How to use Useful in a sentence

useful
  • He has a useful gift.

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  • For someone who needs more power, it's a very useful talent.

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  • She was useful for now.

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  • He was the bravest and most useful man in the party.

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  • She spins, and does a great deal of fancy work, and reads, and leads a pleasant, useful life.

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  • This will be extremely useful, because the game, as they say, has just changed completely.

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  • Gimme a ring if you have anything useful to say.

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  • Dean found nothing useful until he looked in the trash.

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  • We play a little game which I find most useful in developing the intellect, and which incidentally answers the purpose of a language lesson.

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  • But, above all, that thought was kept out of their minds by the fact that they saw they were really useful, as in fact they were to the whole Rostov family.

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  • Pierre still considered that it would be a useful and worthy action to slay the evildoer, but now he felt that he would not do it.

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  • If we can open him up, I think he'll be useful.

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  • Perhaps I may prove useful to your Serene Highness.

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  • Hyphear is useful for fattening cattle if they are hardy enough to withstand the purgative effect it produces at first; viscum is medicinally of value as an emollient, and in cases of tumour, ulcers and the like.

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  • He was also well known as a sanitary reformer, and during the last ten years of his life he did much useful work in inculcating more enlightened ideas on the subject both in Edinburgh and other places.

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  • She was early regarded as a useful medium for contracting an alliance with England, more necessary than ever to Portugal after the treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659 whereby Portugal was ostensibly abandoned by France.

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  • In Britain the evergreen oak is quite hardy in ordinary winters, and is useful to the ornamental planter from its capacity for resisting the sea gales; but it generally remains of small size.

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  • Probably a sphere would prove most useful for a pressure anemometer, since owing to its symmetrical shape it would not require a weathercock.

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  • It carried their baggage and was useful to ride in wherever there were good roads, and since it had accompanied them so far in their travels they felt it their duty to preserve it.

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  • He was an enthusiastic and most useful leader of the volunteer movement from its beginning, and a writer, composer and singer of humorous and patriotic songs, some of which, as "The Three Foot Rule" and "They never shall have Gibraltar," became well known far beyond the circle of his acquaintance.

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  • Every portion, from its roots to its leaves, serves some useful purpose.

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  • The birch is one of the most wide-spread and generally useful of forest trees of Russia, occurring in that empire in vast forests, in many instances alone, and in other cases mingled with pines, poplars and other forest trees.

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  • A useful sketch of recent biographies is to be found in The Edinburgh Review (July 1906).

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  • The cadmium molecule, as shown by determinations of the density of its vapour, is monatomic. The metal unites with the majority of the heavy metals to form alloys; some of these, the so-called fusible alloys, find a useful application from the fact that they possess a low melting-point.

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  • They perform a useful function in protecting their clients from the cruel usury which prevails, especially in the south.

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  • Notwithstanding this prospective loss of revenue, parliament showed great reluctance to vote any new impost, although hardly a year previously it had sanctioned (3oth June 1879) Depretiss scheme for spending during the next eighteen years 43,200,000 in building 5000 kilometres of railway, an expenditure not wholly justified by the importance of the lines, and useful principally as a source of electoral sops for the constituents of ministerial deputies.

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  • It is quite possible that the characters of the nematocysts might afford data as useful to the systematist in this group as do the spicules of sponges, for instance.

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  • If the new characters be useful, they are selected and perfected in.

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  • Political geography has been too often looked on from both sides as a mere summary of guide-book knowledge, useful in the schoolroom, a poor relation of physical geography that it was rarely necessary to recognize.

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  • Among the martens there is a weasel (itachi), which, though useful as a ratkiller, has the evil repute of being responsible for sudden and mysterious injuries to human beings; there is a river-otter (kawauso), and there is a sea-otter (rakko) which inhabits the northern seas and is highly valued for its beautiful pelt.

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  • I am totally ignorant in every part of useful knowledge.

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  • As yet, however, the medusa of Microhydra has only been seen in an immature condition, but it shows some well-marked differences from Limnocodium, especially in the structure of the tentacles, which furnish useful characters for distinguishing species amongst medusae.

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  • For it is almost impossible to prove that any structure, however rudimentary, is useless - that is to say, that it plays no part whatever in the economy; and, if it is in the slightest degree useful, there is no reason why, on the hypothesis of direct creation, it should not have been created.

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  • Outside his judicial duties he was responsible for much useful public work, particularly in the department of higher education.

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  • The Lombardy poplar is valuable chiefly as an ornamental tree, its timber being of very inferior quality; its tall, erect growth renders it useful to the landscape-gardener as a relief to the rounded forms of other trees, or in contrast to the horizontal lines of the lake or river-bank where it delights to grow.

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  • P. canadensis, the "cotton-wood" of the western prairies, and its varieties are perhaps the most useful trees of the genus, often forming almost the only arborescent vegetation on the great American plains.

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  • The society has also established a chemical research laboratory, in which much useful work has been done in connexion with the national pharmacopoeia under the direction of the Pharmacopoeia Committee of the Medical Council.

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  • All the surviving forms, however, have a completely established double system with the specific characters alluded to, and since there is every reason to believe that the conditions of evolution of the primitive Pteridophyte must have been essentially similar to those of the Bryophytes, the various stages in the evolution of the conducting system of the latter (p. 732) are very useful to compare with the arrangements met with in the former.

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  • However, the terms are incapable of exact definition, and are only useful when used in a very general way.

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  • Useful and suggestive as they often are, teratological facts played, at one time, too large a part in the framing of morphological theories; for it was thought that the monstrous form gave a clue to the essential nature of the organ assuming it.

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  • We find the ultimate explanation of this in the facts that all organisms vary, and that their variations are inherited and, if useful, perpetuated.

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  • Missionaries continued to do useful geographical work.

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  • The great and splendidly illustrated collections of voyages and travels of Theodorus de Bry and Hulsius served a similar useful purpose on the continent of Europe.

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  • The action of the society in supplying practical instruction to intending travellers, in astronomy, surveying and the various branches of science useful to collectors, has had much to do with advancement of discovery.

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  • It combines with many metals to form sulphides, and also decomposes many metallic salts with consequent production of sulphides, a property which renders it extremely useful in chemical analysis.

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  • Peter had endeavoured to import from western Europe the essentials of good government and such of the useful arts as were required for the development of the natural resources of the country; Catherine did likewise, but she did not restrict herself to purely utilitarian aims in the narrower sense of the term.

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  • As was suggested at the outset, railway accident statistics are useful only as showing how to make life and limb safer, though in pursuing this object increased economy should also be secured.

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  • Useful compulsory laws regarding the details of train management are difficult to frame and hard to carry out; but the Board has exercised a persistent persuasiveness and has secured most of its objects.

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  • A majority of the states have railway commissions, but the investigation of railway accidents, with comparatively few exceptions, has not been done in such a way as to make the results useful in promoting improved practice.

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  • These are useful so far as they go, but they lack the impartiality that would be secured by an inquiry such as is held in England.

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  • The Master Car Builders' Association, a great body of mechanical officers organized especially to being about improvement and uniformity in details of construction and operation, expressed its sense of the importance of " self-coupling " so far back as 1874, but no device of the kind that could be considered useful had then been invented.

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  • He had entered the war office in 1870, and in 1880 became general secretary, in which capacity he introduced many useful reforms in the army.

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  • This subject has been recently treated with admirable clearness by Marti in his useful treatise Die Religion des A.T.

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  • Bathgen's Beitriige zur semitischen Religionsgeschichte (1888) is most useful, and contains valuable epigraphic material.

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  • Weber's Jiidische Theologie is a useful compendium of the theology of later Judaism.

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  • As a philosopher, Favorinus belonged to the sceptical school; his most important work in this connexion appears to have been Hvppwvetot rpoiroc (the Pyrrhonean Tropes) in ten books, in which he endeavours to show that the methods of Pyrrho were useful to those who intended to practise in the law courts.

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  • The cypress, as the olive, is found everywhere in the dry hollows and high eastern slopes of Corfu, of the scenery of which it is characteristic. As an ornamental tree in Britain the cypress is useful to break the outline formed by roundheaded low shrubs and trees.

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  • In 1863 the Territory raised six companies of infantry and six of cavalry (about 1000 men), which saw no actual service against the Confederates but were useful in subduing hostile Indians.

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  • These useful labours were interrupted in 1838 by complications in Afghanistan, which excited the fears.

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  • Poland, Panin opined, would be especially useful in case of Oriental combinations.

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  • Probably the best modern Life is that by Jean Guiraud, in the series Les Saints (translated into English by Katharine de Mattos, 1901); the bibliography contains a useful list of the chief sources for the history of St Dominic and the order, and of the best modern works thereon.

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  • The trees of India producing economically useful timber are comparatively few, owing to the want of durability of the wood, in the extremely hot and moist climate.

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  • Of other useful woods found in the plains may be named the babool, Acacia; toon, Cedrela; and sissoo, Dalbergia.

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  • Its viscid character, and its non-liability to dry and harden by exposure to air, also fit it for various other uses, such as lubrication, &c., whilst its peculiar physical characters, enabling it to blend with either aqueous or oily matters under certain circumstances, render it a useful ingredient in a large number of products of varied kinds.

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  • He went over every part of the translation with me, observed on every passage in which justice was not done to the thought or the force of the expression lost, and made many useful criticisms. During this occupation we had occasion to see one another often, and became very intimate; and, as he had read much, had seen a great deal of the world, was acquainted with all the most distinguished persons who at that time adorned either the royal court or the republic of letters in France; had a great knowledge of French and Italian literature, and possessed very good taste, his conversation was extremely interesting and not a little instructive.

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  • The most useful modern books are Louis and Charles de Lomenie, Les Mirabeau (5 vols., 1878 and 1889); Alfred Stern, Das Leben Mirabeaus (1889).

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  • On the outbreak of the war he was appointed lieutenant-general of Shropshire, Cheshire and North Wales, where he rendered useful military services, and later was made one of the prince of Wales's councillors, and a commissioner at the negotiations at Uxbridge in 1645.

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  • The most useful economically are several species of sturgeon and of herring, trout,barbel,chubb,bream, ray,sea-dace, carp, anchovy.

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  • Amidst much that is valueless there are some useful notices concerning the state of agriculture at the time in different parts of England.

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  • After a highly useful career, under the presidency till 1813 of Sir John Sinclair, the Board of Agriculture was dissolved in 1819, but left in its statistical account, county surveys and other documents much interesting and valuable information regarding the agriculture of the period.

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  • The judges, in making their awards at the show held annually in December, at Islington, North London (since 1862), are instructed to decide according to quality of flesh, lightness of offal, age and early maturity, with no restrictions as to feeding, and thus to promote the primary aim of the club in encouraging the selection and breeding of the best and most useful animals for the production of meat, and testing their capabilities in respect of early maturity.

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  • Useful figures for purposes of comparison are obtained by dividing the weight of a fat beast by the number of days in its age, the weight at birth being thrown in.

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  • Mill could now feel that his main work was accomplished; he remained, however, on the alert for opportunities of useful influence, and pressed on with hardly diminished enthusiasm in his search for useful truth.

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  • Among the early writings, besides the book of Curtis, there may also be mentioned a still useful little publication by Pohl and Kollar, entitled Insects Injurious to Gardeners, Foresters and Farmers, published in 1837, and Taschenberg's Praktische Insecktenkunde.

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  • The two most useful arsenical sprays are Paris green and arsenate of lead.

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  • So, again, it is impossible to make a useful comparative estimate of the advantages and disadvantages of the transport systems of England, the United States and Germany, unless we keep constantly in view the very different geographical, military and political conditions which these systems have to satisfy.

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  • Mathematics has influenced the form and the terminology of the science, and has sometimes been useful in analysis; but mathematical methods of reasoning, in their application to economics, while possessing a certain fascination, are of very doubtful utility.

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  • Every hypothesis must be tested by an appeal to the facts of life, and modified or abandoned if it will not bear examination, unless we are convinced on genuine evidence that it may for a time be employed as a useful approximation, without prejudice to the later stages of the investigation we are conducting.

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  • If all the industries belong to one economic area over which, so far as we can tell from general statistics of wages and prices, and other information, fairly homogeneous conditions prevailed, we may be able to reach some useful conclusions as to the operation of the act.

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  • It is useful and necessary, and plays somewhat the same part in economic investigation as ton-mile statistics do in the administration of a railway.

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  • Some of the criticism of their works, necessary and useful as it has been, will probably be corrected later on by that breadth of view and sense of proportion which has enabled us to appreciate justly the achievements of lesser men in more remote times.

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  • Many of the questions of the greatest practical importance at the present time, such as the competition between old and new methods of manufacturing commodities substantially the same in kind, and equally useful to the great body of consumers, arise largely from the immobility of capital or labour, or both of them.

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  • The fresh branches, with their thick mat of foliage, are useful to the gardener for sheltering wall-fruit in the spring.

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  • Though holding good within certain limits only, the law has been found immensely useful.

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  • Thereafter he resided successively at Toulon, St Tropez and Antibes, doing useful work in fortifying the coast and using his spare time in arduous study of the science of war.

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  • Talleyrand, Roederer, Cambaceres and Real were among his special confidants, his brothers Joseph and Lucien also giving useful advice.

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  • The letterpress is commonly limited to technical details, and is not always accurate; but it is of its kind useful, for in general knowledge of the outside of birds Temminck probably surpassed any of his contemporaries.

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  • The accompanying letter press is in some places copious, and useful lists of the species of various genera are occasionally subjoined, adding to the definite value of the work, which, forming one volume, was completed in 1869.

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  • The enormous labour required for this work seems scarcely to have been appreciated, though it remains to this day one of the most useful books in an ornithologist's library.

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  • Noble's List of European Birds (1898) is a useful compilation, and Dresser's magnificent Eggs of the Birds of Europe is another great contribution by that author to European ornithology.

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  • Gadow and P. Chalmers Mitchell, have shown that useful systematic information can be obtained from the study of the alimentary canal.

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  • Greek writers give a more flattering account of the Ephthalites, which may perhaps be due to the fact that they were useful to the East Roman empire as enemies of Persia and also not dangerously near.

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  • The secrecy of its deliberations and the rapidity with which it could act made it a useful adjunct to the constitution, and it gradually absorbed many of the more important functions of the state.

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  • Grote maintains that ostracism was a useful device, on the grounds that it removed the danger of tyranny, and was better than the perpetual civil strife of the previous century.

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  • Lowne's machine is useful in specially wide-planted fields and when the ground is sufficiently hard.

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  • Brehier's L'Eglise et l'orient au moyen age (Paris, 1907) contains not only an up-to-date account of the Crusades, but also a full and useful bibliography, which should be consulted for fuller information.

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  • In the meantime he had done much useful work, especially that of laying down, conjointly with Merlin of Douai, the principles on which the legislation of the revolutionary epoch should be codified.

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  • He was a celebrated gourmet, and his dinners were utilized by Napoleon as a useful adjunct to the arts of statecraft.

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  • This sulphur again was not ordinary sulphur, but some principle derived from it, which constituted the philosopher's stone or elixir - white for silver and yellow or 1 " Some traditionary knowledge might be secreted in the temples and monasteries of Egypt; much useful experience might have been acquired in the practice of arts and manufactures, but the science of chemistry owes its origin and improvement to the industry of the Saracens.

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  • The pope appointed censors for both translations, who found the work to be replete with piety and holiness, highly useful and wholesome.

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  • He made himself useful in muzzling the Saxon states and was successively chief receiver of taxes and minister for the interior in 1731.

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  • In this capacity he did very useful work, and after the Restoration continued in this post at the request of the duc de Richelieu, his work being recognized by his election as a member of the Academie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres in 1820.

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  • Atargatis, in the capacity of fro?uovxos, wears a mural crown, is the ancestor of the royal house, the founder of social and religious life, the goddess of generation and fertility (hence the prevalence of phallic emblems), and the inventor of useful appliances.

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  • More useful is the property of isomorphous substances of forming mixed crystals, which are strictly isomorphous with their constituents, for all variations in composition.

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  • It also prevents the mouldiness of preserved fruits and has been found useful in the manufacture of vinegar.

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  • It has a very useful local anhidrotic action.

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  • Cuvier expresses the opinion that the dog exhibits the most complete and the most useful conquest that man has made.

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  • To this class belong most of the useful dogs, such as the spaniel, the setter, the pointer and the sheepdog.

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  • Pointers are employed to mark game for guns, and are especially' useful in low cover such as that afforded by turnip fields.

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  • Several isolated efforts were made earlier than this; it is evident that there was a school at Lothersdale near Skipton in 1800 " for the preservation of the youth of both sexes, and for their instruction in useful learning"; and another at Nottingham.

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  • We have so far dealt with the political results of ancient slavery, and have found it to have been in certain respects not only useful but indispensable.

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  • About 1607 Schoppe entered the service of Ferdinand, archduke of Styria, afterwards the emperor Ferdinand II., who found him very useful in rebutting the arguments of the Protestants, and who sent him on several diplomatic errands.

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  • He had also created in1811-1812a new National Guard, organized in " cohorts " to distinguish it from the regular army, and for home defence only, and these by a skilful appeal to their patriotism and judicious pressure applied through the prefects, became a useful reservoir of half-trained men for new battalions of the active army.

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  • Wooden and glass copings are also very useful in warding off frosts.

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  • Useful information on this point will be found in Ronalds's Fly-Fisher's Entomology, edited by Westwood.

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  • This cliff is crowned by the walls and towers of the citadel, once white, but now maroon with age, and, though useful as a prison and barracks, no longer of any military value.

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  • Tubes are generally made up around mandrels, and allowed throughout the curing to remain imbedded i n p u lverized French chalk, which affords a useful support for many articles that tend to lose their shape during the process.

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  • The most useful edition is that of Mansi (38 vols., Lucca, 1738-1759), giving Pagi's corrections at the foot of each page.

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  • The double bay of Gizhiga and Penzhina, as well as that of Taui, would be useful as harbours were they not frozen seven or eight months in the year and persistently shrouded in dense fogs in summer.

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  • These cracks coincide with planes of easy separation or of gliding in the crystal; they are especially useful in helping to determine the crystallographic orientation of a cleavage flake of mica when crystal faces are absent.

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  • She instructed certain of her favourites in gymnastics and athletics, as a useful training for war.

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  • His bibliographies (each bearing the Hebrew title Qontres) were useful compilations.

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  • It will be a useful exercise for the reader to interpret the corresponding covariants of the general quantic, to show that some of them are simple powers or products of other covariants of lower degrees and order.

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  • For the interpretation of the book in detail, the English reader will find Driver's commentary (1906) the most useful.

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  • It is useful in haemorrhage from a gastric ulcer or in haemorrhage from the intestine.

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  • There is one condition of the heart itself in which aconite is sometimes useful.

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  • A wire carrying an electric current is surrounded by a magnetic field, and if the wire is bent into the form of an elongated coil or spiral, a field having certain very useful qualities is generated in the interior.

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  • Although the above useful formulae, (io) to (15), are true only for an infinitely small magnet, they may be practically applied whenever the distance r is considerable compared with the length of the magnet.

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  • The Ivanhoe baths, erected in 1826, are frequented for their saline waters, which, as containing bromine, are found useful in scrofulous and rheumatic complaints.

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  • But he was an energetic, clear-headed man, of great practical force and skill, cultivated, accomplished, agreeable, flexible, possibly unscrupulous, just the sort of person whom a restless despot like Justinian finds useful.

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  • He sometimes succeeded in toning down the hard, abrupt language of Napoleon's communications, and in every way proved a useful intermediary.

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  • Already the nations are groaning under the burdens of militarism, and are for ever diverting energies that might be employed in the furtherance of useful productive work to purposes of an opposite character.

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  • Different substances were distinguished by the name of "alumen"; but they were all characterized by a certain degree of astringency, and were all employed in dyeing and medicine, the light-coloured alumen being useful in brilliant dyes, the dark-coloured only in dyeing black or very dark colours.

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  • Another highly useful palm is the carnauba or carnahuba (Copernicia cerifera) which supplies fruit, medullary meal, food for cattle, boards and timber, fibre, wax and medicine.

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  • The fibre of the piassava (Leopoldinia piassava, or Attalea funifera) is widely used for cordage, brushes and brooms. There are many other palms whose fruit, fibre and wood enter largely into the domestic economy of the natives, but the list given shows how important a service these trees rendered to the aboriginal inhabitants of tropical America, and likewise how useful they still are to the people of tropical Brazil.

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  • The twelve who replaced the council of nine (as these had previously replaced the council of the nobles) consisted - both as individuals and as a party - of ignorant, incapable, turbulent men, who could neither rule the state with firmness nor confer prosperity on the republic. They speedily broke with the nobles, for whose manoeuvres they had at first been useful tools, and then split into two factions, one siding with the Tolomei, the other, the more restless and violent, with the Salimbeni and the noveschi (partisans of the nine), who, having still some influence in the city, probably fomented these dissensions, and, as we shall see later on, skilfully availed themselves of every chance likely to restore them to power.

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  • Pre-Cape Rocks principally the yellow wood (Podocarpus)., sneezewood (Pteroxylon utile), stinkwood (Oreodaphne bullata), black ironwood (Olea laurifolia), white ironwood (Vepris lanceolata), and umtomboti (Exoecaria africana); all are very useful woods, and the yellow wood, sneezewood, stinkwood and ironwood when polished have grain and colour equal to maple, walnut and ebony.

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  • For, inexorable as Stephen ever was towards fanatical pagans, renegades and rebels, he was too good a statesman to inquire too closely into the private religious opinions of useful and quiet citizens.

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  • As compilers of useful manuals may be mentioned also Joseph Szvorenyi, Zoltan Betithy, Alexander Imre, Paul Jambor, Ladislaus Nevy, John Kornyei and Joseph Szinnyei, junior.

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  • The extension of the range of subjects to which mathematical methods can be applied, accompanied as it is by an extension of the range of study which is useful to the ordinary worker, has led in the latter part of the 19th century to an important reaction against the specialization mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

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  • Another useful set of graphs comprises those which give the relation between the expressions of a length, volume, &c., on different systems of measurement.

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  • The graphic method, therefore, does not give any direct assistance towards the conception of negative numbers as operators, though it is useful for interpreting negative quantities as results.

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  • The elementary idea of a differential coefficient is useful in reference to the logarithmic and exponential series.

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  • Necessarily, according to the theory of natural selection, structures either are present because they are selected as useful or because they are still inherited from ancestors to whom they were useful, though no longer useful to the existing representatives of those ancestors.

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  • Structures previously inexplicable were now explained as survivals from a past age, no longer useful though once of value.

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  • Every variety of form and colour was urgently and absolutely called upon to produce its title to existence either as an active useful agent or as a survival.

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  • He also did useful and interesting work as a New Testament commentator.

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  • The last-named work, though lacking in original power and clearness of judgment, is extremely convenient and useful, and has had an influence perhaps disproportionate to its real exegetical merits.

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  • In English we have, among others, the useful work of Perowne (5th ed., 1883), that of Lowe and Jennings, (2nd ed., 1885), and the valuable translation of Cheyne (1884).

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  • Few of the low veld bushes are large or straight enough to furnish any useful wood, and timber trees are wholly absent from the level country.

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  • To the Nestorian movement in Persia he rendered useful service by his letter to Mari of Beth Hardasher, in which he maintained the tenets of Diodore and Theodore, while allowing that Nestorius had erred.

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  • In the troublous state of European politics the earl's conduct and experience were more useful abroad than at home, and he was sent to the Hague as ambassador a second time.

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  • He rejected the theory of the unity and continuity of history so far as it would obliterate distinctions between ancient and modern history, holding that, though work on ancient history is a useful preparation for the study of modern history, either may advantageously be studied apart.

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  • He became a member of the Committee of Public Instruction early in 1793, and after carrying many useful decrees on the preservation of national monuments, on the military schools, on the reorganization of the Museum of Natural History and other matters, he brought forward on the 26th of June his Projet d'education nationale (printed at the Imprimerie Nationale), which proposed to lay the burden or primary education on the public funds, but to leave secondary education to private enterprise.

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  • It is also useful in relieving the paroxysms of asthma.

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  • He is useful to us for what he wrote about the history of medicine, not for what he contributed.

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  • More important in their results than any of these works were the discoveries of Edward Jenner, respecting the prevention of small-pox by vaccination, in which he superseded the partially useful but dangerous practice of inoculation, which.

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  • Yet on the whole, even from the beginning, the revolt was useful in that it shook the position of the "learned physician," who took a literary, fastidious and meditative rather than an experimental interest in his profession, and, as in great part a descendant of the humanists, was never in full sympathy with experimental science.

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  • Reinhard, who considered Arthur O'Connor "a far abler man," accurately read the character of Lord Edward Fitzgerald as that of a young man "incapable of falsehood or perfidy, frank, energetic, and likely to be a useful and devoted instrument; but with no experience or extraordinary talent, and entirely unfit to be chief of a great party or leader in a difficult enterprise."

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  • Voltaire had made, however, a useful friend in another grand seigneur, as profligate and nearly as intelligent, the duke of Richelieu, and with him he passed 1724 and the next year chiefly, recasting Mariamne (which was now successful), writing the comedy of L'Indiscret, and courting the queen, the ministers, the favourites and everybody who seemed worth.

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  • He was good-natured when not crossed, generous to dependents who made themselves useful to him, and indefatigable in defending the cause of those who were oppressed by the systems with which he was at war.

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  • In the article on Mineral Deposits the distribution and mode of occurrence of the useful minerals and ores are fully discussed.

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  • The prospector is guided in his search by a knowledge of the geological conditions under which useful minerals occur.

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  • As the sinking of shafts or the driving of narrow entries or drifts is expensive, and as the mineral extracted rarely pays more than a small fraction of the cost, it is usual to plan this exploratory work so that the openings made shall serve some useful purpose later.

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  • If, for a twocompartment shaft, a pair of drums (or a single wide drum) be keyed to the engine shaft, with the ropes wound in opposite directions, the hoisting is " in balance," that is, the cages and cars counterbalance each other, so that the engine has to raise only the useful load of mineral, plus the rope.

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  • It is, in fact, admitted that some of the glasses, most useful optically, the dense barium crown glasses, which are so widely used in modern photographic lenses, cannot be produced entirely free either from noticeable colour or from numerous small bubbles, while the chemical nature of these glasses is so sensitive that considerable care is required to protect the surfaces of lenses made from them if serious tarnishing is to be avoided.

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  • It is possible, however that it served no useful purpose, but that the construction is a survival from the manufacture of vessels with fondi d'oro.

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  • Besides compiling numerous useful tables, he contributed largely to the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana.

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  • Rich had already done useful topographical work.

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  • Menant have done useful work in distinguishing word-groups, and have essayed partial interpretations.

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  • A mulch of half-decayed stable litter is useful to prevent loss of moisture in summer.

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  • The cultivation of vines in pots is very commonly practised with good results, and pot-vines are very useful to force for the earliest crop. The plants should be raised from eyes, and grown as strong as possible in the way already noted, in rich turfy loam mixed with about one-third of horse dung and a little bone dust.

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  • The complete life-history of this form is at present unknown; and information as to where the fungus passes the winter, and in what form, would probably afford some useful indications as to the method that should be adopted to combat the disease.

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  • As a preventive to its attacks the copper sulphate sprays and a solution (50%) of iron sulphate have been found very useful, as well as care in planting on well-drained soil that does not lie too low, the disease seldom appearing in dry, well-exposed vineyards.

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  • Besides his commercial value to Cromwell, Carvajal was politically useful also, for he acted as "intelligencer."

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  • The following table may be useful to planters and central factory owners.

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  • He was nominated a commissioner for disbanding the army, and was appointed keeper of the records in the Tower, a post in which he performed useful services.

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  • There is much less moisture, and the flora is of a less tropical character than farther north; it has some Polynesian and New Zealand affinities, and on the west coast a partially Australian character; on the higher hills it is stunted; on the lower, however, there are fine .grass lands, and a scattered growth of niaulis (Melaleuca viridiflora), useful for its timber, bark and cajeput oil.

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  • It will be useful to consider the nature of the four chief constituents just mentioned and their bearing upon the texture, water-holding capacity and other characters which were referred to in the previous section.

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  • Chalk consists, when quite pure, of calcium carbonate (CaC03), a white solid substance useful in small amounts as a plant foodmaterial, though in excess detrimental to growth.

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  • Generally speaking, soils containing from 30 to 50% of clay and 50 to 60% of sand with an adequate amount of vegetable residues prove the most useful for ordinary farm and garden crops; such blends are known as " loams," those in which clay predominates being termed clay loalns, and those in which the sand predominates sandy roams. " Stiff clays " contain over 50% of clay; " light sands " have less than to %.

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  • It also sets free potash and possibly other useful plant food-constituents of the soil.

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  • Their growth makes no new addition of mineral food-constituents to the land, but they bring useful substances from the subsoil nearer to the surface, and after the decay of the buried vegetation these become available to succeeding crops of wheat or other plants.

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  • Potassium nitrate was used at one time in many different diseased conditions, but it is now never administered internally, as its extremely depressant action upon the heart is not compensated for by any useful properties which are not possessed by many other drugs.

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  • Hybridization can also be readily controlled in the case of tobaccos, and in this connexion it is useful to note that, if pollen is desired of some variety growing at a distance, it will retain its vitality for several weeks if kept perfectly dry, and so can readily be sent by post from one place to another.

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  • Hungary produces tobacco of a rich, dark brown colour, useful for cigars, and also a small, bright yellow leaf, of value as a cigarette and pipe tobacco.

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  • It could most easily make them useful to gain the influence and support which it needed, and to provide for the public functions which fell to its share, by employing the precarium tenure.

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  • In the meantime Sheik Mubarak had found useful allies in the Muntafik Arabs from the lower Euphrates, and the Wahhabis of Riad; the latter under the amir Ibn Saud marched against Ibn Rashid, who at the instigation of the Porte had again threatened Kuwet (Koweit), compelled him to retire to his own territory and took possession of the towns of Bureda and Aneza.

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  • The drug is largely employed in cases of Bright's disease and dropsy from any cause, being especially useful when the liver shares in the general venous congestion.

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  • They are a useful addition and correction to the Croker Papers, written from a Tory point of view.

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  • The tree is employed for a variety of useful purposes, especially in building.

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  • The extracts from Cicero and Ovid, Origen and St John, Chrysostom, Augustine and Jerome are but specimens of a useful custom which reaches its culminating paint in book xxviii., which is devoted entirely to the writings of St Bernard.

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  • On the other hand, La Marck thought that Montmorin's feebleness was occasionally useful in restraining Mirabeau's impetuosity.

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  • The rivers of the state are short and of no great volume, but they flow swiftly and are useful in supplying power for manu 10,957.

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  • For the general reader the most useful text is that of Bartsch in Deutsche Classiker des Mittelalters, as it includes notes and a glossary.

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  • The books illustrated by the men of this school were mainly collections of useful information, guide-books, romances and historical and religious compilations; but much of the best of their work is to be found in the collections of pictorial designs, very often taken from Chinese sources, which were produced for the use of workers in lacquer, pottery and similar crafts.

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  • All these still exist and are as useful as ever within certain limits.

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  • The principal works of Gregory Thaumaturgus are the Panegyricus in Origenem (Eis 't ptybniv iravrnvpucos Xbyos), which he wrote when on the point of leaving the school of that great master (it contains a valuable minute description of Origen's mode of instruction), a Metaphrasis in Ecclesiasten, characterized by Jerome as " short but useful "; and an Epistola canonica, which treats of the discipline to be undergone by those Christians who under pressure of persecution had relapsed into paganism, but desired to be restored to the privileges of the Church.

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  • A useful handbook of Swedenborg's theology is the Compendium of the Theological Writings of Emanuel Swedenborg by the Rev. Samuel Warren (London, 1885).

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  • The Phase Rule of Willard Gibbs, especially as developed by Bakhuis Roozeboom, is a most useful guide in such investigations.

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  • But when three or more metals are present, as is often the case in useful alloys, the phenomena are much more complicated.

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  • A nickel steel containing 36% of nickel has the property of retaining an almost constant volume when heated or cooled through a considerable range of temperature; it is therefore useful for the construction of pendulums and for measures of length.

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  • During the following winter he made himself useful in France in gaining information for the government.

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  • Faraday introduced the important and useful conception of lines and tubes of electric force.

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  • The above method is especially useful for the determinations of very small capacities of the order of Ioo electrostatic units or so and upwards.

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  • The plants are evergreen shrubs and extremely useful for winter flowering.

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  • The Carpathian system is richer in metallic ores than any other mountain system of Europe, and contains large quantities of gold, silver, copper, iron, lead, coal, petroleum, salt, zinc, &c., besides a great variety of useful mineral.

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  • The Bibliographie generale de l'Agenais, by the same author (1886-1891, 3 vols.), may be found useful.

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  • Others, like John Heydon, admitted they were not Rosicrucians, but under attractive and suggestive titles to their works sought to make Hermeticism and other curious studies more useful and popular, and succeeded, for a time at least.

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  • Kattenbusch supposes that Anatolius, bishop of Constantinople, or his archdeacon Aetius, who read the creed at the 2nd session of the council, took up the idea that through its likeness to the Roman Creed it would be a useful weapon against Eutyches and others who were held to interpret the Nicene Creed in an Apollinarian sense.

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  • This theory, however, depended upon unverified assumptions, such as the supposed silence of theologians about the creed at the beginning of the 9th century; the suggestion that the completed creed would have been useful to them if they had known it as a weapon against the heresy of Adoptianism; the assertion that no MS. containing the complete text was of earlier date than c. 813.

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  • Medieval ceremonies are described as useful but without power to remit sins.

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  • Jerome's mind was evidently full of anxiety about his translation of the Old Testament, for we find him in his letters recording the conversations he had with learned men about disputed readings and doubtful renderings; the blind Didymus of Alexandria, whom he heard interpreting Hosea, appears to have been most useful.

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  • British cavalry and cyclists found some scope for useful activity and considerable progress was made.

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  • But, on the other hand, as Lennox after meeting Wood wrote to Crawford for his reminiscences of his own interview with Mary (January 21, 1567), and as these reminiscences were only useful as corroborative of Mary's account in Letter II., it seems that Wood had either shown Lennox the letters or had spoken of their contents.

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  • It was useful as marking definitely the boundary of the Roman sway, and as assuring the Romans that no inroad could be made without intelligence being had of it beforehand, while the limes itself and the system of roads behind it enabled troops to be directed rapidly to any threatened point, and the fortified positions could be held against large numbers till reinforcements arrived.

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  • Philip II., by Martin Hume (London, 1897), is more just in its treatment of Philip's personal character, and gives a useful bibliography.

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  • Serveti doctrina (1876), is useful.

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  • Osler's Michael Servetus (1909), are useful.

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  • The telegraph cable companies were quick to apply and to extend the oceanographical methods useful in cable-laying, and to their practical acuteness many of the most important improvements in apparatus are due.

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  • The first useful determinations of the dissolved gases of sea-water were made by Oskar Jacobsen in 1872.

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  • The differences of salinity support this method, and, especially in the northern European seas, often prove a sharper criterion of the boundaries than temperature itself; this is especially the case at the entrance to the Baltic. Evidence drawn from drift-wood, wrecks or special drift bottles is less distinct but still interesting and often useful; this method of investigation includes the use of icebergs as indicators of the trend of currents and also of plankton, the minute swimming or drifting organisms so abundant at the surface of the sea.

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  • Coals richer in hydrogen, on the other hand, are more useful for burning in open fires - smiths' forges and furnaces - where a long flame is required.

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  • The use of small auxiliary blowing ventilators underground, for carrying air into workings away from the main circuits, which was largely advocated at one time, has lost its popularity, but a useful substitute has been found in the induced draught produced by jets of compressed air or high-pressure water blowing into ejectors.

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  • In Koepe's method the drum is replaced by a disk with a grooved rim for the rope, which passes from the top of one cage over the guide pulley, round the disk, and back over the second guide to the second cage, and a tail rope, passing round a pulley at the bottom of the shaft, connects the bottoms of the cages, so that the dead weight of cage, tubs and rope is completely counterbalanced at all positions of the cages, and the work of the engine is confined to the useful weight of coal raised.

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  • The formation of nitrides and cyanamides by actions of this kind and their easy conversion into ammonia is a useful method for fixing the nitrogen of the atmosphere and rendering it available for manurial purposes.

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  • Palacky's Geschichte Btihmens (1864-1867) is also very useful.

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  • The river banks are lined with belts of dense forest, in which useful timber occurs.

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  • Just before his resignation he had been elected, with Mirabeau and Sieyes, a member of the department of Paris; and in that capacity did useful work for some eighteen months in seeking to support the cause of order in the turbulent capital.

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  • His administration was, in many respects, well-intentioned and useful.

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  • Mucilages are useful in medicine as vehicles for various insoluble and other drugs, and in the arts as thickeners (in calico-printing, dyeing, &c.).

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  • The scheme as a whole was shortlived and did not survive its originator; but the Capitula were commonly recognized as supplying a useful and much-needed supplement to St Benedict's Rule on points not sufficiently provided for therein.

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  • A useful sketch, with references to the best literature, is in Max Heimbucher, Orden and Kongregationen (1896), i.

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  • The presence or absence of useful minerals, plants and animals rendered some congenial, others unfriendly; some areas were the patrons of virile occupations, others of feminine pursuits.

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  • At last, the central advanced tribes made the names of the abbreviated pictures useful in other connexions, and were far on the way to a syllabary.

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  • Besides his contributions to the Allgemeine Deutsche Bibliothek, he edited a popular and practically useful Magazin fiir Prediger (1792-1801).

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  • He also made some useful contributions to religious history.

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  • The other large river valleys are far less useful as highways, though each is paralleled by one or more railways.

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  • The compulsory education law as amended in 1907 and 1909 requires the full attendance at a public school, or at a school which is an approximate equivalent, of all children who are between seven and fourteen years of age, are in the proper physical and mental condition, and reside in a city or school district having a population of 5000 or more and employing a superintendent of schools; in such a city or district children between fourteen and sixteen years must attend school unless they obtain an employment certificate and are regularly engaged in some useful employment or service; and outside of such a city or district all children between the ages of eight and fourteen years and those between fourteen and sixteen years who are not regularly employed must attend school on all school days from October to June.

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  • Almost useless for communication or transport, they can be easily drawn upon for irrigation where, as in the east centre, water-races are useful.

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  • Coming to a country without useful animals, cereals, rich grasses or fruit trees, the colonists had to bring all these necessaries with them.

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  • As some compensation for its paucity of useful animals and food plants, New Zealand was, of course, free from wild carnivora, has no snakes, and only one poisonous insect, the katipo, a timid little spider found on certain sea-beaches.

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  • The "work" contemplated by St Benedict was ordinarily field work, as was natural in view of the conditions of the time and best suited to the majority of the monks; but the principle laid down is that the monks should do whatever work is most useful.

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  • Objecting, as Germain Gamier had, to Smith's distinction between productive and unproductive labour, he maintains that, production consisting in the creation or addition of a utility, all useful labour is productive.

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  • We find in him other corrections or new presentations of views previously accepted, and some useful suggestions for the improvement of nomenclature.

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  • All children between eight and fifteen years of age, and all between fifteen and sixteen years of age who are not regularly employed in some useful or remunerative occupation, must attend the public school all the time it is in session or a private school for the same time unless excused by the city or the county superintendent because of mental or physical disability or because of proficiency in the branches taught in the first eight grades.

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  • President Brand opened the proceedings by proposing a treaty of friendship and free trade between the two Republics, in which a number of useful and thoroughly practical provisions were set forth.

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  • That of Le Clerc (3 vols., Paris, 1826-1828) and in a more compact form that of Louandre (4 vols., Paris, 1854) have been most useful; but that of MM.

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  • For many years he devoted his leisure to Greek studies, and in1850-1857he published five volumes of a Critical History of the Language and Literature of Ancient Greece, which, though uncompleted and somewhat antiquated, is still useful.

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  • Hence the formula is more useful in the form w = (w i +w2)1 2 / (Kd -1 2) = (wl +w 2)lr/ (K -lr) where k= (wl+w2-1-w3)lr/w3 is to be deduced from the data of some bridge previously designed with the same working stresses.

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  • The shearing area of rivets in tension members was made r z times the useful section of plate in tension.

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  • For compression members the shearing area of rivets in butt-joints was made half the useful section of plate in compression.

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  • Frames are much used as girders, and they also give useful designs for suspension and arched bridges.

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  • A small percentage of cubebs is also commonly included in lozenges designed for use in bronchitis, in which the antiseptic and expectoral properties of the drug are useful.

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  • Women's settlements probably are more general in the United States than in Great Britain; but in both countries they carry out a great variety of useful work, providing medical mission dispensaries, district nurses, workrooms for needle-women, hospitals for women and children, &c.

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  • The most useful edition for ready reference, containing critical texts (up to date) and good translations, is Lightfoot's one-volume edition, The Apostolic Fathers (London, 1891).

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  • He first made himself useful by his extraordinary knowledge of foreign languages.

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  • Thereafter he refused to enter the ministry, but became a member of the council of state and of the Corps Legislatif, where his advice on the state of public opinion was frequently useful.

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  • The Greek signs of the zodiac, including Libra, are obvious upon both these monuments, which have thrown useful light upon the calendar system and method of stellar grouping of the ancient Egyptians.16 Planispheres.

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  • It is an index to a department of the book of nature, and as such is useful to the student.

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  • One vessel returned to Seville by the Cape route, thus completing the first voyage round the world; the other attempted to return by the Pacific, but was driven back to Tidore and there welcomed by the natives as a useful ally against the Portuguese.

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  • The natural was sometimes white, and sometimes red; the artificial was more useful to the chemist.

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  • Moller (1889 ff., second edition by von Schuberth, 1898 ff., greatly enlarged and improved), the translation of the latter (1892 ff.) being the most useful text-book in English.

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  • The book was deliberately unpopular in tone; it excited much controversial comment and some serious and useful discussion.

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  • An elder brother, who like himself was early turned out into the world to seek his own fortune, rose to command a brigade in the Mysore army, while Hyder, who never learned to read or write, passed the first years of his life aimlessly in sport and sensuality, sometimes, however, acting as the agent of his brother, and meanwhile acquiring a useful familiarity with the tactics of the French when at the height of their reputation under Dupleix.

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  • The following varieties are among the most useful for bedding and pot culture.

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  • Disbursements for rent, rates and taxes naturally vary according to the special conditions; in a large number of cases public land is provided free of cost, and in a smaller number of cases the institutions, in view of their useful public functions, are relieved of the ordinary burden of taxation.

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  • The cost of new buildings varies too much to make any individual figures useful.

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  • A lotion of sodium bicarbonate is useful to allay itching.

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    0
  • Sodium bicarbonate is one of our most useful gastric sedatives and antacids, relieving pain in hyperchloridia.

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  • These purgative sodium salts are most useful in the treatment of chronic constipation, and of the constipation associated with gout and hepatic dyspepsia.

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  • Similarly though he carried out many useful administrative reforms, in a vain effort to combat Social Democracy he seriously interfered with the liberty of public meeting and attempted the forcible suppression of strike movements.

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  • In this office, which he held till 1899, he did very useful work in collaboration with the provincial estates.

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  • George Chalmers published (1817) a selection from his works relating to Scotland, for which he wrote a useful life.

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  • But this theory is very far from being of practical value for most purposes of gunnery; so that a first requirement is an accurate experimental knowledge of the resistance of the air to the projectiles employed, at all velocities useful in artillery.

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  • Siacci's altitude-function is useful in direct fire, for giving immediately the angle of elevation 4, required for a given range of R yds.

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  • These theorems may prove useful in preliminary calculations where the pressure-curve is nearly straight; but, in the absence of any observable law, the area of the pressure-curve must be read off by a planimeter, or calculated by Simpson's rule, as an indicator diagram.

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  • In the stomach potassium salts neutralize the gastric acid, and hence small doses are useful in hyperchloridia.

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  • Potassium nitrate is chiefly used to make nitre paper, which on burning emits fumes useful in the treatment of the asthmatic paroxysm.

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  • It would be impossible to refer here even briefly to all these, and it may be more useful to select for somewhat full description,.

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  • There was also a useful collection of texts by Prof. Charteris of Edinburgh, Canonicity (1880), based on Kirchhofer, Quellensamm- lung (1844), but with improvements.

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  • Various useful texts have been issued, among which those of Nestle (Novum Testamentum Graece, Stuttgart, 1904), based on a comparison of the texts of Tischendorf, WH and Weiss, and of Baljon (Novum Testamentum Graece, Groningen, 1898), are the best.

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  • From the Restoration onwards Evelyn enjoyed unbroken court favour till his death in 1 7.06; but he never held any important political office, although he filled many useful and often laborious minor posts.

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  • The notes were generally compiled from original documents, references to which are usually given, so that they remain useful to the present day.

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  • As a preparation for this it is stated in the Code that it will be useful to give in Standard III.

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  • At one time they were supposed to be useful as a vermifuge.

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  • This position he occupied for nearly twelve years, which he long afterwards declared to have been "by far the most useful, and therefore by far the happiest and most honourable period of his life."

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  • Its fixed capital consists chiefly of (1) machines, (2) buildings which are the means of procuring a revenue, (3) agricultural improvements and (4) the acquired and useful abilities of all members of the society (since sometimes known as "personal capital").

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  • It has been thought necessary to give in detail the facts relating to the conversion of the logarithms, as unfortunately Charles Hutton in his history of logarithms, which was prefixed to the early editions of his Mathematical Tables, and was also published as one of his Mathematical Tracts, has charged Napier with want of candour in not telling the world of Briggs's share in the change of system, and he expresses the suspicion that " Napier was desirous that the world should ascribe to him alone the merit of this very useful improvement of the logarithms."

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  • These tables, which form perhaps the most complete and practically useful collection of logarithms for the general computer that has been published, passed through many editions.

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  • Among the most useful and accessible of modern ordinary sevenfigure tables of logarithms of numbers and trigonometrical functions may be mentioned those of Bremiker, Schriin and Bruhns.

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  • This was published in 1876 under the title Tables for the formation of logarithms and antilogarithms to twenty-four or any less number of places, and contains the most complete and useful application of the method, with many improvements in points of detail.

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  • One of the causes of these sudden advances is undoubtedly to be found in the acquisition of a new and extremely useful character., Thus the perfect jaw and the perfect pair of lateral fins when first acquired among the fishes favoured a very rapid and for a time unchecked development.

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  • Among still other causes are great bulk, which proves fatal under certain new conditions; relatively slow breeding; extreme specialization and development of dominant organs, such as horns and tusks, on which for a time selection centres to the detriment of more useful characters.

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  • He made it clear from the first might prove a useful instrument for carrying out the Society's objects.

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  • We cannot here undertake to set forth and explain in detail all the complex varieties of the Gnostic systems; but it will be useful to take a nearer view of certain principal figures which have had an influence upon at least one series of Gnostic systems, and to examine their origins in the history of religion.

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  • It is plain that this rotation of signs served no, useful purpose whatever, being less convenient than ordinary counting such as the Mexicans employed in their other calendar already mentioned, where the 20-day periods had each a name like our' months, and their days had signs in regular order.

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  • It is said that Pallas, Hephaestus, and Poseidon entered into a competition as to which of them could create the most useful thing.

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  • His book is thus historically more useful, but legally less suggestive.

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  • It is more useful than (1), as the refractive indices may be measured with a prism of any convenient angle.

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  • He accompanied the fugitive government to Konigsberg, where he rendered considerable service in the commissariat, and was afterwards still more useful as commissioner of the national debt and by his opposition to illconsidered schemes of taxation.

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  • Between Trinity College and St Stephen's Green, a large group of buildings includes the Royal Dublin Society, founded in 1683 to develop agriculture and the useful arts, with a library and gallery of statuary; the Science and Arts Museum, and the National Library, the former with a noteworthy collection of Irish antiquities; the Museum of Natural History, with a splendid collection of Irish fauna; and the National Gallery of Ireland, founded in 1853.

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  • A lotion containing ten minims of the dilute acid to an ounce of water and glycerin will relieve itching due to any cause; and is useful in some forms of neuralgia.

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  • The works of Mr Jeremiah Curtin and Dr Douglas Hyde are useful for Ireland; for Scotland, Kirk's Secret Commonwealth has already been quoted.

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  • The accounts of Mosheim, Lardner, Walch and Schrockh, as well as the monograph by Trechsel, Ueber Kanon, Kritik and Exegese der Manichder (1832), may also be mentioned as still useful.

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  • He had already gained some reputation as an industrious theologian, and had published among other works an annotated edition of the Prayer Book (1867), a History of the English Reformation (1868), and a Book of Church Law (1872), as well as a useful Dictionary of Doctrinal and Historical Theology (1870).

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  • It is not a government, as Europeans understand the term, but a group of heads of departments, whom their chief, though he usually consults them separately, often finds it useful to bring together for a talk about current politics and the course proper for the administration to take in them, or in order to settle some administrative question which lies on the borderland between the provinces of two ministers.

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  • Cooley, A Treatise on the Constitutional Limitations which rest upon the Legislative Power of the States of the A merican Union (6th ad., Boston, 1890) is one of the most useful secondary works.

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  • The American Political Science Review (Baltimore, 1907 sqq.) is especially useful for a comparative study of the state governments.

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  • There is much useful material in Municipal Affairs, 6 vols., and vol.

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  • For the executive departments the Annual Reports of each and numerous executive documents are useful.

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  • The following table gives the values of this constant and several expressions involving it Useful fractional approximations are 22/7 and 355/113.

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  • Tozer's volume of selections (Oxford, 1893) is useful.

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  • The snow and the frost in the ground are considered useful as furnishing moisture to start the wheat in spring.

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  • Useful carriage horses and saddle horses are bred in many localities.

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  • At all these farms experiments are conducted to gain information as to the best methods of preparing the land for crop and of maintaining its fertility, the most useful and profitable crops to grow, and how the various crops grown can be disposed of to the greatest advantage.

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  • Like Plato, he believed in real Universals, real essences, real causes; he believed in the unity of the universal, and in the immateriality of essences; he believed in the good, and that there is a good of the universe; he believed that God is a living being, eternal and best, who is a supernatural cause of the motions and changes of the natural world, and that essences and matter are also necessary causes; he believed in the divine intelligence and in the immortality of our intelligent souls; he believed in knowledge going from sense to reason, that science requires ascent to principles and is descent from principles, and that dialectic is useful to science; he believed in happiness involving virtue, and in moral virtue being a control of passions by reason, while the highest happiness is speculative wisdom.

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  • Dialectic is useful, for exercise, for conversation and for philosophical sciences, where by being critical it has a road to principles.

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  • They bloom during the months of May and June, as well as later, and are always most welcome ornaments for the flower borders, and useful for cutting for decorative purposes.

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  • He was the finest swordsman in the army, and possessed that daring recklessness which is the most useful quality of leadership against Asiatics.

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  • McKechnie's Magna Carta (Glasgow, 1905) are among the most useful.

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  • Balfour, and a useful bibliographical summary, appeared in 1897-1898.

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  • The Greek figure probably had little effect on the native ideas, but it is likely that it served as a useful link between the two' religions.

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  • The success of this very useful scheme was due chiefly to his sedulous interest and help.

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  • Administrative indifference to the eminently useful officials forming the service has led, in many cases, to diminishing instead of increasing their number and their salaries, but it is obvious that the extension of their duties and a corresponding raising of their status would be much more in accordance with the national interest.

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  • There is thus still good work for diplomacy to do, and if, in the selection of diplomatic representatives, states followed on the one hand the above-mentioned French example, and on the other hand the American example of selecting for the heads of diplomatic missions men who are not necessarily de la carriere, diplomacy might obtain a new lease of activity, and become once more an extremely useful part of the administrative machinery by which states maintain good business relations as well as friendly political intercourse with one another.

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  • The discussion on the question of the " opendoor " in connexion with the Morocco difficulty was useful in calling general public attention once more to the undesirability of allowing any single power to exclude other nations from trading on territory over which it may be called to exercise a protectorate, especially if equality of treatment of foreign trade had been practised by the authority ruling over the territory in question before its practical annexation under the name of protectorate.

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  • Both unions issue monthly bulletins and other publications giving useful information about these two services.'

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  • This is a body of international lawyers, consisting of sixty members and sixty associates recruited by election - the members from those who " have rendered services to international law in the domain of theory or practice," and associates from those " whose knowledge may be useful to the Institute."

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  • This most useful institution, which has its office at Bern, serves as a means of bringing and keeping together all the known peace societies.

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  • This analogy is useful because the application of Fourier's analysis to the optical theory of spectroscopes has been doubted, and it may be urged in answer to the objections raised that the instrument acts in all respects like a mechanical analyser,' the applicability of which has never been called into question.

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  • He went to China as orderly officer to General Gaselee in 1901, and provided the expedition with a hospital ship at his own expense, while his Imperial Service Transport Corps proved a useful auxiliary to the British army in the Chitral and Tirah expeditions.

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