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utah

utah

utah Sentence Examples

  • "Our evac plan was to take everyone here," Dusty said, indicating a point in the Utah desert.

  • But it would be hot as hell crossing the desert in Utah and Nevada.

  • It was found in some abundance at the end of the 18th century in the copper mines of the St Day district in Cornwall, and has since been found at a few other localities, for example, at Konigsberg near Schemnitz in Hungary, and in the Tintic district in Utah.

  • In the United States, sulphur occurs in the following states, in many of which the mineral has been worked: Louisiana (q.v.),Utah,Colorado, California, Nevada, Alaska, Idaho, Texas and Wyoming.

  • The Rabbit Hole sulphur-mines are in Nevada, and a great deposit in Utah occurs at Cove Creek, Beaver (disambiguation)|Beaver county.

  • Hitherto the western terminus of this group of lines had been Salt Lake City, Utah; by the exceedingly bold construction of the Western Pacific from Salt Lake City to Oakland, Cal., opposite San Francisco, an additional line to the Pacific coast was provided, having low grades and being in all respects well adapted for cheap operation.

  • half of Utah, the S.W.

  • The whole Basin is marked by three features of elevation - the Utah basin, the Nevada basin and, between them, the Nevada plateau.

  • Straggling forests, mainly of conifers, characterize the high plateaus of central Utah.

  • In the Pleistocene period many large lakes were formed within the Great Basin; especially, by the fusion of small catchment basins, two great confluent bodies of water - Lake Lahontan (in the Nevada basin) and Lake Bonneville (in the Utah basin).

  • by Utah and Arizona, the Colorado River separating it in part from the latter state, and S.

  • of the Utah boundary.

  • The " black mouse " or Carson field mouse (Microtus montanus) is found throughout Nevada, as well as in Utah, north-eastern California, and eastern Oregon; it multiplies rapidly under favourable conditions, and at times causes serious injury to crops.

  • It was then a part of California known as the Washoe Country, and remained so until the 9th of September 1850, when most of the present state was included in the newly organized Territory of Utah.

  • The object of this gathering was to frame a government for the settlers, as the seat of the Territorial government of Utah was too remote to afford protection for life and property.

  • An independent local government was formed a week later, and this lasted for several months, until the Utah authorities intervened.

  • On the 2nd of March 1861 the Territory of Utah was divided at 39° W.

  • The additions eastward were made from Utah and those to the south from Arizona.

  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

  • In the second place it was necessary to form a territorial government for the remainder of the territory acquired from Mexico, including that now occupied by Nevada and Utah, and parts of Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico.

  • New Mexico (then including the present Arizona) and Utah were organized without any prohibition of slavery (each being left free to decide for or against, on admission to statehood), and a rigid fugitive slave law was enacted; these were concessions to the South.

  • In the third place, the rejection of the Wilmot Proviso and the acceptance (as regards New Mexico and Utah) of "Squatter Sovereignty" meant the adoption of a new principle in dealing with slavery in the territories, which, although it did not apply to the same territory, was antagonistic to the Missouri Compromise of 1820.

  • 2,722 The Mormons of Alberta are in the most southerly part of the province, and are a colony from the Mormon settlements in Utah, U.S. On coming to Canada they were given lands by the Dominion of Canada.

  • The organization adopted in Utah among the Mormons is found also in Alberta, but the Canadian Mormons profess to have received a later revelation condemning polygamy.

  • In the Mexican War he won two brevets for gallantry - that of captain for Molino del Rey and that of major for Chapultepec. He served at West Point as instructor and adjutant (1849-1855), and he took part in the Utah expedition.

  • In Utah begin the ruins of the Pueblo culture.

  • The first railway was the Oregon Short Line, which was completed by the Union Pacific Company from Ogden, Utah, to Butte in 1881.

  • The coyote of the deserts of eastern California, Nevada and Utah is, for instance, a smaller and paler-coloured animal, whose length is usually about 42 in.

  • On this and other local variations a number of nominal species have been founded; but it is preferable to regard them in the light of geographical phases or races, such as the above-mentioned C. latrans estor of Nevada and Utah, C. 1.

  • The chief provinces of the Cordihleran region are: The Rocky Mountain system and its basins, from northern New Mexico northward, including all the mountains from the front ranges bordering on the plains to the Uinta and Wasatch ranges in Utah; the Pacific ranges including the Sierra Nevada of California, the Cascade range of Oregon and Washington, and the Coast range along the Pacific nearly to the southern end of California; and a great intermediate area, including in the north the Columbian lava plains and in the south the large province of the Basin ranges, which extends into Mexico and widens from the centre southward, so as to meet the Great Plains in eastern New Mexico, and to extend to the Pacific coast in southern California.

  • The mountains rapidly grow wider and higher northward, by taking on new complications of structure and by including large basins between the axes of uplift, tintil in northern Colorado and Utah a complex of ranges has a breadth of 300 m., and in Colorado alone there are 40 summits over 14,000 ft.

  • The \Vasatch Range, trending north-south in central Utah, is peculiar in possessing large east-West folds, which.

  • A wonderful series of these forms occurs in southern Utah, where in passing northward from the Carboniferous platform one ascends in succession the Vermilion Cliffs (Triassic sandstones), the ViThite Cliffs (Jurassic sandstones, of remarkably cross-bedded structure, interpreted the dunes of an ancient desert), and finally the Pink Cliffs (Eocene strata of fluviatile and lacustrine origin) of the high, forested plateaus.

  • deep, hardly wider at the top than at the bottom, in the heavy Triassic sandstones of southern Utah; but the most famous example is the Grand Canyon (qv.) of Arizona, eroded by the Colorado river across the uplifted platform of Carboniferous limestone.

  • In Western Utah and through most of Nevada many of the blocks exhibit deformed structures, involving folds and faults of relatively ancient (Jurassic) date; so ancient that the moun~ tains then formed by the folding were worn down to the lowland stage of old age before the block-faulting occurred.

  • A few of the basins are occupied by lakes without outlet, of which Great Salt Lake, in north-west Utah, is the largest.

  • The Wasatch stage, when deposition was in progress over much of Utah and western Colorado, parts of Wyoming, and elsewhere.

  • The Uinta stage, when the region south of the mountains of that name, in Utah and Colorado, was the site of great deposition.

  • The Arid Transition life-zone comprises the western part of the Dakotas, north-eastern Montana, and irregular areas in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and western Texas, covering for the most part the eastern base of the Cascade and Sierra Nevada Mountains and the higher parts of the Great Basin and the plateaus.

  • The Upper Sonoran life-zone comprises south-eastern Montana, central, eastern and north-eastern Wyoming, a portion of south-western South Dakota, western Nebraska and Kansas, the western extremity of Oklahoma, north-western Texas, eastern Colorado, south-eastern New Mexico, the Snake plains in Idaho, the Columbia plains in Washington, the Malheur and Harney plains in Oregon, the Great Salt Lake and Sevier deserts in Utah, and narrow belts in California, Nevada and Arizona.

  • Colorado, 296,272; Illinois, 240,000; \Vest Virginia, 231,000; Utah, 196,408; Pennsylvania, 112,574; Kentucky, 104,028; OhiO, 86,028; Alabama, 68,903; Indiana, 44,169; Missouri, 40,ooo; New Mexico, 30,805, Tennessee, 25,665; Virginia.

  • The most powerful impulse to mining operations, and the immediate cause of a somewhat lengthy period of wild excitement and speculation, was the discovery and successful opening of the Comstock lode in 1859, in the western part of what is now Nevada, but was then part of Utah.

  • Colorado ($22,871,000), Alaska ($19,858,800), California ($19,329,700), Nevada ($11,689,400), South Dakota ($7,742,200), Utah ($3,946,700), Montana ($3,160,000) and Arizona ($2,500,000)

  • With Utah and California their yield in 1908 was 93% of the total.

  • Idaho, Utah and Colorado produce together almost as great a proportion of the desilverized lead, half of which has come in recent years from Idaho.

  • in Utah, Arizona and Oregon.

  • Five states Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho and Washingtongive the suffrage for all elections to women.i In 1905 women could vote at school elections in twenty-four states.

  • In Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho and Washington universal adult suffrage prevails.

  • He died in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the 29th of August 1877.

  • SOLON HANNIBAL BORGLUM (1868-), American sculptor, was born in Ogden, Utah, on the 22nd of December 1868, the son of a Danish wood-carver.

  • Some of the corporations constructing works for the sale of water built structures of notable size, such, for example, as the Sweet-water and Hemet dams of southern California, the Bear river canal of Utah, and the Arizona canal, taking water from Salt river, Arizona.

  • California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming 185,936 1,445,872 I,611,271 602,568 951,154 504, 1 68 203,893 388,310 629,293 135,470 605,878 7,263,813 expensive construction and heavy charges.

  • In a few localities, notably in South Dakota, the Yakima valley of Washington, San Joaquin, and San Bernardino valleys of California, San Luis valley of Colorado, and Utah valley of Utah, water from artesian wells was also used for the irrigation of from 1 to 160 acres.

  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

  • CYRUS EDWIN DALLIN (1861-), American sculptor, was born at Springville, Utah, on the 22nd of November 1861.

  • Deposits of rock-salt have evidently been formed by the evaporation of salt water, probably in areas of inland drainage or enclosed basins, like the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, or perhaps in some cases in an arm of the sea partially cut off, like the Kara Bughaz, which forms a natural salt-pan on the east side of the Caspian.

  • The Mormons remained only about five years, but on their departure for Utah their places were speedily taken by new immigrants.

  • They joined tracks near Ogden, Utah, in May 1869.

  • by Colorado and Utah, and on the W.

  • by Utah, Idaho, and a small southward projection of Montana.

  • 19,507 were natives of Wyoming, 6112 were born in Iowa, 5009 in Nebraska, 4923 in Illinois, 4412 in Missouri and 3750 in Utah.

  • corner of the present state was at that time a part of Utah.

  • from Utah and Idaho, and included parts of the three great additions to the original territory of the United States.

  • Bancroft, Nevada, Colorado and Wyoming (San Francisco, 1890), and Utah (San Francisco, 1889); E.

  • The lower division appears on the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts, and is traceable thence, in a great belt southwest of those points, through Maine and the Hudson-Champlain valley into Alabama, a distance of some 2000 m.; and the rocks are brought up again on the western uplift, in Nevada, Idaho, Utah, western Montana and British Columbia.

  • by Utah.

  • The last-named includes a number of lofty plateaus - the Roan or Book, Uncompahgre, &c., which form the eastern continuation of the high plateaus of Utah - and covers the western quarter of the state.

  • The boreal embraces the highest mountain altitudes; the transition belts it on both sides of the continental divide; the upper Sonoran takes in about the eastern half of the plains region east of the mountains, and is represented further by two small valley penetrations from Utah.

  • About one-fifth of the total product is made into coke, the output of which increased from 245,746 tons in 1890 to 1,421,579 tons (including a slight amount from Utah) in 1907; in 1907 the coke manufactured in Colorado (and Utah) was valued at 4,747,436.

  • As a matter of fact, he was personally in favour of insisting upon 54 40' as the boundary in Oregon, and threw upon Congress the responsibility for accepting 49° as the boundary, and he approved the acquisition of California, Utah and New Mexico, territory from which slavery was excluded by geographical and climatic conditions.

  • It admitted California as a free state, organized Utah and New Mexico as Territories without reference to slavery, and enacted a more efficient fugitive slave law.

  • the plateau continues into Colorado, Utah and Arizona.

  • The other Indians live on reservations, of which there are three: the Mescalero Apache reservation, in Otero county, containing 554 Indians in 190o; the Jicarilla Apache reservation, in Rio Arriba county, with a population of 829; and the Navaho reservation, in Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, which contains in that part of it situated in New Mexico a population of 2480.

  • He was the author of the so-called Edmunds Act (22nd of March 1882) for the suppression of polygamy in Utah, and of the anti-trust law of 1890, popularly known as the Sherman Act.

  • Utah >>

  • by Utah, E.

  • by Utah and Nevada, and W.

  • that empty into Great Salt Lake, Utah) rises in Yellowstone National Park a few miles from the heads of the Madison fork of the Missouri, which flows to the Gulf of Mexico, and the Green fork of the Colorado, which flows to the Gulf of California.

  • Bear Lake, in the extreme S.E., lies partly in Utah.

  • The production of this lode declined in 1876, but the total production of this country was increased by discoveries in Colorado (Leadville) and Nevada (Eureka); and in more recent years silver-producing areas in other states (Montana, Utah, Idaho) have been exploited.

  • part of Utah, U.S.A., lying between 1 18.8° and 113.2° W.

  • Utah and a little of S.

  • He was a member, and several times speaker, of the Utah House of Representatives.

  • UTAH,' one of the Central Western states of the United States of America.

  • Utah has an area of 84,990 sq.

  • are water surface, including Great Salt, Utah and other lakes.

  • The eastern portion of Utah consists of high plateaus, and constitutes a part of the Colorado Plateau province.

  • The lower basin portion of Utah is separated from the high plateaus by a series of great fault scarps, by which one descends abruptly to a level of but 5000 or 6000 ft.

  • One of the fault scarps is known as the Hurricane Ledge, and continues as a prominent landmark from a point south of the Grand Canyon in Arizona to the central part of Utah, where it is replaced by other scarps farther east.

  • The Wasatch Mountain range constitutes the eastern margin of the Great Basin in central and northern Utah, and resembles the true basin ranges in that it is formed by a great block of the earth's crust uptilted along a north-south fault-line.

  • The trout of the Utah mountain streams is considered a distinct species.

  • Flora.-Western Utah and vast areas along the Colorado river in the east and south-east are practically treeless.

  • Climate.-On account of its great diversity in topography, the state of Utah is characterized by a wide range in climatic conditions.

  • In general Utah may be said to have a true continental climate, although the presence of Great Salt Lake has a modifying effect on the climate of that portion of the Basin Region in which it lies.

  • Forests.-The forest resources of Utah are of little value: the total wooded area was about 10,000 sq.

  • Irrigation.-Under the Federal Reclamation Fund, established in 1902, $830,000 was allotted to Utah in 1902-9, and $200,000 more in 1910, for the development of the Strawberry Valley project.

  • This project, which was about one-third completed in the beginning of 1910, provides for the irrigation in Strawberry Valley (Utah and Wasatch counties, S.

  • contents, diverting water from Spanish Fork river into two canals, one on each side of the river, for the irrigation of land in the valley of Utah lake; by a hydro-electric power plant about 3 m.

  • Irrigation of the arid western regions of the United States began in the Great Basin of Utah when the Mormon pioneers in 1847 diverted the waters of City Creek upon the parched soil of Salt Lake Valley.

  • Agriculture.-The number of farms in Utah (not including those of less than 3 acres and of small productivity) in 1880 was 945 2; in 1890, 10,517; and in 1900, 19,007: their average size in 1880 was 69.4 acres; in 1890, 125.9 acres; and in 1900, 216.6 acres.

  • Alfalfa (or lucerne) formed the principal part of the hay crop in 1899, and was produced chiefly in the counties of Utah (95,316 tons), Salt Lake (91,266 tons), Cache (64,543 tons) and Boxelder (50,019 tons), all in the northern part of the state.

  • Honey was a large crop with the early settlers, who put a hive and honey-bees on the state-seal of Deseret and of Utah.

  • Mining.-The mineral resources of Utah are varied and valuable, but their development was retarded for many years by the policy of the Mormon Church, which practically forbade its members to do any mining; more recently the development has been slow because of inadequate transportation facilities, and the inaccessibility of some of the deposits.

  • Systematic prospecting for the precious metals did not begin in Utah until 1862, when Colonel Patrick E.

  • In the same year the largest producing gold mines were the Centennial Eureka in Juab county, the Mercur in Tooele county, and the Utah Consolidated and the Utah Copper in Salt Lake county.

  • The principal silver regions in 1908 were the Tintic, in Juab and Utah counties, and the Park City, in Summit and Wasatch counties.

  • from copper ore) were from Utah county; 1,125,209 oz.

  • Far larger in value than either gold or silver, and larger than both together, was the output of copper in Utah in 1907 ($12,851,377) and in 1908 ($11,463,383).

  • In the production of copper in 1908 Utah ranked fourth among the states.

  • The apparently inexhaustible supplies of iron ore in southern Utah, and especially in Iron county, had been little worked up to 1910 on account of their inaccessibility.

  • The beds of magnetite and hematite, in the southern portion of the Wasatch Mountains, are the largest in the western United States; in 1902 the four productive mines in Milford, Juab and Utah counties produced 16,240 tons of ore, valued at $27,417.

  • Coal was first discovered in Utah in 1851 along Coal Creek near Cedar City (in what is now Iron county) in the south-western part of Utah, and there was some mining of coal at Wales, Sanpete county, as early as 1855, but there was no general mining until about twenty years later, and the industry was not well established until 1888.

  • The shales of Utah, Sanpete, Juab and San Juan counties may furnish a valuable supply of petroleum if transportation facilities are improved; and there are rich supplies of asphalt-19,033 tons (valued at $100,324) was the output for 1908.

  • Some marble is quarried at Beaver in Beaver county, and Utah onyx has been used for interior decoration, notably in the city and county building of Salt Lake City.

  • Many semi-precious and precious stones are found in Utah, including garnet (long sold to tourists by the Navaho Indians), amethyst, jasper, topaz, tourmaline, opal, variscite (or " Utahlite "), malachite, diopside and Smithsonite.

  • In 1908 the reported value of precious stones from Utah was $20,350.

  • The beet sugar industry is one of growing importance in Utah: there were in 2900 3 refineries, having a daily total capacity of 1100 tons of beets; in 1905, 4, with a daily total capacity of 2850 tons; and in 1909,' 5, which treated 455,064 tons of beets and produced 48,884 tons of sugar.

  • Sugar beets were first grown by irrigation in Utah; under that system it becomes possible to estimate closely the tonnage of the product.

  • The first trade route to be established by white men within the present boundaries of Utah was the old Spanish trail from Santa Fe to Los Angeles.

  • The trail entered what is now Utah, just east of the Dolores river, crossed the Grand river near the Sierra La Salle and the Green river at the present crossing of the Denver & Rio Grande railway, proceeded thence to the Sevier river and southward along its valley to the headwaters of the Virgin river, which it followed southward, and then westward, so that its line' left the present state near its south-west corner.

  • The legislative power is vested in (I) the legislature, consisting of the Senate and House of Representatives, and (2) in the people of Utah.

  • The university of Utah at Salt Lake City was opened in 1850 as the state university of the " state of Deseret."

  • The banking business for many years was largely in the hands of high Mormon officials, and the loyalty of church members built up a remarkable financial confidence, so that no Utah banks failed even in the panic of 1893.

  • Existing documents seem to indicate that Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, the Spanish explorer, sent out an expedition of twelve men under Captain Garcia Lopez de Cardenas in 1540, which succeeded in reaching the Colorado river at a point now within the state of Utah.

  • This party came in sight of Utah lake on the 23rd of August.

  • Ashley, of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, who, in 1825, at the head of about 120 men and a train of horses, left St Louis and established the fort named for him at Lake Utah.

  • 2, 1848)1848) ceded to the United States the vast western territory which included Utah.

  • Deseret then comprised not only the present state of Utah, but all Arizona and Nevada, together with parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and California.

  • Application was made to Congress to admit it as a state or Territory, and on the 9th of September 1850 the Territory of Utah, then comprising the present state and portions of Nevada, Colorado and Wyoming, was established under an Act, which provided that it should be admitted as a state, with or without slavery, as the constitution adopted at the time of admission prescribed (see Compromise of 1850).

  • The waters of City Creek were at first diverted and a canal was built; and the results were encouraging, though in the summer of 1848 crops were destroyed by a swarm of black crickets; but in turn this pest was devoured by sea-gulls, and the phrase " gulls and crickets " has become one of peculiar historic significance in Utah.

  • of Utah tribes, whereby they agreed to remove to Uinta Valley, where a reservation had been made for them.

  • - On the physiography of Utah see Henry Gannett, Gazetteer of Utah (Washington, 1900), being Bulletin 166 of the U.S. Geological Survey; J.

  • Powell, Geology of the Uinta Mountains (ibid., 1876), Exploration of the Colorado River of the West (ibid., 1875), and The Lands of Utah (ibid., 1879); W.

  • Dutton, The High Plateaus of Utah (Washington, 1880); and G.

  • On mineral wealth see Nichols, Mineral Resources of Utah (Pittsburg, 1873).

  • Bancroft, History of Utah (San Francisco, 1889), and 0.

  • Whitney, History of Utah (4 vols., Salt Lake City, 1892-98).

  • At the East Canon Creek dam, Utah, the height of which is about 6r ft.

  • SALT LAKE CITY, the capital city of Utah and the county-seat of Salt Lake county, in the N.W.

  • part of Utah, immediately E.

  • of the city is Fort Douglas, established as Camp Douglas in 1862 by Colonel P. Edward Connor (1820-1891), afterwards prominently connected with the development of the mineral resources of Utah; the fort overlooks the city, being more than 4900 ft.

  • There is a large city and county building (1894), built of rough grey sandstone from Utah county; it has a dome on the top of which is a statue of Columbia; over its entrances are statues of Commerce, Liberty and Justice; its balconies command views of the neighbouring country and of the Great Salt Lake; the interior is decorated with Utah onyx.

  • A monument to Brigham Young and the Utah Pioneers, crowned by a statue of Brigham Young, by C. E.

  • Near the city is the Judge Miner's Home and Hospital (Roman Catholic), a memorial to John Judge, a successful Utah miner.

  • Salt Lake City has a good public school system In the city is the University of Utah, chartered in 1850 as the University of the state of Deseret and opened in November 1850; it was practically discontinued from 1851 until 1867, and then was scarcely more than a business college until 1869; its charter was amended in 5884 and a new charter was issued in 1894, when the present style of the corporation was assumed; in 1894 60 acres from the Fort Douglas reservation were secured for the campus.

  • Salt Lake City is the great business centre of Utah and one of the main shipping points of the West for agricultural products, live stock (especially sheep), precious metals and coal; and the excellent railway facilities contribute greatly to the commercial importance of the city.

  • In 1905 the value of the factory products was $7,543,983, being 76.3% more than in 1900 and being nearly one-fifth of the total value of the factory products of all Utah.

  • The history of the city is largely that of the Mormons and in its earlier years that of Utah (q.v.).

  • In 1850 the city had a population of 6000, more than half the total number of inhabitants of the Great Salt Lake Valley, which, as well as the rest of Utah, was largely settled from Salt Lake City.

  • Since the Civil War, the non-Mormon element (locally called "Gentile") has steadily increased in strength, partly because of industrial changes and partly because the city is the natural point of attack on the Mormon church of other denominations, which are comparatively stronger here than elsewhere in Utah.

  • See the bibliography under Mormons and under Utah; and particularly E.

  • Bancroft, History of Utah (San Francisco, 1890).

  • This trade is one of the most picturesque chapters in border history, and picturesque in retrospect, too, is the army of emigrants crossing the continent in " prairie schooners " to California or Utah, of whom almost all went through Kansas.

  • Besides these highest points there are a considerable number of mountains in the central provinces of Imerina and Betsileo and the intervening and surrounding districts; and in the Bara country the Isalo range has been compared to the "Church Buttes" and other striking features of the scenery of Utah.

  • He ardently supported the policy of making Federal appropriations (of land, but not of money) for internal improvements of a national character, being a prominent advocate of the construction, by government aid, of a trans-continental railway, and the chief promoter (1850) of the Illinois Central; in 1854 he suggested that Congress should impose tonnage duties from which towns and cities might themselves pay for harbour improvement, &c. To him as chairman of the committee on territories, at first in the House, and then in the Senate, of which he became a member in December 1847, it fell to introduce the bills for admitting Texas, Florida, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, California and Oregon into the Union, and for organizing the territories of Minnesota, Oregon, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, Kansas and Nebraska.

  • Kearney on the way to Oregon, California or Utah.

  • "Our evac plan was to take everyone here," Dusty said, indicating a point in the Utah desert.

  • But it would be hot as hell crossing the desert in Utah and Nevada.

  • These are solid rocket boosters or SRB for short The SRB are made by Thiokol at their factory at Utah.

  • Main feature this month is John Thornley's fascinating account of the EX 181 record breaking expedition to the Utah salt flats.

  • Figure 1: An approximately horizontal outcrop map, of the Big Hole fault, Utah.

  • immured in this strong prison of Utah?

  • infantrymanh Utah saw the first beach landings of D-Day, by American infantrymen.

  • madam MAO 's underwear quot get your workout in utah.

  • madam MAO 's underwear quot get your workout in utah.

  • One of the artillery pieces that helped to defend this section of Utah beach.

  • Enable our new hobby Utah quarterback alex the ionosphere the.

  • retail stores here in Utah sell it for only $ 6.99 (US )!

  • The other star of Stagecoach is Utah's breathtakingly beautiful Monument Valley, made famous by Ford here and in many later westerns.

  • It was found in some abundance at the end of the 18th century in the copper mines of the St Day district in Cornwall, and has since been found at a few other localities, for example, at Konigsberg near Schemnitz in Hungary, and in the Tintic district in Utah.

  • In the United States, sulphur occurs in the following states, in many of which the mineral has been worked: Louisiana (q.v.),Utah,Colorado, California, Nevada, Alaska, Idaho, Texas and Wyoming.

  • The Rabbit Hole sulphur-mines are in Nevada, and a great deposit in Utah occurs at Cove Creek, Beaver (disambiguation)|Beaver county.

  • Hitherto the western terminus of this group of lines had been Salt Lake City, Utah; by the exceedingly bold construction of the Western Pacific from Salt Lake City to Oakland, Cal., opposite San Francisco, an additional line to the Pacific coast was provided, having low grades and being in all respects well adapted for cheap operation.

  • half of Utah, the S.W.

  • The whole Basin is marked by three features of elevation - the Utah basin, the Nevada basin and, between them, the Nevada plateau.

  • Straggling forests, mainly of conifers, characterize the high plateaus of central Utah.

  • In the Pleistocene period many large lakes were formed within the Great Basin; especially, by the fusion of small catchment basins, two great confluent bodies of water - Lake Lahontan (in the Nevada basin) and Lake Bonneville (in the Utah basin).

  • The latter, the remnants of which are represented to-day by Great Salt, Sevier and Utah Lakes, had a drainage basin of some 54,000 sq.

  • by Utah and Arizona, the Colorado River separating it in part from the latter state, and S.

  • of the Utah boundary.

  • The " black mouse " or Carson field mouse (Microtus montanus) is found throughout Nevada, as well as in Utah, north-eastern California, and eastern Oregon; it multiplies rapidly under favourable conditions, and at times causes serious injury to crops.

  • It was then a part of California known as the Washoe Country, and remained so until the 9th of September 1850, when most of the present state was included in the newly organized Territory of Utah.

  • The object of this gathering was to frame a government for the settlers, as the seat of the Territorial government of Utah was too remote to afford protection for life and property.

  • An independent local government was formed a week later, and this lasted for several months, until the Utah authorities intervened.

  • In 1854 the Utah legislature created the county of Carson, which included all the settlements in western Utah; but the inhabitants sought to rid themselves of all connexion with the people of the Salt Lake region, and petitioned Congress to annex them to California.

  • On the 2nd of March 1861 the Territory of Utah was divided at 39° W.

  • The additions eastward were made from Utah and those to the south from Arizona.

  • Devonshire (retinasphalt), France, Spain, Italy, Asia Minor, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rumania, Dalmatia, Istria, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Moravia, Bavaria, Elsass, Kutais, Armenia, Persia, Baluchistan, Afghanistan, Punjab, Assam, Sumatra, Algeria, Egypt, Maryland, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Louisiana, Texas, Cuba, Colombia, Brazil.

  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

  • In the second place it was necessary to form a territorial government for the remainder of the territory acquired from Mexico, including that now occupied by Nevada and Utah, and parts of Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico.

  • New Mexico (then including the present Arizona) and Utah were organized without any prohibition of slavery (each being left free to decide for or against, on admission to statehood), and a rigid fugitive slave law was enacted; these were concessions to the South.

  • In the third place, the rejection of the Wilmot Proviso and the acceptance (as regards New Mexico and Utah) of "Squatter Sovereignty" meant the adoption of a new principle in dealing with slavery in the territories, which, although it did not apply to the same territory, was antagonistic to the Missouri Compromise of 1820.

  • 2,722 The Mormons of Alberta are in the most southerly part of the province, and are a colony from the Mormon settlements in Utah, U.S. On coming to Canada they were given lands by the Dominion of Canada.

  • The organization adopted in Utah among the Mormons is found also in Alberta, but the Canadian Mormons profess to have received a later revelation condemning polygamy.

  • In the Mexican War he won two brevets for gallantry - that of captain for Molino del Rey and that of major for Chapultepec. He served at West Point as instructor and adjutant (1849-1855), and he took part in the Utah expedition.

  • In Utah begin the ruins of the Pueblo culture.

  • The first railway was the Oregon Short Line, which was completed by the Union Pacific Company from Ogden, Utah, to Butte in 1881.

  • The coyote of the deserts of eastern California, Nevada and Utah is, for instance, a smaller and paler-coloured animal, whose length is usually about 42 in.

  • On this and other local variations a number of nominal species have been founded; but it is preferable to regard them in the light of geographical phases or races, such as the above-mentioned C. latrans estor of Nevada and Utah, C. 1.

  • The chief provinces of the Cordihleran region are: The Rocky Mountain system and its basins, from northern New Mexico northward, including all the mountains from the front ranges bordering on the plains to the Uinta and Wasatch ranges in Utah; the Pacific ranges including the Sierra Nevada of California, the Cascade range of Oregon and Washington, and the Coast range along the Pacific nearly to the southern end of California; and a great intermediate area, including in the north the Columbian lava plains and in the south the large province of the Basin ranges, which extends into Mexico and widens from the centre southward, so as to meet the Great Plains in eastern New Mexico, and to extend to the Pacific coast in southern California.

  • The mountains rapidly grow wider and higher northward, by taking on new complications of structure and by including large basins between the axes of uplift, tintil in northern Colorado and Utah a complex of ranges has a breadth of 300 m., and in Colorado alone there are 40 summits over 14,000 ft.

  • The structure of the inner ranges is so variable as to elude simple description; but mention should be made of the Uinta range of broad anticlinal structure in north-east Utah, with east-west trend, as if corresponding to the east-west Rattlesnake Mountains, already named.

  • The \Vasatch Range, trending north-south in central Utah, is peculiar in possessing large east-West folds, which.

  • A wonderful series of these forms occurs in southern Utah, where in passing northward from the Carboniferous platform one ascends in succession the Vermilion Cliffs (Triassic sandstones), the ViThite Cliffs (Jurassic sandstones, of remarkably cross-bedded structure, interpreted the dunes of an ancient desert), and finally the Pink Cliffs (Eocene strata of fluviatile and lacustrine origin) of the high, forested plateaus.

  • deep, hardly wider at the top than at the bottom, in the heavy Triassic sandstones of southern Utah; but the most famous example is the Grand Canyon (qv.) of Arizona, eroded by the Colorado river across the uplifted platform of Carboniferous limestone.

  • The Henry Mountains in south-western Utah are peculiar in owing their relief to the doming or blistering up of the plateau strata by the underground intrusion of large bodies or cisterns (laccolites) of lava, now more or less exposed by erosion.

  • In Western Utah and through most of Nevada many of the blocks exhibit deformed structures, involving folds and faults of relatively ancient (Jurassic) date; so ancient that the moun~ tains then formed by the folding were worn down to the lowland stage of old age before the block-faulting occurred.

  • A few of the basins are occupied by lakes without outlet, of which Great Salt Lake, in north-west Utah, is the largest.

  • The Wasatch stage, when deposition was in progress over much of Utah and western Colorado, parts of Wyoming, and elsewhere.

  • The Uinta stage, when the region south of the mountains of that name, in Utah and Colorado, was the site of great deposition.

  • The Arid Transition life-zone comprises the western part of the Dakotas, north-eastern Montana, and irregular areas in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and western Texas, covering for the most part the eastern base of the Cascade and Sierra Nevada Mountains and the higher parts of the Great Basin and the plateaus.

  • The Upper Sonoran life-zone comprises south-eastern Montana, central, eastern and north-eastern Wyoming, a portion of south-western South Dakota, western Nebraska and Kansas, the western extremity of Oklahoma, north-western Texas, eastern Colorado, south-eastern New Mexico, the Snake plains in Idaho, the Columbia plains in Washington, the Malheur and Harney plains in Oregon, the Great Salt Lake and Sevier deserts in Utah, and narrow belts in California, Nevada and Arizona.

  • Among its characteristic mammals and birds are the sage cotton-tail, black-tailed jack-rabbit, Idaho rabbit, Oregon, Utah and Townsends ground squirrels, sage chipmunk, fivetoed kangaroo rats, pocket mice, grasshopper mice, burrowing owl, Brewers sparrow, Nevada sage sparrow, lazuli finch, sage thrasher, Nuttall s poor-will, Bullocks oriole and rough-winged swallow.

  • The Mormons settled Utah to insure social isolation, for the security of their theological system.

  • Colorado, 296,272; Illinois, 240,000; \Vest Virginia, 231,000; Utah, 196,408; Pennsylvania, 112,574; Kentucky, 104,028; OhiO, 86,028; Alabama, 68,903; Indiana, 44,169; Missouri, 40,ooo; New Mexico, 30,805, Tennessee, 25,665; Virginia.

  • The most powerful impulse to mining operations, and the immediate cause of a somewhat lengthy period of wild excitement and speculation, was the discovery and successful opening of the Comstock lode in 1859, in the western part of what is now Nevada, but was then part of Utah.

  • Colorado ($22,871,000), Alaska ($19,858,800), California ($19,329,700), Nevada ($11,689,400), South Dakota ($7,742,200), Utah ($3,946,700), Montana ($3,160,000) and Arizona ($2,500,000)

  • With Utah and California their yield in 1908 was 93% of the total.

  • Idaho, Utah and Colorado produce together almost as great a proportion of the desilverized lead, half of which has come in recent years from Idaho.

  • in Utah, Arizona and Oregon.

  • Five states Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho and Washingtongive the suffrage for all elections to women.i In 1905 women could vote at school elections in twenty-four states.

  • In Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho and Washington universal adult suffrage prevails.

  • He died in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the 29th of August 1877.

  • SOLON HANNIBAL BORGLUM (1868-), American sculptor, was born in Ogden, Utah, on the 22nd of December 1868, the son of a Danish wood-carver.

  • Some of the corporations constructing works for the sale of water built structures of notable size, such, for example, as the Sweet-water and Hemet dams of southern California, the Bear river canal of Utah, and the Arizona canal, taking water from Salt river, Arizona.

  • California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming 185,936 1,445,872 I,611,271 602,568 951,154 504, 1 68 203,893 388,310 629,293 135,470 605,878 7,263,813 expensive construction and heavy charges.

  • In a few localities, notably in South Dakota, the Yakima valley of Washington, San Joaquin, and San Bernardino valleys of California, San Luis valley of Colorado, and Utah valley of Utah, water from artesian wells was also used for the irrigation of from 1 to 160 acres.

  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

  • CYRUS EDWIN DALLIN (1861-), American sculptor, was born at Springville, Utah, on the 22nd of November 1861.

  • Deposits of rock-salt have evidently been formed by the evaporation of salt water, probably in areas of inland drainage or enclosed basins, like the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, or perhaps in some cases in an arm of the sea partially cut off, like the Kara Bughaz, which forms a natural salt-pan on the east side of the Caspian.

  • The Mormons remained only about five years, but on their departure for Utah their places were speedily taken by new immigrants.

  • They joined tracks near Ogden, Utah, in May 1869.

  • by Colorado and Utah, and on the W.

  • by Utah, Idaho, and a small southward projection of Montana.

  • 19,507 were natives of Wyoming, 6112 were born in Iowa, 5009 in Nebraska, 4923 in Illinois, 4412 in Missouri and 3750 in Utah.

  • corner of the present state was at that time a part of Utah.

  • from Utah and Idaho, and included parts of the three great additions to the original territory of the United States.

  • White, " Geology and Physiography of a portion of North-western Colorado and adjacent parts of Utah and Wyoming," pp. 677-712 of 9th Ann.

  • Bancroft, Nevada, Colorado and Wyoming (San Francisco, 1890), and Utah (San Francisco, 1889); E.

  • The lower division appears on the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts, and is traceable thence, in a great belt southwest of those points, through Maine and the Hudson-Champlain valley into Alabama, a distance of some 2000 m.; and the rocks are brought up again on the western uplift, in Nevada, Idaho, Utah, western Montana and British Columbia.

  • by Utah.

  • The last-named includes a number of lofty plateaus - the Roan or Book, Uncompahgre, &c., which form the eastern continuation of the high plateaus of Utah - and covers the western quarter of the state.

  • The boreal embraces the highest mountain altitudes; the transition belts it on both sides of the continental divide; the upper Sonoran takes in about the eastern half of the plains region east of the mountains, and is represented further by two small valley penetrations from Utah.

  • About one-fifth of the total product is made into coke, the output of which increased from 245,746 tons in 1890 to 1,421,579 tons (including a slight amount from Utah) in 1907; in 1907 the coke manufactured in Colorado (and Utah) was valued at 4,747,436.

  • As a matter of fact, he was personally in favour of insisting upon 54 40' as the boundary in Oregon, and threw upon Congress the responsibility for accepting 49° as the boundary, and he approved the acquisition of California, Utah and New Mexico, territory from which slavery was excluded by geographical and climatic conditions.

  • It admitted California as a free state, organized Utah and New Mexico as Territories without reference to slavery, and enacted a more efficient fugitive slave law.

  • the plateau continues into Colorado, Utah and Arizona.

  • The other Indians live on reservations, of which there are three: the Mescalero Apache reservation, in Otero county, containing 554 Indians in 190o; the Jicarilla Apache reservation, in Rio Arriba county, with a population of 829; and the Navaho reservation, in Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, which contains in that part of it situated in New Mexico a population of 2480.

  • He was the author of the so-called Edmunds Act (22nd of March 1882) for the suppression of polygamy in Utah, and of the anti-trust law of 1890, popularly known as the Sherman Act.

  • by Utah, E.

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