Urban sentence example

urban
  • It was a scene from another time as Dean's friend and his smiling wife handed the reins to the urban couple.
    1185
    128
  • The town is governed by an urban district council.
    569
    217
  • Even on this holiday, one of the busiest days of the year, traffic remained modest by urban standards.
    255
    146
  • I'm an urban warfare tactics trainer, specializing in tracking.
    237
    142
  • The urban half clearly have no opportunity to farm.
    157
    85
    Advertisement
  • Lights from lasers and muzzle fire spotted the forest below them before they reached an urban area, mostly dark with several patches of electricity.
    116
    83
  • The hills and farmlands gradually turned to inner suburbia and then to the harshness of urban streets, choked tightly with the crush, smells and sounds of the city.
    91
    59
  • Brady approached the five soldiers in urban gray tactical suits crowded around the small box with a hole still smoking from a hit by a wayward laser bullet.
    80
    51
  • But between 1890 and 1900 the urban population increased 56.6% and the semiurban 61-6%, while the rural increased only 10.6%.
    6
    0
  • A castle in the town, of the 15th century, is restored to use as offices for the urban district council.
    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • Only 8% of the Russians total are classed as urban.
    3
    0
  • The corporation was replaced by two constables chosen annually in the court leet of the manor until 1894, when an urban district council was appointed.
    30
    28
  • Burnham is an urban district with a population (1901) of 3245.
    2
    0
  • The lay subjects of the Order consisted of two classes; on the one hand there were the conquered Prussians, in a position of serfdom, bound in time of war to serve with the brethren in foreign expeditions; on the other hand there were the German immigrants, both urban and rural, along with the free Prussians who had voluntarily submitted and remained faithful.
    2
    0
  • In 12 9 5 the Malatesta obtained possession of it, and kept it until 1444, when it was sold, with Pesaro, to Federico di Montefeltro of Urbino, and with the latter it passed to the papacy under Urban VIII.
    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • The other urban districts are Alfreton (17,505), Alvaston and Boulton(i 279), Ashbourne (4039), Bakewell(2850), Baslow and Bubnell (797), Belper (10,934), Bolsover (6844) Bonsall (1360), Brampton and Walton (2698), Buxton (10,181), Clay Cross(8358), Dronfield(3809), Fairfield(2969), Heage(2889), Heanor (16,249), Long Eaton (13,045), Matlock (5979), Matlock Bath and Scarthin Nick (1819), Newbold and Dunston (5986), New Mills (7773), North Darley (2756), Ripley (io,III), South Darley (788), Swadlincote (18,014), Whittington (9416), Wirksworth (3807).
    2
    0
  • Pop. of urban district (Igo') 3495 It is pleasantly situated in the rich valley of the small river Otter.
    2
    0
  • The cathedral (dedicated to St Nicholas the Pilgrim, a Greek assassinated at Trani in 1094 and canonized by Urban II.), on a raised open site near the sea, was consecrated, before its completion, in 1143; it is a basilica with three apses, a large crypt and a lofty tower, the latter erected in1230-1239by the architect whose name appears on the ambo in the cathedral of Bitonto, Nicolaus Sacerdos.
    2
    0
  • These urban municipalities are towns which for their local government are independent of the counties in which they are situated, and have, therefore, a larger amount of municipal autonomy than the communes or the other towns.
    2
    0
  • Besides these sixty-three rural counties for Hungary, and eight for Croatia-Slavonia, Hungary has twenty-six urban counties or towns with municipal rights.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In Croatia-Slavonia there are four urban counties or towns with municipal rights namely: Eszek, Varasd, Zagrab and Zimony.
    1
    0
  • Besides Pretoria and the towns in the Witwatersrand district, there are few urban centres of any size.
    1
    0
  • The administration is in the hands of an urban district council.
    1
    0
  • These acts contain provisions whereby burials may be prohibited in urban districts, and Burial churchyards or burial grounds already existing may be Acts.
    1
    0
  • If the area under a burial board in 1894 was partly in a rural parish and partly in an urban district, the burial board was superseded, and the powers of the board are exercised bya joint committeeappointed partly by the urban district council and partly by the parish council, or parish meeting, as the case may be.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It may be convenient here to add that where, under the Local Government Act 1894, the powers of a parish council are not already possessed by an urban district council, the Local Government Board may by order confer such powers on the urban council.
    1
    0
  • This has been done almost universally, as far as regards the power to appoint overseers and assistant overseers, and in many cases urban councils have also obtained powers to appoint trustees of parochial charities.
    1
    0
  • It will be seen that the scheme, as at present existing, has for its object the simplification of local government by the abolition of unnecessary independent authorities, and that this has been carried out almost completely, the principal exception being that in some cases burial boards still exist which have not been superseded either by urban district councils or by parish councils or parish meetings.
    1
    0
  • In 1625 he visited England in the train of Henrietta Maria; in 1640 he was at Rome, on the invitation of Cardinal Barberini, and was received with special favour by Pope Urban VIII.
    1
    0
  • His election to the papacy, to succeed Urban VII., on the 5th of December 1590, was due to Spanish influence.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The population numbered 1,571,243 in 1897,and of that number 707,132 were women and 286,369 were urban.
    1
    0
  • This unusual predominance of rural over urban manufacturing is further shown by the fact that in 1900, 64.3% of the establishments reporting, and 69.3% of the value of their products were from factories classified as rural, and in 1905 the proportion of rural factories was 58.8%, and the value of their products 72.9% of the total.
    1
    0
  • Newlyn ward in the urban district of Paul (pop. 6332) had in 1901 a population of 3749.
    1
    0
  • Similar industries, with brick-making, are practised at Darlaston, an urban district (pop. 15,395), within the parliamentary borough.
    1
    0
  • This industrial centre is continued eastward in the urban district of East Ham (pop. 96,018), where the old village church of St Mary Magdalene retains Norman portions.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The average of settlement per square mile varied from 169.7 in Havana province to 11.8 in Camaguey, and was 46.4 for all of Cuba; the percentage of urban population (in cities, that is, with more than 1000 inhabitants) in the different provinces.
    0
    0
  • In order to conciliate even the Moslems, who include the bulk of the great landholders and of the urban population, its representatives visit the mosques in state on festivals; grants are made for the Mecca pilgrimage; and even the howling Dervishes in Serajevo are maintained by the state.
    0
    0
  • Esher is included in the urban district of Esher and The Dittons, of which Thames Ditton is a favourite riverside resort.
    0
    0
  • Together with the town of Windermere it forms an urban district (pop. 5061 in 1901), but the two towns were separate until 1gos.
    0
    0
  • To the north lies the urban district of Southborough (pop. 6977).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • They acquired great wealth and influence, and in 1623 Maffeo Barberini was raised to the papal throne as Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • After the death of Urban in 1644 his successor, Innocent X., showed hostility to the Barberini family.
    0
    0
  • Bowling Green is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton and the Toledo & Ohio Central railways, and by the Toledo Urban & Interurban and the Lake Erie, Bowling Green & Napoleon electric lines, the former extending from Toledo to Dayton.
    0
    0
  • Though his Roman Antiquities and Scotia illustrior had been placed on the Index pending correction, Pope Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • As a municipality covers a large extent of country, the population given is larger than that of the urban parishes, and is therefore not strictly correct according to European practice.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The number and aggregate population of all towns and boroughs in Hungary proper having in 1890 more than 10,000 inhabitants was at the censuses of 1880, 1890 and 1900: Thus the relative increase of the population living in urban districts of more than io,000 inhabitants amounted in 1900 to nearly 4% of the total population.
    0
    0
  • Writing in the name of the desolate church at Jerusalem he sounded the first trumpet-call of the crusades, though almost a century was to pass away before his note was repeated by Peter the Hermit and Urban II.'
    0
    0
  • Each district is sub-divided into field-cornetcies, the cornetcies being themselves divided, where necessary, into urban and rural areas.
    0
    0
  • While thus caring for the urban areas the administration was equally alive to the needs of the country districts.
    0
    0
  • Out of the civil parish, which has an area of 10,785 acres and had in 1 9 01 a population of 854, there was formed in 1907 the urban district, comprising 1611 acres, and with an estimated population at the date of formation of 812.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At that period the urban masses, but recently converted to Christianity, sought in the worship of the martyrs a sort of substitute for polytheism.
    0
    0
  • It was formerly in the ancient parish of Eglwysilan, but from that and Bedwas (Mon.) an ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1850, while the whole of the parishes of Eglwysilan and Llanfabon, with a total acreage of 14,426, were in 1893 constituted into an urban district; its population in 1901 was 15,385, of which 4343 were in the "town" ward.
    0
    0
  • A minute knowledge of printed books and a methodical examination of departmental and communal archives furnished him with material for a long course of successful lectures, which gave rise to some important works on municipal history and led to a great revival of interest in the origins and significance of the urban communities in France.
    0
    0
  • Many widenings and other improvements of existing thoroughfares, and extensions of tramways were proposed, and detailed recommendations were made as regards urban and suburban railways, and the rehousing of the working population on the outskirts of London.
    0
    0
  • Only 9.4% of the people were classed as urban in the census of 1901, and a considerable proportion of this number were natives of India and not Burmese.
    0
    0
  • Here he composed a large number of motets and sacred pieces, which, being brought under the notice of Pope Urban VIII., obtained for him an appointment in the choir of the Sistine Chapel at Rome.
    0
    0
  • Urban crossed the Alps in the summer, and remained over a year in France and Burgundy, being everywhere reverently received.
    0
    0
  • He held a largely attended council at Clermont in November 1095, where the preaching of the First Crusade marked the most prominent feature of Urban's pontificate.
    0
    0
  • Urban died suddenly at Rome on the 29th of July 1099, fourteen days after the capture of Jerusalem, but before the tidings of that event had reached Italy.
    0
    0
  • It is well established that Urban preached the sermon at Clermont which gave the impetus to the crusades.
    0
    0
  • A fresh danger threatened the republic in 1367 when Charles IV., who had allied himself with Pope Urban V., Queen Joanna of Naples, and various north Italian despots to humble the Visconti, demanded that the Florentines should join the league.
    0
    0
  • We may consider that, in country districts, constant soil moisture is one of the chief factors; while in the case of urban outbreaks mere soil moisture is subsidiary to other more potent causes.
    0
    0
  • The church of St John the Baptist, principally Perpendicular, - has in its tower three bells presented by Charles Both this town and the adjacent urban district of Radstock (pop. 3355) have a considerable trade in coal, which is mined in the vicinity.
    0
    0
  • It is governed by an urban district council.
    0
    0
  • Petrarch had urgently pressed Urban V., Gregory's immediate predecessor, to accomplish the desired change; and Dante had at an earlier date laboured to bring about the same object.
    0
    0
  • Peace was signed with the new pope, Urban VI., and Catherine, having thus accomplished her second great political task, went home again to Siena.
    0
    0
  • Thence on the outbreak of the schism Urban summoned her to Rome, whither, somewhat reluctantly, she journeyed with her now large spiritual family in November.
    0
    0
  • Once arrived she gave herself heartily to Urban's cause, and wore her slender powers out in restraining his impatient temper, quieting the revolt of the people of Rome, and trying to win for Urban the support of Europe.
    0
    0
  • Rhode Island in 1900 had the highest percentage of urban population of any state in the Union, 91.6% of the total population living in cities of 4000 or more inhabitants.
    0
    0
  • In 1906 the urban population was 2229, the communal population 9986.
    0
    0
  • Pop of urban district, which includes several neighbouring parishes (1901), 16,665.
    0
    0
  • A neighbouring centre of the serge industry is the urban district of Buckfastleigh (pop. 2520), 3 m.
    0
    0
  • Midleton is governed by an urban district council.
    0
    0
  • The consistent opposition of the retail traders in large urban centres other than the large stores, and of the country shopkeeper generally, has been sufficient to secure the refusal of the postmaster-general to the proposed scheme, but a commencement was made in 1908 for orders not exceeding X20 between the United Kingdom and Egypt, Cyprus and Malta, and certain British post offices in Turkey and Tangier.
    0
    0
  • He became a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, where he made the acquaintance of Anselm, at that time visiting England as abbot of Bec. The intimacy was renewed when Anselm became archbishop of Canterbury in 1093; thenceforward Eadmer was not only his disciple and follower, but his friend and director, being formally appointed to this position by Pope Urban II.
    0
    0
  • The rural element of the population is large, though it is not increasing as rapidly as the urban; and no other state in the Union is so uniformly settled.
    0
    0
  • Between 1890 and -1900 the urban population increased 38.3%, while the rural increased 14.6%.
    0
    0
  • A few fragments printed in Polish had appeared before this, as the Lord's Prayer in the statutes of the bishops of Breslau in 1475, the story of Pope Urban in Latin, German and Polish in 1505, &c.; but the first complete work in the Polish language appeared from the press of this printer at Cracow in 1521, under the title, Speeches of the Wise King Solomon.
    0
    0
  • To fix their European soldiery upon the new soil was an obvious necessity for the Macedonian chiefs who had set up kingdoms among the barbarians, and the lots of the veterans (except in Egypt) were naturally attached to various urban centres.
    0
    0
  • Of the total population, about 20% is urban.
    0
    0
  • The percentages of urban and rural population are respectively about 38 and 62.
    0
    0
  • Urban was vain, self-willed and extremely conscious of his position; he accepted the papacy chiefly as a temporal principality, and made it his first care to provide for its defence and to render it formidable.
    0
    0
  • The only territory gained during Urban's pontificate, the duchy of Urbino, the last addition to the papal states, was acquired by reversion (1631); and in his one war, with the duke of Parma, for the district of Castro, he met defeat and humiliation (1644).
    0
    0
  • The Thirty Years' War Urban professed to regard as waged for political, not for religious, ends.
    0
    0
  • Urban was the last pope to practise nepotism on a grand scale.
    0
    0
  • Urban bore a hand in the condemnation of Galileo.
    0
    0
  • Urban did much to embellish the city.
    0
    0
  • The other urban districts are Brynmawr, Builth Wells and Hay, with populations of 6833, of 1805 and of 1680 respectively in 1901.
    0
    0
  • An urban district council was formed in 1900.
    0
    0
  • Westward again is Leigh-on-Sea (an urban district, pop. 3667); its lofty Perpendicular church tower is visible from afar.
    0
    0
  • And, since the strongest motive in the pilgrimage was the acquisition of indulgences, unnumbered thousands were moved to assume the Cross, when, in 1095, Urban II.
    0
    0
  • The large urban population of the state makes the animal products very valuable, Illinois ranking third in 1900 in the number of dairy cows, and in the farm value of dairy products; indeed, all classes of live stock, except sheep, increased in number from 1850 to 1900, and at the end of the latter year Illinois was surpassed only by Iowa in the number of horses and swine; in 1909 there were more horses in Illinois than in Iowa.
    0
    0
  • The urban population, on the basis of places having 4000 inhabitants or more, was 51% of the total; indeed the population of Cook county, in which the city of Chicago is situated, was two-fifths of the total population of the state; during the decade of the Civil War (1860-1870) the population of the state increased only 48.4%, and that of Cook county about 140%, while from 1870 to 1900 the increase of all counties, excluding Cook, was about 36%, the increase in Chicago was about 468%.
    0
    0
  • He received the red hat from Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • The latter was crowned by the antipope Clement, while Urban regarded both him and his rival as usurpers.
    0
    0
  • Son of Agapito Colonna, who had himself become a bishop and cardinal, the new pope belonged to one of the greatest Roman families; to Urban VI.
    0
    0
  • Pop. of urban district (1901) 3599 It is intersected by the river Barrow, which is here crossed by a bridge of five arches.
    0
    0
  • The government edifices, large retail shops and most of the fine urban residences are in the ciudad nueva, while most of the urban industries, the railway stations and the dwellings of the poorer classes are in the ciudad novisima.
    0
    0
  • There are seven plazas, or squares, within the urban limits: Zabala or Rincon, Constitucion or Matriz, Independencia, Libertad or Cagancha, Treinte y Tres, Flores and Frutos; and two suburban parks or public gardens: the Paseo del Prado and Parque Urbano.
    0
    0
  • In 1900 there were 116 incorporated towns and cities; and of the total population 43.3% was urban, - i.e.
    0
    0
  • Pop. of urban district (1901), 4544 The town is only of importance from its antiquarian interest and the magnificent ruins of its old castle.
    0
    0
  • Aspiring during the reign of her son to the same role which she had seen Blanche of Castile play, she induced, in 1263, the young Philip, heir to the throne, to promise to obey her in everything up to the age of thirty; and Saint Louis was obliged to ask for a bull from Urban IV.
    0
    0
  • In the same period (1900-1905), the value of the products of urban 1 establishments decreased from $1,332,288 to $1,244,223, and the amount of capital invested increased from $871,531 to $988,615; but the value of the products of rural establishments increased from $1,936,267 to $2,279,037, and the capital invested from $1,176,352 to $1,707,274.
    0
    0
  • The urban district, under the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1900, is wholly in county Westmeath, but the same area is divided by the Shannon between the parliamentary divisions of South Westmeath and South Roscommon.
    0
    0
  • The governing body consisted of a high steward, deputy steward, two water-bailiffs and 28 burgesses, but the cdrporation was abolished by the Municipal Corporation Act of 1883, and a Local Board was formed, which, under the Local Government Act, gave place in 1894 to an urban district council.
    0
    0
  • Pop. (1897) 1,005,460, of whom 132,383 were urban.
    0
    0
  • The one great economic change brought about by the decline of the Roman Empire was the lessening of urban life throughout the greater part of Europe, the closing up of avenues of communication and the predominance of isolated agricultural communities.
    0
    0
  • The quarrel with the papacy was continued with the new pope Urban III., and open warfare was begun.
    0
    0
  • The German clergy remained loyal to the emperor, and hostilities were checked by the death of Urban and the election of a new pope as Gregory VIII., who adopted a more friendly policy towards the emperor.
    0
    0
  • In the one class the density is mainly rural, in the other it is chiefly due to the concentration of the population into large urban aggregates.
    0
    0
  • Infantile mortality is higher, too, in urban tracts, especially those associated with manufacturing industries.
    0
    0
  • In 1257 he became bishop of Le Puy; in 1259 he was elected archbishop of Narbonne; and on the 24th of December 1261 Urban IV.
    0
    0
  • The institution of the Angelus is by some ascribed to Pope Urban II., by some to John XXII.
    0
    0
  • All education above that level is in the hands of the educational department and school boards elected in each parish, each rural parish being bound (since 1898) to be divided into a proper number of school districts and to have a school in each of them, the state contributing to these expenses Boo marks a year for each male and 600 marks for each female teacher, or 25% of the total cost in urban communes.
    0
    0
  • Area 5082 acres, including the former urban district of Pemberton (pop. 21, 664 in 1901), which was included with Wigan in 1904.
    0
    0
  • He studied law in Rome and Naples, entered the Curia under Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • Urban, on the other hand, remained at Rome, where he appointed twenty-six new cardinals and excommunicated Clement and his adherents.
    0
    0
  • Urban succeeded in escaping to Genoa, where he put several of his cardinals to death for suspected disloyalty.
    0
    0
  • Urban was frugal and never practised simony, but harshness, lack of tact, and fondness for unworthy nephews disgraced his pontificate.
    0
    0
  • It is uncertain whether he was present at Urban's great sermon at Clermont in 1095; but it is certain that he was one of the preachers of the crusade in France after that sermon, and his own experience may have helped to give fire to his eloquence.
    0
    0
  • Towns.-In the first half of the 19th century the percentage of urban population remained nearly stationary at a little less than 10.
    0
    0
  • Of a rhyming family of Hjarne, it is enough to mention one member, Urban Hjarne (1641-1724), who introduced the new form of classical tragedy from France, in a species of transition from the masques of Stjernhjelm to the later regular rhymed dramas.
    0
    0
  • It was generally believed that miracles were wrought at his tomb in Chichester cathedral, which was long a popular place of pilgrimage, and in 1262 he was canonized at Viterbo by Pope Urban IV.
    0
    0
  • According to official returns, the real-estate valuations in 1903-1904 aggregated 1, 777, 21 7,7 0 4 pesos, of which 1,020,609,215 pesos were in urban and 754,608,489 pesos in rural property.
    0
    0
  • On account of his knowledge of civil and canon law, he was made papal vice-chamberlain and archbishop of Ravenna by Urban VI., and appointed by Boniface IX.
    0
    0
  • Together they make a fine collection, and it is a pity that Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • The clergy suffered more than the laity under a prolonged interdict, and in 1262 Pope Urban VI.
    0
    0
  • On the 5th of May 1364 he became privy seal, and in June is addressed by the new pope, Urban V., as king's secretary.
    0
    0
  • A long story has been made out of Pope Urban V.'s delay in the recognition of Wykeham, which has been conjectured to have been because of his nationalist proclivities.
    0
    0
  • The foundation of Winchester was begun with a bull of Pope Urban VI.
    0
    0
  • The time which elapsed between the foundation and completion of the colleges may be attributed to Wykeham's preoccupation with politics in the disturbed state of affairs, due to the papal schism begun in 1379, in which England adhered to Urban VI.
    0
    0
  • Other regulations prevailed in different countries, until the inconveniences arising from the want of uniformity led to the rule now observed being laid down under Pope Urban II.
    0
    0
  • The university of Heidelberg was founded by the elector Rupert I., in 1385, the bull of foundation being issued by Pope Urban VI.
    0
    0
  • Thurles is governed by an urban district council.
    0
    0
  • A part of the town is in Suffolk, and the urban district is in the administrative county of West Suffolk.
    0
    0
  • In 1894 this was formed into an urban district, which was enlarged in 1900 by the addition of a portion of the parish of Aberystruth in Monmouthshire, the whole being at the same time consolidated into a civil parish.
    0
    0
  • The urban and rural communities are in the proportion of 4 to 6.
    0
    0
  • The great length of river and sea front, and the easy communication from all parts of the state with the leading urban markets, have brought about the development of this industry.
    0
    0
  • In 1800 barely 2% of the population was urban; in 1900 80% of the inhabitants either lived in cities or were in daily communication with Philadelphia or New York.
    0
    0
  • West Cowes is separated from East Cowes by the picturesque estuary of the river Medina, the two towns (each of which is an urban district) lying on opposite sides of its mouth at the apex of the northern coast of the island.
    0
    0
  • The population numbered 988,431 in 1860 and 1,938,326 in 1897, of whom only 302,852 were urban, while 942,179 were women.
    0
    0
  • The official total of the in habitants of Ortigueira (18,426 in 1900) includes many families which dwell at some distance; the actual urban population does not exceed 2000.
    0
    0
  • Apart from the huge area of urban and suburban London, the London Basin has few large towns.
    0
    0
  • It is interesting to note, in this connexion, that the increase of population diminished steadily, in the three decades under notice, within the area covered by the administrative county of London, which is only the central part of urban London (compare the population table of the great urban districts, below).
    0
    0
  • The English counties were: The Welsh counties were Montgomeryshire, Cardiganshire, Flintshire, Merionethshire and Brecknockshire, the first-named showing Urban and the highest decrease, 5.08%, in 1891-1901.
    0
    0
  • This suggested some tendency to return to a state of equilibrium as between urban and rural districts.
    0
    0
  • Housing.-The total area of England and Wales covered by urban districts (a term which coincides pretty nearly with that of towns, which bears no technical meaning in England) was 3,848,987 acres, and contained a population of 25,058,355 in 1901, the increase in the decade 1891-1901 being 15.2%.
    0
    0
  • The urban population averaged 5.4 persons to a house, but varied greatly in different towns.
    0
    0
  • In 1901 the proportion of females to males in urban districts was 1086 to woo, and in rural districts 1011 to 1000.
    0
    0
  • The proportion of married adults (aged twenty and upwards) was found to decrease from 1881 to 1901, being 630 per thousand Urban Districts of England and Wales with Population exceeding 80,000 (1901) .
    0
    0
  • In the case of Cornwall and Cumberland the physical conditions are similar to these; but in that of Middlesex and Surrey the existence of large urban areas belonging or adjacent to London must be taken into account.
    0
    0
  • The presence of a widespread urban population must also be remembered in the case of Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire.
    0
    0
  • Market-gardening is carried on most extensively on suitable lands in the neighbourhood of the great areas of urban population; thus the open land remaining in Middlesex is largely devoted to this industry.
    0
    0
  • The establishment of their engineering and other workshops at certain centres by the great railway companies has important bearing on the concentration of urban population.
    0
    0
  • The various urban and rural districts are described below (Section X.).
    0
    0
  • In rural districts the functions of these boards are, under the Local Government Act of 1894, performed by the district councils, and in other places their constitution is similar to that of the urban and district councils (see PooR LAW).
    0
    0
  • The largest area of local government is the county; next to that the sanitary district, urban or rural, including under this head municipal boroughs, all of which are urban districts.
    0
    0
  • Election petitions against county councillors and members of other local bodies (borough councillors, urban and rural district councillors, members of school boards and boards of guardians) are classed together as municipal election petitions, and are heard in the same way, by a commissioner who must be a barrister of not less than fifteen years' standing.
    0
    0
  • Provision is made for the control of main roads in urban districts being retained by the urban district council.
    0
    0
  • In urban districts where such control has not been claimed, and in rural districts, the county council may either maintain the main roads themselves or allow or require the district councils to do so.
    0
    0
  • The things referred to include the alteration of the boundary of the district or parish; the division or union thereof with any other district or districts, parish or parishes; the conversion of a rural district or part thereof into an urban district or vice versa.
    0
    0
  • For higher education county councils and county boroughs are the sole education authorities, except that non-county boroughs and urban councils are given a concurrent power of levying a rate for higher education not exceeding id.
    0
    0
  • Under the Allotments Acts 1887 to 1907, it is the duty of a county council to ascertain the extent to which there is a demand for Allot allotments in the urban districts and parishes in the county,.
    0
    0
  • A county council may delegate, by arrangement, to the council of any borough or urban district in the county their powers in respect of the act.
    0
    0
  • But in every case the council of the borough have the powers and duties of an urban district council, and, except where they derive their authority from local acts, it may be said that their principal powers and duties consist of those which they exercise or perform as an urban council.
    0
    0
  • By the Public Health Act of that year the whole country was mapped out into urban and rural sanitary districts, and that system has been maintained until the present time, with some important changes introduced by the Public Health Acts 1875 to 1907, and the Local Government Act 1894.
    0
    0
  • There is a concurrent power in the Local Government Board under the Public Health Act 1875, but that power is now rarely exercised, and new urban districts are in practice created only by orders of county councils made under the Local Government Act 1888, section 57.
    0
    0
  • Before that time there was practically no sanitary authority outside the urban district, for although the vestry of a parish had in some cases power to make sewers and had also some other sanitary powers, there was no authority for such a district as now corresponds to a rural district.
    0
    0
  • Before the year 1894 the rural district consisted of the area of the poor-law union, exclusive of any urban district which might be within it, and the guardians of the poor were the rural sanitary authority.
    0
    0
  • Guardians are still elected as such for urban districts, but the rural district council have ceased to be the same body as the guardians and are now wholly distinct.
    0
    0
  • A district councillor, whether urban or rural, holds office for a term of three years.
    0
    0
  • The qualification and disqualification of district councillors, whether urban or rural, now depend upon the Local Government Act 1894.
    0
    0
  • The electors both in urban and rural districts are the body called the parochial electors.
    0
    0
  • It has been thought convenient to deal here with district councils, whether urban or rural, together, but the powers of the former are much more extensive than those of the latter, and Powers of as the consideration of the subject proceeds it will be necessary to indicate what powers and duties are con- rural ferred or imposed upon urban district councils only.
    0
    0
  • The necessity for this provision arises because it sometimes happens that in a district otherwise rural there are some centres of population, hardly large enough to be constituted urban districts, which nevertheless require the same control as an urban district.
    0
    0
  • If the urban district is a borough, the town clerk and borough treasurer fulfil the same office for purposes of the Public Health Acts.
    0
    0
  • In so far as such powers and duties are common to urban and rural district councils alike they will be referred to as appertaining to district councils.
    0
    0
  • When reference is made to any power or duty of an urban council it is to be understood that the rural council have no such power or duty unless conferred or imposed upon them by order of the Local Government Board.
    0
    0
  • And it must be borne in mind that in a borough the borough council is the urban district council.
    0
    0
  • In the case of new houses, these may not be built or occupied in an urban district without their being first provided with sufficient drains as the council may require; and in an urban district it is forbidden to cause any building to be newly erected over a sewer without the consent of the council.
    0
    0
  • The urban council have power to s e for provide and maintain and make provision for the regu- houses.
    0
    0
  • An urban council and a rural council, if invested with the requisite power by the Local Government Board, may, and when required by order of that board must, provide for the proper cleansing of streets, and may also provide for the proper watering of streets.
    0
    0
  • If they do not undertake these duties, they may make by-laws imposing on the occupiers of premises the duty of cleansing footways and pavements, the removal of house refuse, and the cleansing of earth-closets, privies, ashpits and cesspools; and an urban council may also make by-laws for the prevention of nuisances arising from snow, filth, dust, ashes and rubbish, and for the prevention of the keeping of animals on any premises so as to be injurious to health.
    0
    0
  • The keeping of swine in a dwelling-house, or so as to be a nuisance, is made an offence punishable by a penalty in an urban district, as also is the suffering of any waste or stagnant water to remain in any cellar, or within any dwelling-house after notice, and the allowing of the contents of any closet, privy or cesspool to overflow or soak therefrom.
    0
    0
  • Provision is also made for enforcing the removal of accumulations of manure, dung, soil or filth from any premises in an urban district, and for the periodical removal of manure or other refuse from mews, stables or other premises.
    0
    0
  • It is to be observed that they are not bound to charge for a supply of water at all, unless they are required to do so in an urban district by at least ten persons, rated to the poor rate, or in a parish in a rural district by at least five persons so rated in the parish.
    0
    0
  • Even then the amount of the rate is left to the council, any deficiency in the cost of the water, in so far as it is not defrayed out of water rates or rents, being borne in an urban district by the general district rate, and in a rural district by the separate sanitary rates made for the parish or contributory place supplied.
    0
    0
  • The urban council are required to cause fire-plugs, and all necessary works, machinery and assistance for securing a supply of water in case of fire, to be provided and maintained, and for this purpose they may enter into an agreement with any water company or person.
    0
    0
  • It is forbidden to establish within an urban district without the consent of the council any offensive trade, business or manufacture.
    0
    0
  • With regard to any offensive trade which has been established or may be consented to in any urban district, if it is verified by the medical officer or any two legally qualified medical practitioners, or by any ten inhabitants of the district, to be a nuisance or injurious to health, the urban district council are required to take proceedings before magistrates with a view to the abatement of the nuisance complained of.
    0
    0
  • When adopted it enabled an urban or district council to obtain the inspection of dairies where these were suspected to be the cause of infectious disease, with a view to prohibiting the supply of milk from such dairies if the fact were established.
    0
    0
  • These fees are paid by the urban or rural district council as the case may be.
    0
    0
  • It may be mentioned, however, that under the Local Government Act 1894, where a burial board district is wholly in an urban district, the urban council may resolve that the powers, duties and liabilities of the burial board shall be transferred to the council, and thereupon the burial board may cease to exist.
    0
    0
  • And it is provided by the same act that the Burial Acts shall not hereafter be adopted in any urban parish without the approval of the urban council.
    0
    0
  • The distinction between a burial ground provided under the Burial Acts and a cemetery provided under the act of 1879 is important in many ways, of which one only need be mentioned here - the expenses under the Burial Acts are paid out of the poor rate, while the expenses under the act of 1879 are paid in an urban district out of the general district rate, the incidence of which differs materially from that of the poor rate, as will be seen hereafter.
    0
    0
  • In an urban district the urban council have always had all the powers and duties of a surveyor of highways under the Highway highways Acts.
    0
    0
  • The highway authority in every district, rural as well as urban, is therefore the district council.
    0
    0
  • But while rural as well as urban district councils have the powers and duties of surveyors of highways, the provisions of the Public Health Acts relating to streets apply only in urban districts, except in so far as the Local Government Board may by order have conferred urban powers upon a rural district council.
    0
    0
  • The urban council are required from time to time to cause all such streets to be made up and repaired as occasion may require, and they are empowered to raise, lower or alter the soil of the street, and to place and keep in repair fences and posts for the safety of foot-passengers.
    0
    0
  • An alternative procedure has been provided by the Private Street Works Act, which may be adopted by any urban council.
    0
    0
  • Where a house or building in a street is taken down to be rebuilt, the urban district council may prescribe the line to which it is to be rebuilt, paying compensation to the building owner for any damage which he may sustain consequent upon the requirement.
    0
    0
  • But under an act of 1888 it is provided that it shall not be lawful in any urban district without the consent of the urban authority to erect or bring forward any house or building in any street or any part of such house or building beyond the front main wall of the house or building on either side thereof in the same street.
    0
    0
  • The control exercised by an urban district council over streets and buildings is to a very large extent exercised through by-laws which they are empowered to make for various purposes relating to the laying out and formation of new streets, the erection and construction of new buildings, the provision of sufficient air-space about buildings to secure a free circulation of air, and the provision of suitable and sufficient sanitary conveniences.
    0
    0
  • Among the miscellaneous powers of an urban council with respect to streets may be mentioned the power to widen or improve, and certain powers incorporated from the Towns Improvement Clauses Act 1847, with respect to naming streets, numbering houses, improving the line of streets, removing obstructions, providing protection in respect of ruinous or dangerous buildings, and requiring precautions to be taken during the construction and repair of sewers, streets and houses.
    0
    0
  • An urban council may also provide for the lighting of any street in their district, and may contract with any person or company for that purpose.
    0
    0
  • An urban council may acquire and maintain lands for the purpose of being used as public walks or pleasure-grounds, and may support or contribute to the support of such walks or grounds if Public provided by any other person.
    0
    0
  • An urban council may also provide public clocks or pay for the reasonable cost of repairing and maintaining any public clocks in the district, though not vested in them.
    0
    0
  • Where an urban council are the council of a borough, and in other cases with the consent of the owners and ratepayers of the district, they may provide market accommodation for their district.
    0
    0
  • The tolls which may be taken by an urban council must be approved by the Local Government Board; and any by-laws which they make for the regulation of the market must be confirmed by the same body.
    0
    0
  • An urban council may also provide slaughter-houses and make by-laws with respect to the management and charges for the use of them.
    0
    0
  • Certain police regulations contained in the Town Police Clauses Act 1847 are by virtue of the Public Health Act 1875 in force in all urban districts.
    0
    0
  • An urban council cFQ ' may also license proprietors, drivers and conductors of horses, ponies, mules or asses standing for hiring in the district in the same way as in the case of hackney carriages, and they may also license pleasure boats and vessels, and the boatmen or persons in charge thereof, and they may make by-laws for all these purposes.
    0
    0
  • In the case of an urban council certain stringent regulations are laid down.
    0
    0
  • As a general rule, all the expenses of carrying into execution the Public Health Acts in an urban district fall upon a fund which is called the general district fund, and that fund is provided by means of a rate called the general district rate.
    0
    0
  • First, in the case of boroughs where from the time of the first adoption of the Sanitary Acts these expenses have been paid out of the borough rate, the expenses continue to be so paid; and in an urban district which was formerly subject to an Improvement Act, the expenses may be payable out of the improvement rate authorized by that act.
    0
    0
  • Of these the first is that the owner may be rated instead of the occupier, at the option of the urban authority, where the value of the premises is under Rio, where the premises are let to weekly or monthly tenants, or where the premises are let in separate apartments, or the rents become payable or are collected at any shorter period than quarterly.
    0
    0
  • The only other point to be noticed in this connexion is that an urban council may divide their district into parts for all or any of the purposes of the act, rating each part separately for those purposes.
    0
    0
  • The expenses of highways in an urban district fall as a rule upon the general district rate, but under certain conditions, which need not be here set out, a separate highway rate may have to be levied.
    0
    0
  • The urban council have extensive powers of amending the rate, and the rate is collected in such manner as the urban authority may appoint.
    0
    0
  • These special expenses are chargeable to each parish or contributory place, and they are defrayed by means of special sanitary rates, such rates being raised on all property assessed to the relief of the poor, but with the same exemptions of certain properties as have been mentioned under the head of general district rate in urban districts.
    0
    0
  • Where the urban council are the council of a borough, their accounts as urban council are made up and audited in the same t.
    0
    0
  • Where the urban council are not the council of a borough, the accounts are made up annually, and audited by the district auditor in the same effective manner as has already been mentioned in the case of the accounts of a county council.
    0
    0
  • Under the first an urban district council may, by means of a scheme, acquire, working .
    0
    0
  • The second part of the act deals with unhealthy dwellinghouses, and requires the urban district council to take steps for the closing of any dwelling-houses within their district which are unfit for human habitation.
    0
    0
  • This part of the act may be adopted by a rural district council, but an urban district council can carry it into execution without formal adoption.
    0
    0
  • The urban district council may adopt the provisions of the Baths Baths and and Washhouses Acts, and thereunder provide public wash= baths, wash-houses, open bathing-places, covered swim.
    0
    0
  • Under the Tramways Act 1870 the urban district council may obtain from the Board of Trade a provisional order authorizing the construction of tramways in their district by themselves.
    0
    0
  • Under the Borough Funds Act 1872 the urban district council may, if in their judgment it is expedient, promote or oppose any local and personal bill or bills in parliament, or may Bills In prosecute or defend any legal proceedings necessary for the promotion or protection of the interests of the district, Parlla- and may charge the costs incurred in so doing to the w ent and rates under their control.
    0
    0
  • It is now almost the exception, at least in urban districts, to find a district council which has not obtained a provisional order under these acts, and for the most part the undertakings of local authorities in the way of supplying electricity have been very prosperous.
    0
    0
  • The urban district council execute the Public Libraries Acts for their district, and the rate for the expenses of the acts, which may not exceed td.
    0
    0
  • In every rural parish, that is to say, in every parish which is not included within an urban district, there is a parish meeting, which consists of the parochial electors of the parish.
    0
    0
  • They remain, however, the rating authority so far as regards the poor rate and nearly all other rates, the exceptions being the general district rate in an urban district and the borough rate in a borough, made by the town council.
    0
    0
  • But since the advent of British administration the history of Bengal has substantially been a record of prosperity; the teeming population of its river valleys is one of the densest in the world, and the purely agricultural districts of Saran and Muzaffarpur in the Patna division support over 900 persons to the square mile, a number hardly surpassed elsewhere except in urban areas.
    0
    0
  • The other urban districts are - Ampthill (2,77), Biggleswade (5120), Kempston, connected with Bedford to the south-west (4729), and Leighton Buzzard (6331).
    0
    0
  • All persons with an income of £50 vote in the first; all residents in an urban commune who pay taxes amounting to sixteen shillings yearly, with those who have been through the primary course of education, and all members of the liberal professions, retired officers and state pensioners, vote in the second.
    0
    0
  • Pop. of urban district (including the township of Coatham, 1901) 7695.
    0
    0
  • Those of the urban middle classes are shopkeepers and artizans, and those of the lower class are domestics and day labourers.
    0
    0
  • The urban population, reckoning as such dwellers in the nine largest towns and their suburbs, exceeds 331,000, being nearly 25% of the total population of the colony proper.
    0
    0
  • The first task of the new government was to introduce (on the 4th of March) an Additional Representation Bill, to rectify - in part - the disparity in electoral power of the rural and urban districts.
    0
    0
  • While the country districts remained fairly prosperous (agricultural and pastoral products increasing), the transit trade and the urban industries continued to decline.
    0
    0
  • The population, which was 686,863 in 1897 (324,587 women), consists chiefly of Russians in the northern and middle portions, and of Kirghiz (about 350,000), who breed cattle, horses and sheep. The urban population was only 74,069.
    0
    0
  • His failure to pay the interest of the money borrowed in Rome, and the desire of Urban VIII.
    0
    0
  • With West Kirby to the south, at the mouth of the estuary of the Dee, it forms the urban district of Hoylake and West Kirby.
    0
    0
  • Baldus was the master of Pierre Roger de Beaufort, who became pope under the title of Gregory XI., and whose immediate successor, Urban VI., summoned Baldus to Rome to assist him by his consultations in 1380 against the anti-pope Clement VII.
    0
    0
  • Urban died before the arrival of Charles, of Anjou, and was succeeded by Clement IV.
    0
    0
  • In 1900 34.3% was urban, i.e.
    0
    0
  • St Peter's parish, lying on the landward side of Broadstairs, and included in the urban district, has a church dating from the 12th to the end of the 16th century.
    0
    0
  • The early 'eighties were made notable by a tremendous " boom " in real estate, rural and urban, throughout the commonwealth.
    0
    0
  • They fought first upon the question of acknowledging Urban II.
    0
    0
  • Anselm felt himself obliged to accept this decision, and refused to accept his own pallium from William when Urban sent it across the sea by the hands of a legate.
    0
    0
  • But there was a simultaneous outbreak in many urban districts.
    0
    0
  • In 1905, out of a total factory product of $411,139,681, $259,420,044 was the value of goods made in factories in the twenty-two municipalities of the state, with a population (1900) of at least 8000; but only 36.3% of the total number of factories were in urban districts.
    0
    0
  • Wednesfield (pop. 4883), Heath Town Or Wednesfield Heath (9441) and Willenhall (18, 515) are neighbouring urban districts, with populations employed in the manufacture of locks, keys and small iron goods, in iron and brass foundries, varnish works, &c.
    0
    0
  • The last named distributes it thus-1,50o,000 rural, 200,000 urban, and ioo,000 shepherds.
    0
    0
  • The urban district includes the townships of Upper Swinford and Wollaston.
    0
    0
  • They were much used by Constantine Lascaris in his Greek grammar and by Urban of Belluno (end of 15th cent.).
    0
    0
  • The urban district includes what were once the separate villages of Aberaman, Abernant, Cwmbach, Cwmaman, Cwmdare, Llwydcoed and Trecynon.
    0
    0
  • The urban population, indeed, has for some years shown a tendency to increase.
    0
    0
  • Thus in 1841 the rural population was returned as 7,052,923 and the urban as 1,143,674, while the corresponding figures in 1901 were respectively 3,073,846 and 1,384,929.
    0
    0
  • During the decade only three counties, Dublin, Down and Antrim, showed any increase, the increase being due to the growth of certain urban areas.
    0
    0
  • The inhabitants of the rural districts (3,073,846) decreased during the decade by over 380,000; that of the urban districts, i.e.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, towns like Cork (75,978), Waterford (26,743) and Limerick (38,085), remained almost stationary during the ten years, but the urban districts of Pembroke and of Rathmines and Rathgar, which are practically suburbs of Dublin, showed considerable increases.
    0
    0
  • Subordinate district councils, urban and rural, were also established as in England and Scotland to manage the various local areas within each county.
    0
    0
  • The act provides facilities for the conversion into urban districts of (1) towns having town commissioners who are not sanitary authorities and (2) non-municipal towns with populations of over i 50o and entitled to petition for town commissioners.
    0
    0
  • It was even intended to crown him; and Urban III.
    0
    0
  • Except in number, the rural establishments showed greater increases than the urban.'
    0
    0
  • The number of rural establishments in 1900 was 1174; in 1905, 1179; and the number of urban establishments in 1900, 195; in 1905, 220; but the capitalization of the rural establishments increased from $50,057,922 in 1900 to $97,942,185 in 1905; while that of the urban increased from $12,692,105 to $15,480,039; the value of the products of the rural establishments increased from $41,930,816 to $ 6 4, 88 7,74 8; while that of the urban establishments increased from $11,404,995 to $14,488,514; and the number of employes in rural establishments increased from 36,616 to 50,744, while those in urban establishments increased from 7409 to 8697.
    0
    0
  • For administrative purposes Croatia-Slavonia is divided into 8 rural counties, already enumerated; besides the 4 urban counties, or municipalities of Agram, Semlin, Warasdin and Esseg.
    0
    0
  • These are subdivided into rural and urban communes, each with its representative council.
    0
    0
  • He demanded of the king, as the conditions of his retaining office, that he should give up all the possessions of the see, accept his spiritual counsel, and acknowledge Urban as pope in opposition to the anti-pope, Clement.
    0
    0
  • But William would not permit this; he had not acknowledged Urban, and he maintained his right to prevent any pope being acknowledged by an English subject without his permission.
    0
    0
  • The matter was postponed, and William meanwhile privately sent messengers to Rome, who acknowledged Urban and prevailed on him to send a legate to the king bearing the archiepiscopal pall.
    0
    0
  • Anselm was received with high honour by Urban, and at a great council held at Bari, he was put forward to defend the doctrine of the procession of the Holy Ghost against the representatives of the Greek Church.
    0
    0
  • But Urban was too politic to embroil himself with the king of England, and Anselm found that he could obtain no substantial result.
    0
    0
  • At the celebrated council of Clermont (1095), at which the first crusade was preached, Urban strengthened the former prohibitions by declaring that no one might accept any spiritual office from a layman, or take an oath of fealty to any layman.
    0
    0
  • Monarchic centralization, interrupted for the moment by the war, took up with fresh vigour its attacks upon urban liberties, especially in the always more independent south.
    0
    0
  • The victims of this process were the urban proletariat, whose treatment by their employers in trade became less and less protective and beneficent, and the nobility, straitened in their financial resources, uprooted from their ancient strongholds, and gradually despoiled of their power by a monarchy based On popular support.
    0
    0
  • Under pressure of this new danger and urged on by the Catholic dvts, supported by the influence of Pope Urban VIII., Richelieu concluded with Spain the treaty of Monzon (March 5, 1626), by which the interests of his allies Venice, Savoy and the Grisons were sacrificed without their being consulted.
    0
    0