of 600,000 gulden, to transport 12,000 men to England.

    0
    0
  • But the chronic state of rebellion in western Denmark, which, fomented by the discontented Jutish magnates, lasted with short intervals from 1350 to 1360, compelled Valdemar to renounce these farreaching and fantastic designs.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar now turned his eyes from the west to the east, where lay the "kingdom of Scania."

    0
    0
  • Valdemar had indeed pledged it solemnly and irrevocably to King Magnus of Sweden, who had held it for twenty years; but profiting by the difficulties of Magnus with his Norwegian subjects, after skilfully securing his own position by negotiations with Albert of Mecklenburg and the Hanseatic League, Valdemar suddenly and irresistibly invaded Scania, and by the end of 1361 all the old Danish lands, except North Holland, were recovered.

    0
    0
  • By the recovery of Scania Valdemar had become the lord of the great herring-fishery market held every autumn from St Bartholomew's day (24th of August) to St Denis's day (9th of October) on the hammer-shaped peninsula projecting from the S.W.

    0
    0
  • But Valdemar was by no means disposed to submit to their dictation, and political conjunctures now brought about actual hostilities between Valdemar and the Hansa, or at least that portion of it known as the Wendish Towns,' whose commercial interests lay principally in the Baltic.

    0
    0
  • In July 1361 Valdemar set sail from Denmark at the head of a great fleet, defeated a peasant army before Visby, and a few days later the burgesses of Visby made a breach in their walls through which the Danish monarch passed in triumph.

    0
    0
  • The conquest of Gotland at once led to a war between Valdemar and Sweden allied with the Hanseatic towns; but in the spring of 1362 Valdemar repulsed from the fortress of Helsingborg a large Hanseatic fleet provided with "shooting engines" (cannon) and commanded by Johan Wittenburg, the burgomaster of Lubeck.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar was now at the height of his power.

    0
    0
  • At a Hansetag held at Cologne on the 11th of November 1367, three groups of the towns, seventy in number, concerted to attack Denmark, and in January 1368 Valdemar's numerous domestic enemies, especially the Jutlanders and the Holstein counts, acceded to the league, with the object of partitioning the realm among them.

    0
    0
  • At Easter-tide 1368, on the very eve of this general attack, Valdemar departed for three years to Germany, leaving his realm in the capable hands of the earl-marshal Henning Podbusk.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's skilful diplomacy, reinforced by golden arguments, did indeed induce the dukes of Brunswick, Brandenburg and Pomerania to attack the confederates in the rear; but fortune was persistently unfriendly to the Danish king, 1 Rostock, Greifswald, Wismar and Stralsund.

    0
    0
  • The conditions of peace were naturally humiliating for Valdemar,' though, ultimately, he contrived to render illusory many of the inordinate privileges he was obliged to concede.

    0
    0
  • ABSALON (c. 1128-1201), Danish archbishop and statesman, was born about 1128, the son of Asser Rig of Fjenneslev, at whose castle he and his brother Esbjorn were brought up along with the young prince Valdemar, afterwards Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • Absalon first appears in Saxo's Chronicle as a fellow-guest at Roskilde, at the banquet given, in 1157, by King Sweyn to his rivals Canute and Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Both Absalon and Valdemar narrowly escaped assassination at the hands of their treacherous host on this occasion, but at length escaped to Jutland, whither Sweyn followed them, but was defeated and slain at the battle of Grathe Heath.

    0
    0
  • The same year (1158) which saw Valdemar ascend the Danish throne saw Absalon elected bishop of Roskilde.

    0
    0
  • Henceforth Absalon was the chief counsellor of Valdemar, and the promoter of that imperial policy which, for three generations, was to give Denmark the dominion of the Baltic. Briefly, it was Absalon's intention to clear the northern sea of the Wendish pirates, who inhabited that portion of the Baltic littoral which we now call Pomerania, and ravaged the Danish coasts so unmercifully that at the accession of Valdemar one-third of the realm of Denmark lay wasted and depopulated.

    0
    0
  • He was now but fifty-seven, but his strenuous life had aged him, and he was content to resign the command of fleets and armies to younger men, like Duke Valdemar, afterwards Valdemar and to confine himself to the administration of the empire which his genius had created.

    0
    0
  • It was contrary to his advice and warnings that Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • (1163-1202), king of Denmark, eldest son of Valdemar was crowned in his seventh year (1170), as his father's co-regent, so as to secure the succession.

    0
    0
  • During his twenty years' reign Denmark advanced steadily along the path of greatness and prosperity marked out for her by Valdemar I., consolidating and extending her dominion over the North Baltic coast and adopting a more and more independent attitude towards Germany.

    0
    0
  • The war continued intermittently till 1201, when Duke Valdemar, Canute's younger brother, conquered the whole of Holstein, and Duke Adolf was subsequently captured at Hamburg and sent in chains to Denmark.

    0
    0
  • Undoubtedly he owed the triumphs of his reign very largely to the statesmanship of Absalon and the valour of Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • The Order of the Dannebrog is, according to Danish tradition, of miraculous origin, and was founded by Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • It was then only a fishing village, and remained so until about the middle of the 12th century, when Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • In 1306 it managed to repel the Norwegians, but in 1362, and again in 1368, it was captured by the opponents of Valdemar Atterdag.

    0
    0
  • In 1230 the conquest of Prussia was begun by the Order, although not under his immediate leadership. In 1225 he reconciled Valdemar II., king of Denmark, with Henry I., count of Schwerin, and thus won again the land on the right bank of the Elbe for the Empire, and the recognition of imperial superiority over Denmark.

    0
    0
  • After Bouvines he purchased the assistance of Valdemar II., king of Denmark, by ceding to him a large stretch of land along the Baltic coast; and, promising to go on crusade, he secured his coronation at Aix-la-Chapelle in July 1215.

    0
    0
  • There was, moreover, a struggle between Valdemar of Denmark and some neighboring German nobles.

    0
    0
  • The Hanseatic League carried on war with Valdemar V., king of Denmark, and his ally, the king of Norway, seventy-seven towns declaring war on these monarchs in 1367, and emerged victorious from the struggle, while its commerce extended to nearly all parts of the known world.

    0
    0
  • The period between the death of Canute the Great and the accession of Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • The third archbishop of Lund was Absalon (1128-1201), Denmark's first great statesman, who so materially assisted Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • The policy of Absalon was continued on a still vaster scale by Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • (See Valdemar I., Ii., and Absalon.) Yet the age of the Valdemars was one of the most glorious in Danish history, and it is of political importance as marking a.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar's son, Eric Plovpenning, succeeded him as king; but his near kinsfolk also received huge appanages, and Period of family discords led to civil wars.

    0
    0
  • It was reserved for another Valdemar (Valdemar IV., q.v.) to reunite and weld together the scattered members of his heritage.

    0
    0
  • To make an end of this universal lawlessness Valdemar IV.

    0
    0
  • Throughout his reign Valdemar laboured incessantly to acquire as much land as possible.

    0
    0
  • Everywhere indeed Valdemar intervened personally.

    0
    0
  • The popular tribunals regained their authority, and a supreme court of justice, Det Kongelige Retterting, presided over by Valdemar himself, not only punished the unruly and guarded the prerogatives of the crown, but also protected the weak and defenceless from the tyranny of the strong.

    0
    0
  • Nor did Valdemar hesitate to meet his people in public and periodically render an account of his stewardship. He voluntarily resorted to the old practice of summoning national assemblies, the so-called Danehof.

    0
    0
  • At the first of these assemblies held at Nyborg, Midsummer Day 1314, the bishops and councillors solemnly promised that the commonalty should enjoy all the ancient rights and privileges conceded to them by Valdemar II., and the wise provision that the Danehof should meet annually considerably strengthened its authority.

    0
    0
  • The keystone to the whole constitutional system was " King Valdemar's Charter "issued in May 1360 at the Rigsmiide, or parliament, held at Kalundborg in May 1360.

    0
    0
  • The work of Valdemar was completed and consolidated by his illustrious daughter Margaret (1 375 - 1 4 12), whose crowning achievement was the Union of Kalmar (1397), whereby she sought to combine the three northern kingdoms The Union f o into a single state dominated by Denmark.

    0
    0
  • 1852) must also be mentioned as a poet and critic. Valdemar Rordam, whose The Danish Tongue was the lyrical success of 1901, may also be named.

    0
    0
  • In 1219 the Danish king Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar III.

    0
    0
  • After her death he married Ingibjorg or Ingeborg (q.v.), daughter of Valdemar I.

    0
    0
  • In the Danish code of Valdemar II., which was in force from 1280 to 1683, it was provided that a concubine kept openly for three years shall thereby become a legal wife; this was the custom of hand vesten, the "handfasting" of the English and Scottish borders, which appears in Scott's Monastery.

    0
    0
  • The Lives of King Valdemar and his Son, written c. 1185, by a contemporary of Abbot Karl's, are the last of this series.

    0
    0
  • The whole were edited and compiled into one book, often quoted as Skioldunga, by a 13th-century editor, possibly Olaf, the White Poet, Sturla's brother, guest and friend of King Valdemar II.

    0
    0
  • The great religious poet of Iceland, Hallgrimr Petursson, has found a worthy successor in Valdemar Briem (b.

    0
    0
  • MARGARET (1353-1412), queen of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, the daughter of Valdemar IV.

    0
    0
  • Margaret also recovered for the Crown all the landed property which had been alienated during the troublous days of Valdemar IV.

    0
    0
  • Otto was succeeded in 1309 by his nephew, Valdemar, who, assisted by other members of his family, conquered Pomerellen, which he shared with the Teutonic order in 1310, and held his own in a struggle with the kings of Poland, Sweden and Denmark and others, over the possession of Stralsund.

    0
    0
  • Hermann's daughter Agnes married the elector Valdemar, and on the death of her only brother, John VI., in 1317, the possessions of the Saltzwedel branch of the family passed to Valdemar, together with Landsberg and the Saxon Palatinate, which had been purchased from Albert the Degenerate, landgrave of Thuringia.

    0
    0
  • Valdemar thus gathered the whole of the mark under his rule, together with upper and lower Lusatia, and various outlying districts.

    0
    0
  • Upper and lower Lusatia, Landsberg, and the Saxon Palatinate had been inherited by female members of the family, and passed into the hands of other princes, the old mark was retained by Agnes, the widow of Valdemar, who was married again to Otto II., duke of Brunswick, and the king was forced to acknowledge these claims, and to cede districts to Mecklenburg and Bohemia.

    0
    0
  • During the struggle between the families of Wittelsbach and Luxemburg, which began in 1342, there appeared in Brandenburg an old man who claimed to be the margrave Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • This step compelled Louis to make peace with Charles, who abandoned the false Valdemar, invested Louis and his step-brothers with Brandenburg, and in return was recognized as king.

    0
    0
  • Louis, who then undertook the government, made peace with his neighbours, finally defeated the false Valdemar, and was recognized by the Golden Bull of 1356 as one of the seven electors.

    0
    0
  • A group of half Vampires, led by Valdemar, has united the Dark Elves into a large imposing force.

    0
    0
  • The Heralds of Valdemar serve in a feudal-level fictitious kingdom created by fantasy novelist Mercedes Lackey.

    0
    0
  • Heralds of Valdemar are known not only for their companion, but for their magic - heralds all have some kind of magical skill.

    0
    0
  • The Heralds of Valdemar books typically come in trilogies, of which there are a number, and follow one character from their selection by a Companion throughout their training and mature career.

    0
    0
  • There is a period in Valdemar history in which the Mages became fewer and fewer until for a time, there were none at all.

    0
    0
  • Thus, you can either read the novels in order of publication (recommended) or in chronological order as they reveal the history of the kingdom of Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar books also views magic as an inborn talent, and those with the talent gravitate to the Heralds, keepers of the peace in the kingdom.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →