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universalist

universalist

universalist Sentence Examples

  • Other serials of this class are the Protestant Episcopal Quarterly Review (1854), the Presbyterian Magazine (1851-1860), the Catholic World (1865), the Southern Review (1867), the New' Jerusalem Magazine (1827), American Baptist Magazine (1817), the Church Review (1848), the Christian Review (1836), the Universalist Quarterly (1844).

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  • It is the seat of Buchtel College (co-educational; non-sectarian), which was founded by the Ohio Universalist Convention in 1870, was opened in 1872, and was named in honour of its most liberal benefactor, John R.

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  • Among its institutions are the Aldrich public library and Goddard Seminary (1870; Universalist).

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  • For while 1-8 was most probably a Jewish apocalyptical fragment and strongly particularistic, 9-17 is clearly universalist in character and is probably from the hand of our author.

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  • Boston University (Methodist Episcopal, 1867); Tufts College (1852), a few miles from Boston in Medford, originally a Universalist school; Clark University (1889, devoted wholly to graduate instruction until 1902, when Clark College was added), at Worcester, are important institutions.

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  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

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  • Yet the deepest strain here is more serenely universalist even than St Paul, for here Jesus says: " God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should.

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  • St Paul's heroic labours (30-64) had gradually gained full recognition and separate organization for the universalist strain in our Lord's teaching; and he who had never seen the earthly Jesus, but only the heavenly Christ, could even declare that Christ " though from the Jewish fathers according to the flesh " had died, " so that henceforth, even if we have known Christ according to the flesh, now we no further know Him thus," " the Lord is the Spirit," and " where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty."

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  • In religious faith he was from boyhood a Universalist, and for many years was a conspicuous member of the leading Universalist church in New York.

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  • In religion he first became a Prebysterian (1822); was a Universalist minister from 1826 to 1831, editing for some time the chief journal of this church, the Gospel Advocate; was an independent preacher at Ithaca, N.Y., in 1831; became a Unitarian minister in 1832, and in 1836 organized in Boston the Society for Christian Union and Progress, of which he was the pastor for seven years.

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  • This monthly magazine,organized by the Rev. Abel Charles Thomas (1807-1880), pastor of the First Universalist Church, was from October 1840 to March 1841 made up of articles prepared for some of the many improvement circles or literary societies; it then became broader in its scope, received more spontaneous contributions, and from October 1842 until December 1845 was edited by Harriot F.

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  • HOSEA BALLOU (1771-1852), American Universalist clergyman, was born in Richmond, New Hampshire, on the 30th of April 1771.

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  • He preached at Barnard, Vermont, and the surrounding towns in 1801-1807; at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1807-1815; at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1815-1817; and as pastor of the Second Universalist Church in Boston from December 1817 until his death there on the 7th of June 1852.

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  • He founded and edited The Universalist Magazine (1819; later called The Trumpet) and The Universalist Expositor (1831; later The Universalist Quarterly Review); wrote about io,000 sermons, many hymns, essays and polemic theological works; and is best known for Notes on the Parables (1804), A Treatise on Atonement (1805) and Examination of the Doctrine of a Future Retribution (1834); in these, especially the second, he showed himself the principal American expositor of Universalism.

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  • He was the first (1847) to urge the necessity of a Universalist denominational college, and this did much towards the establishment of Tufts.

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  • He was associated with the elder Hosea Ballou in editing The Universalist Quarterly Review; edited an edition of Sismondi's History of the Crusades (1833); and wrote the Ancient History of Universalism, down to A.D.

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  • Franklin has a public library (housed in the Ray memorial building and containing 7700 volumes in 1910) and is the seat of Dean Academy (Universalist; founded in 1865), a secondary school for boys and girls.

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  • Charles Chauncy (1705-1787), pastor of the First Church from 1727 until his death, the chief opponent of Edwards in the great revival, was both a Unitarian and a Universalist.

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  • Pluralist universalists should perhaps be a separate class universalist without reference to Christ.

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  • universalist approach would put more money behind the better-off people who can afford to pay for school meals.

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  • universalist outlook.

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  • universalist aspirations seeking to act as the intellectual conscience of their age.

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  • universalist democratic ideals.

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  • universalist argument which need not deny cultural diversity (is democratic India less Indian?

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  • Other serials of this class are the Protestant Episcopal Quarterly Review (1854), the Presbyterian Magazine (1851-1860), the Catholic World (1865), the Southern Review (1867), the New' Jerusalem Magazine (1827), American Baptist Magazine (1817), the Church Review (1848), the Christian Review (1836), the Universalist Quarterly (1844).

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  • It is the seat of Buchtel College (co-educational; non-sectarian), which was founded by the Ohio Universalist Convention in 1870, was opened in 1872, and was named in honour of its most liberal benefactor, John R.

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  • Among its institutions are the Aldrich public library and Goddard Seminary (1870; Universalist).

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  • For while 1-8 was most probably a Jewish apocalyptical fragment and strongly particularistic, 9-17 is clearly universalist in character and is probably from the hand of our author.

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  • Boston University (Methodist Episcopal, 1867); Tufts College (1852), a few miles from Boston in Medford, originally a Universalist school; Clark University (1889, devoted wholly to graduate instruction until 1902, when Clark College was added), at Worcester, are important institutions.

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  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

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  • Yet the deepest strain here is more serenely universalist even than St Paul, for here Jesus says: " God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should.

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    0
  • St Paul's heroic labours (30-64) had gradually gained full recognition and separate organization for the universalist strain in our Lord's teaching; and he who had never seen the earthly Jesus, but only the heavenly Christ, could even declare that Christ " though from the Jewish fathers according to the flesh " had died, " so that henceforth, even if we have known Christ according to the flesh, now we no further know Him thus," " the Lord is the Spirit," and " where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty."

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  • In religious faith he was from boyhood a Universalist, and for many years was a conspicuous member of the leading Universalist church in New York.

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  • A body of infidels under the leadership of Abner Kneeland (1 774-1844), who had previously been in turn a Baptist minister and the editor of a Universalist magazine, proffered him the use of their small hall; and, no other place being accessible, he accepted it gratefully, and delivered therein (in October 1830) three lectures, in which he unfolded his principles and plans.

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  • In religion he first became a Prebysterian (1822); was a Universalist minister from 1826 to 1831, editing for some time the chief journal of this church, the Gospel Advocate; was an independent preacher at Ithaca, N.Y., in 1831; became a Unitarian minister in 1832, and in 1836 organized in Boston the Society for Christian Union and Progress, of which he was the pastor for seven years.

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  • This monthly magazine,organized by the Rev. Abel Charles Thomas (1807-1880), pastor of the First Universalist Church, was from October 1840 to March 1841 made up of articles prepared for some of the many improvement circles or literary societies; it then became broader in its scope, received more spontaneous contributions, and from October 1842 until December 1845 was edited by Harriot F.

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  • HOSEA BALLOU (1771-1852), American Universalist clergyman, was born in Richmond, New Hampshire, on the 30th of April 1771.

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  • He preached at Barnard, Vermont, and the surrounding towns in 1801-1807; at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1807-1815; at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1815-1817; and as pastor of the Second Universalist Church in Boston from December 1817 until his death there on the 7th of June 1852.

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  • He founded and edited The Universalist Magazine (1819; later called The Trumpet) and The Universalist Expositor (1831; later The Universalist Quarterly Review); wrote about io,000 sermons, many hymns, essays and polemic theological works; and is best known for Notes on the Parables (1804), A Treatise on Atonement (1805) and Examination of the Doctrine of a Future Retribution (1834); in these, especially the second, he showed himself the principal American expositor of Universalism.

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  • He was the first (1847) to urge the necessity of a Universalist denominational college, and this did much towards the establishment of Tufts.

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  • He was associated with the elder Hosea Ballou in editing The Universalist Quarterly Review; edited an edition of Sismondi's History of the Crusades (1833); and wrote the Ancient History of Universalism, down to A.D.

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  • Franklin has a public library (housed in the Ray memorial building and containing 7700 volumes in 1910) and is the seat of Dean Academy (Universalist; founded in 1865), a secondary school for boys and girls.

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  • Charles Chauncy (1705-1787), pastor of the First Church from 1727 until his death, the chief opponent of Edwards in the great revival, was both a Unitarian and a Universalist.

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  • Pluralist universalists should perhaps be a separate class universalist without reference to Christ.

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  • Brown countered that the universalist approach would put more money behind the better-off people who can afford to pay for school meals.

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  • Christianity and Islam, Kenya 's two main religions of the book, both make universalist claims on their adherents.

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  • In contrast, some critics have attempted to reconcile a focus on identity with a more universalist outlook.

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  • Foucault is highly critical of such intellectuals with universalist aspirations seeking to act as the intellectual conscience of their age.

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  • Localism maintains the traditional ties of blood and kinship but undermines modern, universalist democratic ideals.

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  • Yet properly understood, this offers a universalist argument which need not deny cultural diversity (is democratic India less Indian?

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