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utica

utica

utica Sentence Examples

  • Eden (Utica) shale 250

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  • The son was brought up in Utica, studied in1824-1825at Geneva Academy (afterwards Hobart College), and then at a military school in Middletown, Conn., and was admitted to the bar in 1832.

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  • Marcy in 1833-1839, was a member of the New York Assembly in 1842, in 1844 and in 1845, being speaker in 1845; mayor of Utica in 1843, and in 1852 was elected governor of the state over Washington Hunt (1811-1867), the Whig candidate, who had defeated him in 1850.

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  • He died on the 12th of February 1886 in Utica, at the home of his sister, who was the wife of Roscoe Conkling.

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  • He graduated from Union College in 1820, having taught school for a short time at Savannah, Georgia, to help pay his expenses; was admitted to the bar at Utica, N.Y., in 1822, and in the following year began the practice of law at Auburn, N.Y., which was his home for the rest of his life.

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  • of Utica and 4 m.

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  • 3.15), he was liberated through the interference of the tribunes of the commons; but he had shortly afterwards to retire from Rome (in or about 204) to Utica.

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  • They were Utica (Bu Shatir), Hadrumetum (Susa), Thapsus (Dimas), Leptis Minor (Lemta), Achulla (Badria), Uzalis (about 11 m.

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  • from Utica) and Theudalis.

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  • Utica became a Roman colony under Hadrian, and the civitates liberae, municipia, castella, pagi and turres were peopled with Latins.

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  • Daux, in the years preceding 1869, explored the sites of the ancient harbours of Utica, Hadrumetum, Thapsus (Dimas).

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  • of Utica.

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  • - Restoration of Triarthrus Becki, Green, as determined by Beecher from specimens obtained from the Utica Slates (Ordovician), New York.

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  • Roscoe Conkling was admitted to the bar at Utica, New York, in 1850, was appointed district-attorney of Oneida (disambiguation)|Oneida county in the same year, and soon attained success in the practice of his profession.

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  • Flowing north-east the Majerda forms an extensive plain in its lower course, reaching the sea near the ruins of Utica.

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  • UTICA, a city and the county-seat of Oneida (disambiguation)|Oneida county, New York, U.S.A., on the Mohawk river, about 45 m.

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  • Utica is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and several lines leased by it, including the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the New York, Ontario & Western; and the West Shore railways; by the Erie Canal, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • There are many fine business and public buildings, especially on Genesee Street, the principal thoroughfare, and Utica is known for the number of its institutions, public and private.

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  • Those of an educational character include, in addition to the public schools and the Utica Free Academy, the New School (for girls) and the Utica Catholic Academy.

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  • Among its many charitable institutions are a Masonic Home and School (1893), a Home for the Homeless (1867), St Elizabeth's Home (1886), St Luke's Home (1869), a Home for Aged Men and Couples (1879), Utica Orphan Asylum (1830), St Joseph's Infant Home (1893) and St John's Female Orphan Asylum (1834), both under the Sisters of Charity; the House of the Good Shepherd (1872; Protestant Episcopal); and the General (1873; City of Utica), Homeopathic (1895), St Luke's (1869; supported by the Protestant Episcopal Churches), St Elizabeth's (1866; Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis) and Faxton (1873) hospitals.

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  • of Utica, are Trenton Falls, which descend 312 ft.

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  • Utica has varied and extensive manufactures.

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  • Among the other manufactures are food preparations, wooden ware, wagons and carriages, stoves and furnaces, boots and shoes, tobacco and cigars, flour, candy, gloves, bricks, tile and pottery, furniture, paper boxes and firearms. Utica is a shipping point for the products of a fertile agricultural region, from which are exported dairy products (especially cheese), nursery products, flowers (especially roses), small fruits and vegetables, honey and hops.

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  • The territory on which Utica was built was part of the 22,000acre tract granted in 1734 by George II.

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  • During the Seven Years' War a palisaded fort was erected on the south bank of the Mohawk at the ford where Utica later sprung up. It was named Fort Schuyler, in honour of Colonel Peter Schuyler, an uncle of General Philip Schuyler.

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  • In 1797 Oneida county was established, and the village was incorporated under the name of Utica.

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  • The Erie Canal, completed in 1825, added to Utica's prosperity.

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  • Utica was chartered as a city in 1832.

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  • Bagg, Pioneers of Utica (Utica, 1877); Outline History of Utica and Vicinity (Utica, 1900); and the publications of the Oneida Historical Society (Utica, 1881 sqq.).

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  • Rome is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg (controlled by the New York Central), the New York, Ontario & Western, and the Utica & Mohawk Valley (electric) railways.

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  • After 1776, when it was partly repaired by Colonel Elias Dayton, it was called by the continentals Fort Schuyler, in honour of General Philip Schuyler, and so is sometimes confused with (old) Fort Schuyler at Utica.

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  • DANIEL BUTTERFIELD (1831-1901), American soldier, was born in Utica, New York.

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  • of Utica, and about 26 m.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, Ontario & Western, the West Shore and the Oneida (electric) railways (the last connecting with Utica and Syracuse), and by the Erie Canal.

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  • "JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN (18J5-1912), American politician, was born near Utica, N.Y., Oct.

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  • He graduated from Hamilton College in 1878, was admitted to the bar in 1880, and practised in Utica until 1907.

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  • In early manhood he left the Democratic party, became a Republican, and as such was elected mayor of Utica in 1884.

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  • Four years later he was renominated, but he died at Utica, Oct.

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  • The cities having a population of 15,000 or more in 1905 were: New York City, 4,013,781; Buffalo, 376,587; Rochester, 181,666; Syracuse, 117,503; Albany, 98,374; Troy, 76,910; Utica, 62,934; Yonkers, 61,716; Schenectady, 58,387; Binghamton, 42,036; Elmira, 34,687; Auburn, 31,422; Niagara Falls, 26,560; Newburgh, 26,498; Jamestown, 26,160; Kingston, 25,556; Watertown, 2 5,447; Poughkeepsie, 25,379; Mt.

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  • The first state insane asylum, designed chiefly for recent and curable cases, was opened at Utica in 1843.

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  • In 1910 there were fourteen state hospitals (corresponding to fourteen state hospital districts) for the poor and indigent insane; these were at Utica, Willard, Poughkeepsie, Buffalo, Middletown (homoeopathic), Binghamton, Rochester, Ogdensburg, Gowanda (homoeopathic), Flatbush, Ward's Island, King's Park, Central Islip and Yorktown.

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  • from Utica, Fergus county, where blue stones are found, and on Rock and Cottonwood creeks, where green, yellow, red and blue sapphires have been found.

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  • 1 Utica shales.

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  • The principal localities are at Missouri Bar, Ruby Bar and other places near Helena, where they were first worked, and also at Yogo Gulch, near Utica.

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  • Melkarth or Melqarth) and Astarte, founded the feast of the awakening of Heracles in the month Peritius, and reduced the inhabitants of Utica to their allegiance.

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  • Lixus in Mauretania, Gades and Utica, are said to have been founded, one after the other, as far back as the 12th century B.C. Most of the African colonies were no doubt younger; we have traditional dates for Aoza (887-855) and Carthage (813).

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  • At the general election in November 1908 the people of Illinois authorized the issue of bonds to the amount of $20,000,000 to provide for the canalizing of the Desplaines and Illinois rivers as far as the city of Utica, on the latter river, and connecting with the channel of the Chicago Sanitary District at Joliet.

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  • On their return journey they ascended the Illinois river as far as Lake Peoria; they then crossed the portage to Lake Michigan, and in 1675 Marquette founded a mission at the Indian town of Kaskaskia, near the present Utica, Ill.

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  • GERRIT SMITH (1797-1874), American reformer and philanthropist, was born in Utica, New York, on the 6th of March 1 797.

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  • He became an abolitionist in 1835, after seeing an antislavery meeting at Utica broken up by a mob.

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  • Under the excitement following the raid on Harper's Ferry he became temporarily insane, and for several weeks was confined in an asylum in Utica.

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  • to the south-west, near the village of Bu Shater, are identified with the ancient Utica.

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  • Thrasea's own model of life and conduct was Cato of Utica, on whom he had written a panegyric, one of Plutarch's chief authorities in his biography of Cato.

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  • of Utica, on the S.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson river, and the West Shore railways, by the Utica & Mohawk Valley Electric railroad, and by the Erie canal.

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  • In 1837 the Old Side obtained the majority in the General Assembly for the second time only in seven years; they seized their opportunity and abrogated the "Plan of Union of 1801 with the Connecticut Congregationalists," cut off the synod of Western Reserve and then the synods of Utica, Geneva and Genesee, without a trial, and dissolved the third presbytery of Philadelphia without providing for the standing of its ministers.

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  • The son was brought up in Utica, studied in1824-1825at Geneva Academy (afterwards Hobart College), and then at a military school in Middletown, Conn., and was admitted to the bar in 1832.

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  • Marcy in 1833-1839, was a member of the New York Assembly in 1842, in 1844 and in 1845, being speaker in 1845; mayor of Utica in 1843, and in 1852 was elected governor of the state over Washington Hunt (1811-1867), the Whig candidate, who had defeated him in 1850.

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  • He died on the 12th of February 1886 in Utica, at the home of his sister, who was the wife of Roscoe Conkling.

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  • He graduated from Union College in 1820, having taught school for a short time at Savannah, Georgia, to help pay his expenses; was admitted to the bar at Utica, N.Y., in 1822, and in the following year began the practice of law at Auburn, N.Y., which was his home for the rest of his life.

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  • of Utica and 4 m.

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  • 3.15), he was liberated through the interference of the tribunes of the commons; but he had shortly afterwards to retire from Rome (in or about 204) to Utica.

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  • They were Utica (Bu Shatir), Hadrumetum (Susa), Thapsus (Dimas), Leptis Minor (Lemta), Achulla (Badria), Uzalis (about 11 m.

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  • from Utica) and Theudalis.

    0
    0
  • Utica became a Roman colony under Hadrian, and the civitates liberae, municipia, castella, pagi and turres were peopled with Latins.

    0
    0
  • Daux, in the years preceding 1869, explored the sites of the ancient harbours of Utica, Hadrumetum, Thapsus (Dimas).

    0
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  • of Utica.

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    0
  • - Restoration of Triarthrus Becki, Green, as determined by Beecher from specimens obtained from the Utica Slates (Ordovician), New York.

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  • Roscoe Conkling was admitted to the bar at Utica, New York, in 1850, was appointed district-attorney of Oneida (disambiguation)|Oneida county in the same year, and soon attained success in the practice of his profession.

    0
    0
  • Flowing north-east the Majerda forms an extensive plain in its lower course, reaching the sea near the ruins of Utica.

    0
    0
  • UTICA, a city and the county-seat of Oneida (disambiguation)|Oneida county, New York, U.S.A., on the Mohawk river, about 45 m.

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    0
  • Utica is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and several lines leased by it, including the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the New York, Ontario & Western; and the West Shore railways; by the Erie Canal, and by interurban electric railways.

    0
    0
  • There are many fine business and public buildings, especially on Genesee Street, the principal thoroughfare, and Utica is known for the number of its institutions, public and private.

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  • Those of an educational character include, in addition to the public schools and the Utica Free Academy, the New School (for girls) and the Utica Catholic Academy.

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  • Among the libraries are included the Public Library (1893) with 54,000 volumes in 1909, the library of the Oneida Historical Society (which occupies the Munson-Williams Memorial Building), the Utica Law Library and the Deutscher Leserverein.

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  • Among its many charitable institutions are a Masonic Home and School (1893), a Home for the Homeless (1867), St Elizabeth's Home (1886), St Luke's Home (1869), a Home for Aged Men and Couples (1879), Utica Orphan Asylum (1830), St Joseph's Infant Home (1893) and St John's Female Orphan Asylum (1834), both under the Sisters of Charity; the House of the Good Shepherd (1872; Protestant Episcopal); and the General (1873; City of Utica), Homeopathic (1895), St Luke's (1869; supported by the Protestant Episcopal Churches), St Elizabeth's (1866; Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis) and Faxton (1873) hospitals.

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  • of Utica, are Trenton Falls, which descend 312 ft.

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  • Utica has varied and extensive manufactures.

    0
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  • Among the other manufactures are food preparations, wooden ware, wagons and carriages, stoves and furnaces, boots and shoes, tobacco and cigars, flour, candy, gloves, bricks, tile and pottery, furniture, paper boxes and firearms. Utica is a shipping point for the products of a fertile agricultural region, from which are exported dairy products (especially cheese), nursery products, flowers (especially roses), small fruits and vegetables, honey and hops.

    0
    0
  • The territory on which Utica was built was part of the 22,000acre tract granted in 1734 by George II.

    0
    0
  • During the Seven Years' War a palisaded fort was erected on the south bank of the Mohawk at the ford where Utica later sprung up. It was named Fort Schuyler, in honour of Colonel Peter Schuyler, an uncle of General Philip Schuyler.

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  • A fort subsequently built at Rome also was at first called Fort Schuyler (and afterwards Fort Stanwix), and the fort at Utica was then distinguished from it by the prefix "old" and it was as "Old Fort Schuyler" that Utica was first known.

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  • In 1797 Oneida county was established, and the village was incorporated under the name of Utica.

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  • The Erie Canal, completed in 1825, added to Utica's prosperity.

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  • Utica was chartered as a city in 1832.

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  • Bagg, Pioneers of Utica (Utica, 1877); Outline History of Utica and Vicinity (Utica, 1900); and the publications of the Oneida Historical Society (Utica, 1881 sqq.).

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  • Rome is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg (controlled by the New York Central), the New York, Ontario & Western, and the Utica & Mohawk Valley (electric) railways.

    0
    0
  • After 1776, when it was partly repaired by Colonel Elias Dayton, it was called by the continentals Fort Schuyler, in honour of General Philip Schuyler, and so is sometimes confused with (old) Fort Schuyler at Utica.

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  • DANIEL BUTTERFIELD (1831-1901), American soldier, was born in Utica, New York.

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  • of Utica, and about 26 m.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, Ontario & Western, the West Shore and the Oneida (electric) railways (the last connecting with Utica and Syracuse), and by the Erie Canal.

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    0
  • "JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN (18J5-1912), American politician, was born near Utica, N.Y., Oct.

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  • He graduated from Hamilton College in 1878, was admitted to the bar in 1880, and practised in Utica until 1907.

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  • In early manhood he left the Democratic party, became a Republican, and as such was elected mayor of Utica in 1884.

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  • Four years later he was renominated, but he died at Utica, Oct.

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  • The cities having a population of 15,000 or more in 1905 were: New York City, 4,013,781; Buffalo, 376,587; Rochester, 181,666; Syracuse, 117,503; Albany, 98,374; Troy, 76,910; Utica, 62,934; Yonkers, 61,716; Schenectady, 58,387; Binghamton, 42,036; Elmira, 34,687; Auburn, 31,422; Niagara Falls, 26,560; Newburgh, 26,498; Jamestown, 26,160; Kingston, 25,556; Watertown, 2 5,447; Poughkeepsie, 25,379; Mt.

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  • The first state insane asylum, designed chiefly for recent and curable cases, was opened at Utica in 1843.

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  • In 1910 there were fourteen state hospitals (corresponding to fourteen state hospital districts) for the poor and indigent insane; these were at Utica, Willard, Poughkeepsie, Buffalo, Middletown (homoeopathic), Binghamton, Rochester, Ogdensburg, Gowanda (homoeopathic), Flatbush, Ward's Island, King's Park, Central Islip and Yorktown.

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  • from Utica, Fergus county, where blue stones are found, and on Rock and Cottonwood creeks, where green, yellow, red and blue sapphires have been found.

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  • 1 Utica shales.

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  • Eden (Utica) shale 250

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  • The principal localities are at Missouri Bar, Ruby Bar and other places near Helena, where they were first worked, and also at Yogo Gulch, near Utica.

    0
    0
  • Melkarth or Melqarth) and Astarte, founded the feast of the awakening of Heracles in the month Peritius, and reduced the inhabitants of Utica to their allegiance.

    0
    0
  • Lixus in Mauretania, Gades and Utica, are said to have been founded, one after the other, as far back as the 12th century B.C. Most of the African colonies were no doubt younger; we have traditional dates for Aoza (887-855) and Carthage (813).

    0
    0
  • At the general election in November 1908 the people of Illinois authorized the issue of bonds to the amount of $20,000,000 to provide for the canalizing of the Desplaines and Illinois rivers as far as the city of Utica, on the latter river, and connecting with the channel of the Chicago Sanitary District at Joliet.

    0
    0
  • On their return journey they ascended the Illinois river as far as Lake Peoria; they then crossed the portage to Lake Michigan, and in 1675 Marquette founded a mission at the Indian town of Kaskaskia, near the present Utica, Ill.

    0
    0
  • GERRIT SMITH (1797-1874), American reformer and philanthropist, was born in Utica, New York, on the 6th of March 1 797.

    0
    0
  • He became an abolitionist in 1835, after seeing an antislavery meeting at Utica broken up by a mob.

    0
    0
  • Under the excitement following the raid on Harper's Ferry he became temporarily insane, and for several weeks was confined in an asylum in Utica.

    0
    0
  • to the south-west, near the village of Bu Shater, are identified with the ancient Utica.

    0
    0
  • Thrasea's own model of life and conduct was Cato of Utica, on whom he had written a panegyric, one of Plutarch's chief authorities in his biography of Cato.

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  • of Utica, on the S.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson river, and the West Shore railways, by the Utica & Mohawk Valley Electric railroad, and by the Erie canal.

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    0
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