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university

university

university Sentence Examples

  • On a hunch, she called the University of Arkansas.

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  • At the university he made rapid progress, especially in jurisprudence, though preferring the study of history, literature, juridical science and philosophy.

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  • 12 1876 and educated at the university of California.

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  • I encouraged him to enroll at nearby Boston University in hopes he'd find an interest.

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  • He went to the university of Leipzig as a student of philosophy and natural sciences, but entered officially as a student of medicine.

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  • This was a guy from a small town in Iowa who failed his 1933 entrance exam to the University of Minnesota.

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  • Owing to the historical past of Naples, and its social and economic condition at the end of the 17th century, the only study that really flourished there was that of law; and this soon penetrated from the courts to the university, and was raised to the level of a science.

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  • In 1907-1908 the university had 122 instructors, 1178 students and a library of 55,395 volumes.

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  • His education was completed at the Calvinist college of Sarospatak and at the university of Budapest.

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  • It was something she had smelled at the University ... but when and where?

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  • After the war, in 1947, Jonas Salk was offered his own laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

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  • He was attending Bucknell University on a baseball scholarship and working in a New Jersey camp for the summer.

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  • At the age of thirteen he entered the university where he studied under Graevius and Gronovius.

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  • Educated at Leipzig and Berlin, he became extraordinary professor in 1883 and ordinary professor in 1892 of Egyptology in the university of Berlin, and in 1885 he was appointed director of the Egyptian department of the royal museum.

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  • From the Consistory, from the Senate, from the University, from the Foundling Hospital, the Suffragan has sent... asking for information....

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  • What's more, the Internet can be a fact checker, post office, Rolodex, Yellow Pages, White Pages, game board, garage sale, university, movie theater, jukebox, matchmaking service, travel agent, photo album, bank, support group ...

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  • Warham, who was chancellor of Oxford University from 1506 until his death, was munificent in his public, and moderate in his private life.

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  • He was preparing to enter the university, but he and his friend Obolenski had lately, in secret, agreed to join the hussars.

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  • The university being disorganized, Grynaeus pursued his studies, and in 1531 visited England for research in libraries.

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  • The university of Cagliari, which in1874-1875had only 60 students, had 260 in 1 9 02-1903.

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  • On the 11th of May 1820 he took his doctor's degree; in the same year he qualified as Privatdozent at the university of Erlangen.

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  • On the strength of these works he offered himself as a candidate for the university chair of jurisprudence, but as he had no personal or family influence was not elected.

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  • Through the columns of the Independent Reflector, which he established in 1752, Livingston fought the attempt of the Anglican party to bring the projected King's College (now Columbia University) under the control of the Church of England.

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  • The university, founded in 1869, built mainly of basalt, has schools of arts, medicine, chemistry and mineralogy.

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  • Gaining his freedom at the instance of Hungarian magnates, he visited Melanchthon at Wittenberg, and in 152 4 became professor of Greek at the university of Heidelberg, being in addition professor of Latin from 1526.

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  • No record of his studies is to be found, but he has left an amusing account of his part in the wilder doings of the university life of that day, in which, in spite of his small stature, he was recognized by his fellows as their leader.

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  • In 1904 he delivered at the university of California a course of lectures, the object of which was to illustrate the application of the methods of physical chemistry to the study of the theory of toxins and antitoxins, and which were published in 1907 under the title Immunochemistry.

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  • Thompson proved a worthy successor to Whewell; the twenty years of his mastership were years of progress, and he himself took an active part in the abolition of tests and the reform of university studies and of the college statutes.

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  • A fierce quarrel arose over his burial between the brotherhood of St Stephen, to which he had belonged, and the university professors, who desired to escort his corpse to the grave.

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  • The city is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio, and the Southern railways, and is best known as the seat of the University of Virginia, which was founded by Thomas Jefferson.

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  • (1784) a professorship at the university of Wilna, which he did not find to his taste.

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  • He entered the university of Göttingen, but soon left, and, taking service in the Austrian army, took part in the Russian campaign of 1812, and fought in the following year at Dresden, Kulm and Leipzig.

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  • The old (1678) and new (1873) episcopal palaces, the hospital, the university and the barracks (formerly a Franciscan monastery) are noteworthy examples of Spanish colonial architecture.

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  • The city also contains numerous excellent educational establishments, although the state university is not here but at Tubingen, and its conservatorium of music has long been renowned.

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  • Later he was chosen director of the university observatory, which was erected (1818-1821) under his superintendence.

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  • President Harper was selected by him to organize the university, and it was his will that the president and two-thirds of the trustees should be " always " Baptists.

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  • He was one of the founders of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), was a member of the New York Council for some years before the War of Independence, a member and president of the First Provincial Congress of New York (1775), and a member of the Second Provincial Congress (1775-1776).

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  • Here are also the Rawlings Institute for girls, founded as the Albemarle Female Institute in 1857, and a University school.

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  • FLOWERS Imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (as the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles of decoration and ornament.

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  • On the other end of the education spectrum, college degrees are up: A recent Harvard University study reports that 6.7 percent of the world has a college degree, up from 5.9 percent in 2000.

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  • He was educated at home and at the university of Strassburg, where he was chiefly noted for his athletic skill.

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  • "Ah yes, my dear," said the count, addressing the visitor and pointing to Nicholas, "his friend Boris has become an officer, and so for friendship's sake he is leaving the university and me, his old father, and entering the military service, my dear.

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  • He did something at the university.

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  • In 1815 he settled at Leipzig as privatdocent, and the next year became extraordinary professor of astronomy in connexion with the university.

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  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).

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  • In 1877 the Ohio Wesleyan female college,established at Delaware in 1853, was incorporated in the university.

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  • Of Waynflete's education it is only possible to assert that he was at Oxford University.

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  • He was educated at Pavia and Bologna, and in 1812 became professor of law at the latter university.

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  • He was privately educated before entering the university.

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  • A Sikh college for university education was opened in 1897.

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  • He then returned to Pavia, where he pursued his studies at the university under Francesco Brioschi, and determined to seek a career as teacher of mathematics.

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  • In 1860 he was appointed to the professorship of higher geometry at the university of Bologna, and in 1866 to that of higher geometry and graphical statics at the higher technical college of Milan.

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  • In 1873 he was called to Rome to organize the college of engineering, and was also appointed professor of higher mathematics at the university.

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  • He reorganized the university of Vienna and encouraged the development of the universities of Ingolstadt and Freiburg.

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  • Subsequently he entered Berlin University as a student of theology, but soon turned to scientific subjects.

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  • He was educated at the military school at Berlin and afterwards at the university of Oxford.

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  • In 1847 he began to act as Privatdozent in the university, and founded with Reinhardt the Archiv fiir pathologische Anatomie and Physiologic, which, after his collaborator's death in 1852, he carried on alone, and in 1848 he went as a member of a government commission to investigate an outbreak of typhus in upper Silesia.

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  • In 1867 he became privatdozent in Berlin University, and in the following year was chosen professor of physics at the Zurich Polytechnic: then, after a year or two at Wurzburg, he was called in 1872 to Strassburg, where he took a great part in the organization of the new university, and was largely concerned in the erection of the Physical Institute.

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  • In the choice of these spots two motives seem to have influenced him - the neighbourhood of a university or college, and the amenities of the situation.

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  • About the same time (April 1645) Schoock was summoned before the university of Groningen, of which he was a member, and forthwith disavowed the more abusive passages in his book.

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  • When Descartes complained to the authorities of this unfair treatment, 4 the only reply was an order by which all mention of the name of Cartesianism, whether favourable or adverse, was forbidden in the university.

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  • At Leiden, Utrecht, Groningen, Franeker, Breda, Nimeguen, Harderwyk, Duisburg and Herborn, and at the Catholic university of Louvain, Cartesianism was warmly expounded and defended in seats of learning, of which many are now left desolate, and by adherents whose writings have for the most part long lost interest for any but the antiquary.

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  • In 1671 the archbishop of Paris, by the king's order, summoned the heads of the university to his presence, and enjoined them to take stricter measures against philosophical novelties dangerous to the faith.

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  • In 1677 the university of Caen adopted not less stringent measures against Cartesianism.

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  • From this period dates the castle, and also the buildings of the university, founded by Gabriel Bethlen, and now used as barracks.

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  • He was educated there and at Madrid University, where his Radicalism soon got him into trouble, and he narrowly escaped being expelled for his share in student riots and other demonstrations against the governments of Queen Isabella.

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  • Having received his elementary education at the monastery of Monte Cassino, he studied for six years at the university of Naples, leaving it in his-sixteenth year.

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  • Before he left Paris he had thrown himself with ardour into the controversy raging between the university and the Friar-Preachers respecting the liberty of teaching, resisting both by speeches and pamphlets the authorities of the university; and when the dispute was referred to the pope, the youthful Aquinas was chosen to defend his order, which he did with such success as to overcome the arguments of Guillaume de St Amour, the champion of the university, and one of the most celebrated men of the day.

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  • The "McGill University College of British Columbia" at Vancouver is one of the colleges of McGill University (Montreal).

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  • Fleeming Jenkin was educated at first in Scotland, but in 1846 the family went to live abroad, owing to financial straits, and he studied at Genoa University, where he took a first-class degree in physical science.

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  • In 1868 he obtained the same professorship at Edinburgh University, and in 1873 he published a textbook of Magnetism and Electricity, full of original work.

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  • ADOLPHUS WILLIAM WARD (1837-), English historian and man of letters, was born at Hampstead, London, on the 2nd of December 1837, and was educated in Germany and at the university of Cambridge.

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  • The university possesses a very important library.

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  • Tubingen's chief claim to attention lies in its famous university, founded in 1477 by Duke Eberhard of Wurttemberg.

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  • The university adopted the reformed faith in 1 534, and in 1537 a Protestant theological seminary, a residential college - the so-called Stift - was incorporated with it.

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  • The university was attended in 1908 by 1891 students and had a teaching staff of over Ioo.

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  • The university of Aberdeen conferred upon him the honorary degree of D.D.

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  • Two important educational establishments are the Indian Institute for the education of civil service students for thecolonies, to which is attached an ethnographical museum; and the Royal Polytechnic school, which almost ranks as a university, and teaches, among other sciences, that of diking.

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  • Higher education is represented by the provincial university, which teaches science and mathematics, holds examinations, distributes scholarships, and grants degrees in all subjects.

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  • The arts colleges of the churches carry on the several courses required by the university, and send their students to the examinations of the university.

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  • The necessary inference is that his stay at the university was short, and that only the groundwork of his education was laid there.

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  • Although there is no direct evidence of the fact, there can be no doubt that he left St Andrews to complete his education abroad, and that he probably studied at the university of Paris, and visited Italy and Germany.

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  • As early as 1839 Stanley had joined with Tait, the future archbishop, in advocating certain university reforms. From 1846 onwards Jowett threw himself into this movement, which in 1848 became general amongst the younger and more thoughtful fellows, until it took effect in the commission of 1850 and the act of 1854.

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  • and other degrees, and for university and college offices.

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  • He spoke at an important meeting upon this question in London on the 10th of June 1864, which laid the ground for the University Tests Act of 1871.

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  • The university pulpit, indeed, was closed to him, but several congregations in London delighted in his sermons, and from 1866 until the year of his death he preached annually in Westminster Abbey, where Stanley had become dean in 1863.

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  • His influence in the university was less assured.

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  • Theologian, tutor, university reformer, a great master of a college, Jowett's best claim to the remembrance of succeeding generations was his greatness as a moral teacher.

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  • The Old Side adopted the academy at New London, Chester (disambiguation)|Chester county, Pennsylvania, which had been organized by Francis Alison in 1741, as their own; but the New London school broke up when Alison became a professor in the Philadelphia Academy (afterwards the university of Pennsylvania).

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  • William Dunlop (c. 1650-1700) ministered to them until 1688, when he became principal of the university of Glasgow.

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  • Dumas's novel, Memoirs of a Physician, is founded on his adventures; see also a series of papers in the Dublin University Magazine, vols.

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  • The royal university of Parma, founded in 1601 by Ranuccio I., and reconstituted by Philip of Bourbon in 1768, has faculties in law, medicine and natural science, and possesses an observatory, and natural science collections, among which is the Eritrean Zoological Museum.

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  • Science and Literature.-Though the university of Cordoba is the oldest but one in South America, it has made no conspicuous contribution to Argentine literature beyond the historical works of its famous rector, Gregorio Funes (1749-1830).

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  • This university was founded in 1621 and the university of Buenos Aires in 1821, but although Bonpland and some other European scientists were members of the faculty of Buenos Aires in its early years, neither there nor at Cordoba was any marked attention given to the natural sciences until President Sarmiento (official term, 1868-1874) initiated scientific instruction at the university of Cordoba under the eminent German naturalist, Dr Hermann Burmeister (1807-1892), and founded the National Observatory at Cordoba and placed it under the direction of ' There are two distinct statistical offices compiling immigration returns and their totals do not agree, owing in part to the traffic between Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

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  • Not only has scientific study advanced at the university of Buenos Aires, but scientific research is promoting the development of the country; examples are the geographical explorations of the Andean frontier, and especially of the Patagonian Andes, by Francisco P. Moreno.

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  • He was educated at the Jesuit College in Calatayud and afterwards studied law at the university of Valladolid.

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  • After attending the Cologne gymnasium, he entered the university of Berlin in 1844, and took his doctor's degree there three years later.

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  • In 18J4 he left Berlin to become professor of physics in Basel University, removing nine years afterwards to Brunswick Polytechnic, and in 1866 to Karlsruhe Polytechnic. In 1871 he accepted the chair of physical chemistry a t Leipzig.

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  • At twenty he entered the university of Wittenberg, and studied afterwards at the university of Leipzig.

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  • Matriculating at the university of Gottingen in 1811, he began by devoting himself to astronomy under Carl Friedrich Gauss; but he enlisted in the Hanseatic Legion for the campaign of 1813 - 14, and became lieutenant of artillery in the Prussian service in 1815.

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  • Among the public edifices are the capitol, which occupies a whole square, the university, of nearly equal size, the cathedral, pantheon, masonic temple (built by the state in the spendthrift days of Guzman Blanco), national library, opera-house, and a number of large churches.

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  • From 1879 to 1884 he was Cavendish professor of experimental physics in the university of Cambridge, in succession to Clerk Maxwell; and in 1887 he accepted the post of professor of natural philosophy at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, which he resigned in 1905.

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  • He remained president till 1908, in which year he was chosen to succeed the 8th duke of Devonshire as chancellor of Cambridge University.

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  • He began his education at Valladolid, and studied law afterwards at Madrid University, where he leaned towards Radicalism in politics.

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  • In 1493 he was created a cardinal, and in 1495 was elected chancellor of the university of Oxford.

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  • His great fame as a professor of civil law at the university of Bologna caused Balduinus to be elected podestd of the city of Genoa, where he was entrusted with the reforms of the law of the republic. He died at Bologna in 1225, and has left behind him some treatises on procedure, the earliest of their kind.

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  • He was elected fellow of Balliol in 1850 and Savilian professor of geometry in 1861, and in 1874 was appointed keeper of the university museum.

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  • He was descended in the sixth generation from Jonathan Dickinson, first president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and his ancestors had been closely connected with the Presbyterian church.

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  • He was educated at Winchester and University College, Oxford, where he took a first class in classics and a second in mathematics, besides taking a leading part in the Union debates.

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  • His previous university reputation and connexions, combined with his colonial experience, stood him in good stead.

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  • He felt then, and still more after the Reform Act of 1866, that "we must educate our masters," 1 and he rather scandalized his old university friends by the stress he laid on physical science as opposed to classical studies.

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  • Educated at University College, London, he was called to the bar in 1849.

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  • from the university of Dublin, he neither sought nor received the ordinary rewards to which his discoveries would entitle him.

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  • university statutes, in which he indicated the necessity for reform; and in 1850 and 1855 he was a member of the commission of inquiry relative to the university of Cambridge.

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  • A few weeks later his eldest son, Philip William, count of Buren, a student at the university of Louvain, was kidnapped and carried off to Madrid.

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  • In honour of this great deliverance, the state of Holland founded the university, which was speedily to make the name of Leiden illustrious throughout Europe.

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  • Clausius as ordinary professor of physics in the university of Bonn.

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  • The formation during recent years of such lectureships as the "Lyman Beecher" course at Yale University has resulted in increased attention being given to homiletics, and the published volumes of this series are the best contribution to the subject.

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  • He graduated at the university of Virginia in 1856, and studied at the university of Berlin in 1866-1868.

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  • In 1869-1879 he was professor of Hebrew in the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (first in Greenville, South Carolina, and after 1877 in Louisville, Kentucky), and in 1880 he became professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages in Harvard University, where until 1903 he was also Dexter lecturer onzbiblical literature.

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  • After studying at the university of Prague he travelled through Europe, and among other countries he visited England, where he became acquainted with James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) and other leaders of the Tractarian party.

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  • The chief institutions for higher instruction are the university of Vermont and State Agricultural College (1800, 1865), a land-grant college at Burlington, Middlebury College (1800) at Middlebury, Norwich University (1819) at, Northfield, and the state normal schools at Randolph (1867), Johnson (1867) and Castleton (1868).

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  • degree at the university of Zurich and published his first papers on physical subjects.

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  • These were so highly thought of that in 1909 he was appointed extraordinary professor of theoretical physics at the university of Zurich.

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  • At Jena, where he lectured as a Privatdozent at the university, he contributed to the Athenaeum the aphorisms and essays in which the principles of the Romantic school are most definitely stated.

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  • He studied philosophy and medicine at the university of Louvain, where he remained as a lecturer for several years.

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  • He entered the Protestant Church, and in 1663, through the influence of his friend Abraham Heidanus, who had assisted him in his greatest need, he obtained a poorly paid lectureship at the university.

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  • at Oxford, and in 1651 chancellor of the University, an office which he held till 1657, when he was succeeded by his son Richard.

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  • In 1657 he founded a new university at Durham, which was suppressed at the Restoration.

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  • In 1266 he was attached to the Faculty of Arts in the University of Paris at the time when there was a great conflict between the four "nations."

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  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).

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  • This university was founded to furnish a practical education at a low cost, and in 1910 had 187 instructors and a total enrolment of 5367 students.

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  • On his return he became librarian to the university, and took the chair of recent philosophy at the faculty of letters.

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  • He matriculated at the university in 1482, graduated B.A.

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  • of that university, and with Wimpina's assistance he drew up, in January 1518, a hundred and six theses in answer to Luther's.

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  • GEORGE MONRO GRANT (1835-1902), principal of Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, was born in Nova Scotia in 183 5.

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  • He was educated at Glasgow university, where he had a brilliant academic career; and having entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, he returned to Canada and obtained a pastoral charge in Halifax, Nova Scotia, which he held from 1863 to 1877.

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  • "SIR DAVID GILL (1843-1914), British astronomer, was born in Aberdeenshire June 12 18 4 3 and educated at the university of Aberdeen.

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  • In that licentious university Francis found the greatest difficulty in resisting attacks on his virtue, and once at least had to draw his sword to defend his personal safety against a band of ruffians.

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  • Excavations under the auspices of Harvard University began here in 1908.

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  • Lingen was the seat of a university from 1685 to 1819.

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  • The university dates from 1307, and has faculties of law, science and medicine; it had 318 students in 1902-1903.

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  • Marburg is the seat of a university.

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  • There are 21 universitiesBologna, Cagliari, Camerino, Catania, Ferrara,Genoa,Macerata, Messina, Modena, Naples, Padua, Palermo, Parma, Pavia, Perugia, Pisa, Rome, Sassari, Siena, Turin, Urbino, of which Camerino, Ferrara, Perugia and Urbino are not state institutions; university courses are also given at Aquila, Ban and Catanzaro.

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  • The institutions which co-operate with the universities are the special schools for engineers at Turin, Naples, Rome and Bologna (and others attached to some of the universities), the higher technical institute at Milan, the higher veterinary schools of Milan, Naples and Turin, the institute for higher studies at Florence (Istituto di studi superiori, pratici e di perfezionamento), the literary and scientific academy of Milan, the higher institutes for the training of female teachers at Florence and Rome, the Institute of Social Studies at Florence, the higher commercial schools at Venice, Ban and Genoa, the commercial university founded by L.

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  • Thus, that of 1907-1908 was devoted mainly to raising the salaries of government officials and university professors; even then the maximum for both (in the former class, for an under-secretary of state) was only 500 per annum.

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  • One of the causes of ill-feeling was the university question; the Austrian government had persistently refused to create an Italian university for its Italian subjects, fearing lest it should become a hotbed of irredentism, the Italianspeaking students being thus obliged to attend the GermanAustrian universities.

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  • by the university of Oxford; in December he became a commissioner of trade, and in December 1696 governor of the Royal Fishery Company.

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  • Little is known with certainty of his university career beyond the facts that he became a fellow of Jesus College in 1510 or 1511, that he had soon after to vacate his fellowship, owing to his marriage to " Black Joan," a relative of the landlady of the Dolphin Inn, and that he was reinstated in it on the death of his wife, which occurred in childbirth before the lapse of the year of grace allowed by the statutes.

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  • If the offer was made, it was declined, and Cranmer continued at Cambridge filling the offices of lecturer in divinity at his own college and of public examiner in divinity to the university.

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  • It was a somewhat curious concurrence of circumstances that transferred Cranmer, almost at one step, from the quiet seclusion of the university to the din and bustle of the court.

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  • The university, founded in 1473, existed until 17 9 7.

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  • It was mainly by his instrumentality that the university plate was sent to the king at York in 1642.

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  • He was of good family, and after studying at the university of Naples he entered the public service, and was for many years employed in the office of the administration of finances.

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  • At the age of sixty, having become widely known by his writings on philosophy, he was called to the chair of logic and metaphysics in the university of Naples, which he held till his death in November 1846.

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  • c. 17 provided that married laymen might be judges of the courts Christian if they were doctors of civil law, created in any university.

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  • These courts consist of every parochial minister or professor of divinity of any university within the limits, and of an elder commissioned from every kirk session.

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  • In 1787 he was appointed lecturer in chemistry to the Royal Artillery, and when the university was founded in 1810 he was selected to be the professor of chemistry.

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  • Of modern buildings may be mentioned the University (1826), the Palais de Justice (1844), and the new theatre (1848), all designed by Roelandt, and the Institut des Sciences (1890) by A.

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  • Among the educational establishments is the State University, founded by King William I.

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  • This was, in fact, a great university.

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  • From Glasgow University he went to Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • In 1869 he was elected chancellor of Edinburgh University, having already been rector of the university of Glasgow.

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  • The preliminary, or classical examination, is usually that of university matriculation, or its equivalent.

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  • FRANCOIS DE BAR (1538-1606), French scholar, was born at Seizencourt, near St Quentin, and having studied at the university of Paris entered the order of St Benedict.

    0
    0
  • There are an opera-house and an academy of music. The Auckland University College and the grammar school are the principal educational establishments.

    0
    0
  • In his twentieth year he matriculated at the university of Seville, but his career as a student was undistinguished.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1850 Ayala removed his name from the university books, and settled in Madrid with the purpose of becoming a professional dramatist.

    0
    0
  • On the passing of the Act of Uniformity in 1662, Newcomen lost his living, but was soon invited to the pastorate at Leiden, where he was held in high esteem not only by his own people but by the university professors.

    0
    0
  • Further, the term is particularly used of a course of post-graduate study at a university, for which many universities have provided special Research Studentships or Fellowships.

    0
    0
  • Kant's lectures on physical geography were delivered in the university of Konigsberg from 1765 onwards.'

    0
    0
  • The Ohio State University (non-sectarian and co-educational), opened as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College in 1873, and reorganized under its present name in 1878, is 3 m.

    0
    0
  • The government of the university is vested in a board of trustees appointed by the governor of the state for a term of seven years.

    0
    0
  • Other institutions of learning are the Capital University and Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary (Theological Seminary opened in 1830; college opened as an academy in 1850), with buildings just east of the city limits; Starling Ohio Medical College, a law school, a dental school and an art institute.

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    0
  • Besides the university library, there is the Ohio state library occupying a room in the capitol and containing in 1908 126,000 volumes, including a "travelling library" of about 36,000 volumes, from which various organizations in different parts of the state may borrow books; the law library of the supreme court of Ohio, containing complete sets of English, Scottish, Irish, Canadian, United States and state reports, statutes and digests; the public school library of about 68,000 volumes, and the public library (of about 55,000), which is housed in a marble and granite building completed in 1906.

    0
    0
  • It possesses a Roman Catholic seminary for priests, and was the seat of a university founded in 1635, which was transferred to Budapest in 1777.

    0
    0
  • He is celebrated as a collector of paintings, books, gems and sculptures, his "Arundel marbles" being given by his grandson in 1667 to the University of Oxford.

    0
    0
  • His efforts were impeded by the obstruction of the clergy of Cracow, who regarded him as an adventurer; but he succeeded in reforming the university after his own mind, and was its rector for three years (1782-1785).

    0
    0
  • In 1885 he became professor of modern history in the university of Berlin, and he was a member of the German Reichstag from 1884 to 1890.

    0
    0
  • At the university of Greifswald he gained much distinction as a humanist, and in 1504 was appointed by the abbot of the Praemonstratensian monastery at Belbuck rector of the town school at Treptow.

    0
    0
  • He preached and lectured in the university, but his zeal and organizing skill soon spread his reforming influence far beyond its limits.

    0
    0
  • He left Oxford in 1819 and settled at Laleham, near Staines, where he took pupils for the university.

    0
    0
  • He graduated, at West Point in 1853, served for two years in the artillery, was assistant professor of natural and experimental philosophy at West Point in 1855-1860, and while on leave (1860-1861) was professor of physics at Washington university, St Louis.

    0
    0
  • The latter position he held for nearly forty-five years, with the exception of a short time spent at the university of Leiden, where his health was affected by the Dutch climate.

    0
    0
  • Educated at Toronto University, he became a lecturer in English at the Toronto Collegiate Institute and held that post until 1885, when he gave up teaching for journalism, being editor and proprietor of the Lindsay Warder from 1885 to 1897.

    0
    0
  • The university of Orihuela, founded in 1568 by the archbishop of Valencia, was closed in 1835, part of the revenue being applied to the support of a college affiliated to the university of Valencia.

    0
    0
  • Molsheim was known in the 9th century as Molleshem, and formerly was the seat of a famous Jesuit college, which in 1702 was removed to Strassburg and united with the university of that city.

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    0
  • Montevideo possesses a university and a number of preparatory schools, a state-supported technical school and a military college.

    0
    0
  • He studied at the university of Padua, where he graduated in 1696.

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    0
  • An excellent system of parks-8 within the city with an aggregate area of 1311 acres, and 3 with an aggregate area of 310 acres just outside the city limits - adds to the beauty of the city, among the most attractive being the Riverside, the St Clair, the University, the Military, the Fair View, the Garfield and the Brookside.

    0
    0
  • The university of Indianapolis (1896) is a loose association of three really independent institutions - the Indiana Law School (1894), the Indiana Dental College (1879), and Butler University (chartered in 1849 and opened in 1855 as the North-western Christian University, and named Butler University in 1877 in honour of Ovid Butler, a benefactor).

    0
    0
  • Other educational institutions are the Indianapolis College of Law (1897), the Indiana Medical College (the School of Medicine of Purdue University, formed in 1905 by the consolidation of the Medical College of Indiana, the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Fort Wayne College of Medicine), the State College of Physicians and Surgeons (the medical school of Indiana University), the Indiana Veterinary College (1892), the Indianapolis Normal School, the Indiana Kindergarten and Primary Normal Training School (private), and the Winona Technical Institute.

    0
    0
  • Educated at Harrow and Balliol College, Oxford, he was for ten years a lecturer at University College, Oxford (1871-81).

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    0
  • Andrew's University.

    0
    0
  • On his arrival in Russia he rapidly rose to distinction, and was made professor of chemistry in the university of St Petersburg; he ultimately became_rector, and in 1764 secretary of state.

    0
    0
  • In 1852 he became lecturer in medicine at the university of Tubingen, where he published his great work Kraft and Stoi' (18J5).

    0
    0
  • The name of John Ford appears in the university register of Oxford as matriculating at Exeter College in 1601.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Pembroke College, Oxford, of which college (after taking a first class in mathematics in 1840 and gaining the university mathematical scholarship in 1842) he becalm fellow in 1844 and tutor and mathematical lecturer in 1845.

    0
    0
  • He at once took a leading position in the mathematical teaching of the university, and published treatises on the Di f ferential calculus (in 1848) and the Infinitesimal calculus (4 vols., 1852-1860), which for long were the recognized textbooks there.

    0
    0
  • Other important buildings are the Sobranye, or parliament house, the palace of the synod, the ministries of war and commerce, the university with the national printing press, the national library, the officers' club and several large military structures.

    0
    0
  • Probably in 1304 he went to Paris, in 1307 he received his doctor's degree from the university, and in the same year was appointed regent of the theological school.

    0
    0
  • Since about the same time a process of rigorous Russification has been carried through in the same provinces, in all departments of administration, in the higher schools and in the university of Dorpat, the name of which was altered to Yuriev.

    0
    0
  • 4 Distrust of the natural sciences, Ed uca- even in their technical applications, and of Western ideas of free government; desire to make university don.

    0
    0
  • Finland has a university of its own at Helsingfors.

    0
    0
  • In several university towns there are free teaching establishments for women, supported by subscription, with programmes and examinations equal to those of the universities.

    0
    0
  • Besides the Academy of Science, the Moscow Society of Naturalists, the Mineralogical Society, the Geographical Society, with its Caucasian and Siberian branches, the archaeological societies and the scientific societies of the Baltic provinces, all of which are of old and recognized standing, there have lately sprung up a series of new societies in connexion with each university, and their serials are yearly growing in importance, as, too, are those of the Moscow Society of Friends of Natural Science, the Chemico-Physical Society, and various medical, educational and other associations.

    0
    0
  • of St Petersburg University, xv.

    0
    0
  • For more detailed bibliographical information see Apercu des travaux zoo-ge'ographiques, published at St Petersburg in connexion with the Exhibition of 1878; and the index Ukazatel Russkoi Literatury for natural science, mathematics and medicine, published since 1872 by the Society of the Kiev University.

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    0
  • degrees from all the Scottish universities, was from 1896 to 1899 lord rector of Edinburgh University and from 1900 chancellor of St.

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    0
  • Andrews University.

    0
    0
  • The first group consists of experiments selected from the records of a large number made on the boiler of the locomotive belonging to the Purdue University, Indiana, U.S.A.

    0
    0
  • In 1524 he went to the university of Paris, where he entered the .College of St Barbara, then the headquarters of the Spanish and Portuguese students, and in 1528 was appointed lecturer in Aristotelian philosophy at the College de Beauvais.

    0
    0
  • He was prepared for college by a private tutor, studied for two years at the Farmers' College, near Cincinnati, and in 1852 graduated from Miami University, at that time the leading educational institution in the State of Ohio.

    0
    0
  • All three brothers studied at St Andrews University.

    0
    0
  • In 1879 and 1880 as Rector Magnificus he fought against the introduction of Czech instead of German in the Prague University.

    0
    0
  • The schools include the lyceum for philosophy and Catholic theology (a survival of the university suppressed in 1803), a seminary, two gymnasia, a Realschule, and several technical schools, including one for porcelainpainting.

    0
    0
  • Two years later, however, he obtained leave to continue his studies at Glasgow University.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 he was appointed vice-chancellor and principal of Glasgow University.

    0
    0
  • He was not well grounded in any of the elementary branches, which are essential to university studies and to all success in their prosecution.

    0
    0
  • It was natural, therefore, that he should dislike the university, and as natural that the university should dislike him.

    0
    0
  • Many of his complaints of the system were certainly just; but it may be doubted whether any university system would have been profitable to him, considering his antecedents.

    0
    0
  • The days in which his university influence was asserted were a time of much shaking of old beliefs.

    0
    0
  • He made Prague an archbishopric in 1344, and three years later founded the university there.

    0
    0
  • An agricultural experiment station and a normal school are conducted in connexion with the university.

    0
    0
  • The bonded debt of the state on the 31st of December 1908 amounted to $550,000, of which the state held an irredeemable bond for $380,000; the actual redeemable bonded debt of $170,000 was due to the investment of the school and university funds in the bonds of the state.

    0
    0
  • Three years later he was appointed to the chair of philosophy at the Istituto di Perfezionamento at Florence, and, in 1871, was made professor of philosophy in the university of Rome.

    0
    0
  • In 1862 she became secretary to the committee which was formed for the purpose of procuring the admission of women to university examinations, and from 1870 to 1873 was a member of the London school board.

    0
    0
  • In 1873, she was elected a life governor of University College, London, and in 1882 became secretary of Girton College, Cambridge, retiring in 1904.

    0
    0
  • The site of Berkeley was a farming region until its selection for the home of the university.

    0
    0
  • In the following year he was transferred to Naples as professor of philosophy in the university there.

    0
    0
  • In1896-1900Judge Taft was professor and dean of the law department of the University of Cincinnati.

    0
    0
  • A movement to elect Mr Taft president of Yale University gained some strength in 1898-99, but was promptly checked by him, on the ground that the head of a great university should be primarily an educationalist.

    0
    0
  • Mr Taft delivered the Dodge lectures at Yale University in 1906 on the Responsibilities of Citizenship, published as Four Aspects of Civic Duty (1906).

    0
    0
  • In 1849 he was appointed professor of practical chemistry at University College, London, and from 1855 until his retirement in 1887 he also held the professorship of chemistry.

    0
    0
  • Graduating at the university of North Carolina in 1816, he studied law in the famous Litchfield (Connecticut) law school, and in 1819 was admitted to practice in Southampton county, Virginia.

    0
    0
  • EDWARDS PARK Amasa (1808-1900), American Congregational theologian, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on the 29th of December 1808, the son of Calvin Park (1774-1847), a Congregational minister, professor from 5804 to 1825 at Brown University, and pastor at Stoughton, Massachusetts, in 1826-1840.

    0
    0
  • The son graduated at Brown University in 1826, was a teacher at Braintree for two years, and in 1831 graduated from Andover theological seminary.

    0
    0
  • In Wichita are Fairmount College (Congregational; co-educational; organized as a preparatory school in 1892 and as a college in 1895); Friends' University (Society of Friends; co-educational; 1898); and Mount Carmel Academy and the Pro-Cathedral School (both Roman Catholic).

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy (r840-1847) and the university of Edinburgh (1847-1850).

    0
    0
  • He superintended every step of the progress of the building and of the purchase of the very valuable collection of apparatus with which it was equipped at the expense of its munificent founder the seventh duke of Devonshire (chancellor of the university, and one of its most distinguished alumni).

    0
    0
  • Bennigsen, having studied at the university of Gottingen, entered the Hanoverian civil service.

    0
    0
  • He presented to the Ashmolean museum, Oxford, a variety of fossils and antiquities, which he had described in his works, and received the thanks of the university and the degree of LL.D.

    0
    0
  • Reverting to incidents in England itself, in 1870 the abolition of university tests removed all restrictions on Jews at Oxford and Cambridge, and both universities have since elected Jews to professorships and other posts of honour.

    0
    0
  • In Germany Jews are still rarely admitted to the rank of officers in the army, university posts are very difficult of access, Judaism and its doctrines are denounced in medieval language, and a tone of hostility prevails in many public utterances.

    0
    0
  • It is the seat of Miami University (co-educational; chartered in 1809, opened as a grammar school in 1818, and organized as a college in 1824), which had 40 instructors and 1076 students in 1909.

    0
    0
  • In 1640 Henderson was elected by the town council rector of Edinburgh University - an office to which he was annually re-elected till his death.

    0
    0
  • During Charles's second state-visit to Scotland, in the autumn of 1641, Henderson acted as his chaplain, and managed to get the funds, formerly belonging to the bishopric of Edinburgh, applied to the metropolitan university.

    0
    0
  • The dissatisfaction displayed shortly after by the government obliged the university to give up this scheme, and was probably the cause of Pierre d'Ailly's temporary retirement to Noyon, where he held a canonry.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, by means of an exchange, he obtained to the highest dignity in the university, becoming chancellor of Notre-Dame de Paris.

    0
    0
  • His obsequious language on this occasion, and the favours with which it was rewarded, formed a too violent contrast to the determined attitude of the university of Paris, which, tired of the schism, was even then demanding the resignation of the two pontiffs.

    0
    0
  • None the less, on his return from Avignon, he again in the presence of the king enlarged upon the advantages offered by the way which the university commended.

    0
    0
  • Henceforward he was under suspicion at the university, and was excluded from the assemblies where the union was discussed.

    0
    0
  • At the ecclesiastical council which took place at Paris in 1406 Pierre d'Ailly made every effort to avert a new withdrawal from the obedience and, by order of the king, took the part of defender of Benedict XIII., a course which yet again exposed him to attacks from the university party.

    0
    0
  • The Normal school, now the Cleveland school of education, was affiliated with Western Reserve University.

    0
    0
  • In 1920-1 the university had 243 instructors and 2,027 students.

    0
    0
  • When Leland Stanford, Jr., University was opened in 1891 he entered with the first class and specialized in geology and engineering, supporting himself by working at various jobs in free hours.

    0
    0
  • He played an active part in the stirring church politics of the period, and was twice moderator of the kirk, and a member of the commission of inquiry into the condition of the university of St Andrews (1583).

    0
    0
  • 1868), became widely known as a philanthropist, and particularly for her generous gifts to American army hospitals in the war with Spain in 1898 and for her many contributions to New York University, to which she gave $250,000 for a library in 1895 and $100,000 for a Hall of Fame in 1900.

    0
    0
  • He had already been ordained priest when he entered the university of Paris for higher education.

    0
    0
  • In 1819 Congress granted thirty-six sections of public land for the establishment of a university.

    0
    0
  • Congress granted another township (thirty-six sections) for the university in 1892, and its income is supplemented by legislative appropriations for current expenses and special needs.

    0
    0
  • to 1 The increase is due mainly to the assumption of the university obligations in 1880.

    0
    0
  • He studied history and humanities at the university of Moscow, and, after having gone through his military training in a grenadier regiment, left for Germany where he read political economy in Berlin under Prof. Schmoller.

    0
    0
  • After doing some research work at Simancas in Spain, he became professor of history at the university of Dorpat in 1867; and was then in turn professor at Konigsberg, Bonn and Leipzig.

    0
    0
  • The Robert Browning Settlement was founded in York Street, Walworth Road, in 1895 and incorporated in 1903, and in Nelson Square is the Women's University Settlement.

    0
    0
  • Reid graduated at Aberdeen in 1726, and remained there as librarian to the university for ten years, a period which he devoted largely to mathematical reading.

    0
    0
  • In this year, Reid succeeded Adam Smith as professor of moral philosophy in the university of Glasgow.

    0
    0
  • Hamilton's edition of Reid also contains an account of the university of Glasgow and a selection of Reid's letters, chiefly addressed to his Aberdeen friends the Skenes, to Lord Kames, and to Dr James Gregory.

    0
    0
  • His portrait by Raeburn is the property of Glasgow University, and in the National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, there is a good medallion by Tassie, taken in his eighty-first year.

    0
    0
  • ROBERT RAINY (1826-1906), Scotch Presbyterian divine, was born on the 1st of January 1826; his father, Dr Harry Rainy, professor of forensic medicine in Glasgow University, was the son of a Sutherlandshire minister.

    0
    0
  • ALEXANDER PEDEN (c. 1626-1686), Scottish divine, one of the leading forces in the Covenant movement, was born at Auchincloich, Ayrshire, about 1626, and was educated at Glasgow University.

    0
    0
  • Thomas graduated at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, in 1815, and in August 1816 was admitted to the bar at Lancaster, where he won high rank as an advocate.

    0
    0
  • Another son, Thomas Ewing (1829-1896), studied at Brown University in1852-1854(in 1894, by a special vote, he was placed on the list of graduates in the class of 1856); he was a lawyer and a freestate politician in Kansas in 1857-1861, and was the first chiefjustice of the Kansas supreme court (1861-1862).

    0
    0
  • The university, a little farther north, the buildings of which were erected in 1764, has some 240 students.

    0
    0
  • St Peter's College, founded by Schwarz as a school, is now a first-grade college affiliated to the university of Madras.

    0
    0
  • Education is provided for by a university at Greifswald and by numerous schools.

    0
    0
  • Mr Austin was educated at Stonyhurst, Oscott, and London University, where he graduated in 1853.

    0
    0
  • Wheelock appealed to the legislature in the following year, when it was strongly Republican, and that body responded by passing acts which virtually repealed the charter received from George III., created a state university, placed Wheelock at its head, and transferred to it the property of the college.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Rugby under Dr. Arnold and at University College, Oxford, where he graduated with first-class honours in 1854.

    0
    0
  • After his wife's death in 1871 he left Marlborough and went to Oxford as a modern history tutor and lecturer at University, Balliol and New Colleges and in 1874 was elected to a fellowship at University and in 1878 to an honorary fellowship at Balliol.

    0
    0
  • In 1881 he became master of University College, and threw himself with vigour into university and City life, becoming treasurer of the Radcliffe infirmary, and founder of the first technical school in Oxford, for which he presented a site.

    0
    0
  • Thomas was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford; but the details of his university career are doubtful owing to the defectiveness of the university and college registers.

    0
    0
  • Finding law as distasteful as theology, he devoted himself entirely to philosophy, of which he was appointed extraordinary professor in the university of Naples.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the Moscow University, and in 1755 entered the "Reiter" of the Horse Guards.

    0
    0
  • Lovering is first mentioned as master in 1619, so that Taylor probably spent seven years at the school before he was entered at Gonville and Caius College as a sizar in 1626, 1 eighteen months after Milton had entered Christ's, and while George Herbert was public orator and Edmund Waller and Thomas Fuller were undergraduates of the university.

    0
    0
  • He was also made a member of the Irish privy council and vice-chancellor of the university of Dublin.

    0
    0
  • Of the university he writes, "I found all things in a perfect disorder.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly he set himself vigorously to the task of framing and enforcing regulations for the admission and conduct of members of the university, and also of establishing lectureships.

    0
    0
  • Oldham wrote other satires, notably one "addressed to a friend about to leave the university," which contains a well-known description of the state of slavery of the private chaplain, and another "dissuading from poetry," describing the ingratitude shown to Edmund Spenser, whose ghost is the speaker, to Samuel Butler and to Abraham Cowley.

    0
    0
  • At the early age of twelve he was sent to the university of Edinburgh, being intended for the clerical profession.

    0
    0
  • Berzelius; and ten years later he accepted the office of principal of the university of Edinburgh, the duties of which he discharged until within a few months of his death, which took place at Allerly, Melrose, on the 10th of February 1868.

    0
    0
  • Greifswald is, however, best known to fame by reason of its university.

    0
    0
  • In front of the university, which had 775 students and about Ioo teachers in 1904, stands a monument commemorating its four hundredth anniversary.

    0
    0
  • In accordance with his directions, his body was dissected in the presence of his friends, and the skeleton is still preserved in University College, London.

    0
    0
  • In 1872 he became docent, and in 1882 professor of political economy at Upsala, of which university he was afterwards rector.

    0
    0
  • CARL GUSTAF NORDIN (1749-1812), Swedish statesman, historian and ecclesiastic. In 1774 he was made docent of Gothic antiquities at Upsala University in consequence of his remarkable treatise, Monumenta svia-golhica vetustioris aevi falso meritoque suspecta.

    0
    0
  • He left behind him a colossal collection of MSS., the so-called Nordinska Samlingarna, which were purchased and presented to Upsala university by Charles XIV.

    0
    0
  • After attending the Academy at Edinburgh and spending a session at the University, he went up to Cambridge as a member of Peterhouse, and graduated as senior wrangler and first Smith's prizeman in 1852.

    0
    0
  • Many other inquiries conducted by him might be mentioned, and some idea may be gained of his scientific activity from the fact that a selection only from his papers, published by the Cambridge University Press, fills three large volumes.

    0
    0
  • This mass of work was done in the time he could spare from his professorial teaching in the university.

    0
    0
  • In some instances colleges are supported entirely by one county, as is the Holmes Chapel College, Cheshire; in others a college is supported by several affiliated counties, as in the case of the agricultural department of the University College, Reading, which acts in connexion with the counties of Berks, Oxon, Hants and Buckingham.

    0
    0
  • Edinburgh University, Agriculture Department.

    0
    0
  • University of St.

    0
    0
  • 1908); Inaugural Address at the University of St Andrews (1867); England and Ireland (1868); Subjection of Women (1869; ed.

    0
    0
  • Slingerland, whose investigations are published by Cornell University.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Sorau and Dresden and at the university of Leipzig, in which city he spent the rest of his life.

    0
    0
  • During the week which he spent there, Bonaparte displayed marvellous energy in endowing the city with modern institutions; he even arranged the course of studies to be followed in the university.

    0
    0
  • The same centralizing tendency is strongly marked in the organization of the university of France, the general principle of which was set forth in May 1806, while the details were arranged by that of March the 17th, 1808.

    0
    0
  • His life, henceforth, was devoted to teaching (mainly philosophical) in the university - first as college tutor, afterwards, from 1878 until his death (at Oxford on the 26th of March 1882) as Whyte's Professor of Moral Philosophy.

    0
    0
  • Withers had proposed a disputation against vestments, which the university would not allow; his thesis affirming the excommunicating power of the presbytery was sustained.

    0
    0
  • The superintendent of the local Sunday school sent him to an academy at Washington, Wilkes county, for one year and in the following year (1828) he was sent by the Georgia Educational Society to Franklin College (university of Georgia), where he graduated in 1832.

    0
    0
  • His parents meant him for the military profession, but his bent being for study he was allowed to enter the university of Paris.

    0
    0
  • He was assistant librarian of Harvard University from 1856 to 1872, and planned and perfected an alphabetical card catalogue, combining many of the advantages of the ordinary dictionary catalogues with the grouping of the minor topics under more general heads, which is characteristic of a systematic catalogue.

    0
    0
  • Further examination of the enormous collections gathered by the author, and preserved in the Museum of Yale University at New Haven, Connecticut, showed him that this last bird, and another to which he gave the name of Apatornis, had possessed welldeveloped teeth implanted in sockets in both jaws, and induced him to establish (v.

    0
    0
  • How little effect this had, however, is shown by the fact that in 1265 Odo, archbishop of Sens, could do no more than prohibit the obscene excesses of the feast, without abolishing the feast itself; that in 1444 the university of Paris, at the request of certain bishops, addressed a letter condemning it to all cathedral chapters; and that King Charles VII.

    0
    0
  • He entered the university of Edinburgh at the early age of twelve, and continued to attend classes there for more than ten years.

    0
    0
  • was conferred on Guthrie by the university of Edinburgh; and in 1850 William Hanna (1808-1882), the biographer and son-in-law of Thomas Chalmers, was inducted as his colleague in Free St John's Church.

    0
    0
  • After studying at the university of Munich he served in the Bavarian army from 1859 to 1872, when he retired with the rank of captain.

    0
    0
  • In 1868 he received the degree of doctor from the university of Tubingen in recognition of a treatise on the psychology of Dreams (Oneirokritikon.

    0
    0
  • Three institutions for higher education are supported in large measure by the state: Ohio University at Athens, founded in 1804 on the proceeds derived from two townships granted by Congress to the Ohio Company; Miami University (chartered in 1809) at Oxford, which received the proceeds from a township granted by Congress in the Symmes purchase; and Ohio State University (1873) at Columbus, which received the proceeds from the lands granted by Congress under the act of 1862 for the establishment of agricultural and mechanical colleges, and reorganized as a university in 1878.

    0
    0
  • Among the numerous other colleges and universities in the state are Western Reserve University (1826) at Cleveland, the university of Cincinnati (opened 1873) at Cincinnati, and Oberlin College (1833) at Oberlin.

    0
    0
  • The revenues of the state are classified into four funds; the general revenue fund, the sinking fund, the state common school fund and the university fund.

    0
    0
  • There still remains, however, an irredeemable debt due to the common schools, Ohio University and Ohio State University, in return for their public lands.

    0
    0
  • The university fund is derived from special taxes levied for the four institutions which receive aid from the state; in 1909 the levy was 0.245 mills and the total receipts were $582,843.

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    0
  • There are two excellent secondary accounts: Samuel P. Orth, The Centralization of Administration in Ohio, in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, xvi.

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  • Wilcox, Municipal Government in Michigan and Ohio, in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, v.

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  • Gephart's Transportation and Industrial Development in the Middle West (New York, 1909), in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, is a commercial history of Ohio.

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  • Having studied classical philology at the university of Giessen, he was appointed (1803) master in the high school, an office which he combined with that of lecturer at the university.

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  • Welcker returned to Giessen in 1808, and resuming his schoolteaching and university lectures was in the following year appointed the first professor of Greek literature and archaeology at that or any German university.

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  • His liberalism in politics having brought him into conflict with the university authorities of Giessen, he exchanged that university for Göttingen in 1816, and three years later received a chair at the new university of Bonn, where he established the art museum and the library, of which he became the first librarian.

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  • He studied at Haddington, and graduated in 1739 at the university of Edinburgh, where he completed a divinity course in 1743.

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  • He refused calls to churches in Dublin and Rotterdam, and in 1766 declined an invitation brought him by Richard Stockton to go to America as president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); but he accepted a second invitation and left Paisley in May 1768.

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  • There is a statue of Witherspoon in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, and another on the University Library at Princeton.

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  • In the following year, or perhaps later, he crossed over to France and studied at the university of Paris, then the centre of intellectual life in Europe.

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  • are: - (1) The extensive work on the fundamental notions of physics, called Communia Naturalium, which is found in the Mazarin library at Paris, in the British Museum, and in the Bodleian and University College libraries at Oxford; (2) on the fundamental notions of mathematics, De Cornmunibus Mathematicae, part of which is in the Sloane collection, part in the Bodleian; (3) Baconis Physica, contained among the additional MSS.

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  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

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  • Young Kane entered the university of Virginia and obtained the degree of M.D.

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  • Boston University was endowed by Isaac Rich (1801-1872), a Boston fish-merchant, Lee Claflin (1791-1871), a shoe manufacturer and a benefactor of Wesleyan University and of Wilbraham Seminary, and Jacob Sleeper.

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  • Simmons College and Harvard University maintain the Boston school for social workers (1904).

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  • While studying theology at the university he devoted special attention to Biblical archaeology.

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  • He studied at the university of Gratz, where he became a professor in 1885, and died at Gratz on the 22nd of November 1906.

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  • After some hesitation between music and philosophy, he decided to make the latter the serious work of his life, and in 1867 the university of Rostock conferred on him the degree of doctor of philosophy.

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  • signed the famous decree of Kuttenberg, by which the Bohemian nation was given three votes in the elections to the faculty of Prague University as against one for the three other "nations."

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  • Although Louis V., who founded the university of Giessen in 1607, was a Lutheran, he and his son, George II.

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  • In 1844 an article by Mr Barnett in the Nineteenth Century discussed the question of university settlements.

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  • This resulted in July in the formation of the University Settlements Association, and when Toynbee Hall was built shortly afterwards Mr Barnett became its warden.

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  • NEW HAVEN, the largest city of Connecticut, U.S.A., the county-seat of New Haven and the seat of Yale University.

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  • Besides the University Library, there are a Public Library (1887), containing about 80,000 vols., the library of the Young Men's Institute (1826) and the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society.

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  • One of the most important events in the history of New Haven was the removal hither in October 1716 from Saybrook of the Collegiate School of Connecticut, which developed into Yale University.

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  • Having finished his university course, he returned to Hamburg, and passed his examination for the Christian ministry.

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  • After an interval of about eighteen months, however, he definitively betook himself to an academic career, "habilitating" in Heidelberg, where two vacancies had occurred in the theological faculty of the university.

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    0
  • By the generosity of friends he was educated at the gymnasium at Haarlem and afterwards at the university of Leiden.

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  • At the time of his father's assassination in 1584 he was being educated at the university of Leiden, at the expense of the states of Holland and Zeeland.

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  • Leopold received his education first at Donndorf, a school established in an old monastery near his home, and then at the famous school of Schulpforta, whence he passed to the university of Halle and later to that of Berlin.

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  • His studies, both at school and university, were classical and theological.

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  • Within a week Ranke received the promise of a post at Berlin, and in less than three months was appointed supernumerary professor in the university of that city, a striking instance of the promptitude with which the Prussian government recognized scientific merit when, as in Ranke's case, it was free from dangerous political opinions.

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  • He took paternal pride in the achievements of his pupils, and delighted to see, through them, his influence spreading in every university.

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  • And so opposition arose to the Modern Devotion, and the controversy was carried to the legal faculty at Cologne University, which gave a judgment strongly in their favour.

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  • Ambition and a strong inclination towards a scientific career led him to throw up his business and remove to Berlin, where he entered the university in 1820.

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  • and extraordinary professor in the university of Berlin, and in 1839 member of the Berlin Academy of Sciences.

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  • Before 1905 the state provided for higher education by the Florida State College, at Tallahassee, formerly the West Florida Seminary (founded in 1857); the University of Florida, at Lake City, which was organized in 1903 by enlarging the work of the Florida Agricultural College (founded in 1884); the East Florida Seminary, at Gainesville (founded 1848 at Ocala); the normal school (for whites) at De Funiak Springs; and the South Florida Military Institute at Bartow; but in 1905 the legislature passed the Buckman bill abolishing all these state institutions for higher education and establishing in their place the university of the state of Florida and a state Agricultural Experiment Station, both now at Gainesville, and the Florida Female College at Tallahassee, which has the same standards for entrance and for graduation as the state university for men.

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  • Stetson University at De Land (Baptist); Rollins College (1885) at Winter Park (non-sectarian), with a collegiate department, an academy, a school of music, a school of expression, a school of fine arts, a school of domestic and industrial arts, and a business school; Southern College (1901), at Sutherland (Methodist Episcopal, South); the Presbyterian College of Florida (1905), at Eustis; Jasper Normal Institute (1890), at Jasper, and the Florida Normal Institute at Madison.

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  • This undertaking owes much to the liberality of Sir William P. Hartley, whose name the college, which is a school of the Victoria University, now bears.

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  • The university (founded by Pius II.

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  • The university library is very rich, and contains the original MSS.

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  • In 1709 he entered the university of Glasgow, where he exhibited a decided genius for mathematics, more especially for geometry; it is said that before the end of his sixteenth year he had discovered many of the theorems afterwards published in his Geometria organica.

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  • The following year he was elected professor of mathematics in the university of Edinburgh on the urgent recommendation of Newton.

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  • University Of Michigan >>

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  • Another Syriac MS., in the library of Cambridge University, contains a translation of a work by Zosimus which is so far unknown in the original Greek.

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  • from the university of Aberdeen.

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  • In 1424 he went to the university of Paris, where he became a master of arts in 1429, and afterwards studied law at Louvain and Pavia.

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  • He attended the council of Ferrara, and was soon made canon of the church at Rouen, professor of canon law in the new university of Caen and vicar-general for the bishop of Bayeux.

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  • Close by is the university, with a colonnade adorned with paintings, and the Vallianean library with a handsome Doric portico of Pentelic marble.

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    0
  • In the period of the Antonines the endowment of professors out of the imperial treasury gave Athens a special status as a university town.

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  • Capes, University Life in Ancient Athens (London, 1877); A.

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  • During his stay of a year and a half in this university, besides his classes, he found occasion to give to some companions his Spiritual Exercises in the form they had then taken and certain instructions in Christian doctrine.

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  • The university of Paris had reached its zenith at the time of the council of Constance (1418), and was now losing its intellectual leadership under the attacks of the Renaissance and the Reformation.

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  • In 1521 the university had condemned Luther's Babylonish Captivity, and in 1527 Erasmus's Colloquies met with the same fate.

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  • At this period there were between twelve and fifteen thousand students attending the university, and the life was an extraordinary mixture of licentiousness and devout zeal.

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  • The pope appointed Faber to teach Holy Scripture, and Laynez scholastic theology, in the university of the Sapienza.

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  • EDWARD CAIRD (1835-1908), British philosopher and theologian, brother of John Caird, was born at Greenock on the 22nd of March 1835, and educated at Glasgow University and Balliol College, Oxford.

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  • In 1866 he became professor of moral philosophy in the university of Glasgow, and in 1893 succeeded Benjamin Jowett as master of Balliol.

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    0
  • The Holy Ghost College became Duquesne University, and in 1920 had 2,129 students, including department of law, 86 students, and evening school of accounts and finance, 1,120 students.

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  • The university of Pittsburgh, established in 1908 by assembling the scattered departments of what was the Western University of Pennsylvania, and taking over 43 ac. near the Carnegie Institute for a campus, grew rapidly in its new location, and in 1920 numbered 4,979 students.

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  • Magee, by agreement the maternity hospital of the university of Pittsburgh, is perhaps the most modern and complete maternity hospital in America.

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  • An ascent made by Dr Honda of the imperial university of Japan showed that, up to a height of 6000 ft., the mountain is clothed with primeval forests of palms, banyans, cork trees, camphor trees, tree ferns, interlacing creepers and dense thickets of rattan or stretches of grass higher than a man's stature.

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  • The school system comprises preparatory schools, rural schools, graded schools, three high schools and the university of Porto Rico.

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  • The university at Rio Piedras was established by act of the insular legislature in 1903, but in 1910 only two departments had been organized - the insular normal school and the department of agriculture.

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    0
  • He was the son of a physician, and went to study medicine first at Zurich University in 1851, and then, two years later, at Wurzburg, where he had R.

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  • He first entered Kentucky University but finished his course at Bethany College in 1873.

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  • In 1899 the university of Jena gave him the honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy for his work on Hegel.

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  • After having studied law at the university of Toulouse he practised successfully at Pau.

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  • The medical school, a department of Washington University, includes laboratory, anatomical, clinical and other buildings.

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  • Louis University (subject to the life income of certain surviving relatives) for the erection and support of a hospital and for the advancement of medicine and surgery.

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  • Louis, $2,000,000; the Missouri athletic club, $500,000; the Railway Exchange, $3,000,000, 18 storeys, covering an entire city block; the University club, $600,- 000; the Young Women's Christian Association, $500,000; the Boatmen's bank, $750,000; the Arcade, $1,250,000; the Post-Despatch building, $500,000; the Bevo Manufacturing Company, $r,000,000.

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  • Returning to Glasgow in 1872 he became assistant in the Young laboratory of technical chemistry at Anderson's College, and from 1874 acted as tutorial assistant in chemistry at the university.

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  • In 1880 he was appointed to the chair of chemistry at University College, Bristol, becoming principal in the following year, and in 1887 he succeeded A.

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  • Williamson as professor of chemistry at University College, London.

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  • 1872), who from 1894 had assisted him at University College, London, and in 1903 was appointed professor of chemistry at University College, Bristol, enabled him to announce the existence in the atmosphere of three new gases, neon, krypton and xenon.

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  • Entering the university of Erfurt in 1514, he took the bachelor's degree in 1515, the master's in 1516.

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  • His tractate (1542) against the permission of bigamy in the case of Philip of Hesse was not allowed to be printed (the manuscript is in the Heidelberg university library).

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  • It has a special interest in being the chief university of the Moslem world, containing some thousands of students (mujawirin), for whom certain parts of the mosque (riwaq) are screened off, according to the country from which they come.

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  • After going through the high school and university courses at Glasgow, he went to Trinity College, Oxford, and in 1862 was elected a fellow of Oriel.

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  • In 1886 he was made under secretary for foreign affairs; in 1892 he joined the cabinet as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster; in 1894 he was president of the Board of Trade, and acted as chairman of the royal commission on secondary education; and in Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (1905) he was made chief secretary for Ireland; but in February 1907 he was appointed British ambassador at Washington, and took leave of party politics, his last political act being a speech outlining what was then the government scheme for university reform in Dublin - a scheme which was promptly discarded by his successor Mr Birrell.

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  • In that year he matriculated at the university, and took lessons in composition from Theodor Weinlig, cantor at the Thomasschule.

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  • He was also the founder of the Rumford medal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the Rumford professorship in Harvard University.

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  • In 1484 he went to Michael House, Cambridge, where he took his degrees in arts in 1487 and 1491, and, after filling several offices in the university, became master of his college in 1499.

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  • There are a university at Giessen and a technical high school at Darmstadt.

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  • The upper consists of princes of the grand-ducal family, heads of mediatized houses, the head of the Roman Catholic and the superintendent of the Protestant church, the chancellor of the university, two elected representatives of the land-owning nobility, and twelve members nominated by the grand duke.

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  • Following the example of his ancestors Philip cared for education and the general welfare of his land, and the Protestant university of Marburg, founded in 1527, owes to him its origin.

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  • Columbus and Magellan had such globes, those of the latter produced by P. Reinel (1519), and Conrad Celtes tells us that he illustrated his lectures at the university of Vienna with the help of globes (1501).

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  • The repeal of the Test Act, the admission of Quakers to Parliament in consequence of their being allowed to affirm instead of taking the oath (1832, when Joseph Pease was elected for South Durham), the establishment of the University of London, and, more recently, the opening of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge to Nonconformists, have all had their effect upon the body.

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  • In 1789 he exchanged his chemistry lectureship for that of the theory and practice of physic; and when the medical college, which he had helped to found, was absorbed by the university of Pennsylvania in 1791 he became professor of the institutes of medicine and of clinical practice, succeeding in 1796 to the chair of the theory and practice of medicine.

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  • 1 In the early decades of the Christian era the text was current in two forms, which are denoted by H a and H R in this article and in the edition of the text published by the Oxford University Press.

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  • Patriarchs (Oxford University Press, 1908).

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  • Educated at several schools in London, he went to Edinburgh University in 1792, where he attended Dugald Stewart's moral philosophy class.

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  • After twice failing in the attempt to gain a professorship in the university, he was invited, during an illness of Dugald Stewart in the session of 1808-1809, to act as his substitute, and during the following session he undertook a great part of Stewart's work.

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  • In his fifteenth year he entered the order of St Augustine, was afterwards professor of theology at the university of Alcala, and published a Cursus theologiae in five volumes (1732-1738).

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  • During his three years' residence at the Belgian capital he found ample scope for his gifts as a diplomatist in the education controversy then raging, and as mediator between the Jesuits and the Catholic university of Louvain.

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  • In 1857 he became docent in German law at Munich university, and in 1862 professor-extraordinary, but in 1863 was called to Wiirzburg to a full professorship. In 1872 he removed to the university of Konigsberg, and in 1888 settled at Breslau, becoming rector of the university in 1895.

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  • Dr Peckard, vice-chancellor of the university of Cambridge, who entertained strong convictions against the slave trade, proposed in 1785 as subject for a Latin prize dissertation the question, " An liceat invitos in servitutem dare."

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  • She was well versed in mathematics, which she studied at the university of Moscow, and in general literature her favourite authors were Bayle, Montesquieu, Boileau, Voltaire and Helvetius.

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  • Furlong in the publications of the University of California, under the name of Preptoceras sinclairi.

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  • During those two years he paid three visits to the university.

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  • Wesley s spirit at this time is seen from his sermon on "The Circumcision of the Heart," preached before the university on the 1st of January 1733.

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  • Without taking a degree he removed his name from the college books in April 1798, as a protest against the inquisitorial examination of the political views of the students conducted by Lord Clare as chancellor of the university.

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  • After receiving his early education at the Caroline academy of Stuttgart, he entered the university of Tubingen, where he received the degree of doctor of medicine.

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  • Graillot of the University of Bordeaux, member of the French School of Rome, but after two weeks' work was suspended by order of the Italian government, and then resumed under the supervision of their own officials.

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  • The secular masters of the university of Paris denounced the work to Pope Innocent IV., and the bishop of Paris sent it to the pope.

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  • In 1812 he entered the university of Edinburgh, where he distinguished himself specially in mathematics.

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  • Born on the 18th of February 1718 he was educated at the parish school of St Ninians, and at the grammar school of Stirling, and, after completing his course at Edinburgh University, became master of the grammar school at Annan.

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  • from Edinburgh University in 1771, and served as moderator of the general assembly of the church of Scotland in 1774, he was appointed one of the ministers of the Old Greyfriars' Church, Edinburgh, in 1776, remaining in this charge until his death on the 24th of November 1790.

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  • It was not until 1836 that he completed any apparatus that would work, and finally, on the 2nd of September 1837, the instrument was exhibited to a few friends in the building of the university of the City of New York, where a circuit of 1700 ft.

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  • The university of Göttingen has had bequeathed to it the largest collection (exceeding 4 0,000 specimens) ever made by a single individual - that of Professor Grisebach.

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  • Of those in the United States of America, the chief, formed by Asa Gray, is the property of Harvard university; there is also a large one at the New York Botanical Garden.

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  • The son entered the university of Göttingen in 1735, and his work among the poor of Göttingen led to the establishment of the present orphan house there.

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  • WILLIAM JOHN MACQUORN RANKINE (1820-1872), Scottish engineer and physicist, was born at Edinburgh on the 5th of July 1820, and completed his education in its university.

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  • At the age of twenty he was fitted, in six months, for college, and in 1819, graduated with highest honours, from the Brown University at Providence, Rhode Island, having devoted himself so unremittingly to his studies as to weaken further his naturally feeble constitution.

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  • He then studied law for a short time at Wrentham, Massachusetts; was tutor in Latin and Greek (1820-1822) and librarian (1821-1823) at Brown University; studied during 1821-1823 in the famous law school conducted by Judge James Gould at Litchfield, Connecticut; and in 1823 was admitted to the Norfolk (Mass.) bar.

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  • 1857) graduated at the university of Wisconsin in 1879, became instructor in geology there in 1883, in 1897 became consulting geologist of the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, and in 1900 became geologist in charge of the Division of Pre-Cambrian and Metamorphic Geology, U.S. Geological Survey.

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  • On his return home his university honoured him with the honorary degree of D.C.L.

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    0
  • Meanwhile his lectures and publications (among the latter a Grundriss der Neutestamentlichen Hermeneutik, 1816) had brought him into considerable repute, and he was appointed professor extraordinarius in the new university of Bonn in the spring of 1818; in the following autumn he became professor ordinarius.

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  • Good work has also been done by the Audubon sugar school of the state university, founded " for the highest scientific training in the growing of sugar cane and in the technology of sugar manufacture."

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    0
  • The university of Havana (founded of the island was practically absolute.

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  • In 1907 the number of students was 554 Below the university there are six provincial institutes, one in each province, in each of which there is a preparatory department, a department of secondary education, and (this due to peculiar local conditions) a school of surveying; and in that of Havana commercial departments in addition.

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  • In connexion with the university is a botanical garden; with the national sanitary service, a biological laboratory, and special services for small-pox, glanders and yellow fever.

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  • Callahan, Cuba and International Relations (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 1898), which supplement each other.

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  • A university, founded in 1825, three colleges, one of them dating from colonial times, a medical school, and a public library, founded in 1821, are distinguishing features of the city, which has always taken high rank in Peru for its learning and liberalism, as well as for its political restlessness.

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  • The schools include a high school affiliated to the university of Allahabad, a school for the sons of nobles, and a girls' school called after Lady Elgin.

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  • His father, a prosperous merchant in Breslau, intended Ferdinand for a business career, and sent him to the commercial school at Leipzig; but the boy got himself transferred to the university, first at Breslau, and afterwards at Berlin.

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    0
  • Having completed his university studies in 1845, he began to write a work on Heraclitus from the Hegelian point of view; but it was soon interrupted by more stirring interests, and did not see the light for many years.

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  • Promising pupils are frequently sent to Vienna University, with scholarships, which may be forfeited if the holders engage in political agitation.

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  • At school and at Harvard University he in nowise distinguished himself, though he was an intelligently receptive student; he became, however, proficient enough in Greek, Latin, and the more general acquirements to enable him to act for a time as a master.

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  • Among its buildings are the cathedral, dating from 1553 and once noted for its wealth; the president's palace and halls of congress, which are no longer occupied as such by the national government; the cabildo, or town-hall; a mint dating from 1572; the courts of justice, and the university of San Xavier, founded in 1624, with faculties of law, medicine and theology.

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  • Vladimir entered the university of Kazan as a student of law, but was expelled for taking part in revolutionary agitation.

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  • The table on the following page, for which the writer is indebted to the kindness of Carolidi Effendi, formerly professor of history in the university of Athens, and in 1910 deputy for Smyrna in the Turkish parliament, shows the various races of the Ottoman Empire, the regions which they inhabit, and the religions which they profess.

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  • For superior education there is (1) the university of Constantinople, with its four faculties of letters, science, law and medicine; and (2) special schools, including (a) the normal school for training teachers, (b) the civil imperial school, (c) the school of the fine arts and (d) the imperial schools of medicine.

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  • Special state schools of medicine, arts, science, crafts, &c., have been created successively, and in 1901 a university was founded.

    0
    0
  • Besides the public school system there are many parochial schools; the University school, with an eight years' course; the Western Reserve University, with its medical school (opened in 1843), the Franklin T.

    0
    0
  • In 1907-1908 Western Reserve University had 193 instructors and 914 students (277 in Adelbert College; 269 in College for Women; 20 in graduate department; and 102 in medical, 133 in law, 75 in dental and 51 in Library school); and the Case School of Applied Science 40 instructors and 440 students.

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  • Parisian families, but in 1675 he was appointed to the chair of philosophy at the Protestant university of Sedan.

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    0
  • In 1681 the university at Sedan was suppressed, but almost immediately afterwards Bayle was appointed professor of philosophy and history at Rotterdam.

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    0
  • The University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, founded in 1883, under the principalship of J.

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    0
  • Carne, in Cathays Park, where the registry of the university of Wales (of which the college is a constituent) is also situated.

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  • See also a Handbook of Cardiff and District, prepared for the use of the British Association, 1891; Cardiff, an Illustrated Handbook, 1896; the Annual Report of the Cardiff Chamber of Commerce; the Calendar of the University College.

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    0
  • Salem is the seat of Willamette University (Methodist Episcopal, 1844), an outgrowth of the mission work of the Methodist Episcopal church begun in 1834 about 10 m.

    0
    0
  • After studying at the university of his native city, he removed to Edinburgh, where he qualified for the Scottish bar and practised as an advocate; but his progress was slow, and he eked out his narrow means by miscellaneous literary work.

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    0
  • The reputation which he had gained in the physical sciences soon caused him to be raised to the position of rector of the university (for the first term of the year 1313).

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  • To overthrow the ecclesiastical hierarchy, to deprive the clergy of all their privileges, to reduce the pope to the rank of a kind of president of a Christian republic, which governs itself, or rather submits to the government of Caesar - such is the dream formed in 1324 by two masters of the university of Paris.

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  • Stevenson (1847-1900) was an accomplished art-critic, who in 1889 became professor of fine arts at University College, Liverpool; he published several works on art (Rubens, 1898; Velasquez, 1895; Raeburn, 1900).

    0
    0
  • The state supports a highly efficient public school system, organized through all the grades from the primary district and rural schools to the state university.

    0
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  • At the head of the system stands the state superintendent of public instruction, appointed by the governor; there are also county superintendents; and a state high school board, consisting of the governor, state superintendent and the president of the state university, has general supervision of the schools and apportions the state aid.

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  • The university of Minnesota at Minneapolis was projected by the Territorial Legislature of 1851.

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  • It is governed by a board of twelve regents, of whom the president of the university, the governor of the state and the state superintendent of public instruction are members ex officio, and the other nine, holding office for six years, are appointed by .the governor with the advice and consent of the senate.

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  • The growth and development of the university have been almost entirely under the administration of Cyrus Northrop (b.

    0
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  • The university is one of the largest in the country.

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  • The university library of 110,000 volumes is supplemented by the libraries of Minneapolis and St Paul.

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  • Other higher educational institutions in Minnesota are Hamline University (Methodist Episcopal), with a college of liberal arts at St Paul, and a college of medicine at Minneapolis; Macalester College (Presbyterian) at St Paul; Augsburg Seminary (Lutheran) at Minneapolis; Carleton College (non-sectarian, founded in 1866) and St Olaf College (Lutheran, founded in 1874) at Northfield; Gustavus Adolphus College (Lutheran) at St Peter; Parker College (Free Baptist, 1888) at Winnebago City; St John's University (Roman Catholic) at Collegeville, Stearns county; and Albert Lea College for women (Presbyterian, founded 1884) at Albert Lea.

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  • JOHANN CHRISTIAN KONRAD VON HOFMANN (1810-1877), Lutheran theologian and historian, was born on the 21st of December 1810 at Nuremberg, and studied theology and history at the university of Erlangen.

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  • He was the head of what has been called the Erlangen School, and "in his day he was unquestionably the chief glory of the University of Erlangen" (Lichtenberger).

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  • On the whole, oceanographical research was being taken up most actively in Europe, but much important work was also begun in America, for instance the fine hydrographical research in the Pacific by the Scripps Institute of the university of California.

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  • Havundersiigelser, Serie Hydrografi (Copenhagen 1904-20), contain important papers; the publications of the university of California (Zoology) deal with the work of the Scripps Inst.

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  • At Oxford Rotherham built part of Lincoln College and increased its endowment; at Cambridge, where he was chancellor and master of Pembroke Hall, he helped to build the University Library.

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  • Georgetown is the seat of the Southwestern University (Methodist Episcopal, South, co-educational), formed in 1873 (chartered 1875) by the combination of Ruterville College (Methodist Episcopal, at Ruterville, Texas, chartered in 1840, and closed in 1850), McKenzie College (at Clarksville, Texas, founded in 1841 and closed in 1872), Wesleyan College at San Augustine (chartered in 1844, burned a few years later, and not rebuilt), and Soule University at Chapel Hill (chartered in 1856, but closed in 1870).

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  • The university includes a fitting school at Georgetown, and a medical department at Dallas, Texas; in 1909 it had an enrolment of 1037 students.

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  • Buildings include the small cathedral, disused bishop's palace, deanery,'small Roman Catholic church and other churches, the University College of N.

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  • Among the clubs of the city are the Pacific Club, founded in 1853 as the British Club; the Scottish Thistle Club (1891), of which Robert Louis Stevenson was a member; the Hawaii Yacht Club, and the Polo, Country and University Clubs.

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  • He was educated at the grammar school of his native town, and at the university of Edinburgh, where he graduated M.A.

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  • Among them may be mentioned the Zeitschrift fiir physikalische Chemie (Leipzig); and the Journal of Physical Chemistry (Cornell University).

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  • In 1756 he was appointed by Leopold, grand-duke of Tuscany, to the professorship of mathematics in the university of Pisa, a post which he held for eight years.

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  • Here the son received his education, until in 1595 he entered the university of Leiden, where he became the lifelong friend of Hugo Grotius, and studied classics, Hebrew, church history and theology.

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  • In 1622, however, he was appointed professor of rhetoric and chronology, and subsequently of Greek, in the university.

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