Universities sentence example

universities
  • Though no bishops abandoned it, a few priests, suc as Father Hyacinthe Loyson, and a few scholars at the Ger an universities refused their adhesion.
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  • From 1816 to 1819 Leo studied at the universities of Breslau, Jena and Göttingen, devoting himself more especially to history, philology and theology.
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  • In the youthful Dutch universities the effect of the essays was greater.
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  • Whether the preservation of my father's house in Moscow, or the glory of the Russian arms, or the prosperity of the Petersburg and other universities, or the freedom of Poland or the greatness of Russia, or the balance of power in Europe, or a certain kind of European culture called "progress" appear to me to be good or bad, I must admit that besides these things the action of every historic character has other more general purposes inaccessible to me.
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  • After studying law at the universities of Leipzig and Göttingen, he entered the service of the prince of Nassau-Weilburg, whom in 1791 he represented at the imperial diet.
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  • He spent two years from 1886 to 1888 in travelling, and visited Riga Polytechnic and the universities of Wiirzburg, Graz, Amsterdam and Leipzig.
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  • 3 law schools, 4 veterinary institutes, 4 agricultural colleges, 2 mining institutes, 4 engineering institutes, 2 universities for women (93 o students at St Petersburg), 3 technical pedagogic schools, to technical institutes, I forestry and 1 topographical school.
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  • In the universities of the Netherlands and of lower Germany, as yet free from the conservatism of the old-established seats of learning, the new system gained an easy victory over Aristotelianism, and, as it was adapted for lectures and examinations, soon became almost as scholastic as the doctrines it had supplanted.
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  • The Cartesianism of Holland was a child of the universities, and its literature is mainly composed of commentaries upon.
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  • Of the elected members 3 are returned by the " black " clergy (the monks), 3 by the " white " clergy (seculars), 5 18 by the corporations of nobles, 6 by the academy of sciences and the universities, 6 by the chambers of commerce, 6 by the industrial councils, 34 by the governments having zemstvos, 16 by those having no zemstvos, and 6 by Poland.
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  • In 1966, Mao Zedong closed the universities in China and sent their students and professors to the country to farm.
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  • American universities are thought by many to be among the best in the world.
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  • Unfortunately, All Souls being a later foundation, the college at Higham Ferrers was not affiliated to it, and so fell with other colleges not part of the universities.
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  • He reorganized the university of Vienna and encouraged the development of the universities of Ingolstadt and Freiburg.
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  • In France Cartesianism won society and literature before it penetrated into the universities.
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  • France is divided into sixteen academies or educational districts, having their centres at the seats of the universities.
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  • Cromwell was especially interested in the universities.
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  • The professors are ordinary and extraordinary, and free professors (liberi docenti), corresponding to the German Privatdozenten, are also allowed to be attached to the universities.
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  • One of the causes of ill-feeling was the university question; the Austrian government had persistently refused to create an Italian university for its Italian subjects, fearing lest it should become a hotbed of irredentism, the Italianspeaking students being thus obliged to attend the GermanAustrian universities.
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  • HANS DELBRUCK (1848-), German historian, was born at Bergen on the island of Riigen on the 11th of November 1848, and studied at the universities of Heidelberg and Bonn.
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  • It long remained a text-book of music in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
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  • l Bibliography: Memoirs, Izvestia and Geological Maps of the Committee for the Geological Survey of Russia; Memoirs and Sborniks of the Mineralogical Society, of the Academy of Science and of the Societies of Naturalists at the Universities; Mining Journal; Murchison's Geology of Russia; Helmersen's and MSller's Geological Maps of Russia and the Urals; Inostrantsev in Appendix to Russian translation of Reclus's Geogr.
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  • For higher education there were in 1904 only 9 universities.
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  • The standard of teaching in the universities is on the whole very high, and may be compared to that of the German universities.
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  • in the matter of the independence of the universities.
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  • In several university towns there are free teaching establishments for women, supported by subscription, with programmes and examinations equal to those of the universities.
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  • There were no great, well-organized secret societies, but there were many small groups, composed chiefly of male and female students of the universities and technical schools, which worked independently for a common purpose.
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  • degrees from all the Scottish universities, was from 1896 to 1899 lord rector of Edinburgh University and from 1900 chancellor of St.
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  • It may be added that a special translation of the chapter on Roman Law (Gibbon's historische Ubersicht des romischen Rechts) was published by Hugo at Göttingen in 1839, and has frequently been used as a text-book in German universities.
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  • SCHWENKFELD,' 'KASPAR (1490-1561), of Ossing, German theologian, was born in 1490, and after studying at Cologne and other universities served in various minor courts of Silesia, finally entering the service of the duke of Liegnitz, over whom he had great influence.
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  • From 1860 to 1870 he was professor of history at the faculty of letters at Strassburg, where he had a brilliant career as a teacher, but never yielded to the influence exercised by the German universities in the field of classical and Germanic antiquities.
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  • Thus the Babylonian academies combined the functions of specialist law-schools, universities and popular parliaments.
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  • The doors of the universities and academies, hitherto closed to them, were thrown open..
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  • Reverting to incidents in England itself, in 1870 the abolition of university tests removed all restrictions on Jews at Oxford and Cambridge, and both universities have since elected Jews to professorships and other posts of honour.
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  • Many Jews have filled professorial chairs at the universities, others have been judges, and in art, literature (there is a notable Jewish publication society), industry and commerce have rendered considerable services to national culture and prosperity.
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  • American universities have owed much to Jewish generosity, a foremost benefactor of these (as of many other American institutions) being Jacob Schiff.
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  • While he was in London he had a personal interview with the king, with the view of obtaining assistance for the Scottish universities from the money formerly applied to the support of the bishops.
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  • He was the author of Principles of Mining (1909), based on lectures given at Stanford and at Columbia universities.
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  • and to gain opinions from foreign universities in favour of the king's divorce from Catherine of Aragon.
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  • HERMANN OLSHAUSEN (1796-1839), German theologian, was born at Oldeslohe in Holstein on the 21st of August 1796, and was educated at the universities of Kiel (1814) and Berlin (1816), where he was influenced by Schleiermacher and Neander.
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  • His main reading was still history, but he went through all the Latin and Greek authors commonly read in the schools and universities, besides several that are not commonly read by undergraduates.
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  • Green's teaching was, directly and indirectly, the most potent philosophical influence in England during the last quarter of the 19th century, while his enthusiasm for a common citizenship, and his personal example in practical municipal life, inspired much of the effort made, in the years succeeding his death, to bring the universities more into touch with the people, and to break down the rigour of class distinctions.
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  • It possesses close scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge universities.
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  • Under an act of 1902 normal colleges, supported by the state, have also been created in connexion with Ohio and Miami universities.
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  • Among the numerous other colleges and universities in the state are Western Reserve University (1826) at Cleveland, the university of Cincinnati (opened 1873) at Cincinnati, and Oberlin College (1833) at Oberlin.
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  • Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopadie, and P. Schaff, Germany: its Universities and Theology (1857).
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  • GOTTLIEB CHRISTOPH ADOLF VON HARLESS (1806-1879), German divine, was born at Nuremberg on the 21st of November 1806, and was educated at the universities of Erlangen and Halle.
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  • He was educated at the Carolinum, an endowed school at Osnabruck, and studied at the universities of Gottingen and Heidelberg.
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  • The American School, founded in 1882, is supported by the principal universities of the United States.
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  • Numerous scholarships have been established at government expense in Porto Rican schools and in colleges or universities of the United States.
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  • He was educated at the Gymnasium of Frankfort-on-Main and at the universities of Heidelberg and Berlin.
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  • Meanwhile his academic honours from home and foreign universities multiplied, and he became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1894.
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  • Although for a long time lecturers and professors had been attached to universities, generally their duties had also included the study of physics, mineralogy and other subjects, with the result that chemistry received scanty encouragement.
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  • Oxford and Cambridge sadly neglected the erection of convenient laboratories for many years, and consequently we find technical schools and other universities having a far better equipment and offering greater facilities.
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  • During recent years chemistry has become one of the most important subjects in the curriculum of technical schools and universities, and at the present time no general educational institution is complete until it has its full equipment of laboratories and lecture theatres.
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  • The repeal of the Test Act, the admission of Quakers to Parliament in consequence of their being allowed to affirm instead of taking the oath (1832, when Joseph Pease was elected for South Durham), the establishment of the University of London, and, more recently, the opening of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge to Nonconformists, have all had their effect upon the body.
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  • This schism lasted fully ten years, although the antipope found hardly any adherents outside of his own hereditary states, those of Alphonso of Aragon, of the Swiss confederation and certain universities.
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  • He was educated at the universities of St Andrews and Glasgow, and in his sixteenth year was sent to Paris, where he studied civil and canon law.
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  • CASPAR SCHOPPE (1576-1649), German controversialist and scholar, was born at Neumarkt in the upper Palatinate on the 27th of May 1576 and studied at several German universities.
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  • There are large herbaria at the British Museum and at the Royal Gardens, Kew, and smaller collections at the botanical institutions at the principal British universities.
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  • THOMAS ROTHERHAM (1423-1500), archbishop of York, also called Thomas Scot, was born at Rotherham on the 24th of August 1423; he was educated in his native town and seems to have been connected with both the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
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  • He was educated at Schulpforta, and studied the classics at the universities of Bonn and Leipzig.
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  • As an authority on the Inquisition he stood in the highest rank of modern historians, and distinctions were conferred on him by the universities of Harvard, Princeton, Pennsylvania, Giessen and Moscow.
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  • This was the most distinguished post in the most famous of continental universities, and Dempster was now at the height of his fame.
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  • At the age of twelve he was sent abroad to complete his education, and resided at the principal universities of Germany, Holland, France, Italy and Switzerland for seventeen years.
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  • The university of Edinburgh, the youngest of the Scottish universities, was founded in 1583 by a royal charter granted by James IV., and its rights, immunities and privileges have been remodelled, ratified and extended at various periods.
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  • In 1621 an act of the Scottish parliament accorded to the university all rights and privileges enjoyed by other universities in the kingdom, and these were renewed under fresh guarantees in the treaty of union between England and Scotland, and in the Act of Security.
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  • It was one of the first universities to admit women students to its classes and degrees, and its alumni are brought into close bonds of sympathy and activity by a students' union.
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  • The university benefits also, like the other Scottish universities, from Mr Andrew Carnegie's endowment fund.
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  • The only positive piece of evidence produced is the passage from Thomas Nash's "Epistle to the Gentlemen of the Two Universities," prefixed to Greene's Arcadia, 1859, in which he upbraids somebody (not known to be Shakespeare) with having left the "trade of Noverint" and busied himself with "whole Hamlets" and "handfuls of tragical speeches."
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  • For higher education provision was made by the affiliation of Natal to the Cape of Good Hope University and by exhibitions tenable at English universities.
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  • In the schools and universities of the middle age the intellect of the semi-barbarous European peoples had been trained for the work of the modern world.
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  • The middle schools comprise classical schools (gymnasia) which are preparatory for the universities and other " high schools," and modern schools (Realschulen) preparatory for the technical schools.
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  • The high schools include the universities, of which Hungary possesses three, all maintained by the state: at Budapest (founded in 1635), at Kolozsvar (founded in 1872), and at Zagrab (founded in 1874).
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  • Its ready response to the king's heavy demands for the purpose of the national defence points to the existence of a healthy and self-sacrificing public spirit, and the eagerness with which the youth of all classes now began to flock to the foreign universities is another satisfactory feature of the age.
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  • Between 1362 and 1450 no fewer than 4151 Magyar students frequented the university of Vienna, nearly as many went by preference to Prague, and this, too, despite the fact that there were now two universities in Hungary itself, the old foundation of Louis the Great at Pecs, and a new one established at Buda by Sigismund.
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  • The active search for knowledge by means of observation and experiment found its natural home in the universities.
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  • Owing to the connexion of medicine with these seats of learning, it was natural that the study of the structure and functions of the human body and of the animals nearest to man should take root there; the spirit of inquiry which now for the first time became general showed itself in the anatomical schools of the Italian universities of the 16th century, and spread fifty years later to Oxford.
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  • He followed up this measure by dissolving parliament and attacking the universities.
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  • In 1908 the educational facilities provided by the republic, not including some private subventioned schools, were two universities and thirtythree national colleges.
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  • The universities are at Caracas and Merida, the latter known as the Universidad de los Andes.
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  • DANIEL NEAL (1678-1743), English historian, born in London on the 14th of December 1678, was educated at the Merchant Taylors' School, and at the universities of Utrecht and Leiden.
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  • That this movement coincided with the establishment of some of the older European universities is well known.
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  • At the same time, through the rise of the universities, medical learning was much more widely diffused, and the first definite forward movement was seen in the school of Montpellier, where a medical faculty existed early in the 12th century, afterwards united with faculties of law and philosophy.
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  • Montpellier became distinguished for the practical and empirical spirit of its medicine, as contrasted with the dogmatic and scholastic teaching of Paris and other universities.
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  • The northern universities contributed little - the reputation even of Paris being of later growth.
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  • Upon this apparently trifling question arose a controversy which lasted many years, occupied several universities, and led to the interposition of personages no less important than the pope and the emperor, but which is thought to have largely contributed to the final downfall of the Arabian medicine.
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  • None of these men founded a school - a result due in part to their intellectual character, in part to the absence in England of medical schools equivalent in position and importance to the universities of the Continent.
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  • The founding of new teaching universities, in which England, and even France, had been at some disadvantage as compared with Scotland and Germany, strengthened the movement in favour of enlarging and liberalizing technical training, and of anticipating technical instruction by some broader scientific discipline; though, as in all times of transition, something was lost temporarily by a departure from the old discipline of the grammar school before a new scheme of training the mind in scientific habits and conceptions was established or fully apprehended.
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  • For the record and diffusion of rapidly growing knowledge, learned societies, universities and laboratories, greatly increased in number and activity, issue their transactions in various fields; and by means of yearbooks and central news-sheets the accumulation of knowledge is organized and made accessible.
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  • His elder brother James, who just outlived him, was Conservative M.P. for Glasgow and Aberdeen Universities from 1880 to 1906.
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  • The failure of the government in Ireland (where the only success was Mr Birrell's introduction of the Universities Bill in April 1908), their internal divisions as regards socialistic legislation, their variance from the views of the selfgoverning colonies on Imperial administration, the admission after the general election that the alleged "slavery" of the Chinese in the Transvaal was, in Mr Winston Churchill's phrase, a "terminological inexactitude," and the introduction of extreme measures such as the Licensing Bill of 1908, offered excellent opportunities of electioneering attack.
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  • Both classical and modern education is provided; a large number of scholarships are maintained out of the foundation, and exhibitions from the school to the universities and other higher educational institutions.
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  • From 1581 he studied at the universities of Strassburg, Leipzig, Heidelberg and Jena.
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  • It was the hand of the author of that offensive Missive to Frederick William III., on the liberty of the press, that drafted the Carlsbad decrees; it was he who inspired the policy of repressing the freedom of the universities; and he noted in his diary as "a day more important than that of Leipzig" the session of the Vienna conference of 1819, in which it was decided to make the convocation of representative assemblies in the German states impossible, by enforcing the letter of Article XIII.
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  • He lectured in Japan in 1892, 1899 (when he also visited the universities of India) and 1906-1907.
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  • No laboratories were accessible to ordinary students, who had to content themselves with what the universities could give in the lectureroom and the library, and though both at Bonn and Erlangen Liebig endeavoured to make up for the deficiencies of the official instruction by founding a students' physical and chemical society for the discussion of new discoveries and speculations, he felt that he could never become a chemist in his own country.
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  • He was educated at the universities of St Andrews and Edinburgh, and after taking the degree of M.D.
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  • Innocent was also a notable patron of learning; he encouraged Alexander of Hales to write his Summa universae theologiae, did much for the universities, notably the Sorbonne, and founded law schools at Rome and Piacenza.
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  • In 1831 Daubeny represented the universities of England at the first meeting of the British Association, which at his request held their next session at Oxford.
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  • Universities and colleges were founded in Peru soon after the conquest, and Lima, Cuzco, Arequipa and Chuquisaca (now the Bolivian town of Sucre) became centres of considerable intellectual activity.
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  • For higher instruction there are four universities: the Universidad Mayor de San Marcos at Lima, and three provincial institutions at Arequipa, Cuzco and Trujillo.
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  • "ALBERT HAUCK (1845-), German theologian, was born at Hassertriidingen, M.-Franken, Dec. 9 1845, and was educated at the gymnasium at Ansbach and later (1864-8) at the universities of Erlangen and Berlin.
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  • In the session of 1834 his most important performance was a speech in opposition to Hume's proposal to throw the universities open to Dissenters.
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  • In the following session Religious Tests in the universities were abolished, and a bill to establish secret voting was carried through the House of Commons.
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  • Martineau, who was in his youth denied the benefit of a university education, yet in his age found famous universities eager to confer upon him their highest distinctions.
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  • Fukuzawa Yukichi, founder of the KeiO Gijuku, now one of Japans four universities, did more than any of his contemporaries by writing and speaking to spread a knowledge of the West, its ways and its thoughts, and Nakamura Keiu labored in the same cause by translating Smiless Self-help and Mills Representative Government.
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  • There are two universities, the Protestant at Heidelberg and the Roman Catholic at Freiburg-im-Breisgau, and a celebrated technical college at Karlsruhe.
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  • The upper chamber is composed of all the princes of the reigning family who are of full age; the chiefs of the mediatized families; the archbishop of Freiburg; the president -of the Protestant Evangelical church; a deputy from each of the universities and from the technical high school, eight members elected by the territorial nobility for four years, three representatives of the chamber of commerce, two of that of agriculture, one of that of trades, two mayors of municipalities, one burgomaster of lesser towns, one member of a district council, and eight members (two of them legal functionaries) nominated by the grand-duke.
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  • He was intended for the medical profession, and studied at the universities of Berlin, Halle, Gottingen and Leiden.
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  • Ramus's works appear among the logical textbooks of the Scottish universities, and he was not without his followers in England in the 17th century.
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  • The Nova litteraria maris Balthici et Septentrionis (1698-1708) was more especially devoted to north Germany and the universities of Kiel, Rostock and Dorpat.
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  • One of the most noteworthy Scandinavian periodicals has been the Nordisk Universitets Tidsskrift (1854-1864), a bond of union between the universities of Christiania, Upsala, Lund and Copenhagen.
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  • He held honorary degrees at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, Edinburgh and Durham, was an Associate of the Institute of France; a Commander of the Legion of Honour, and of the Order of Leopold.
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  • He studied, first theology and then philosophy and natural science, at the universities of Konigsberg and Berlin.
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  • The following of Eucken's works also have been translated into English: - Liberty in Teaching in the German Universities (1897); Are the Germans still a Nation of Thinkers?
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  • A number of entrance scholarships and leaving scholarships tenable at the universities are offered annually.
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  • This gave the new king much popularity with the mass of the people; while the educated classes were pleased by his removal of Frederick's ban on the German language by the admission of German writers to the Prussian Academy, and by the active encouragement given to schools and universities.
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  • He steadily opposed whatever might encourage the admission of Catholics to the national universities, and so put his foot down on Newman's project to open a branch house of the Oratory at Oxford with himself as superior.
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  • He studied law, theology and science at the university of Poitiers from 1536 to 1539; then, after some travel, attended the universities of Bologna and Padua, receiving the doctorate from the latter in 1548.
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  • Logic he probably despised as merely an instrument of pedants - a judgment for which, in his day, and especially at the universities, there was only too much ground.
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  • Oxford, Edinburgh and Glasgow gave him honorary degrees; the two Scottish universities made him lord rector.
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  • Other educational establishments are Queen's University, replacing the old Queen's College (1849) under the Irish Universities Act 1908; the Presbyterian and the Methodist Colleges, occupying neighbouring sites close to the extensive botanical gardens, the Royal Academical Institution, and the Municipal Technical Institute.
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  • The history of institutions like universities and academies, and that of great popular movements like the Reformation, are of course 1 Technical subjects like painting or English law have been excluded by Hallam, and history and theology only partially treated.
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  • JOHANN ARNDT (1555-1621), German Lutheran theologian, was born at Ballenstedt, in Anhalt, and studied in several universities.
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  • with Henrietta Maria of France had stimulated the propaganda of the Roman Catholic Church, and the Jesuits made the universities their special point of attack.
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  • ONNO KLOPP (1822-1903), German historian, was born at Leer on the 9th of October 1822, and was educated at the universities of Bonn, Berlin and Gottingen.
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  • and viii.) are based, in part, on documents in the Swedish Royal Archives and at the universities of Upsala and Lund, which were unknown to Benjamin Ferris (History of the Original Settlements of the Delaware, Wilmington, 1846) and Francis Vincent (History of the State of Delaware, Philadelphia, 1870), which ends with the English occupation in 1664).
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  • as a result of which he resigned his professorship. Several universities were eager to obtain his services, and he had accepted a post offered him by the elector palatine at Heidelberg, when he died suddenly on the 12th of September, 1672.
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  • The cry of atheism was raised, and the electoral government of Saxony, followed by all the German states except Prussia, suppressed the Journal and confiscated the copies found in their universities.
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  • In 1839 the Congress of the Republic set apart fifty square leagues (221,420 acres) of land for the establishment of two universities.
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  • From Cambridge he wrote some Latin satiric verses 1 in defence of the universities and the English Church against Andrew Melville, a Scottish Presbyterian minister.
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  • He then travelled through Germany, the Netherlands, England, France and Italy, and was received with marked respect at the different universities he visited.
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  • Of his sons, Thomas (1616-1680) was born at Copenhagen, where, after a long course of study in various universities of Europe, he was appointed successively professor of mathematics (1647) and anatomy (1648).
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  • Chesnelong now devoted himself to the establishment of Catholic universities and to the formation of Catholic working-men's clubs.
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  • In 1860 he was appointed by the crown to the new chair of logic and English in the university of Aberdeen (created on the amalgamation of the two colleges, King's and Marischal, by the Scottish Universities Commission of 1858).
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  • ABRAHAM GEIGER (1810-1874), Jewish theologian and orientalist, was born at Frankfort-on-Main on the 24th of May 1810, and educated at the universities of Heidelberg and Bonn.
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  • Luxury and drinking were to be suppressed, the universities, especially the divinity schools, reorganized, &c.
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  • The king's agents secured the opinion of a number of prominent universities that his marriage was void, and an assembly of notables, which he summoned in June 1530, warned the pope of the dangers involved in leaving the royal succession in uncertainty, since the heir was not only a woman, but, as it seemed to many, of illegitimate birth.
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  • Law and medical schools are maintained in Boston and Harvard universities.
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  • In German universities the townsfolk of Jaffa (Joppa) to the Egyptian desert south of Gaza (on the subsequent extension of the name in its Greek form Palaestina, see Palestine).
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  • He studied at the universities of Bonn and Berlin till 1834, was then accused of participation in the students' societies, which the government was endeavouring to suppress, and was condemned to six years' imprisonment, afterwards reduced to six months.
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  • He received his general education at the City of London School, and his scientific education at the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, and at the universities of Wiirzburg and Munich.
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  • The school is divided into classical and modern sides, and has exhibitions to Oxford and Cambridge universities.
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  • Honorary academic degrees were conferred upon him by the universities of Cairo, Christiania, Berlin, Cambridge and Oxford, and he was given both popular and official ovations of almost royal distinction - ovations which were repeated by his own countrymen on his return to America.
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  • Saxony claims to be one of the most highly educated countries in Europe, and its foundations of schools and universities were among the earliest in Germany.
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  • Of the four universities founded by the Saxon electors at Leipzig, Jena, Wittenberg, later transferred to Halle, and Erfurt, now extinct, only the first is included in the present kingdom of Saxony.
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  • The country had four universities, those of Leipzig, Wittenberg, Jena and Erfurt; books began to increase rapidly, and, by virtue of Luther's translation of the Bible, the Saxon dialect became the ruling dialect of Germany.
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  • He was educated at Westminster School and the universities of Edinburgh and Bonn.
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  • A general strike at the universities was averted by a compromise, by which Wahrmund was transferred from the pious land of Tirol to Prague, which was more than he had desired.
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  • The sympathies of young men at the universities have been enlisted towards the movement, and an Oxford house, a Cambridge house, and other university missions have been founded in London.
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  • He was educated at the Flensburg gymnasium and the universities of Kiel and Berlin.
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  • In this sense the word was applied in the later middle ages to the Germans studying at Italian universities and - to take a particular example - to the French cardinals at the election of Clement V.
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  • Hence the attempts to train its growing manhood in clerically regulated boarding-schools and to keep it shut out from the external world in clerical seminaries, even in places where there are universities.
    0
    0
  • In the episcopacy it has numerous adherents; it has, made progress in the universities, and most of the learned and theological reviews are conducted in its spirit.
    0
    0
  • He had spent several terms at Marriage each of the two universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and he had already travelled much, having visited most of Europe, Egypt and the United States.
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    0
  • Varenius studied at the gymnasium of Hamburg (1640-42), and at Konigsberg (1643-45) and Leiden (1645-49) universities, where he devoted himself to mathematics and medicine, taking his medical degree at Leiden in 1649.
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  • He permitted free study of the Aristotelian writings, and issued (1234), through his chaplain, Raymond of Pennaforte, an important new compilation of decretals which he prescribed in the bull Rex pacificus should be the standard text-book in canon law at the universities of Bologna and Paris.
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    0
  • In 1869 he sought to modify rather than to oppose the bill for the abolition of tests in the universities.
    0
    0
  • As a fellow of Magdalen College, he had been desirous of changes which he felt himself bound by his oath from advocating; and he had taken part in the discussions on the abolition of tests in the old universities.'
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  • From 1659 to 1662 he visited the universities of Basel, Tubingen and Geneva, and commenced the study of heraldry, which he pursued throughout his life.
    0
    0
  • This was especially the case at universities, where medical schools existed.
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  • Dr Rashdall (Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages, vol.
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  • Just as he considered himself entitled to appoint to all ecclesiastical offices, so also he invested the emperor with his empire and kings with their kingdoms. Not only did he despatch his decretals to the universities to form the basis of the teaching of the canon law and of the decisions founded upon it, but he considered himself empowered to annul civil laws.
    0
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  • In the entire republic there are four universities, three Czech and Slovak - the Charles University of Prague, the Masaryk University of Brno and the Comenius University of Bratislava - and one German (at Prague).
    0
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  • The Masaryk and Comenius Universities are new foundations since 1918.
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  • His eldest Son, William Henry Perkin, who was born at Sudbury, near Harrow, on the 17th of June 1860, and was educated at the City of London School, the Royal College of Science, and the universities of Wiirzburg and Munich, became professor of chemistry at the Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh, in 1887, and professor of organic chemistry at Owens College, Manchester, in 1892.
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  • In Scotland he gave £2,000,000 in 1901 to establish a trust for providing funds for assisting education at the Scottish universities, a benefaction which led in 1906 to his being elected lord rector of Edinburgh University.
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  • The extreme divergence in doctrinal position is fostered by the fact that the theology taught in the universities is in a great measure divorced from the practical religious life of the people, and the theological opinions uttered in the theological literature of the country cannot be held to express the thoughts of the members of the churches.
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    0
  • Even the rudiments of Roman law were not then included in the ordinary training of English lawyers; it was assumed at the universities that any good Latin scholar could qualify himself at short notice for keeping up such tradition of civilian studies as survived.
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    0
  • The sons of the gentry, denied proper instruction at home, betook themselves to the nearest universities across the border, to Goldberg in Silesia, to Wittemberg, to Leipzig.
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    0
  • The Polish universities of Warsaw and Vilna were suppressed, and the students compelled to go to St Petersburg and Kiev.
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  • He supported Polish students at Russian universities on condition that they then spent a number of years in the public service.
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  • But the aristocratic youth still preferred frequenting the universities of Prague, Padua and Paris, and accordingly the newly founded studium languished.
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  • In 1636 the privy council decided in his favour his claim of jurisdiction as visitor over both universities.
    0
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  • It was in connexion with this question that Dollinger published his Past and Present of Catholic Theology (1863) and his Universities Past and Present (Munich, 1867).
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  • Dellinger was almost unanimously elected rector-magnificus of the university of Munich, and Oxford, Edinburgh and Marburg universities conferred upon him the honorary degree of doctor of laws and Vienna that of philosophy.
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    0
  • The commissioners feared that, so long as Greek was a sine qua non at the universities, these schools would be cut off from direct connexion with the universities, while the universities would in some degree lose their control over a portion of the higher culture of the nation.
    0
    0
  • The earlier literature is best represented in England by Matthew Arnold's Schools and Universities in France (1868; new edition, 1892) and A French Eton (1864).
    0
    0
  • The old schools and universities were being quietly interpenetrated by the new spirit of humanism, when the sky was suddenly darkened by the clouds of religious conflict.
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    0
  • The Society of Jesus was founded in 1540, and by 1600 most of the teachers in the Catholic schools and universities of in 1773, survived its dissolution.
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    0
  • Goethe and Schiller were convinced that the old Greek world was the highest revelation of humanity; and the universities and schools of Germany were reorganized in this spirit by F.
    0
    0
  • Russell, German Higher Schools (New York, 1899); and (among earlier English publications) Matthew Arnold's Higher Schools and Universities in Germany (1874, reprinted from Schools and Universities on the Continent, 1865).
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    0
  • The state grants scholarships tenable at European universities to promising pupils, and there are three important public libraries.
    0
    0
  • ALEXANDER STUART MURRAY (1841-1904), British archaeologist, was born at Arbroath on the 8th of January 1841, and educated there, at Edinburgh high school and at the universities of Edinburgh and Berlin.
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  • He was educated at the gymnasium in Gotha, and afterwards at the universities of Erfurt, Kiel, where he came under the influence of the pietist Christian Kortholt (1633-1694), and Leipzig.
    0
    0
  • The teaching of political ecomomy was associated in the Scottish universities with that of moral philosophy.
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    0
  • Pombal charged the whole Society with the possible guilt of a few, and, unwilling to wait the dubious issue of an application to the pope for licence to try them in the civil courts, whence they were exempt, issued on the 1st of September 1759 a decree ordering the immediate deportation of every Jesuit from Portugal and all its dependencies and their suppression by the bishops in the schools and universities.
    0
    0
  • The university of Mexico received much support from both church and state, but it never gained a position comparable to the universities of South America - Cordoba, Lima (San Marcos) and Bogota.
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  • He " wished that some special pains should be taken in that behalf for one uniform translation - professing that he could never yet see a Bible well translated in English - and this to be done by the best learned in both the Universities; after them to be reviewed by the bishops and the chief learned of the Church; from them to be presented to the privy council; and lastly to be ratified by his royal authority; and so this whole church to be bound unto it and none other."
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  • (15) Besides the said directors before mentioned, three or four of the most ancient and grave divines in either of the universities, not employed in translating, to be assigned by the vicechancellor upon conference with [the] rest of the heads to be overseers of the translations, as well Hebrew as Greek, for the better observation of the fourth rule above specified."
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    0
  • Freedom is offered to students who wish to be transferred from Oxford, Cambridge, or certain colonial universities to Trinity College, by the recognition of terms kept in the former institutions as part of the necessary course at Trinity College.
    0
    0
  • This building was occupied by the Royal University of Ireland until its dissolution under the Irish Universities Act 1908, which provided for a new university at Dublin, to which the building was transferred under the act (see Ireland: Education).
    0
    0
  • He cannot take a degree in divinity at Oxford, Cambridge or Durham (Universities Tests Act 1871), and so is debarred from holding any professorship of divinity in those universities.
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    0
  • (5) The Elizabethan Act of Uniformity contained a provision that at the universities the public services, with the exception of the Eucharist, might be in a language other than English; and in 1560 there appeared a Latin version of the Prayer-Book, issued under royal letters patent, in which there was a rubric prefixed to the Order for the Communion of the Sick, based on that in the first Prayer-Book of Edward VI.
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    0
  • The countess was very pious and charitable, and under the influence of her confessor, John Fisher, afterwards bishop of Rochester, she founded the Lady Margaret professorships of divinity at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
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  • GOTTFRIED GABRIEL BREDOW (1773-1814), German historian, was born at Berlin on the 14th of December 1773, and became successively professor at the universities of Helmstedt, Frankfort-on-Oder and Breslau.
    0
    0
  • New Brunswick, Ontario and Manitoba support provincial universities at Fredericton, Toronto and Winnipeg.
    0
    0
  • University work in the maritime provinces, instead of being concentrated, as it might well be, in one powerful institution, is distributed among five small, but within their range efficient universities.
    0
    0
  • While the older universities have increased greatly in influence and efficiency, the following new foundations have been made since confederation: - University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 1877; Presbyterian College, Winnipeg, 1870; Methodist College, Winnipeg, 1888; Wesleyan College, Montreal, 1873; Presbyterian College, Montreal, 1868; School of Practical Science, Toronto, 1877; Royal Military College, Kingston, 1875; M`Master University, Toronto, 1888.
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    0
  • All the larger universities have schools of medicine in affiliation, and have the power of conferring medical degrees.
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    0
  • He has also been the recipient of honours from many British and foreign universities.
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  • He was educated at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg and Giessen, at the last of which he graduated Ph.D.
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  • Various universities and colleges conferred honorary degrees upon him.
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  • This extraordinary man, associated by tradition with Omar Khayyam, the well-known mathematician and free-thinking poet, and with Hassan (ibn) Sabbah, afterwards the founder of the sect of the Assassins (q.v.), was a renowned author and statesman of the first rank, and immortalized his name by the foundation of several universities (the Nizamiyah at Bagdad), observatories, mosques, hospitals and other institutions of public utility.
    0
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  • The following is a bibliography of Westcott's more important writings, giving the date of the first editions: - Elements of the Gospel Harmony (1851); History of the Canon of First Four Centuries (1853); Characteristics of Gospel Miracles (1859); Introduction to the Study of the Gospels (1860); The Bible in the Church (1864); The Gospel of the Resurrection (1866); Christian Life Manifold and One (1869); Some Points in the Religious Life of the Universities (1873); Paragraph Psalter for the Use of Choirs (1879); Commentary on the Gospel of St John (1881); Commentary on the Epistles of St John (1883); Revelation of the Risen Lord (1882); Revelation of the Father (1884); Some Thoughts from the Ordinal (1884); Christus Consummator (1886); Social Aspects of Christianity (1887); The Victory of the Cross: Sermons in Holy Week (1888); Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews (1889); From Strength to Strength (1890); Gospel of Life (1892); The Incarnation and Common Life (1893); Some Lessons of the Revised Version of the New Testament (1897); Christian Aspects of Life (1897); Lessons from Work (1901).
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  • He studied law at the universities of Berlin, Göttingen and Kiel, and began his political career in the service of Denmark, in the chancery of Schleswig-Holstein-Lauenburg at Copenhagen, and afterwards in the foreign office.
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  • from the universities and higher technical schools.
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  • He was loaded with the degrees of the universities and membership of numerous societies and academies.
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    0
  • He fought as a volunteer in the Franco-German War (1870-I) and then studied at different universities, retaining throughout his subsequent career a good deal of the jovial (burschikos) manner of a German student.
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  • c. 1580), English chronicler, belonged probably to a Cheshire family, and according to Anthony Wood was educated at one of the English universities, afterwards becoming a "minister of God's Word."
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  • established and in full possession of the religious houses, the universities, and the learned professions.
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  • It was counteracted to some extent by the study at the universities of the deductive logic of Aristotle and the inductive logic of Bacon, by parts of Mill's own logic, and by the natural realism of Reid, Stewart, and Hamilton, which met Hume's scepticism by asserting a direct perception of the external world.
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  • He there applied himself to Oriental languages, but also attended the last course of lectures delivered by Turnebus in the Greek chair, as well as those of Peter Ramus, whose philosophical method and plan of teaching he afterwards introduced into the universities of Scotland.
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  • of Edinburgh University in 1881; of St Andrews University in 1885; of Cambridge University in 1888; of Dublin and Glasgow Universities in 1891; lord rector of St Andrews University in 1886; of Glasgow University in 1890; chancellor of Edinburgh University in 1891; member of the senate London University in 1888; and D.
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  • degrees from many universities, English, American and European, he was made a member of numerous archaeological and similar societies, including the Royal Institute of British Architects, who bestowed on him their gold medal.
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  • The Roman power was also increased by the formation of the universities - privileged corporations of masters and students, which escaped the local power of the bishop and his chancellor only to place themselves under the direction and supervision of the Holy See.
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  • Since whole universities and numerous scholars had pronounced in favour of the new theories, the Pisan synod dismissed all canonical scruples, and unhesitatingly laid claim to authority over both popes, one of whom was necessarily the legitimate pope.
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  • As the yeomen of England were then in comparatively easy circumstances, the practice of sending their sons to the universities was quite usual; indeed Latimer mentions that in the reign of Edward VI., on account of the increase of rents, the universities had begun wonderfully to decay.
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    0
  • The new leaven had begun to communicate its subtle influence to the universities, but was working chiefly in secret and even to a great extent unconsciously to those affected by it, for many were in profound ignorance of the ultimate tendency of their own opinions.
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  • He was the recipient of many British and foreign awards and honours, amongst these being the Royal and Hughes medals of the Royal Society in 1894 and 1902 respectively, the Hodgkins medal of the Smithsonian Institute of Washington in 1902, the Nobel Prize for physics in 1906, enrolment as honorary graduate of many universities, and as honorary fellow of numerous American and continental scientific academies.
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  • to supervise education in Rome and the Papal States; since 1870 it has been exclusively concerned with the Catholic universities, so far as the sacred sciences are concerned.
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    0
  • Of the two great Spanish universities, Alcala de Henares belonged in all respects to Castile, and Salamanca rose to equality with Paris, Oxford or Bologna, under the purely Castilian influence of Alphonso X.
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  • He next took to medicine, which he studied at the universities of Valencia and Barcelona with such success that the local authorities of the latter city made him a grant to enable him to follow his studies at Madrid and Paris, preparatory to appointing him professor.
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  • had been conferred upon him by the universities of Harvard (1877), and of Columbia (1887),(1887), and the degree of D.D.
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  • In the German universities the Professor ordinarius is the occupant of one of the regular and permanent chairs in any faculty.
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    0
  • Towards the end of the 17th century, when large wigs came into fashion, it came for convenience to be constructed gown-wise, open down the front and buttoned at the neck, a fashion which still partially survives, notably at the universities.
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  • In 1879 he became instructor in biblical philology at the Union Theological Seminary, in 1881 an associate professor of the same subject, and in 1890 professor of Hebrew and cognate languages.1 Dr Brown's published works have won him honorary degrees from the universities of Glasgow and Oxford, as well as from Dartmouth and Yale; they are, with the exception of The Christian Point of View (1902; with Profs.
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  • HANS PRUTZ (1843-), German historian, son of Robert Eduard Prutz (1816-1872), the essayist and historian; was born at Jena on the 10th of May 1843, and was educated at the universities of Jena and Berlin.
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  • Central African Mission of the English Universities.
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    0
  • There are now five missions definitely linked with the universities.
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    0
  • The cause of missions in the universities has been fostered greatly by the Student Volunteer Missionary Movement, initiated in America in 1886, and organized in England in 1892.
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  • Mott succeeded in forming students' associations in universities and colleges in several European countries, as well as in Turkey in Asia, Syria, India, Ceylon, China, Japan and Australia; and all these associations, over 150 in number, are now linked together in a great International Student Federation.
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  • Zanzibar is also one of the centres of the Universities Mission, another being Likoma on Lake Nyasa.
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    0
  • The universities of Oxford and Cambridge, under the inspiration of Lord William Cecil, were interesting themselves in 1910 in a scheme for establishing a Christian university in China.
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  • His plea for the teaching of the science of fortification in universities, and the existence of such lectures in Leiden, have led to the impression that he himself filled this chair; but the belief is erroneous, as Stevinus, though living at Leiden, never had direct relations with its university.
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  • The state has two Roman Catholic universities, Munich and Wurzburg, and a Lutheran, Erlangen; in Munich there are a polytechnic, an academy of sciences and an academy of art.
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    0
  • He was educated at the universities of Berlin and Jena, and gained the foundations of his geological knowledge under F.
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    0
  • There are three state universities in Holland, namely, Leiden (1575), Groningen (1585) and Utrecht (1634).
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    0
  • In each of these universities there are five faculties, namely, law, theology, medicine, science and mathematics, and literature and philosophy, the courses for which are respectively four, five, eight, and six or seven years for the two last named.
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    0
  • The fees are the same as those of the universities, and as at the universities there are bursaries.
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    0
  • In 1736 both the universities at Aberdeen gave him the degree of D.D.
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    0
  • He saw all the mechanical difficulties that had to be overcome in mining; he learned the nature and succession of rocks, the physical properties of minerals, ores and metals; he got a notion of mineral waters; he was an eyewitness of the accidents which befel the miners, and studied the diseases which attacked them; he had proof that positive knowledge of nature was not to be got in schools and universities, but only by going to nature herself, and to those who were constantly engaged with her.
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  • Higher instruction is given at the universities and in the schools attached thereto.
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    0
  • Those at Ghent and Liege are state universities; the two others at Brussels and Louvain are free.
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  • When the author was preparing to return from Berlin, the Royal Academy made him their guest at a public dinner, an unprecedented honour; and the universities of Berlin, Heidelberg and Munich united in a testimonial of regard.
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  • His career was determined by his uncle, Johann Hartwig Ernst Bernstorff, who early discerned the talents of his nephew and induced him to study in the German and Swiss universities and travel for some years in Italy, France, England and Holland, to prepare himself for a statesman's career.
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  • After studying law at the universities of Berlin, Gottingen and Heidelberg (1813-1817), he settled as a Privatdocent, in 1821, at the university of Berlin, where he became ordinary professor of law in 1827.
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    0
  • In Leviathan he had vehemently assailed the system of the universities, as originally founded for the support of the papal against the civil authority, and as still working social mischief by adherence to the old learning.
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  • In 1654 Seth Ward (1617-1689), the Savilian professor of astronomy, replying in his Vindiciae academiarum to some other assaults (especially against John Webster's Examen of Academies) on the academic system, retorted upon Hobbes that, so far from the universities being now what he had known them in his youth, he would find his geometrical pieces, when they appeared, better understood there than he should like.
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  • Whereas in Prussia, however, the Regierung is purely official, with no representative element, the Regierungsbezirk in Bavaria has a representative body, the Landrat, consisting of delegates of the district assemblies, the towns, large landowners, clergy andin certain casesthe universities; the president is assisted by a committee (Landratsausschuss) of six members elected by the Landrat.
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  • Universities and Higher Technical Schools.Germany owes its large number of universities, and its widely diffused higher education to its former subdivision into many separate states.
    0
    0
  • Only a few of the universities date their existence from the 19th century; the majority of them are very much older.
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    0
  • The following table gives the names of the 21 universities, the dates of their respective foundations, the number of their professors and other teachers for the winter half -year 19o8i9o9, and of the students attending their lectures during the winter half-year of 1907-1908:
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    0
  • In all the universities the number of matriculated students in 1907 1908 was 46,47,, including 320 women, 2 of whom studied theology, 14 law, 150 philosophy and 154 medicine.
    0
    0
  • Ten schools, technical high schools, or Pot ytechnica, rank with the universities, and have the power of granting certain degrees.
    0
    0
  • Still more powerful, because touching other elements of human nature and affecting a more important class, was the influence of the Renaissance, which, towards the end of the 15th century, passed from Italy to the universities of Germany.
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    0
  • These containedelaborateprovisions for supervising the universities and muzzling the press, laying down that no constitution inconsistent with the monarchical principle should be granted, and setting up a central commission at Mainz to inquire into the machinations of the great revolutionary secret society which existed only in the imagination of the authorities.
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    0
  • The Mainz Commission, though hampered by the jealousy of the governments (the king of Prussia refused to allow his subjects to be haled before it), was none the less effective enough in preventing all free expression of opinion; while at the universities the official curators kept Liberal enthusiasts in order.
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    0
  • After the death of the king the prince-regent, Luitpold, still retained the old administration, but several concessions were made to the Catholics in regard to the schools and universities, and in 1890 it was decided that the claim of the Old Catholics to be regarded officially as members of the Church should no longer be recognized.
    0
    0
  • The tendency towards a stricter censorship was shown by a proposal which was carried through the Prussian parliament for controlling the instruction given at the universities by the Privatdozenten.
    0
    0
  • In the i9th century the scientific spirit received a great impetus from the German system of education, one feature of which was that the universities began to require original work for some of their degrees.
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    0
  • He studied theology in the universities of Heidelberg and Berlin (1817-20) under Karl Daub (1765-1836), Schleiermacher and Neander, the philosophers and historians Georg Hegel, Friedrich Creuzer (1771-1858) and F.
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    0
  • There are also numerous universities throughout the province, founded in early days by the various religious bodies.
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    0
  • Women students are admitted to all the universities save Ottawa on the same terms as men, and form nearly one-third of the whole number of students.
    0
    0
  • Theological colleges are supported by the various religious bodies, and are in affiliation with one or other of the universities.
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    0
  • He helped in the establishment of the universities of Innsbruck and Olmutz; and under his auspices, after the defeat of the Turks in 1683, Vienna began to develop from a mere frontier fortress into one of the most brilliant capitals of Europe.
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  • the control of the church; the universities were remodelled and modernized by the introduction of new faculties, the study of ecclesiastical law being transferred from that of theology to that of jurisprudence, and the elaborate system of elementary and secondary education was established, which survived with slight modification till 1869.
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    0
  • The diets themselves were elected for six years; they were chosen generally (there were slight local differences) in the following way: (a) a certain number of bishops and rectors of universities sat in virtue of their office; (b) the rest of the members were chosen by four electoral bodies or curiae, - (i) the owners of estates which before 1848 had enjoyed certain feudal privileges, the so-called great proprietors; (2) the chambers of commerce; (3) the towns; (4) the rural districts.
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  • They demanded, therefore, that all higher schools and universities should remain German, and that so far as possible the elementary schools should be Germanized.
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    0
  • The authority of the Church extended even to the universities.
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    0
  • He studied law at the universities of Vienna and Graz, but after passing the examination for employment in the state judicial service abandoned this career and, becoming a journalist, travelled extensively in south-east Europe, and visited Asia Minor and Egypt.
    0
    0
  • The professors appointed by the city, however, still taught at Rostock, so that there were practically two universities in the duchy until 1789, when they were reunited at the original.
    0
    0
  • Excavations and explorations are also conducted annually by the agents of universities and museums in England, America and Germany, and by private explorers, concessions being granted generally on the terms that the Egyptian government shall retain half of the antiquities discovered, while the other half remains for the finders.
    0
    0
  • In America the museums and universities of Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco and New York have collections of greater or less interest.
    0
    0
  • During 1663 he was made duke of Orkney, duke of Monmouth and knight of the Garter, and received honorary degrees at both universities; and on his marriage he and his wife were created duke and duchess of Buccleuch, and he took the surname of Scott.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, in many cases bishops have been sent to inaugurate new missions, as in the cases of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa, Lebombo, Corea and New Guinea; and the missionary jurisdictions so founded develop in time into dioceses.
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    0
  • The brilliant days are past when the universities of Damascus, Bagdad, Nishapur, Cairo, Kairawan, Seville, Cordova, were thronged by thousands of students of theology, when a professor had often hundreds or even, like Bukhari, thousands of hearers, and when vast estates in the hands of the clergy fed both masters and scholars.
    0
    0
  • Of the great universities but one survives - the Azhar mosque at Cairo - where thousands of students still gather to follow a course of study which gives an accurate picture of the Mahommedan ideal of theological education.
    0
    0
  • He learnt law at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and the universities of Edinburgh and Gottingen, where he studied philosophy under Lotze.
    0
    0
  • He took first-class honours in philosophy at Edinburgh, and was Gray scholar and Ferguson scholar in philosophy of the four Scottish Universities (1876).
    0
    0
  • 2.3.1 (a) Elementary Schools 2.3.2 (b) Secondary Schools 2.3.3 (c) Universities and Colleges
    0
    0
  • King's Scholars, trained at one of the training colleges, and King's Students who attend one of the universities, form the chief source of supply of certificated teachers.
    0
    0
  • By the act of 1872 their management was transferred to the school boards, and they may be conveniently classified into higher-class public schools, such as the old grammar schools and the liberally endowed schools of the Merchant Company in Edinburgh, and higher grade schools, with a few years' preparatory course for the universities, while some of the ordinary schools have earned the grant for higher education.
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    0
  • There are four universities in Scotland, namely (in the order of foundation), St Andrews (1411), Glasgow (1450), Aberdeen (1494) and Edinburgh (1582), in which are the customary faculties of arts, divinity, law, medicine and science.
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    0
  • In 1901 Mr Andrew Carnegie gave £2,000,000 to the universities.
    0
    0
  • The universities are empowered to affiliate other academical institutions, and.women students are admitted on an equal footing with men.
    0
    0
  • By the Reform Act of 1832 the number of Scottish representatives in the Commons was raised to fifty-three, the counties under a slightly altered arrangement returning thirty members as before, and the burghs, reinforced by the erection of various towns into parliamentary burghs, twenty-three; the second Reform Act (1867) increased the number to sixty, the universities obtaining representation by two members, while two additional members were assigned to the counties and three to the burghs; by the Redistribution of Seats Act in 1885 an addition of seven members was made to the representation of the counties and five to that of the burghs, the total representation being raised to seventy-two.
    0
    0
  • As early as 1730-1740, the great English public schools and universities began to attract the Scottish youths of the wealthier classes, and now good Scots is seldom heard in conversation and is not always written in popular Scottish novels.
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  • Educated at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen, he showed an interest in art and visited Italy; but returning to Frankfort he turned his attention to the study of history, and became secretary of the Gesellschaft fib' dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde.
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    0
  • His pall-bearers comprised representatives of literature, of science, of both Houses of Parliament, of theology, Anglican and Nonconformist, and of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
    0
    0
  • It has been completely transformed into a national Hungarian seat of learning since 1867, and great efforts have been made to keep at home the Hungarian students, who before then frequented other universities and specially that of Vienna.
    0
    0
  • There were in 1907 more than forty other universities and colleges in the state, the most important being the University of Chicago, North-western University at Evanston, Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington, Knox College, Galesburg, and Illinois College at Jacksonville.
    0
    0
  • The first universities of Europe consisted of corporations of teachers and of students analogous to the trade gilds and merchant gilds of the time.
    0
    0
  • The early universities of Europe, being under the same religious authority and animated by the same philosophy, resembled each other very closely in curriculum and general organization and examinations, and by the authority of the emperor, or of the pope in most cases, the permission to teach granted by one university was valid in all (jus ubicunque docendi).
    0
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  • In some universities the sons of nobles were regularly excused certain examinations.
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  • The subjects in which the medieval universities examined were (i.) those of the trivium and quadrivium in the faculty of arts; (ii.) theology; (iii.) medicine; and (iv.) civil and canon law.
    0
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  • At the Scottish universities the B.A.
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  • In 1880 the Victoria University, Manchester, was established, in which teaching and examining were again united; and in the universities since established, with the exception of the Royal University of Ireland (which was created in 1880 as an examining body on the model of London, but which was dissolved under the Irish Universities Act 1908, and replaced by the National University of Ireland and the Queen's University of Belfast), the precedent of Victoria has been followed.
    0
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  • The examinations of the newer universities, the Victoria University of Manchester, Birmingham, Liverpool, Leeds, Sheffield and Wales, are open only to students at these universities, and are conducted by the teachers in association with one or more external examiners for each subject.
    0
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  • In some universities, e.g.
    0
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  • 1 It should be mentioned that the professors of chemistry of a number of German, Austrian and Swiss universities, have, by agreement, instituted an intermediate examination in that subject which students are required to pass before beginning work on the doctoral thesis.
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  • The literary theses required by French universities are, as a rule, volumes of several hundred pages, and more important in character even than the German Habilitationsschrift.
    0
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  • The universities and the College of Preceptors conduct examinations for teaching diplomas.
    0
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  • The faculty of arts in medieval universities covered secondary as well as higher education in the subjects concerned.
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  • Thus the first two years of the arts curriculum in English and American universities correspond, roughly speaking, to the last two years spent in a secondary school of Germany or' France, and the continental " school-leaving examinations " correspond to the intermediate examinations of the newer English universities and to the pass examinations for the degree at Oxford and Cambridge (Mark Pattison, Suggestions on Academical Organization, 1868, p. 238, and Matthew Arnold, Higher Schools and Universities in Germany, 1892, p. 209).
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  • There are in England a number of school examinations which, under prescribed conditions, also serve as school-leaving examinations, and give entrance to certain universities, especially the Oxford and Cambridge local examinations (both established in 1858),and the examinations of the Oxford and Cambridge "Joint Board."
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    0
  • Conferences were held by the consultative committee of the Board of Education in 1903, with representatives of the universities, the Headmasters' Conference, the Association of Head-Masters, the Association of Head-Mistresses, the College of Preceptors, the Private Schools' Association, and with representatives of professional bodies.
    0
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  • In 1904 it was stated that the system was gaining favour in the east,' and that it had been adopted more or less by all the eastern colleges and universities with the exception of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Columbia.
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    0
  • It is understood that at the colleges of the older universities such circumstances are considered.
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  • It many universities of the United States there is a definite understanding that emoluments shall only be accepted by those needing them.
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  • The whole subject of entrance scholarships at English schools and universities, and especially their tendency to produce premature specialization, has recently been much discussed.
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  • Examinations are suited in the first instance for the purpose for which they were originally designed in medieval universities - the test of technical and professional capacity; it has never been proposed to abolish qualifying examinations for doctors, pharmaceutical chemists, &c.; the tests applied are (or should be) direct tests of capacity carried out under conditions as nearly as possible like those of actual practice.
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  • Acland, Some Account of the Origin and Objects of the New Oxford Examinations for the Title of Associate in Arts (London, 1858); Matthew Arnold, Higher Schools and Universities in Germany (1874); Graham Balfour, The Educational Systems of Great Britain and Ireland (2nd ed., Oxford, 1903); W.
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    0
  • Hartog, " Universities, Schools and Examinations " in the University Review (July 1905); P. J.
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  • Bompas Smith, and others, British Association Report, 1907, pp. 707-718; Arthur Schuster, article on " ` Universities and Examinations " in the University Review (May 1905); W.
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  • He was the author of numerous publications dealing mostly with religious subjects and held honorary degrees from various universities.
    0
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  • He entered upon his university studies with zeal, but his own education in Frankfort had not been the best preparation for the scholastic methods which still dominated the German universities; of his professors, only Gellert seems to have won his interest, and that interest was soon exhausted.
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  • He studied in Switzerland, at Milan, and in German universities.
    0
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  • The great aim of his life was to reform the church on Calvinistic lines, and to this end he sent many young Greek theologians to the universities of Switzerland, Holland and England.
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  • The constitution of 1572 was his work, and by these laws the church, the universities and the police were regulated, the administration of justice was improved, and the raising of taxes placed upon a better footing (see Saxony).
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Frankfort-on-theMain, and at the universities of Tubingen, Leipzig and Halle, where he became one of J.
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  • On his return to Halle, he acted for some time as Privatdozent, but in 1773 was appointed to a professorial chair; in 1775 he was translated to Jena, where the rest of his life was spent (though he received calls to other universities).
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  • ideas of aim, administration and curriculum that dominated American universities at the end of the 19th century were anticipated by him.
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  • and refounded by Elizabeth, has exhibitions to Oxford and Cambridge universities.
    0
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  • In the following years Thorbecke undertook a journey of research and study in Germany, staying at most of her famous universities, and making the acquaintance of his best-known contemporaries in the fatherland.
    0
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  • Nevertheless, rhetoric and disputation, though at the present day strangely neglected in English schools and universities, are, within their limits, valuable instruments; and, as specialization in teaching does not necessarily imply specialization in learning, many of those who attended the lectures and the classes of a rhetorician or an eristic sought and found other instruction elsewhere.
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  • At that time the three universities were founded at Calcutta, Madras and Bombay; English-teaching schools were established in every district; the benefit of grants-in-aid was extended to the lower vernacular institutions and to girls' schools; and public instruction was erected into a department of the administration in every province, under a director, with a staff of inspectors.
    0
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  • The five universities of Calcutta, Madras, Bombay, Allahabad and Lahore, which were formerly merely examining bodies, had their senates reformed by the introduction of experts; while hostels or boarding-houses for the college students were founded, so as to approach more nearly to the English ideal of residential institutions.
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  • He opened schools and universities, and he himself wrote poetry in Sicilian dialect.
    0
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  • Scholasticism is the Aristotelianism of medieval orthodoxy as taught in the " schools " or universities of Western Europe.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the universities of Edinburgh, St Andrews and Heidelberg.
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  • Its valley, the lower part of which divides the Taunus hills from the Westerwald, is often very narrow and picturesque; among the towns and sites of interest on its banks are Marburg and Giessen with their universities, Wetzlar with its cathedral, Runkel with its castle, Limburg with its cathedral, the castles of Schaumburg, Balduinstein, Laurenburg, Langenau, Burgstein and Nassau, and the well-known health resort of Ems. The Lahn is about 135 m.
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  • Of these Hurlingham Park is the headquarters of the Hurlingham Polo Club and a fashionable resort; and Queen's Club, West Kensington, has tennis and other courts for the use of members, and is also the scene of important football matches, and of the athletic meetings between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and those between the English and American Universities held in England.
    0
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  • The learned men were monks and priests, the universities were Church institutions, and theology was the queen of the sciences.
    0
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  • Since all educated men were priests, it assimilated the new learning - the revived Aristotelianism - and continued its control of the universities.
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  • There are numerous elementary schools, at which the teaching is free and compulsory, besides ten colleges for secondary or technical education, and two universities.
    0
    0
  • The Carnegie Institution of Washington, founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1902 and endowed by him with $22,000,000 ($10,000,000 in 1902; $12,000,000 later), is designed "to encourage in the broadest and most liberal manner, investigation, research and discovery, and the application of knowledge to the improvement of mankind; and in particular to conduct, endow and assist investigation in any department of science, literature or art, and to this end to co-operate with governments, universities, colleges, technical schools, learned societies and individuals; to appoint committees of experts to direct special lines of research; to publish and distribute documents; and to conduct lectures, hold meetings and acquire and maintain a library."
    0
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  • Under the fostering care of Pius IX., this " neo-Scholasticism " spread from Italy to the German Catholic universities, and especially the seminaries of France.
    0
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  • He packed the privy council, the army and the universities with Catholics, and tried to legalize the exercise of their religion by an utterly unconstitutional Declaration of Indulgence.
    0
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  • Such patronage is by the act vested in the universities, Oxford taking the City of London and twenty-five counties in England and Wales, mostly south of the Trent, Cambridge the remaining twenty-seven.
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  • and the American hierarchy, and endowed with all the privileges of the old pontifical universities of Europe.
    0
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  • In addition there are several other schools that rank as universities.
    0
    0
  • After the usual education of a boy in grammar and elementary classical studies, his father, Piero, sent him to the universities of Ferrara and Padua, where he stayed until the year 1505.
    0
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  • The universities of Bologna, Padua and Salerno had been famous through the middle ages for the study of law, physics and medicine; and during the 15th and 16th centuries the first two still enjoyed celebrity in these faculties.
    0
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  • Germany was already provided with universities, seven of which had been founded between 1348 and 1409.
    0
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  • A few of the German princes, among whom Maximilian, the prince cardinal Albert of Mainz, Frederick the Wise of Saxony, and Eberhard of Wurttemberg deserve mention, exercised a not insignificant influence on letters by the foundation of new universities and the patronage of learned men.
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  • The doctors of the universities were too wedded to their antiquated manuals and methods, too satisfied with dullness, too proud of titles and diplomas, too anxious to preserve ecclesiastical discipline and to repress mental activity, for a genial spirit of humanism to spread freely.
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  • Public schools and universities conformed to the modern methods of study; nor were there wanting opportunities for youths of humble origin to obtain an education which placed them on a level with Italian scholars.
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  • He was educated at the universities of Bonn and Berlin, went to England in 1847, and became private secretary to Baron von Bunsen, the Prussian ambassador in London.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Germany in 1855 he was professor of history successively at the universities of Rostock, Tubingen (which he left in 1866 because of his political views), Marburg and Gottingen.
    0
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  • Educated at the Jesuit seminary at Kalksburg and at the universities of Vienna and Pesth, a long foreign tour completed his curriculum, and at Paris he made the acquaintance of Montalembert, a kindred spirit, whose influence on the young Apponyi was permanent.
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  • In 1918 he became member for the English universities.
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  • universities must be ministers of the church, but a pro posal has been made to throw the chairs open to ministers of any of the Presbyterian bodies.
    0
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  • There is abundant evidence to show that in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge (especially the latter) the new spirit had already modified the old curricula.
    0
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  • Philip Schaff, Germany; its Universities, Theology and Religion (1857), and the article in the Allgemeine deutsche Biographie.
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  • there were, however, to be found at court and in the universities a number of ardent and talented young Welshmen, adherents mostly of the reforming party in Church and State, who were destined to bring about a brilliant literary revival in their native land during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.
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  • Some of their leading pastors had been educated in one or other of the English universities.
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  • Nearly every state soon had its institutions of learning, which aspired to become universities.
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  • In 1812 they had only one degree-conferring college with a small faculty, a small student body and almost no endowment; in 1906 they had more than Too universities and colleges with endowment and equipment valued at about $30,000,000, and an annual income of about $3,000,000.
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  • The Caroline Institute (Karolinska Mediko-Kirurgiska Institut) is a medical foundation dating from 1815, which ranks since 1874 with the state universities of Upsala and Lund in the right to hold examinations and confer degrees in its special faculty.
    0
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  • And above all things the young and the ignorant are to be instructed, the former by a regular gradation or ladder of parish or elementary schools, secondary schools and universities.
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  • From all such property, whether land or the sheaves and fruits of land, and also from the personal property of burghers in the towns; Knox now held that the state should authorize the kirk to claim the salaries of the ministers, and the salaries of teachers in the schools and universities, but above all, the relief of the poor - not only of the absolutely "indigent" but of "your poor brethren, the labourers and handworkers of the ground."
    0
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  • Finally, there are numerous horticultural societies, large nurseries and gardening schools at Stockholm, Alnarp and elsewhere, and botanical gardens attached to the universities of Lund and Upsala.
    0
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  • At the schools examinations are held for entrance to the universities and certain higher special schools.
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  • The state universities are at Upsala and Lund, and with these ranks the Caroline Medical Institution at Stockholm.
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    0
  • There are universities (founded by private individual benefactions, but under state control) at Stockholm and Gothenburg.
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  • of Universities in the Middle Ages, i.
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  • He still survives in many universities on the continent of Europe and in those of Oxford and Cambridge, but he is now shorn of much of his importance.
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    0
  • His Memoire sur l'etat actuel de l'Allemagne, written at the request of the tsar during the congress of Aix-la-Chapelle, was an attack on the German universities, repeated in Coup d'ceil sur les universites de l'Allemagne (Aix, 1818).
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  • Founded as a home for the new religious opinions of the 6th century, it has ever been in the forefront of German universities in liberally accepting new ideas.
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    0
  • At the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century, the opening of new universities, co-operating with the suspicions of the various German governments as to the democratic opinions which obtained at Jena, militated against the university, which has never regained its former prosperity.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at home and at Aberdeen University, where he attained the highest academic distinctions, winning among other things the Ferguson mathematical scholarship, which is open to all graduates of Scottish universities under three years' standing.
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    0
  • He induced the universities of Cologne and Louvain to condemn the reformer's writings, but failed to enlist the German princes, and in January 1520 went to Rome to obtain strict regulations against those whom he called "Lutherans."
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  • Bishops, universities and humanists were at one in denunciation of the outrage; and as for the attitude of the people, Eck was glad to escape from Saxony with a whole skin.
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  • He was educated at the universities of Breslau, Berlin and Konigsberg, and took the degree of M.D.
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  • It was founded as Queen's College, with other colleges of the same name at Belfast and Cork, under an act of 1845, and its name was changed when it was granted a new charter pursuant to the Irish Universities Act 1908.
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  • He was educated at the gymnasium of Stuttgart, and at the universities of Tubingen, Halle and Berlin, where he was successively influenced by Baur and Schmid, by Tholuck and Julius Muller, by Strauss and, above all, Neander.
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  • Two parties threatened to attack them - on one side those who were anxious for extensive reforms in the municipal organization of London; on the other, those who wished to carry forward the process of inspection and revision of endowments, which had already overtaken the universities, schools and other charities.
    0
    0
  • Lichtenberger, History of German Theology in the Nineteenth Century (1889), pp. 212-217; Philip Schaff, Germany; its Universities, Theology and Religion (1857), pp. 300-319.
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    0
  • They state that the colleges were provided to repair the ravages caused by the Black Deaths in the ranks of the clergy, and for the benefit of those whose parents could not without help maintain them at the universities, and the names of the boys appointed by Wykeham and in his time show that "poor and indigent" meant the younger sons of the gentry, and the sons of yeomen, citizens of Winchester or London, and the middle classes generally, who needed the help of exhibitions.
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  • JOHANN KONRAD WILHELM LOHE (1808-1872), German divine and philanthropist, was born on the 21st of February 1808 in Fiirth near Nuremberg, and was educated at the universities of Erlangen and Berlin.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the universities of Kiel, Leipzig and Berlin.
    0
    0
  • The latter include so-called universities at Sucre (Chuquisaca), La Paz, Cochabamba, Tarija, Potosi, Santa Cruz and Oruro - all of which give instruction in law, the first three in medicine and the first four in theology.
    0
    0
  • Secondary instruction is under the control of the universities, and public instruction in general is under the direction of a cabinet minister.
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    0
  • he reorganized the universities of Ghent, Louvain and Liege and the Royal Academy of Brussels.
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  • degrees from the universities of Oxford, Edinburgh and Strassburg.
    0
    0
  • Having studied jurisprudence and political economy at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg, Munich and Berlin, he entered the legal career at Cologne, and immediately devoted his attention to financial and commercial questions.
    0
    0
  • At the head of the educational establishments stand the two universities at Prague, one German and the other Czech.
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    0
  • Bohemia sends 130 deputies to the Reichsrat at Vienna; the local diet, to which belong ex officio the archbishop, the three bishops, and the two rectors of the universities, consists of 242 members.
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    0
  • He studied philology at the universities of Bonn, Göttingen and Berlin, and in 1843 he began to work upon the Monumenta Germaniae historica.
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  • from the universities of Edinburgh (1887) and Wales (1898).
    0
    0
  • Amongst others may be noted honorary degrees by the universities of Oxford, Dublin, Edinburgh, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Leiden and Bologna.
    0
    0
  • A new charter was granted to it under letters patent pursuant to the Irish Universities Act 1908, when it was given its present name.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the classical schools of Helmstedt and Brunswick, and afterwards at the universities of Göttingen and Bonn.
    0
    0
  • The school governors are appointed by the Mercers' Company (by which body the new site was acquired), and the universities of Oxford, Cambridge and London.
    0
    0
  • "SIR LOMER GOUIN (1861-), Canadian statesman, was born at Grondines, Quebec, in 1861 and was educated at Laval and McGill Universities.
    0
    0
  • As a young girl she was fired by the aspiration after intellectual liberty that animated so many young Russian women at that period, and drove them to study at foreign universities, since their own were closed to them.
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    0
  • The patronage of the remaining benefices belongs in the main to the crown, the bishops and cathedral chapters, the lord chancellor, and the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
    0
    0
  • After being educated at Dusseldorf and at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg and Berlin he went in 1823 to Paris, where he came under the influence of the great school of French geometers, whose founder, Gaspard Monge, was only recently dead.
    0
    0
  • He was, however, disappointed in his main object, and in 1300 he sailed to Cyprus to seek support for his plan of teaching Oriental languages in universities and monasteries.
    0
    0
  • He built and endowed a grammar-school at a cost of upwards of X500, educated and maintained a large number of poor children at his own charge, and provided the more promising pupils with means of studying at the universities.
    0
    0
  • - There are two universities in Amsterdam: the Free University (1880), and the more ancient state university of Amsterdam, originally founded in 1632, but reconstructed in 1887.
    0
    0
  • It is justly considered the first as well as the oldest of the zoological stations of the world, and the chief universities pay £ioo a year for tables to which they send students.
    0
    0
  • It is largely endowed, and possesses exhibitions tenable at Oxford, Cambridge and Durham universities.
    0
    0
  • The doctrine of the rights of the lay monarchy sustained by Occam and John of Paris, by Marsilius of Padua, John of Jandun and Leopold of Bamberg, was affirmed by the jurists and theologians, penetrated into the parlements and the universities, and was combated by the upholders of papal absolutism, such as Alvaro Pelayo and Alonzo Trionfo.
    0
    0
  • Dr .Hermann Adler was born in Hanover in 1839, graduated at Leipzig, and received honorary degrees from Scotch and English universities, including Oxford.
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    0
  • The college consisted of a president (the dean of Arches for the time being) and of those doctors of law who, having regularly taken that degree in either of the universities of Oxford or Cambridge, and having been admitted advocates in pursuance of the rescript of the archbishop of Canterbury, were elected fellows in the manner prescribed by the charter.
    0
    0
  • Having studied at the universities of Heidelberg and Leipzig, he went for a tour in Italy, on his return from which he lectured as Privatdozent in Heidelberg.
    0
    0
  • In all the great cities of Western Europe friaries were established, and in the universities theological chairs were held by Dominicans and Franciscans.
    0
    0
  • The heir-apparent, the two archbishops, the six bishops and the rectors of both universities, sit ex officio in the senate.
    0
    0
  • At Bucharest and Jassy there are universities with faculties of law, philosophy, science and medicine and theology.
    0
    0
  • The practice initiated by the more liberal Phanariotes of sending Rumanian students to the French, German and Italian universities tended in the same direction.
    0
    0
  • Up to this point the prince had ruled wisely; he had founded the universities of Bucharest and Jassy; his reforms had swept away the last vestiges of feudalism and created a class of peasant freeholders.
    0
    0
  • The lecture-rooms and other institutions connected with the two universities - in 1881 and 1882 a Bohemian university was founded though the German one continued to exist - are now housed in two vast buildings known as the Carolinum and the Clementinum.
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    0
  • He was a member in turn of the universities of Oxford and Paris, and finally settled in Lombardy, where, thanks to the favour of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, he became bishop, first of Piacenza, then of Vincenza, then of Novara, and afterwards archbishop of Milan.
    0
    0
  • After studying at the universities of Vienna, Göttingen and Berlin, he became professor at the university of Lemberg in 1866, and in quick succession held similar positions at Prague, Strassburg and Berlin.
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    0
  • There were universities in Bogota and Medellin, the former having faculties of letters and philosophy, jurisprudence and political science, medicine and natural sciences, and mathematics and engineering, with an attendance of 1200 to 1500 students.
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    0
  • Mackenzie and a party of missionaries sent out by the Universities Mission to establish a station on the upper Shire.
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  • (2) the Christian priesthood being universal, the laity should share in the spiritual government of the Church; (3) a knowledge of Christianity must be attended by the practice of it as its indispensable sign and supplement; (4) instead of merely didactic, and often bitter, attacks on the heterodox and unbelievers, a sympathetic and kindly treatment of them; (5) a reorganization of the theological training of the universities, giving more prominence to the devotional life; and (6) a different style of preaching, namely, in the place of pleasing rhetoric, the implanting of Christianity in the inner or new man, the soul of which is faith, and its effects the fruits of life.
    0
    0
  • "Bible chairs" were established in state universities and elsewhere by the Disciples, - at the University of Michigan (1893), at the University of Virginia (1899), at the University of Calcutta (1900) and at the University of Kansas (1901).
    0
    0
  • Aberdeen and Glasgow Universities combine to return one member to Parliament.
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    0
  • formation of canon law; it soon became the sole manual, both for teaching and for practice, and even after the publication of the Decretals was the chief authority in the universities.
    0
    0
  • These two works, which were almost contemporary (Gratian is only about two years earlier)," were destined to have the same fate; they were the manuals, one for theology, the other for canon law, in use in all the universities, taught, glossed and commented on by the most illustrious masters.
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  • sent to the universities a collection of 45 decretals, with the order that they should be inserted under their proper titles in the collection of Gregory IX.
    0
    0
  • We know that the universities of the middle ages contained a Faculty g of canon of Decrees, with or without a Faculty of Laws, i.e.
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    0
  • It was prepared under the care of Clement V., and even promulgated by him in consistory in March 1314; The but, in consequence of the death of the pope, which " took place almost immediately after, the publication and despatch of the collec Lion to the universities was postponed till 1317, under John Xxii.
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  • a commission of cardinals, of which he himself became Method president; also a commission of " consultors " resident at Rome, which asked for a certain amount of assistance from canonists at various universities and seminaries.
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    0
  • For instance, we read of Whiting, the last abbot of Glastonbury, judicially murdered by Henry VIII., that his house was a kind of well-ordered court, where as many as 300 sons of noblemen and gentlemen, who had been sent to him for virtuous education, had been brought up, besides others of a meaner rank, whom he fitted for the universities.
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    0
  • He declined many offers from other Italian universities and from St Petersburg until 1768, when he accepted the invitation of Maria Theresa to the chair of natural history in the university of Pavia, which was then being reorganized.
    0
    0
  • He taught law subsequently at Pisa, at Florence, at Padua and at Pavia, at a time when the schools of law in those universities disputed the palm with the school of Bologna.
    0
    0
  • He entered the Franciscan order at an early age and studied philosophy and theology at the universities of Padua and Bologna.
    0
    0
  • This was the time of rapid development in the universities, where not only were the scholastic philosophy i~ and systematic theology eagerly studied, but figures, ~j1,iJlife appear like that of the great Roger Bacon, a scientific researcher of the first rank, whose discoveries in optics and chemistry caused his contemporaries to suspect him of magical arts.
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    0
  • Yet they continued to multiply, and exercised at times considerable influence; though they had few supporters among the baronage, yet among the lesser gentry and still more among the burgher class and in the universities they were strong.
    0
    0
  • It lingered on in a subterranean fashion among a small class in the universities and the minor clergy, and had some adherents among the townsfolk and even among the peasantry.
    0
    0
  • During 1530 Henrys agents were busy abroad making that appeal on the divorce to the universities which Cranmer had suggested.
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    0
  • In the last few years a reaction against it had arisen especially in the universities, and those who adopted an unpopular creed, and who at the same time showed tendencies to I more ceremonial form of worship, naturally fell back on the fupport of the crown.
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  • The bill also conferred the franchise on holders of a certain amount of stock, on depositors in savings banks, on graduates of universities, and on other persons qualified by position or education.
    0
    0
  • The government succeeded in terminating a long controversyby abolishing ecclesiastical tests at universities.
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  • The works of this school are little read, but in time its results penetrate the teaching in schools and universities, and then the pages of literary historians; it is represented in England by a fairly good organization, the Royal Historical Society (with which the Camden Society has been amalgamated), and by an excellent periodical, The English Historical Review (founded in 1884), while some sort of propaganda is attempted by the Historical Association (started in I 906).
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  • The title Ultimus Scholasticorum is often wrongly bestowed on Biel; scholasticism did not cease with him, even in Germany, and continued to flourish long after his time in the universities of Spain.
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  • He held honorary degrees of various universities, and was a chevalier of the Legion of Honour.
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  • Scarlet copes with white fur hoods have been in continuous use on ceremonial occasions in the universities, and are worn by bishops at the opening of parliament.
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  • Schliemann was on several occasions in England, in 1883 to receive honours from the great universities, and in 1886 to confute, at a special gathering of the Hellenic Society, the assertion of Stillman and Penrose that the Tirynthian palace was posterior to the Christian era.
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  • In the Scottish universities the professor of Latin is called the professor of "humanity."
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  • He was one of the first of Jewish graduates of the modern universities, taking his Ph.D.
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  • CLAUDIUS BUCHANAN (1766-1815), English divine, was born at Cambuslang, near Glasgow, and educated at the universities of Glasgow and Cambridge.
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  • The attempt to limit the freedom of theological inquiry and teaching in the universities is a violation of the vital principle of Protestantism.
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  • Left an orphan at an early age, he was educated at the gymnasium in his native town, and attended the universities of Giessen, Bonn and Marburg.
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  • They could trade freely, inherit property and enter the universities, colleges and schools.
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  • Tho