This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

unisexual

unisexual

unisexual Sentence Examples

  • Gonads not so restricted in position as in Oligochaets, and often more abundant; the individuals usually unisexual.

  • The flowers spring in branching spadices from the axils of the leaves, and as the trees are unisexual it is necessary in cultivation to fertilize the female flowers by artificial means.

  • evergreen shrub with flattened leaf-like cladodes, native in the southerly portion of England and Wales; the small flowers are unisexual and borne on the face of the cladode; the male contains three stamens, the filaments of which are united to form a short stout column on which are seated the diverging cells of the anthers; in the female the ovary is enveloped by a fleshy staminal tube on which are borne three barren anthers.

  • The tribe Smilacoideae, shrubby climbers with net-veined leaves and small unisexual flowers, bears much the same relationship to the order as a whole as does the order Dioscoreaceae, which have a similar habit, but flowers with am inferior ovary, to the Amaryllidaceae.

  • Seedling plants from the cultivated vines often produce unisexual flowers, thus reverting to the feral type.

  • The flowers are unisexual and monoecious, the numerous males borne in thick catkins proceeding from the side of last year's shoot.

  • in height, and has oval entire leaves, and unisexual flowers on short stalks.

  • These are followed by the inflorescence, a fleshy spadix bearing in the lower part numerous closely crowded simple unisexual flowers and continued above into a purplish or yellowish appendage; the spadix is enveloped by a leafy spathe, constricted in the lower part to form a chamber, in which are the flowers.

  • Alston's observations were founded on what occurred in certain unisexual plants, such as Mercurialis, Spinach, Hemp, Hop and Bryony.

  • - Rotifera are unisexual, with the sexes dimorphic. The ovary is, as in many Platyhelminthes, duplex; one part, the germary, being an organ for the production by cell multiplication of the germ-cells or eggs.

  • Cross-fertilization must of necessity occur when the flowers are structurally unisexual, as in the hazel, in which the male and female flowers are monoecious, or separate on the same plant, and in the willow, in which they are dioecious, or on different plants.

  • It has narrow, shortstalked leaves and inconspicuous, apetalous, unisexual flowers borne in short spikes.

  • - Aplacophora without distinct ventral groove, with single median unisexual gonad, with differentiated hepatic sac, and with cloacal chamber furnished with two bipectinate gills.

  • The starting-point of the class, however, and the position within it of apetalous families with frequently unisexual flowers, have provoked much discussion.

  • The flowers, which are often unisexual, are wind-pollinated.

  • A few species, as we have seen, are monoecious or dioecious, while many are polygamous (having unisexual as well as bisexual flowers as in many members of the tribes Andropogoneae, fig.

  • Spikelets unisexual, male and female in separate inflorescences or on different parts of the same inflorescence.

  • The spikelets are sometimes unisexual, and there are often six stamens.

  • Flowers unisexual, except in a few cases (Gnetales) without a perianth.

  • Flowers monoecious or dioecious, unisexual, without a perianth, often in the form of cones, but never terminal on the main stem.

  • The flowers spring from, or are enclosed in, a spathe, and are unisexual and regular, with generally a calyx and corolla, each of three members; the stamens are in whorls of three, the inner whorls are often barren; the two to fifteen carpels form an inferior ovary containing generally numerous ovules on often large, produced, parietal placentas.

  • The plants are trees or shrubs with simple leaves alternately arranged and small unisexual flowers generally arranged in catkins and pollinated by wind-agency.

  • If the margins of such a receptacle be developed upwards, the centre not developing, a concave receptacle is formed, which may partially or completely enclose a number of flowers that are generally unisexual.

  • When only one of those organs is present the flower is unisexual or diclinous, and is either male (staminate), j, or female (pistillate), ?

  • By the suppression of the verticil of the stamens, or of the carpels, flowers become unisexual or diclinous, and by the suppression of one or both of the floral envelopes, monochlamydeous and achlamydeous flowers are produced.

  • In unisexual flowers it is not uncommon to find vestiges of the undeveloped stamens in the form of filiform bodies or scales.

  • Hermaphrodite or bisexual flowers are those in which both these organs are found; unisexual or diclinous are those in which only one of these organs appears, - those bearing stamens only, being staminiferous or " male "; those having the pistil only, pistilliferous or " female."

  • When in the same plant there are unisexual flowers, both male and female, the plant is said to be nionoecious, as in the hazel and castor-oil plant.

  • In most cases the adults are hermaphrodite, but unisexual forms also occur, whilst the hermaphrodite adults may carry with them minute " complementary " males.

  • apetalous, unisexual flowers, and apocarpous fruit.

  • unisexual flowers, and apocarpous fruit.

  • Gonads not so restricted in position as in Oligochaets, and often more abundant; the individuals usually unisexual.

  • The flowers spring in branching spadices from the axils of the leaves, and as the trees are unisexual it is necessary in cultivation to fertilize the female flowers by artificial means.

  • evergreen shrub with flattened leaf-like cladodes, native in the southerly portion of England and Wales; the small flowers are unisexual and borne on the face of the cladode; the male contains three stamens, the filaments of which are united to form a short stout column on which are seated the diverging cells of the anthers; in the female the ovary is enveloped by a fleshy staminal tube on which are borne three barren anthers.

  • The tribe Smilacoideae, shrubby climbers with net-veined leaves and small unisexual flowers, bears much the same relationship to the order as a whole as does the order Dioscoreaceae, which have a similar habit, but flowers with am inferior ovary, to the Amaryllidaceae.

  • Seedling plants from the cultivated vines often produce unisexual flowers, thus reverting to the feral type.

  • The flowers are unisexual and monoecious, the numerous males borne in thick catkins proceeding from the side of last year's shoot.

  • in height, and has oval entire leaves, and unisexual flowers on short stalks.

  • These are followed by the inflorescence, a fleshy spadix bearing in the lower part numerous closely crowded simple unisexual flowers and continued above into a purplish or yellowish appendage; the spadix is enveloped by a leafy spathe, constricted in the lower part to form a chamber, in which are the flowers.

  • Alston's observations were founded on what occurred in certain unisexual plants, such as Mercurialis, Spinach, Hemp, Hop and Bryony.

  • In the case of unisexual flowers, whether monoecious, that is, with staminate and pistillate flowers on one and the same plant, such as many of our native trees - oak, beech, birch, alder, &c., or dioecious with staminate and pistillate flowers on different plants, as in willows and poplars, cross pollination only is possible.

  • - Rotifera are unisexual, with the sexes dimorphic. The ovary is, as in many Platyhelminthes, duplex; one part, the germary, being an organ for the production by cell multiplication of the germ-cells or eggs.

  • Cross-fertilization must of necessity occur when the flowers are structurally unisexual, as in the hazel, in which the male and female flowers are monoecious, or separate on the same plant, and in the willow, in which they are dioecious, or on different plants.

  • It has narrow, shortstalked leaves and inconspicuous, apetalous, unisexual flowers borne in short spikes.

  • - Aplacophora without distinct ventral groove, with single median unisexual gonad, with differentiated hepatic sac, and with cloacal chamber furnished with two bipectinate gills.

  • The starting-point of the class, however, and the position within it of apetalous families with frequently unisexual flowers, have provoked much discussion.

  • The flowers, which are often unisexual, are wind-pollinated.

  • A few species, as we have seen, are monoecious or dioecious, while many are polygamous (having unisexual as well as bisexual flowers as in many members of the tribes Andropogoneae, fig.

  • Spikelets unisexual, male and female in separate inflorescences or on different parts of the same inflorescence.

  • The spikelets are sometimes unisexual, and there are often six stamens.

  • Flowers unisexual, except in a few cases (Gnetales) without a perianth.

  • Flowers monoecious or dioecious, unisexual, without a perianth, often in the form of cones, but never terminal on the main stem.

  • The flowers spring from, or are enclosed in, a spathe, and are unisexual and regular, with generally a calyx and corolla, each of three members; the stamens are in whorls of three, the inner whorls are often barren; the two to fifteen carpels form an inferior ovary containing generally numerous ovules on often large, produced, parietal placentas.

  • The plants are trees or shrubs with simple leaves alternately arranged and small unisexual flowers generally arranged in catkins and pollinated by wind-agency.

  • If the spike bears unisexual flowers, as in willow or hazel (fig.

  • If the margins of such a receptacle be developed upwards, the centre not developing, a concave receptacle is formed, which may partially or completely enclose a number of flowers that are generally unisexual.

  • When only one of those organs is present the flower is unisexual or diclinous, and is either male (staminate), j, or female (pistillate), ?

  • By the suppression of the verticil of the stamens, or of the carpels, flowers become unisexual or diclinous, and by the suppression of one or both of the floral envelopes, monochlamydeous and achlamydeous flowers are produced.

  • In unisexual flowers it is not uncommon to find vestiges of the undeveloped stamens in the form of filiform bodies or scales.

  • Hermaphrodite or bisexual flowers are those in which both these organs are found; unisexual or diclinous are those in which only one of these organs appears, - those bearing stamens only, being staminiferous or " male "; those having the pistil only, pistilliferous or " female."

  • When in the same plant there are unisexual flowers, both male and female, the plant is said to be nionoecious, as in the hazel and castor-oil plant.

  • In most cases the adults are hermaphrodite, but unisexual forms also occur, whilst the hermaphrodite adults may carry with them minute " complementary " males.

Browse other sentences examples →