Unitarian sentence example

unitarian
  • His publications, though always of the most thorough and scholarly character, were to a large extent dispersed in the pages of reviews, dictionaries, concordances, texts edited by others, Unitarian controversial treatises, &c.; but he took a more conspicuous and more personal part in the preparation (with the Baptist scholar, Horatio B.
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  • From the beginning of the 18th century the greater number of the Presbyterian congregations became practically independent in polity and Unitarian in doctrine.
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  • In his later years he ministered to a Unitarian congregation at Lympston, Devonshire.
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  • In early life he had been for a short time a Unitarian minister.
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  • Sanford of the Inquirer, the principal Unitarian organ.
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  • At college, as we have seen, he turned Unitarian.
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  • But his innovations and his unconventional views about stereotyped Unitarian doctrines caused alarm, and in 1853 he resigned.
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  • Here he became an instructor in German at Harvard in 1825, and in 1830 obtained an appointment as professor of German language and literature there; but his anti-slavery agitation having given umbrage to the authorities, he forfeited his post in 1835, and was ordained Unitarian minister of a chapel at Lexington in Massachusetts in 1836.
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  • He was called there to combat the unitarian christology of Beryllus, bishop of Bostra, and to clear up certain eschatological questions.
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  • Some mention must be made of the Unitarian movement.
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  • Unitarian tendencies away from the Calvinism of the old Congregational churches were plainly evident about 1750, and it is said by Andrew P. Peabody (1811-1893) that by 1780 nearly all the Congregational pulpits around Boston were filled by Unitarians.
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  • In 1782 King's chapel (Episcopal) became Unitarian, and in 1805 one of that faith was made professor of divinity in Harvard.
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  • The American Unitarian Association, organized in 1825, has always retained its headquarters in Boston.
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  • The college received insufficient financial support and suffered from the attacks of religious sectaries - he himself was charged with insincerity because, previously a Unitarian, he joined the Christian Connexion, by which the college was founded - but he earned the love of his students, and by his many addresses exerted a beneficial influence upon education in the Middle West.
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  • While we may hope for eventual agreement on the history of the different types of creed forms, there can be no hope of agreement on the interpretation of the words Holy Spirit between Unitarian and Trinitarian critics.
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  • In 1842-1855 he was pastor of the South Congregational Church of Boston, and in 1855-1860 was preacher to the university and Plummer professor of Christian Morals at Harvard; he then left the Unitarian Church, with which his father had been connected as a clergyman at Hadley, resigned his professorship and became pastor of the newly established Emmanuel Church of Boston.
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  • When the port of Boston was closed by Great Britain in 1774 the bell of the old First Parish Church (Unitarian) of Portland (built 1740; the present building dates from 1825) was muffled and rung from morning till night, and in other ways the town showed its sympathy for the patriot cause.
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  • When he entered the divinity school he was an orthodox Unitarian; when he left it, he entertained strong doubts about the infallibility of the Bible, the possibility of miracles, and the exclusive claims of Christianity and the Church.
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  • His first ministerial charge was over a small village parish, West Roxbury, a few miles from Boston; here he was ordained as a Unitarian clergyman in June 1837 and here he preached until January 1846.
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  • The Boston Unitarian clergy denounced the preacher, and declared that the "young man must be silenced."
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  • No Unitarian publisher could be found for his sermon, and nearly all the pulpits of the city were closed against him.
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  • A collected edition of his works was published in England by Frances Power Cobbe (14 vols., 1863-1870), and another - the Centenary edition - in Boston, Mass., by the American Unitarian Association (14 vols., 1907-1911); a volume of Theodore Parker's Prayers, edited by Rufus Leighton and Matilda Goddard, was published in America in 1861, and a volume of Parker's West Roxbury Sermons, with a biographical sketch by Frank B.
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  • A translator from Byron and Pope appeared also in Maurice Lukacs.6 Unitarian bishop of Transylvania, author of Vadrozsdk, or " Wild Roses " (1863), a collection of Szekler folk-songs, ballads and sayings.
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  • ROBERT COLLYER (1823-), American Unitarian clergyman, was born in Keighley, Yorkshire, England, on the 8th of December 1823.
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  • independent preacher and lecturer, and in 1859, having joined the Unitarian Church, became a missionary of that church in Chicago, Illinois.
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  • In 1860 he organized and became pastor of the Unity Church, the second Unitarian church in Chicago.
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  • He also took a deep interest in religious matters, was a prominent member of the Church of the Disciples (Unitarian; founded in Boston by the Rev. James Freeman Clarke), and was assistant editor for some time of The Christian World, a weekly religious paper.
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  • In 1865 he presided at the first national convention of the Unitarian Church.
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  • 4 On leaving the college in 1827 Martineau returned to Bristol to teach in the school of Lant Carpenter; but in the following year he was ordained for a Unitarian church in Dublin, whose senior minister was a relative of his own.
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  • In one respect Martineau was singularly happy; he just escaped the active and, on the whole, belittling period of the old Unitarian controversy.
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  • In 1839 he sprang to the defence of Unitarian doctrine, which had been assailed by certain Liverpool clergymen, of whom Fielding Ould was the most active and Hugh McNeill the most famous.
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  • While a comparison of his expositions of the Pauline and Johannine Christologies with the earlier Unitarian exegesis in which he had been trained shows how wide is the interval, the work does not represent a mind that had throughout its history lived and worked in the delicate and judicial investigations he here tried to conduct.
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  • From 1859 to 1869 he was pastor of the Independent Congregational (Unitarian) church at Bangor, Maine.
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  • He was the son of a Unitarian minister, and entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1823, though it was then impossible for any but members of the Established Church to obtain a degree.
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  • Graduating from Harvard in 1841, he was a schoolmaster for two years, studied theology at the Harvard Divinity School, and was pastor in1847-1850of the First Religious Society (Unitarian) of Newburyport, Massachusetts, and of the Free Church at Worcester in 1852-1858.
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  • An Eliot monument was erected in 1847 on the Indian burying-ground near the site of the Indian church, now occupied by a Unitarian church.
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  • Punshon, Hugh Price Hughes and Peter Mackenzie (Wesleyan); James Martineau (Unitarian).
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  • From a Unitarian point of view, Servetus is treated by R.
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  • The Congregational churches, as distinct from the churches retaining the same polity, but separated by the adoption of Unitarian opinions, have in times past professed to be Calvinists of stricter or more moderate types.
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  • Thus the recent defenders of the apostolic authorship, the Unitarian James Drummond (1903), the Anglican William Sanday (1905), the Roman Catholic Theodore Calmes (1904), can tell us, the first, that " the evangelist did not aim at an illustrative picture of what was most characteristic of Jesus "; the second, that " the author sank into his own consciousness and at last brought to light what he found there "; the third, that " the Gospel contains an entire theological system," " history is seen through the intervening dogmatic development," " the Samaritan woman is.
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  • On a hill dominating the town stands the old fortress, which contains a beautiful church in Gothic style built about 1446, where in 1571 the diet was held which proclaimed the equality of the Unitarian Church with the Roman Catholic, the Lutheran, and Calvinistic Churches.
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  • He was called to the ministry of the Brattle Street church (Unitarian) in Boston before he was twenty years old.
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  • In what is probably the oldest Unitarian graveyard in the kingdom Mrs Gaskell lies buried; and in a churchyard a mile from the town stood the ancient church, which, though partially rebuilt in the time of Henry VIII., fell into ruin in 1741.
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  • The strong anti-slavery sentiment here manifested, itself in 1851 in the famous " Jerry rescue," one of the most significant episodes following the enactment of the Fugitive .Slave Law of 1850; Samuel May, pastor of the Unitarian church, and seventeen others, arrested for assisting in the rescue, were never brought to trial, although May and two others publicly admitted that they had taken part in the rescue, and announced that they would contest the constitutionality of the Fugitive Slave Law, if they were tried.
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  • There are theological seminaries at Pittsburg, the Allegheny Seminary (United Presbyterian, 1825), Reformed Presbyterian (1856), and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, 1827); at Lancaster (German Reformed, 1827); at Meadville (Unitarian, 18 44); at Bethlehem (Moravian, 1807); at Chester, the Crozer Theological Seminary (Baptist, 1868); at Gettysburg (Lutheran, 1826); and in Philadelphia several schools, notably the Protestant Episcopal Church divinity school (1862) and a Lutheran seminary (1864), at Mount Airy.
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  • She was educated at an academy in her native town and by her brother Con y ers Francis (1795-1863), a Unitarian minister and from 1842 to 1863 Parkman professor in the Harvard Divinity School.
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  • Bancroft's father was a Unitarian, and he had devoted his son to the work of the ministry; but the young man's first experiments at preaching, shortly after his return from Europe in 1822, were unsatisfactory, the theological teaching of the time having substituted criticism and literature for faith.
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  • In the work of pressing on the national and international expansion of Germany the interests and views of the lesser constituent states of the Empire were apt to be overlooked or overridden; and in the southern states there was considerable resentment at the unitarian tendency of the north, which seemed to aim at imposing the Prussian model on the whole nation.
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  • Charles Lowell (1782-1861), brother of the last named, was born in Boston, graduated at Harvard in 1800, studied law and then theology, and after two years in Edinburgh and one year on the Continent was from 1806 until his death pastor of the West Congregational (Unitarian) Church of Boston, a charge in which Cyrus A.
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  • Among the Church organizations are: the First (Unitarian; originally Trinitarian Congregational), which dates from 1629 and was the first Congregational church organized in America; the Second or East Church (Unitarian) organized in 1718; the North Church (Unitarian), which separated from the First in 1772; the Third or Tabernacle (Congregational), organized in 1735 from the First Church; the South (Congregational), which separated from the Third in 1774; several Baptist churches; a Quaker society, with a brick meeting-house (1832); St Peter's, the oldest Episcopalian church in Salem, with a building of English Gothic erected in 1833, and Grace Church (1858).
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  • Among the causes of offence might be enumerated not only his vigorous defence of one from whom he greatly differed, Bishop Colenso, but his invitation to the Holy Communion of all the revisers of the translation of the Bible, including a Unitarian among other Nonconformists.
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  • But the Adamsites suffered from disease and poverty, and lost heart in a couple of years: returning to America, they sold their property to a German community, the Tempelgemeinde, a Unitarian sect led by Messrs Hoffmann and Hardegg who established themselves in Jaffa in 1868.
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  • In religion he first became a Prebysterian (1822); was a Universalist minister from 1826 to 1831, editing for some time the chief journal of this church, the Gospel Advocate; was an independent preacher at Ithaca, N.Y., in 1831; became a Unitarian minister in 1832, and in 1836 organized in Boston the Society for Christian Union and Progress, of which he was the pastor for seven years.
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  • He bitterly attacked Cavour for his unitarian views, and for the cession of Nice and Savoy.
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  • It contains a university (founded in 1872), with four faculties - theology, philosophy, law and medicine - frequented by about 1900 students in 1905; and amongst its other educational establishments are a seminary for Unitarian priests, an agricultural college, two training schools for teachers, a commercial academy, and several secondary schools for boys and girls.
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  • Between the years 1545 and 1570 large numbers of the Saxon population left the town in consequence of the introduction of Unitarian doctrines.
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  • Sabellianism, in fact, became a collective name for all those Unitarian doctrines in which the divine nature of Christ was acknowledged.
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  • Garrison, Charles Sumner, Theodore Parker and James Freeman Clarke were among her friends; she advocated abolition, and preached occasionally from Unitarian pulpits.
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  • Wesleyan and Presbyterian chapels are likewise numerous, and the Unitarian or Socinian body has long been powerful in the valley of the Teifi.
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  • Two sermons, preached in the college chapel in 17 9 8 and 1799, form the basis of his Discourses on the Scriptural Doctrines of Atonement and Sacrifice (1801); a polemic against Unitarian theology which was answered by Lant Carpenter.
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  • 1738), formed themselves into a separate association, under the name of the General Baptist New Connection, since which time the "Old Connection" has gradually merged into the Unitarian denomination.
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  • The Watchman had a brief life of two months, but at this time Coleridge began to think of becoming a Unitarian preacher, and abandoning literature for ever.
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  • In 17 9 8 an annuity, granted him by the brothers Wedgwood, led Coleridge to abandon his reluctantly formed intention of becoming a Unitarian minister.
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  • When, again, he met Wordsworth in 1797, the two poets freely and sympathetically discussed Spinoza, for whom Coleridge always retained a deep admiration; and when in 1798 he gave up his Unitarian preaching, he named his second child Berkeley, signifying a new allegiance, but still without accepting Christian rites otherwise than passively.
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  • Floyd; and the pro-slavery party seems to have planned to try for union with the Confederacy, or to organize a Pacific Coast republic. Thomas Starr King (1824-1864), a Unitarian minister, was the heroic war-time figure of the city, the leader of her patriotism.
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  • The government of Bolivia is a " unitarian " or centralized republic, representative in form, but autocratic in some important particulars.
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  • OCTAVIUS BROOKS FROTHINGHAM (1822-1895), American clergyman and author, was born in Boston on the 26th of November 1822, son of Nathaniel Langdon Frothingham (1793-1870), a prominent Unitarian preacher of Boston, and through his mother's family related to Phillips Brooks.
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  • He was pastor of the North Unitarian church of Salem, Massachusetts, in 1847-1855.
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  • From 1855 to 1860 he was pastor of a new Unitarian society in Jersey City, where he gave up the Lord's Supper, thinking that it ministered to self-satisfaction; and it was as a radical Unitarian that he became pastor of another young church in New York City in 1860.
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  • Always himself on the unpopular side and an able but thoroughly fair critic of the majority, he habitually under-estimated his own worth; he was not only an anti-slavery leader when abolition was not popular even in New England, and a radical and rationalist when it was impossible for him to stay conveniently in the Unitarian Church, but he was the first president of the National Free Religious Association (1867) and an early and ardent disciple of Darwin and Spencer.
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  • From 1826 to 1840 he was pastor of a Unitarian church in Boston, subsequently retiring from the active ministry altogether.
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  • His father was the Rev. William Emerson, minister of the First Church (Unitarian) in Boston.
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  • In 1825 he entered the divinity school at Cambridge, to prepare himself for the Unitarian pulpit.
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  • In 1829 he married a beautiful but delicate young woman, Miss Ellen Tucker of Concord, and was installed as associate minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in Boston.
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  • There are numerous other modern churches and chapels, of which the Unitarian chapel in Park Row is noteworthy.
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  • The Leeds old library is a private institution founded in 1768 by Dr Priestley, who was then minister of the Unitarian chapel.
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  • His brother, the Rev. Samuel Longfellow, was a minister of the Unitarian Church.
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  • The Disciples are not Unitarian in fact or tendency, but they urge the use of simple New Testament phraseology as to the Godhead.
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  • This movement had several aspects: philosophical, theological, social, economic. Its main theme was regeneration, a revolt from the formalism of both Unitarian and Calvinist theology and a widening literary outlook.
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  • The refusal of the council to accept the recommendation of the senate, that they should appoint an eminent Unitarian minister to the professorship of logic and mental philosophy, revived all De Morgan's sensitiveness on the subject of sectarian freedom; and, though his feelings were doubtless excessive, there is no doubt that gloom was thrown over his life, intensified in 1867 by the loss of his son George Campbell De Morgan, a young man of the highest scientific promise, whose name, as De Morgan expressly wished, will long be connected with the London Mathematical Society, of which he was one of the founders.
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  • The population is estimated at 12,000 (Moslems 6000, Christians 4000, Jews 1500, Germans Soo; the last belong for the greater part to the Unitarian sect of the "Templars," who have colonies also at Jaffa and Jerusalem).
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  • Channing) among English Presbyterians and American Congregationalists left permanent results in the shape of new non-subscribing churches and a diffusion of Unitarian theology (J.
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  • Drummond (Unitarian) and A.
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  • Some conformed; a large number made their way to Holland (where the Remonstrants admitted them to membership on the basis of the Apostles' Creed); others to the German frontier; a contingent settled in Tran sylvania, not joining the Unitarian Church, but maintaining a distinct organization at Kolozsvar till 1793.
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  • The official title is the Hungarian Unitarian Church, with a membership of over 60,000, most of thefn in Transylvania, especially among the Szekler population, a few in Hungary; their bishop has a seat in the Hungarian parliament.
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  • Till 1818 the continued existence of this body was unknown to English Unitarians; relations have since become intimate; since 1860 a succession of students have finished their theological education at Manchester College, Oxford; others at the Unitarian Home Missionary College.
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  • The term "Unitarian" first emerges in 1682, and appears in the title of the Brief History (1687).
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  • Firmin had later a project of Unitarian societies "within the Church"; the first preacher to describe himself as Unitarian was Thomas Emlyn (1663-1741) who gathered a London congregation in 1705.
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  • The union in the London fund was ruptured in 1693; in course of time differences in the administration of the two funds led to the attaching of the Presbyterian name to theological liberals, though many of the older Unitarian chapels were Independent foundations, and at least half of the Presbyterian chapels (of 1690-1710) are now in the hands of Congregationalists.
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  • The formation of a distinct Unitarian denomination dates from the secession (1 773) of Theophilus Lindsey (1723-1808) from the Anglican Church, on the failure of the Feathers petition to parliament (1772) for relief from subscription.
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  • (1705-1783), who has been called "the father of Unitarian nonconformity."
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  • It was followed by other clerical secessions, mostly of men who left the ministry, and Lindsey's hope of a Unitarian movement from the Anglican Church was disappointed.
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  • In 1825 the British and Foreign Unitarian Association was formed as an amalgamation of three older societies, for literature (1791), mission work (1806) and civil rights (1818).
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  • For the education of its ministry it supports Manchester College at Oxford (which deduces its ancestry from the academy of Richard Frankland, begun 1670), the Unitarian Home Missionary College (founded in Manchester in 1854 by John Relly Beard, D.D., and William Gaskell), and the Presbyterian College, Carmarthen.
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  • English Unitarian periodical literature begins with Priestley's Theological Repository (1769-1788), and includes the Monthly Repository (1806-1838), The Christian Reformer (1834-1863), the Prospective Review (1845-1854), the National Review (1855-1864), the Theological Review (1864-1879), and now the Hibbert Journal, one of the enterprises of the Ilibbert Trust, founded by Robert Hibbert (1770-1849) and originally designated the Anti-Trinitarian Fund.
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  • The Scottish Unitarian Association was founded in 1813, mainly by Thomas Southwood Smith, M.D., the sanitary reformer.
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  • Irish Unitarian periodical literature began in 1832 with the Bible Christian, followed by the Irish Unitarian Magazine, the Christian Unitarian, the Disciple and now the Non-subscribing Presbyterian.
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  • Charles Chauncy (1705-1787), pastor of the First Church from 1727 until his death, the chief opponent of Edwards in the great revival, was both a Unitarian and a Universalist.
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  • The first official acceptance of the Unitarian faith on the part of a congregation was by King's Chapel in Boston, which settled James Freeman (1759-1853) in 1782, and revised the Prayer Book into a mild Unitarian liturgy, in 1785.
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  • Unitarian congregations were organized at Portland and Saco in 1792 by Thomas Oxnard; in 1800 the First Church in Plymouth accepted the more liberal faith.
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  • Joseph Priestley came to the United States in 1794, and organized a Unitarian Church at Northumberland, Pennsylvania, the same year, and one at Philadelphia in 1796.
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  • In the same year appeared Unitarian books by John Sherman (1772-1828) and Hosea Ballou (1771-1852), and another in 1810 by Noah Worcester (1758-1837).
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  • At the opening of the 19th century, with one exception, all the churches of Boston were occupied by Unitarian preachers, and various periodicals and organizations expressed their opinions.
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  • William Ellery Channing was settled over the Federal Street Congregational Church, Boston, 1803; and in a few years he became the leader of the Unitarian movement.
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  • His essays on The System of Exclusion and Denunciation in Religion (1815), and Objections to Unitarian Christianity Considered (1819), made him a defender of Unitarianism.
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  • His sermon on "Unitarian Christianity," preached at Baltimore in 1819, at the ordination of Jared Sparks, and that at New York in 1821, on "Unitarian Christianity most favourable to Piety," made him its interpreter.
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  • The result was a growing division in the Congregational churches, which was emphasized in 1825 by the formation of the American Unitarian Association at Boston.
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  • Essentially non-sectarian, with little missionary zeal, the Unitarian movement has grown slowly; and its influence has been chiefly exercised through general culture and the better literature of the country.
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  • Many of its clergymen have been trained in other denominations; but the Harvard Divinity School was distinctly Unitarian from its formation, in 1816, to 1870, when it became an unsectarian department of the university.
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  • The Meadville (Pa.) Theological School was founded in 1844; and the Unitarian Theological School at Berkeley, California, in 1904.
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  • Unitarian thought in the United States has passed through three periods.
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  • In 1865 the National Unitarian Conference was organized, and adopted a distinctly Christian platform„ affirming that its members were "disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ."
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  • The Western Unitarian Association accepted the same position, and based its "fellowship on no dogmatic tests," but affirmed a desire "to establish truth, righteousness and love in the world."
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  • This last phase has been shown in the organization of "The International Council of Unitarian and other Liberal Religious Thinkers and Workers," at Boston on the 25th of May 1900, "to open communication with those in all lands who are striving to unite pure religion and perfect liberty, and to increase fellowship and co-operation among them."
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  • The number of Unitarian churches in the United States in 1909 was 461, with 541 ministers.
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  • The periodicals are The Christian Register, weekly, Boston; Unity, weekly, Chicago; The Unitarian, monthly, New York; Old and New, monthly, Des Moines; Pacific Unitarian, San Francisco.
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  • See Joseph Henry Allen, Our Liberal Movement in Theology (Boston, 1882), and Sequel to our Liberal Movement (Boston, 1897); John White Chadwick, Old and New Unitarian Belief (Boston, 1894), and specially William Ellery Channing (1903); Unitarianism: its Origin and History, a course of Sixteen Lectures (Boston, 1895) George Willis Cooke, Unitarianism in America: a History of its Origin and Development (Boston, 1902); and Unitarian Year Book (Boston).
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  • At fifteen, not before, Benjamin was sent to a Unitarian school at Walthamstow - a well-known school, populous enough to be a little world of emulation and conflict but otherwise unfit.
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  • The Stone Temple, or First (Unitarian) Congregational Church, is the burial-place of the two Adamses.
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  • His father was a well-to-do man of business, a Unitarian in religion and a Liberal in politics.
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  • The Unitarian chapel, Ipswich, is located in Friars Street beside the Willis Faber building.
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  • The humanist movement itself has its roots in the Ethical Societies of the 19th century which grew out of Unitarian congregations.
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  • dragged screaming onto the NUF sub-committee for Expansion and Publicity, which involved attending to the NUF Unitarian Publicity Stall at GA Annual Meetings.
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  • Letters continue to arrive begging the question ' Why didn't I know of the Unitarians and National Unitarian fellowship long ago?
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  • Notes on a Form of Worship for the Bedfordshire Unitarian fellowship.
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  • Taken from a pamphlet circulated from Unitarian headquarters, Essex Hall, 1-6 Essex Street, LONDON.
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  • pamphlet circulated from Unitarian Headquarters, Essex Hall, 1-6 Essex Street, LONDON.
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  • His father was a Quaker and a tory, but Fielden grew up a radical, and ultimately became a Unitarian.
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  • Unitarian chapel, Todmorden.
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  • Why not seek further information from your nearest UNITARIAN minister or lay leader, or from Unitarian minister or lay leader, or from UNITARIAN HEADQUARTERS?
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  • UNITARIAN viewS OF EARTH AND NATURE Six Unitarian viewS OF EARTH AND NATURE Six Unitarian women and men reflect on the relationship between humans and the natural world.
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  • I read a statistic recently about Unitarian universalism in the United States.
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  • I had been to the United States twice before to attend the annual meetings of the Unitarian universalists.
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  • RICHARD HOLT HUTTON (1826-1897), English writer and theologian, son of Joseph Hutton, Unitarian minister at Leeds, was born at Leeds on the 2nd of June 1826.
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  • Berkeley is the seat of the California state university (see California, University Of), opened in 1873; the inter-related Berkeley Bible Seminary (1896, Disciples of Christ); Pacific Theological Seminary (established in 1866 at Oakland, in 1901 at Berkeley, Congregational); Seminary of the Pacific Coast Baptist Theological Union, and Unitarian Theological School - all associated with the University of California; and the state institution for the deaf, dumb and blind.
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  • As early as 1805 it was recognized as predominant in Harvard College, and in 1815 it had become a distinct denomination under the new title "Unitarian" (see Unitarianism) .
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  • Among the most noteworthy churches of Syracuse are the Roman Catholic cathedral of the Immaculate Conception - Syracuse became the see of a Roman Catholic bishop in 1887 - and St Paul's Protestant Episcopal, the first Presbyterian, first Methodist Episcopal, Dutch Reformed and May Memorial (Unitarian) churches, the last erected in memory of Samuel Joseph May (1797-1871), a famous anti-slavery leader, pastor of the church in 1845-1868, and author of Some Recollections of Our Anti-Slavery Conflict (1873).
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  • In 1837 he married Sophia Elizabeth, daughter of William Frend, a Unitarian in faith, a mathematician and actuary in occupation, a notice of whose life, written by his son-in-law, will be found in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (vol.
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  • The earliest of these to appear was his defence of religious liberty, in the Epistola de Tolerantia, addressed to Limborch, published at Gouda in the spring of 1689, and translated into English in autumn by William Popple, a Unitarian merchant in London.
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  • His father was a Quaker and a tory, but Fielden grew up a radical, and ultimately became a unitarian.
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  • He died at Skegness 29 May 1849, and was buried at the unitarian chapel, Todmorden.
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  • Why not seek further information from your nearest UNITARIAN minister or lay leader, or from UNITARIAN HEADQUARTERS?
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  • UNITARIAN VIEWS OF EARTH AND NATURE Six Unitarian women and men reflect on the relationship between humans and the natural world.
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  • I read a statistic recently about Unitarian Universalism in the United States.
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  • I had been to the United States twice before to attend the annual meetings of the Unitarian Universalists.
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  • It is the seat of a Unitarian bishop, and of the superintendent of the Calvinists for the Transylvanian circle.
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