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utopia

utopia

utopia Sentence Examples

  • For as a romance the Utopia has little interest either of incident or of character.

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  • If so, no Utopia has ever yet been presented in a style so little calculated to stir the imagination, to warm the feelings, to soothe the insurgency of the reason.

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  • Few of these survived after the exploration of the Atlantic by Columbus, Vasco da Gama and others in the 15th century; but in literature More's Utopia set a new fashion.

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  • It was translated into the chief languages of Europe, and into English by Ralph Robinson as A fruteful and Pleasaunt Worke of the best State of a Publyque Weale, and of the newe Yle called Utopia (Abraham Nell, 1551); modern editions are by J.

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  • Wells's Anticipations (1901), A Modern Utopia (1905) and New Worlds for Old (1908).

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  • The latter was able to appeal to his countrymen (in a notable speech in the spring of 1906) to rally to a radical programme which had no socialist Utopia in view; and the appearance in him of a strong and practical radical leader had the result of considerably diminishing the effect of the socialist propaganda.

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  • He believed that to look for the restoration of freedom of foreign trade in Great Britain would have been "as absurd as to expect that an Oceana or Utopia should be established in it."

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  • In contrast to More's Utopia, the work is cold and abstract, and lacking in practical detail.

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  • Hence the terms Utopia and Utopian are also used to denote any visionary scheme of reform or social theory, especially those which fail to recognize defects inherent in human nature.

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  • Comte's Utopia has pleased the followers of the Catholic, just as little as those of the scientific, spirit.

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  • In the Utopia, which, though written earlier, More had allowed to be printed as late as 1516, he had spoken against the vices of power, and declared for indifference of religious creed with a breadth of philosophical view of which there is no other example in any Englishman of that age.

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  • The idea of a Utopia is, even in literature, far older than More's romance; it appears in the Timaeus of Plato and is fully developed in his Republic. The idealized description of Sparta in Plutarch's life of Lycurgus belongs to the same class of literary Utopias, though it professes to be historical.

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  • He made this, in 1871, the first volume of his collected lectures and essays, the more popular and didactic form of his new Utopia of human life.

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  • He made this, in 1871, the first volume of his collected lectures and essays, the more popular and didactic form of his new Utopia of human life.

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  • better known as Utopia, was printed at Louvain in 1516, under the superintendence of Erasmus, and appeared in many subsequent editions, many of them of great bibliographical value, the finest being the Basel edition of 1518.

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  • Among the canonizations and beatifications of his pontificate that of Sir Thomas More, author of Utopia, is memorable.

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  • SIR THOMAS MORE (1478-1535), English lord chancellor, and author of Utopia, was born in Milk Street in the city of London, on the 7th of February 1478.

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  • In Blanquerna (1283), a novel which describes a new Utopia, Lull renews the Platonic tradition and anticipates the methods of Sir Thomas More, Campanella and Harrington, and in the Libre de Maravelles (1286) he adopts the Oriental apologue from Kalilah and Dimnah.

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  • UTOPIA, an ideal commonwealth, or an imaginary country whose inhabitants are supposed to exist under the most perfect conditions possible.

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  • 52 to 66) he was again drawn back largely to art by his lectures as professor, whilst prosecuting his social Utopia by speech, pen, example and purse.

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  • 52 to 66) he was again drawn back largely to art by his lectures as professor, whilst prosecuting his social Utopia by speech, pen, example and purse.

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  • In The Discovery of the Future (1902), Mankind in the Making (1903), A Modern Utopia (1905) and New Worlds for Old (1908) his socialistic theories were further developed.

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  • The following translations deserve to be mentioned: - Utopia, written in Latin by Sir Thomas More, Chancellor of England: translated into English (1685); A Relation of the Death of the Primitive Persecutors, written originally in Latin, by L.

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  • Steele for the King's Classics (1908), &c. Other translations of Utopia are by Gilbert Burnet (1684) and by A.

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  • The word first occurs in Sir Thomas More's Utopia, which was originally published in Latin under the title De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, deque Nova Insula Utopia (Louvain, 1516).

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  • "Viret," note D), though the deistic standpoint had already been foreshadowed to some extent by Averroists, by Italian authors like Boccaccio and Petrarch, in More's Utopia (1515), and by French writers like Montaigne, Charron and Bodin.

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  • In a word, literature is my Utopia.

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  • Scholars, like Colet, read the New Testament in Greek and lectured on justification by faith before they knew of Luther, and More included among the institutions of Utopia a rather more liberal and enlightened religion than that which he observed around him.

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  • I am not saying we live in a utopia.

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  • Calvin Henderson Wiley (1819-1887), the author of several romances dealing with life in North Carolina, such as Roanoke: or, Where is Utopia?

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  • They are said, though it is not easy to p believe, to have been elaborated by way of Utopia.

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  • But a more serious volume was Time and Tide (1867), a series of twenty-five letters to a workman of Sunderland, upon various points in the Ruskinian Utopia.

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  • He became himself a persecutor, and a writer of abusive pamphlets unworthy of the author of the Utopia.

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  • With regard to the transition he advocated the progressive abolition of the right of aubaine, by reducing interest, rent, &c. For the goal he professed only to give the general principles; he had no ready-made scheme, no utopia.

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  • Brady peeled his face mask off and lowered the muzzle of his weapon, unnerved by the unrealistic utopia after the three-day battle up the side of the mountain.

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  • classless state on is utopia or heaven on earth.

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  • conspiracy theorist is an optimist, never more than three steps from utopia.

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  • Third, the article concludes by building an incipient theory of ideology as utopia, or the utopian moment of ideology critique.

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  • detached from reality and looks like a draft of yet another utopia.

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  • futurists based their vision of utopia on the potential power of technology.

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  • Third, the article concludes by building an incipient theory of ideology as utopia, or the utopian moment of ideology critique.

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  • viking lander 2 followed on the 3 rd September, landing in Utopia Planitia the Plain of Utopia.

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  • Utopia is also married. Neil A-Z runs a record shop in Enfield.

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  • Next up is Sonny Herman's rare outing on Utopia ' What About Me ', another big Northern floor filler.

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  • When I read Utopia on Trial it all seemed such common sense yet common sense that had been ignored by planners and architects alike.

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  • The socialist utopia is an ethical precept rather than a state of affairs which has to be brought about.

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  • reactionary Utopia.

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  • You wonder what comedy Utopia people are living in that this gets a rough ride from them.

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  • socialist Utopia.

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  • tranquillityft the post-modern suburban utopia of Milton Keynes for the relative country tranquility of Buckingham town.

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  • Pinder, D. (2002) ' In defense of Utopian urbanism: imagining cities after the " end of utopia " ' .

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  • Utopia claimed for it?

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  • Calvin Henderson Wiley (1819-1887), the author of several romances dealing with life in North Carolina, such as Roanoke: or, Where is Utopia?

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  • He emerged from prison a confirmed terrorist and convinced that his Utopia, fully proclaimed to the world in No.

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  • Among the canonizations and beatifications of his pontificate that of Sir Thomas More, author of Utopia, is memorable.

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  • They are said, though it is not easy to p believe, to have been elaborated by way of Utopia.

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  • If so, no Utopia has ever yet been presented in a style so little calculated to stir the imagination, to warm the feelings, to soothe the insurgency of the reason.

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  • Comte's Utopia has pleased the followers of the Catholic, just as little as those of the scientific, spirit.

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  • This gives the Fichtean utopia organized on principles of pure reason; in too many cases the proposals are identical with principles of pure despotism.

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  • Scholars, like Colet, read the New Testament in Greek and lectured on justification by faith before they knew of Luther, and More included among the institutions of Utopia a rather more liberal and enlightened religion than that which he observed around him.

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  • He believed that to look for the restoration of freedom of foreign trade in Great Britain would have been "as absurd as to expect that an Oceana or Utopia should be established in it."

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  • The latter was able to appeal to his countrymen (in a notable speech in the spring of 1906) to rally to a radical programme which had no socialist Utopia in view; and the appearance in him of a strong and practical radical leader had the result of considerably diminishing the effect of the socialist propaganda.

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  • These two small books contain the earliest and most systematic of all Ruskin's efforts to depict a new social Utopia: they contain a vehement repudiation of the orthodox formulas of the economists; and they are for the most part written in a trenchant but simple style, in striking contrast to the florid and discursive form of his works on art.

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  • SIR THOMAS MORE (1478-1535), English lord chancellor, and author of Utopia, was born in Milk Street in the city of London, on the 7th of February 1478.

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  • In the Utopia, which, though written earlier, More had allowed to be printed as late as 1516, he had spoken against the vices of power, and declared for indifference of religious creed with a breadth of philosophical view of which there is no other example in any Englishman of that age.

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  • In the Utopia, published in Latin in 1516 (1st English translation, 1551), he not only denounced the ordinary vices of power, but evinced an enlightenment of sentiment which went far beyond the most statesmanlike ideas to be found among his contemporaries, pronouncing not merely for toleration, but rising even to the philosophical conception of the indifference of religious creed.

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  • For as a romance the Utopia has little interest either of incident or of character.

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  • The idea of putting forward political and philosophical principles under the fiction of an ideal state was doubtless taken from Plato's Republic. The Utopia in turn suggested the literary form adopted by Bacon, Hobbes, Filmer, and other later writers; and the name of the book has passed into the language as signifying optimistic but impracticable ideals of reform.

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  • better known as Utopia, was printed at Louvain in 1516, under the superintendence of Erasmus, and appeared in many subsequent editions, many of them of great bibliographical value, the finest being the Basel edition of 1518.

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  • It was translated into the chief languages of Europe, and into English by Ralph Robinson as A fruteful and Pleasaunt Worke of the best State of a Publyque Weale, and of the newe Yle called Utopia (Abraham Nell, 1551); modern editions are by J.

    0
    0
  • Steele for the King's Classics (1908), &c. Other translations of Utopia are by Gilbert Burnet (1684) and by A.

    0
    0
  • UTOPIA, an ideal commonwealth, or an imaginary country whose inhabitants are supposed to exist under the most perfect conditions possible.

    0
    0
  • Hence the terms Utopia and Utopian are also used to denote any visionary scheme of reform or social theory, especially those which fail to recognize defects inherent in human nature.

    0
    0
  • The word first occurs in Sir Thomas More's Utopia, which was originally published in Latin under the title De Optimo Reipublicae Statu, deque Nova Insula Utopia (Louvain, 1516).

    0
    0
  • The idea of a Utopia is, even in literature, far older than More's romance; it appears in the Timaeus of Plato and is fully developed in his Republic. The idealized description of Sparta in Plutarch's life of Lycurgus belongs to the same class of literary Utopias, though it professes to be historical.

    0
    0
  • Few of these survived after the exploration of the Atlantic by Columbus, Vasco da Gama and others in the 15th century; but in literature More's Utopia set a new fashion.

    0
    0
  • Wells's Anticipations (1901), A Modern Utopia (1905) and New Worlds for Old (1908).

    0
    0
  • In contrast to More's Utopia, the work is cold and abstract, and lacking in practical detail.

    0
    0
  • In The Discovery of the Future (1902), Mankind in the Making (1903), A Modern Utopia (1905) and New Worlds for Old (1908) his socialistic theories were further developed.

    0
    0
  • "Viret," note D), though the deistic standpoint had already been foreshadowed to some extent by Averroists, by Italian authors like Boccaccio and Petrarch, in More's Utopia (1515), and by French writers like Montaigne, Charron and Bodin.

    0
    0
  • In Blanquerna (1283), a novel which describes a new Utopia, Lull renews the Platonic tradition and anticipates the methods of Sir Thomas More, Campanella and Harrington, and in the Libre de Maravelles (1286) he adopts the Oriental apologue from Kalilah and Dimnah.

    0
    0
  • He became himself a persecutor, and a writer of abusive pamphlets unworthy of the author of the Utopia.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the transition he advocated the progressive abolition of the right of aubaine, by reducing interest, rent, &c. For the goal he professed only to give the general principles; he had no ready-made scheme, no utopia.

    0
    0
  • The following translations deserve to be mentioned: - Utopia, written in Latin by Sir Thomas More, Chancellor of England: translated into English (1685); A Relation of the Death of the Primitive Persecutors, written originally in Latin, by L.

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  • The possibility of a gradual improvement in the condition Of the working class is a reactionary Utopia.

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  • You wonder what comedy Utopia people are living in that this gets a rough ride from them.

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  • They have issued total surrender, They have invited everybody to Earth to live on Mars, in their socialist Utopia.

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  • We have left the post-modern suburban utopia of Milton Keynes for the relative country tranquility of Buckingham town.

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  • Pinder, D. (2002) ' In defense of utopian urbanism: imagining cities after the " end of utopia " '.

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  • Can overarching dogmas - such as Communism - deliver the kind of utopia claimed for it?

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  • For many, nudism was not just a therapeutic practice; it was a revolutionary plan for an egalitarian utopia.

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  • The band's 1999 follow-up album, Utopia Parkway, still found the band struggling to find their place in the mainstream.

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  • The environment is actually on the border of a utopia, but with the government spying on all communication that pass through its city.

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  • His lifelong quest is to "create a utopia".

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  • Your craving will be rewarded and your visions for visceral beauty brought into fruition, given homage amid the breathtaking background of majestic mountains descending gracefully into oceanic utopia.

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  • Peopled by 'life's losers' from the surface, the tunnel dwellers, led by Father (Ray Dotrice), the man who found and raised Vincent, have created a Utopia out of time.

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  • Utopia Platinia Yards is an excellent website where the web master scoured the Internet for blueprints and schematics in order to provide them in one central location on his website.

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  • These are typically blueprints that you'll find at other websites, but Utopia does offer a nicely laid out central repository where you'll find most of the best ones.

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  • A utopia is a perfect existence, untroubled by the basic needs of survival or disagreement.

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  • The major work most literary analysts identify as science fiction was Utopia by Thomas More.

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  • But a more serious volume was Time and Tide (1867), a series of twenty-five letters to a workman of Sunderland, upon various points in the Ruskinian Utopia.

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