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unionist

unionist

unionist Sentence Examples

  • He became a member of the Unionist Government in Dec. 1917.

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  • The "passive resistance" movement, with Dr Clifford as its chief leader, had a large share in the defeat of the Unionist government in January 1906, and his efforts were then directed to getting a new act passed which should be undenominational in character.

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  • The unionist constitution, devised by Christian VIII., and pro mulgated by his successor, Frederick VII.

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  • In the crisis of 1860-61 Texas sided with the other Southern States in spite of the strong Unionist influence exerted by the German settlers and by Governor Sam Houston.

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  • During the remainder of 1903 the struggle within the Unionist party continued.

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  • He refused to support Mr Gladstone's Home Rule Bill in 1885, and was one of those who chiefly contributed to its rejection, and whose reputation for unbending integrity and intellectual eminence gave solidity to the Liberal Unionist party.

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  • The Unionist party, both in Ireland and in England, became suspicious of the tendencies of his administration, and he was driven to resignation.

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  • Throckmorton, Unionist Democrat, was elected governor.

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  • But Mr Chamberlain's new programme for a general tariff, with new taxes on food arranged so as to give a preference to colonial products, involved a radical alteration of the established fiscal system, and such out-and-out Unionist free-traders in the cabinet as Mr Ritchie and Lord George Hamilton, and outside it, like Lord Hugh Cecil and Mr Arthur Elliot (secretary to the treasury), were entirely opposed to this.

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  • The Sardinian government had formally invited that of Tuscany to participate in Unionist the war of liberation, and on the grand-dtike rejecting movethe proposal, moderates and democrats combined to ments in present an ultimatum to Leopold demanding that he ~~-~ should abdicate in favor of his son, grant a constitu- ~~ tion and take part in the campaign.

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  • In the Frankfort parliament he was leader of the extreme Right; and after its break-up he was zealous in promoting the Unionist policy of Prussia, which he defended both in the Prussian diet and in the Erfurt parliament.

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  • They have never been a large element in the highland counties; it was these counties which were most strongly Unionist at the time of the Civil War, and which to-day are the region of diversified industry.

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  • In the national elections of 1860 Virginia returned a majority of unionist electors as against the secession candidates, Breckinridge and Lane, many of the large planters voting for the continuance of the Union, and many of the smaller slave-owners supporting the secessionists.

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  • In 1860, however, he ceased to be a Unionist, and became a leader of the secession movement.

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  • " In the attacks made upon the Unionist government this cry was loudly voiced by the Liberal party in England, and in the political campaign which followed, the " Chinese Slavery " issue undoubtedly helped to swell the majority obtained by Sir H.

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  • - and the Orange or unionist party (Oranjegesinden), which was strong in the smaller provinces and had much popular support among the lower classes.

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  • As a Democrat he served in 1836 and in1840-1843in the Illinois House of Representatives, and in1843-1851and in1859-1861was a representative in Congress, where in his first term he vigorously opposed the Wilmot proviso, but in' his second term was a strong Unionist and introduced the resolution of the 15th of July 1861, pledging money and men to the national government.

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  • He was very trenchant in his criticism of the Government; thus giving satisfaction to ardent spirits in the Unionist ranks, but causing ministerial speakers to contrast his bitterness and violence with Mr. Balfour's quieter methods.

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  • a large fortune at a comparatively early age, he came to England in 1910, and stood successfully for the House of Commons as Unionist candidate for Ashton-under-Lyne.

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  • He was from the first an intimate friend and adviser of Mr. Bonar Law when the latter became the Unionist leader.

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  • In January 1910 the Liberal government was again returned to power; but the Unionist party was now committed to Tariff Reform, which had made great strides in obtaining popular support.

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  • P. Blair, and of Nathaniel Lyon, the Unionist military commander, prevailed over the party of secession.

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  • In Kentucky the Unionist victory was secured almost without a blow, and, even at the end of 1861, the Confederate outposts west of the Alleghenies lay no farther north than the line Columbus - Bowling Green - Cumberland Gap, though southern Missouri was still a contested ground.

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  • Michael Hahn, Unionist and Military James M.

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  • This part of the state, strongly Unionist, had striven to prevent secession, and soon became itself a state of the Union (1863).

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  • On the Potomac the Unionist generals McDowell and Patterson commanded respectively the forces at Washington and Harper's Ferry, opposed by the Confederates under Generals J.

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  • Soon afterwards, after a steady resistance, the Unionist garrison of Lexington surrendered to Sterling Price.

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  • Halleck went to Washington as general-in-chief, Pope was transferred to Virginia, Grant, with his own Army of the Tennessee and Rosecrans's (lately Pope's) Army of the Mississippi, was entrusted with operations on the latter river, while Buell's Army of the Ohio was ordered to east Tennessee to relieve the inhabitants of that district, who, as Unionist sympathizers, were receiving harsh treatment from the Confederate and state authorities.

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  • The responsibilities of administration have, however, often converted a political free-lance into a steady-going official, and the Unionist press did its best to encourage such a tendency by continual praise of the departmental action of the new minister.

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  • But the main features of the budget were adhered to, and eventually passed the House of Commons on the 4th of November, in spite of the persistent opposition of the scanty Unionist minority.

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  • 1866), married the daughter of Lord Ashton; he was Unionist M.P. for South Manchester from 1900 to 1905, and later for Taunton, and also acted as Municipal Reform leader on the London County Council.

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  • An election in August of one-half the Senate and all of the House of Representatives resulted in a Unionist majority in the new legislature of 103 to 35, and in September, after Confederate troops had begun to invade the state, Kentucky formally declared its allegiance to the Union.

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  • He accepted the chairmanship of the Royal Commission on Ritualistic Practices in the Church, and he did valuable work as 'an arbitrator; and though when the fiscal controversy arose he became a member of the Free-food League, his parliamentary loyalty to Mr Balfour did much to prevent the Unionist free-traders from precipitating a rupture.

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  • On Lord Salisbury's resignation on the 11th of July 1902, Mr Balfour succeeded him as prime minister, with the cordial approval of all sections of the Unionist party.

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  • Mr Ritchie's remission of the shilling import-duty on corn led to Mr Chamberlain's crusade in favour of tariff reform and colonial preference, and as the session proceeded the rift grew in the Unionist ranks.

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  • His speech at Birmingham (November 14, 1907), fully accepting the principles of Mr Chamberlain's fiscal policy, proved epoch-making in consolidating the Unionist party - except for a small number of free-traders, like Lord Robert Cecil, who continued to hold out - in favour of tariff reform; and during 1908 the process of recuperation went on, the by-elections showing toamarked degree the increased popular support given to the Unionist candidates.

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  • He sat in the House of Commons for Ayrshire (S.) as a Unionist member from 1895-1906.

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  • Meanwhile the Unionist and Liberal agitation was growing in strength, partly owing to the very efforts made to restrain it.

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  • A Liberal Unionist, however, could only be elected by Conservative votes, and he had made himself objectionable to a large section of the party by his independent attitude on various questions, on which his Liberalism outweighed his party loyalty.

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  • After 1895 Mr Courtney's divergences from the Unionist party on questions other than Irish politics became gradually more marked.

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  • Standing as a Liberal Unionist, he lost his seat at the General Election of that year, and did not reappear in Parliament till he succeeded his uncle in the earldom in 1894.

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  • During the years of Unionist ascendancy Mr Asquith divided his energies between his legal work and politics; but his adhesion to Lord Rosebery (q.v.) as a Liberal Imperialist at the time of the Boer War, while it strengthened his position in the eyes of the public, put him in some difficulty with his own party, led as it was by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, who was identified with the "proBoer" policy.

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  • He also made useful party capital out of the necessity for financial retrenchment, owing to the large increase in public expenditure, maintained by the Unionist government even after the Boer War was over; II.

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  • He became prominent, politically, during the nullification excitement of 1832-1833, as a vigorous opponent of nullification, and from 1836 to 1845 he sat in the United States Senate as a Unionist Democrat.

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  • On the 7th of November at Leicester Lord Rosebery insisted that what the country wanted was not fiscal reform but commercial reform, and he appealed to the free-trade section of the Unionist party to join the Liberals in a united defence, - an appeal incidentally for Liberal unity which was warmly seconded ten days later by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman.

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  • Lord Rosebery had just gone down to Cornwall to make a series of speeches in support of the Liberal programme, now fairly well mapped out as regards those items which represented the strong public opposition to what had been done by the Unionist government..

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  • Mar, Queensberry, Stair (of Glencoe) and Argyll (Red John of the Battles) were the leading statesmen of the Unionist party; being opposed by Hamilton, Atholl and Lockhart of Carnwath as Jacobites; by Fletcher of Saltoun as an independent patriot; by popular sentiment, by mob violence, and by many of the preachers, though not by the General Assembly.

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  • In politics he was a strong Liberal and Unionist, and did much to inspire the organization of the Burschenschaft.

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  • 1917 he entered the Federal Unionist Government as president of the council and vice-chairman of the War Committee of the Cabinet, and was elected to the Dominion House of Commons for Durham county, Ontario, Dec. 1917.

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  • After the great man's retirement he entered Parliament as a Liberal Unionist at a byelection in 1895 for Warwick and Leamington - a seat which he held till the Unionist downfall in 1906, returning, however, to the House a few months after the general election as member for St.

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  • He retired with a sufficient competence, and went into Parliament in 190o as Conservative and Unionist member for the Blackfriars division of Glasgow.

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  • Halleck went to Washington as general-in-chief, Pope was transferred to Virginia, Grant, with his own Army of the Tennessee and Rosecrans's (lately Pope's) Army of the Mississippi, was entrusted with operations on the latter river, while Buell's Army of the Ohio was ordered to east Tennessee to relieve the inhabitants of that district, who, as Unionist sympathizers, were receiving harsh treatment from the Confederate and state authorities.

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  • He sat in the House of Commons for Ayrshire (S.) as a Unionist member from 1895-1906.

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  • Standing as a Liberal Unionist, he lost his seat at the General Election of that year, and did not reappear in Parliament till he succeeded his uncle in the earldom in 1894.

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  • There was a brief reaction: Henry Stuart Foote (1800-1880), Unionist, was elected governor in 1851 over Davis, the States' Rights candidate, and in the same year a Constitutional Convention had declared almost unanimously that "the asserted right of secession".

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  • Lord Derby became a Liberal Unionist, and took an active part in the general management of that party, leading it in the House of Lords till 1891, when Lord Hartington became duke of Devonshire.

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  • The elections to the Union House of Assembly, held in September, were notable as showing the strength of the Progressive (or Unionist) party.

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  • On the 4th of December 1905 the Unionist government resigned, and the king sent for Sir Henry CampbellBannerman, who in a few days formed his cabinet.

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  • gradually gave way before the signs of Unionist reintegration.

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  • The more aggressive protectionists among Mr Chamberlain's supporters had lately become very confident, and Mr Balfour plainly repudiated "protection" in so far as it meant a policy aiming at supporting or creating home industries by raising home prices; but he introduced a new point by declaring that an Imperial Conference would be called to discuss with the colonies the question of preferential tariffs if the Unionist government obtained a majority at the next general election.

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  • The Unionist regime as a whole, however, had collapsed.

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  • The more aggressive protectionists among Mr Chamberlain's supporters had lately become very confident, and Mr Balfour plainly repudiated "protection" in so far as it meant a policy aiming at supporting or creating home industries by raising home prices; but he introduced a new point by declaring that an Imperial Conference would be called to discuss with the colonies the question of preferential tariffs if the Unionist government obtained a majority at the next general election.

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  • The Unionist regime as a whole, however, had collapsed.

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  • The new compact was indicated in Mr Balfour's letter, in which he declared that "fiscal reform is, and must remain, the first constructive work of the Unionist party; its objects are to secure more equal terms of competition for British trade and closer commercial union with the colonies; and while it is at present unnecessary to prescribe the exact methods by which these objects are to be attained, and inexpedient to permit differences of opinion as to these methods to divide the party, though other means are possible, the establishment of a moderate general tariff on manufactured goods, not imposed for the purpose of raising prices, or giving artificial protection against legitimate competition, and the imposition of a small duty on foreign corn, are not in principle objectionable, and should be adopted if shown to be necessary for the attainment of the ends in view or for purposes of revenue."

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  • William Sprague,' Unionist.

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  • William C. Cozzens (acting), Unionist .

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  • After nearly four months of strenuous opposition to the bill in Parliament, he renewed and strengthened his encouragement to Ulster by declaring, at a large Unionist gathering at Blenheim on July 27, that the Ulster people would submit to no ascendancy, and that he could imagine no lengths of resistance to which they might go in which he would not be ready to support them, and in which they would not be supported by the overwhelming majority of the British people.

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  • The two branches of the party, the Conserva tives and the Liberal Unionists, had indeed been fused, in May 1912, into one party with a combined national Unionist organization.

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  • At once a large section of Unionists, especially in Unionist Lancashire, became alarmed lest their electoral chances should be jeopardized by the prospect of food taxes imposed without reference to the people.

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  • He refused altogether to haul down the flag of Tariff Reform; it was his policy to give British workmen a preference, both in the home and in the colonial market; but he said that a Unionist Government did not intend themselves to impose food duties.

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  • 14 1913, in answer to a memorial from the bulk of the Unionist M.P.'sa memorial which wished for a reassurance as to food duties, but strongly deprecated a change of leadership - Mr. Law announced that he and Lord Lansdowne were willing to agree that food duties should not be imposed without the approval of the electorate at a subsequent general election; and to remain leaders in deference to their followers' appeal, in spite of the party's disregard of their advice.

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  • 28 and declared then that Ulster would not submit, and the Unionist party would not allow her to be coerced.

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  • He believed, he subsequently told a Unionist audience, that the Opposition could have turned out the Government at this time owing to the indignation about the shortage of munitions; but that would have meant an election and renewal of party feeling, and so have prevented the concentration of effort on the war.

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  • In regard to Ireland, he frankly admitted, Unionist though he was, the need for a change.

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  • The Unionist government which came into power in 1895 lasted, with certain changes of personnel, till 1905, with a break caused by the dissolution of 1900.

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  • The Tariff Reform propaganda of Mr Chamberlain (qv.) in 1903 convulsed ~ the Conservative party, and thelongperiodof Unionist 1910.

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  • The Unionist party in the country had, meanwhile, been recovering from the Tariff Reform divisions of 1903, and was once more solid under Mr Balfour in favor of its new and imperial policy; but the campaign against the House of Lords started by Mr Lloyd George and the Liberal leaders, who put in the forefront the necessity of obtaining statutory guarantees for the passing into law of measures deliberately adopted by the elected Chamber, resulted in the return of Mr Asquiths government to office at the election of January 1910.

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  • In politics he was a Liberal, and became a Liberal Unionist in 1886.

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  • In October Mr Chamberlain visited Ulster, where he was received with enthusiasm, and delivered several stirring Unionist speeches.

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  • A general election followed in July, and 74 Liberal Unionists were returned, forming with the Conservatives a Unionist party, which outnumbered Gladstonians and Parnellites together by over a hundred.

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  • The Unionist party had adopted a policy of local government for Ireland while opposing legislative independence, and a bill was introduced into the House of Commons by Mr Balfour in February 1892.

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  • The lord-lieutenant, on taking up his quarters in Dublin, refused a loyal address because of its Unionist tone; and in October the government issued a commission, with Mr Justice Mathew as chairman, which had the restoration of the evicted tenants as its avowed object.

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  • During the year 1892 a vast number of Unionist meetings were held throughout Ireland, the most remarkable being the great Ulster convention in Belfast, and that of the three other provinces in Dublin, on the 14th and 23rd of June.

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  • On the 22nd of April 1893, the day after the second reading of the bill, the Albert Hall in London was filled by enthusiastic Unionist delegates from all parts of Ireland.

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  • A general election followed, which resulted in a Unionist majority of 150.

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  • The landlords of Ireland, who had made so many sacrifices and worked so hard to return Lord Salisbury to power, felt that [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] the measure was hardly what they had a right to expect from a Unionist administration.

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  • Local government for Ireland had always been part of the Unionist programme, and the vote on the abortive bill of 1892 had committed parliament to legislation.

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  • But a difficult parliamentary crisis, caused by Irish Unionist suspicions on the subject, was only temporarily overcome by Mr Wyndham's resignation in March 1905.

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  • Macdonnell being retained in office by the Liberal government) his Nationalist leanings again became prominent, and the responsibility of the Unionist government in introducing him into the Irish administration became a matter of considerable heart-burning among the Unionist party.

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  • The general election at the beginning of 1906 was disastrous to the Unionist party, and the Liberal government secured an enormous majority.

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  • Macdonnell at once admitted through the newspapers that he had in his possession letters (rumoured to be " embarrassing " to the Unionist leaders) which he might publish at his own discretion; and the discussion as to how far his appointment by Mr Wyndham had prejudiced the Unionist cause was reopened in public with much bitterness, in view of the anticipation of further steps in the Home Rule direction by the Liberal ministry.

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  • The general election of 1910 placed the Liberal and Unionist parties in a position of almost exact equality in the House of Commons, and it was at once evident that the Nationalists under Mr Redmond's leadership would hold the balance of power and control the fortunes of Mr Asquith's government.

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  • The general election, however, returned to parliament 316 Conservatives, 78 Liberal Unionists, and only 276 Gladstonians and Nationalists, Birmingham returning seven Unionist members.

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  • It was enough for them to be able to tie down the Conservative government to such measures as were not offensive to Liberal Unionist principles.

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  • The influence of Liberal Unionist views upon the domestic legislation of the government was steadily bringing about a more complete union in the Unionist party, and destroying the old lines of political cleavage.

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  • At the general election of 1892 Mr Chamberlain was again returned, with an increased majority, for West Birmingham; but the Unionist party as a whole came back with only 315 members against 355 Home Rulers.

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  • Outside parliament he was busy formulating proposals for old age pensions, which had a prominent place in the Unionist programme of 1895.

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  • In that year, on the defeat of Lord Rosebery, the union of the Unionists was sealed by the inclusion of the Liberal Unionist leaders in Lord Salisbury's ministry; and Mr Chamberlain became secretary of state for the colonies.

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  • Mr Chamberlain's influence in the Unionist cabinet was soon visible in the Workmen's Compensation Act and other measures.

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  • Eventually it was the Liberal and not the Unionist party that carried an Old Age Pensions scheme through parliament, during the 1908 session, when Mr Chamberlain was hors de combat.

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  • During the progress of the Boer War from 1899 to 1902, Mr Chamberlain, as the statesman who had represented the cabinet in the negotiations which led to it, remained the object of constant attacks from his Radical opponents - the "little Englanders" and "Pro-Boers," as he called them - and he was supported by the Imperialist and Unionist party with at least equal ardour.

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  • The problems of empire engrossed him, and a new enthusiasm for imperial projects arose in the Unionist party under his inspiration.

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  • Its reimposition, officially supported for the sake of necessary revenue in war-time, and cordially welcomed by the Unionist party, had justified itself, as they contended, in spite of the criticisms of the Opposition (who raised the cry of the "dear loaf"), by proving during the year to have had no general or direct effect on the price of bread.

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  • The Unionist rank and file were committed to its support, - many even advocating its increase to two shillings at least.

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  • The movement grew quickly, its supporters including a number of the cleverest younger politicians and journalists in the Unionist party.

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  • Meanwhile, the death of Lord Salisbury (August 22) removed a weighty figure from the councils of the Unionist party.

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  • In his own words, he went in front of the Unionist army as a pioneer, and if his army was attacked he would go back to it; in no conceivable circumstances would he allow himself to be put in any sort of competition, direct or indirect, with Mr Balfour, his friend and leader, whom he meant to follow (October 6).

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  • The broad fact remained that while Mr Chamberlain's activity gathered round him the bulk of the Unionist members and an enthusiastic band of economic sympathizers, the country as a whole remained apathetic and unconvinced.

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  • One reason was the intellectual difficulty of the subject and the double-faced character of all arguments from statistics, which were either incomprehensible or disputable; another was the fact that substantially this was a political movement, and that tariff reform was, after all, only one in a complexity of political issues, most of which during this period were being interpreted by the electorate in a sense hostile to the Unionist party.

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  • Moreover, the split in the Unionist party brought the united Liberal party in full force into the field, and at last the country began to think that the danger of Irish Home Rule was practically over, and that a Liberal majority might be returned to power in safety, with the prospect of providing an alternative government which would assure commercial repose (Lord Rosebery's phrase), relief from extravagant expenditure, and - as the working-classes were led to believe - a certain amount of labour legislation which the Tory leaders would never propose.

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  • Mr Chamberlain retorted that this was a matter for a general meeting of delegates to decide; if the duke was outvoted he might resign his presidency; for his own part he was prepared to allow the local associations to be subsidized impartially, so long as they supported the government, but he was not prepared for the violent disruption, which the duke apparently contemplated, of an association so necessary to the success of the Unionist cause.

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  • At the crushing Unionist defeat in the general election which followed in January 1906, Mr Chamberlain was triumphantly returned for West Birmingham, and all the divisions of Birmingham returned Chamberlainite members.

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  • J.) which admitted the necessity of making fiscal reform the first plank in the Unionist platform, and accepted a general tariff on manufactured goods and a small duty on foreign corn as "not in principle objectionable."

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  • But while his enemies taunted him with having twice wrecked his party - first the Radical party under Mr Gladstone, and secondly the Unionist party under Mr Balfour - no well-informed critic doubted his sincerity, or failed to recognize that in leaving the cabinet and embarking on his fiscal campaign he showed real devotion to an idea.

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  • The request was ignored, but the section was strongly Unionist in sentiment during the war, and has since been strongly Republican.

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  • In short Paisley is demanding total nationalist capitulation to the unionist agenda.

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  • condemned by unionist politicians.

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  • In this respect, the key role of the six county's notorious Special Branch will not inspire confidence outside of unionist quarters.

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  • I cannot understand those unionist parties who are opposing the devolution of policing powers.

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  • dissension within the ranks of the Unionist family.

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  • Along with the efforts of others Cooper worked to try to establish a new united opposition grouping in parliament to oppose the Unionist government.

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  • leftish views could be the only effective opposition to the Unionist Government ' .

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  • A keen trade unionist, in 1932 Smewin was appointed a magistrate.

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  • In Northern Ireland, a two-thirds Unionist majority is denied the right to run its own affairs in a devolved government.

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  • Police and Unionist crowds both attacked the marchers outside of Derry and within the city itself.

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  • More calamitous still was the Unionist decision to cast in its lot with Prussian militarism during the First World War.

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  • In the first place this essay, like the New Review paper, reveals Hobsbawm as a powerful defender of 'big-nation ' unionist nationalism.

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  • The Official Unionist lost 35 seats, nearly all to the DUP, while Baird's party was all but obliterated.

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  • The total pay out of £ 100,000 has been condemned by unionist politicians.

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  • Wednesday 2 July 1986 unionist politicians established their own version of the Northern Ireland Assembly in Belfast City Hall.

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  • renounce violence was insufficient in itself to convince unionist parties to share power with Sinn Fein, he said.

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  • Norma, a former shop steward in the Health Service, was a proud trade unionist all her life.

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  • I'd love to know Bill how such a vision sits with a committed trade unionist such as yourself?

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  • Although a lifelong trade unionist, he still felt more than a bit concerned with the ideas that I was dealing with.

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  • unionist intransigence.

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  • unionist veto ' over progress.

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  • unionist politicians milled around making statements to the press.

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  • unionist voters on the ground simply are not asking about the Agreement.

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  • unionist Division Could Be Our Downfall A plea for unionist unity at this difficult time.

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  • unionist opposition to the Good Friday reforms.

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  • An active trade unionist, member of the TGWU for 25 years.

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  • It is the exercise of a unionist veto on the agreement.

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  • Either the unionist veto continues or the Good Friday agreement is implemented.

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  • May 1935 Katherine Marjory Stewart Murray, Duchess of Atholl DBE (MP for Kinross & West Perthshire) has the unionist whip removed.

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  • His influence was at first paramount, both with the Unionist party and with the more moderate elements of the Left, and it was he who was mainly instrumental in imposing the principle of a united empire with a common parliament, and in carrying the election of the Archduke John as regent.

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  • At the Imperial Conference in London in 1907 Mr Deakin, the Commonwealth premier, was the leading advocate of colonial preference with a view to imperial commercial union; and though no reciprocal arrangement was favoured by the Liberal cabinet, who temporarily spoke for the United Kingdom, the colonial representatives were all agreed in urging such a policy, and found the Opposition (the Unionist party) in England prepared to adopt it as part of Mr Chamberlain's tariff reform movement.

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  • The Sardinian government had formally invited that of Tuscany to participate in Unionist the war of liberation, and on the grand-dtike rejecting movethe proposal, moderates and democrats combined to ments in present an ultimatum to Leopold demanding that he ~~-~ should abdicate in favor of his son, grant a constitu- ~~ tion and take part in the campaign.

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  • There was a brief reaction: Henry Stuart Foote (1800-1880), Unionist, was elected governor in 1851 over Davis, the States' Rights candidate, and in the same year a Constitutional Convention had declared almost unanimously that "the asserted right of secession".

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  • Michael Hahn, Unionist and Military James M.

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  • Lord Derby became a Liberal Unionist, and took an active part in the general management of that party, leading it in the House of Lords till 1891, when Lord Hartington became duke of Devonshire.

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  • The elections to the Union House of Assembly, held in September, were notable as showing the strength of the Progressive (or Unionist) party.

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  • But Lord Salisbury's retirement, Unionist divisions, the staleness of the ministry, and the accumulating opposition in the country to the Education Act of 1 9 02 and to the continued weight of taxation, together with the growth of the Labour movement, and the antagonism to the introduction of Chinese coolies (1904) into South Africa under conditions represented by Radical spokesmen as those of "slavery," made the political pendulum swing back.

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  • On the 4th of December 1905 the Unionist government resigned, and the king sent for Sir Henry CampbellBannerman, who in a few days formed his cabinet.

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  • But as the man who had doggedly, yet unpretentiously, filled the gap in the days of difficulty, and been somewhat contemptuously criticized by the Unionist press for his pains, Sir Henry was clearly marked out for the post of prime minister when his party got its chance; and, as the head of a strongly composed cabinet, he satisfied the demands of the situation and was accepted as leader by all sections.

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  • Sir Henry's rather petulant intolerance of Unionist opposition, shown at the opening of the 1906 session in his dismissal of a speech by Mr Balfour with the words "Enough of this foolery!"

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  • gradually gave way before the signs of Unionist reintegration.

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  • William Sprague,' Unionist.

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  • William C. Cozzens (acting), Unionist .

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  • The Unionist party, both in Ireland and in England, became suspicious of the tendencies of his administration, and he was driven to resignation.

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  • In the crisis of 1860-61 Texas sided with the other Southern States in spite of the strong Unionist influence exerted by the German settlers and by Governor Sam Houston.

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  • Throckmorton, Unionist Democrat, was elected governor.

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  • a large fortune at a comparatively early age, he came to England in 1910, and stood successfully for the House of Commons as Unionist candidate for Ashton-under-Lyne.

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  • He was from the first an intimate friend and adviser of Mr. Bonar Law when the latter became the Unionist leader.

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  • In January 1910 the Liberal government was again returned to power; but the Unionist party was now committed to Tariff Reform, which had made great strides in obtaining popular support.

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  • P. Blair, and of Nathaniel Lyon, the Unionist military commander, prevailed over the party of secession.

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  • In Kentucky the Unionist victory was secured almost without a blow, and, even at the end of 1861, the Confederate outposts west of the Alleghenies lay no farther north than the line Columbus - Bowling Green - Cumberland Gap, though southern Missouri was still a contested ground.

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  • This part of the state, strongly Unionist, had striven to prevent secession, and soon became itself a state of the Union (1863).

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  • On the Potomac the Unionist generals McDowell and Patterson commanded respectively the forces at Washington and Harper's Ferry, opposed by the Confederates under Generals J.

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  • Soon afterwards, after a steady resistance, the Unionist garrison of Lexington surrendered to Sterling Price.

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  • The responsibilities of administration have, however, often converted a political free-lance into a steady-going official, and the Unionist press did its best to encourage such a tendency by continual praise of the departmental action of the new minister.

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  • But the main features of the budget were adhered to, and eventually passed the House of Commons on the 4th of November, in spite of the persistent opposition of the scanty Unionist minority.

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  • 1866), married the daughter of Lord Ashton; he was Unionist M.P. for South Manchester from 1900 to 1905, and later for Taunton, and also acted as Municipal Reform leader on the London County Council.

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  • An election in August of one-half the Senate and all of the House of Representatives resulted in a Unionist majority in the new legislature of 103 to 35, and in September, after Confederate troops had begun to invade the state, Kentucky formally declared its allegiance to the Union.

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  • He accepted the chairmanship of the Royal Commission on Ritualistic Practices in the Church, and he did valuable work as 'an arbitrator; and though when the fiscal controversy arose he became a member of the Free-food League, his parliamentary loyalty to Mr Balfour did much to prevent the Unionist free-traders from precipitating a rupture.

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  • On Lord Salisbury's resignation on the 11th of July 1902, Mr Balfour succeeded him as prime minister, with the cordial approval of all sections of the Unionist party.

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  • Mr Ritchie's remission of the shilling import-duty on corn led to Mr Chamberlain's crusade in favour of tariff reform and colonial preference, and as the session proceeded the rift grew in the Unionist ranks.

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  • But Mr Chamberlain's new programme for a general tariff, with new taxes on food arranged so as to give a preference to colonial products, involved a radical alteration of the established fiscal system, and such out-and-out Unionist free-traders in the cabinet as Mr Ritchie and Lord George Hamilton, and outside it, like Lord Hugh Cecil and Mr Arthur Elliot (secretary to the treasury), were entirely opposed to this.

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  • During the remainder of 1903 the struggle within the Unionist party continued.

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  • The new compact was indicated in Mr Balfour's letter, in which he declared that "fiscal reform is, and must remain, the first constructive work of the Unionist party; its objects are to secure more equal terms of competition for British trade and closer commercial union with the colonies; and while it is at present unnecessary to prescribe the exact methods by which these objects are to be attained, and inexpedient to permit differences of opinion as to these methods to divide the party, though other means are possible, the establishment of a moderate general tariff on manufactured goods, not imposed for the purpose of raising prices, or giving artificial protection against legitimate competition, and the imposition of a small duty on foreign corn, are not in principle objectionable, and should be adopted if shown to be necessary for the attainment of the ends in view or for purposes of revenue."

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  • The downfall of Mr Balfour's administration, and the necessity of reorganizing the Unionist forces on the basis of the common platform now adopted, naturally represented a fresh departure under his leadership, the conditions of which to some extent depended on the opportunities given to the new opposition by the proceedings of the Radical government (see Campbell Bannerman, Sir H.; and Asquith, H.

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  • His speech at Birmingham (November 14, 1907), fully accepting the principles of Mr Chamberlain's fiscal policy, proved epoch-making in consolidating the Unionist party - except for a small number of free-traders, like Lord Robert Cecil, who continued to hold out - in favour of tariff reform; and during 1908 the process of recuperation went on, the by-elections showing toamarked degree the increased popular support given to the Unionist candidates.

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  • Meanwhile the Unionist and Liberal agitation was growing in strength, partly owing to the very efforts made to restrain it.

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  • The unionist constitution, devised by Christian VIII., and pro mulgated by his successor, Frederick VII.

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  • He refused to support Mr Gladstone's Home Rule Bill in 1885, and was one of those who chiefly contributed to its rejection, and whose reputation for unbending integrity and intellectual eminence gave solidity to the Liberal Unionist party.

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  • A Liberal Unionist, however, could only be elected by Conservative votes, and he had made himself objectionable to a large section of the party by his independent attitude on various questions, on which his Liberalism outweighed his party loyalty.

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  • After 1895 Mr Courtney's divergences from the Unionist party on questions other than Irish politics became gradually more marked.

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  • During the years of Unionist ascendancy Mr Asquith divided his energies between his legal work and politics; but his adhesion to Lord Rosebery (q.v.) as a Liberal Imperialist at the time of the Boer War, while it strengthened his position in the eyes of the public, put him in some difficulty with his own party, led as it was by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, who was identified with the "proBoer" policy.

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  • He also made useful party capital out of the necessity for financial retrenchment, owing to the large increase in public expenditure, maintained by the Unionist government even after the Boer War was over; II.

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  • He became prominent, politically, during the nullification excitement of 1832-1833, as a vigorous opponent of nullification, and from 1836 to 1845 he sat in the United States Senate as a Unionist Democrat.

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  • On the 7th of November at Leicester Lord Rosebery insisted that what the country wanted was not fiscal reform but commercial reform, and he appealed to the free-trade section of the Unionist party to join the Liberals in a united defence, - an appeal incidentally for Liberal unity which was warmly seconded ten days later by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman.

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  • Lord Rosebery had just gone down to Cornwall to make a series of speeches in support of the Liberal programme, now fairly well mapped out as regards those items which represented the strong public opposition to what had been done by the Unionist government..

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  • Mar, Queensberry, Stair (of Glencoe) and Argyll (Red John of the Battles) were the leading statesmen of the Unionist party; being opposed by Hamilton, Atholl and Lockhart of Carnwath as Jacobites; by Fletcher of Saltoun as an independent patriot; by popular sentiment, by mob violence, and by many of the preachers, though not by the General Assembly.

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  • In politics he was a strong Liberal and Unionist, and did much to inspire the organization of the Burschenschaft.

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  • 1917 he entered the Federal Unionist Government as president of the council and vice-chairman of the War Committee of the Cabinet, and was elected to the Dominion House of Commons for Durham county, Ontario, Dec. 1917.

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  • After the great man's retirement he entered Parliament as a Liberal Unionist at a byelection in 1895 for Warwick and Leamington - a seat which he held till the Unionist downfall in 1906, returning, however, to the House a few months after the general election as member for St.

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  • In the Frankfort parliament he was leader of the extreme Right; and after its break-up he was zealous in promoting the Unionist policy of Prussia, which he defended both in the Prussian diet and in the Erfurt parliament.

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  • They have never been a large element in the highland counties; it was these counties which were most strongly Unionist at the time of the Civil War, and which to-day are the region of diversified industry.

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  • In the national elections of 1860 Virginia returned a majority of unionist electors as against the secession candidates, Breckinridge and Lane, many of the large planters voting for the continuance of the Union, and many of the smaller slave-owners supporting the secessionists.

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  • In 1860, however, he ceased to be a Unionist, and became a leader of the secession movement.

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  • " In the attacks made upon the Unionist government this cry was loudly voiced by the Liberal party in England, and in the political campaign which followed, the " Chinese Slavery " issue undoubtedly helped to swell the majority obtained by Sir H.

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  • He became a member of the Unionist Government in Dec. 1917.

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  • The "passive resistance" movement, with Dr Clifford as its chief leader, had a large share in the defeat of the Unionist government in January 1906, and his efforts were then directed to getting a new act passed which should be undenominational in character.

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  • - and the Orange or unionist party (Oranjegesinden), which was strong in the smaller provinces and had much popular support among the lower classes.

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  • As a Democrat he served in 1836 and in1840-1843in the Illinois House of Representatives, and in1843-1851and in1859-1861was a representative in Congress, where in his first term he vigorously opposed the Wilmot proviso, but in' his second term was a strong Unionist and introduced the resolution of the 15th of July 1861, pledging money and men to the national government.

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  • He retired with a sufficient competence, and went into Parliament in 190o as Conservative and Unionist member for the Blackfriars division of Glasgow.

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  • He was very trenchant in his criticism of the Government; thus giving satisfaction to ardent spirits in the Unionist ranks, but causing ministerial speakers to contrast his bitterness and violence with Mr. Balfour's quieter methods.

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  • After nearly four months of strenuous opposition to the bill in Parliament, he renewed and strengthened his encouragement to Ulster by declaring, at a large Unionist gathering at Blenheim on July 27, that the Ulster people would submit to no ascendancy, and that he could imagine no lengths of resistance to which they might go in which he would not be ready to support them, and in which they would not be supported by the overwhelming majority of the British people.

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  • The two branches of the party, the Conserva tives and the Liberal Unionists, had indeed been fused, in May 1912, into one party with a combined national Unionist organization.

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  • At once a large section of Unionists, especially in Unionist Lancashire, became alarmed lest their electoral chances should be jeopardized by the prospect of food taxes imposed without reference to the people.

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  • He refused altogether to haul down the flag of Tariff Reform; it was his policy to give British workmen a preference, both in the home and in the colonial market; but he said that a Unionist Government did not intend themselves to impose food duties.

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  • 14 1913, in answer to a memorial from the bulk of the Unionist M.P.'sa memorial which wished for a reassurance as to food duties, but strongly deprecated a change of leadership - Mr. Law announced that he and Lord Lansdowne were willing to agree that food duties should not be imposed without the approval of the electorate at a subsequent general election; and to remain leaders in deference to their followers' appeal, in spite of the party's disregard of their advice.

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  • 28 and declared then that Ulster would not submit, and the Unionist party would not allow her to be coerced.

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  • He believed, he subsequently told a Unionist audience, that the Opposition could have turned out the Government at this time owing to the indignation about the shortage of munitions; but that would have meant an election and renewal of party feeling, and so have prevented the concentration of effort on the war.

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  • In regard to Ireland, he frankly admitted, Unionist though he was, the need for a change.

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  • The Unionist government which came into power in 1895 lasted, with certain changes of personnel, till 1905, with a break caused by the dissolution of 1900.

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  • The Tariff Reform propaganda of Mr Chamberlain (qv.) in 1903 convulsed ~ the Conservative party, and thelongperiodof Unionist 1910.

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  • In several directions, and notably in administration, they carried their policy into effect; but the House of Lords (see PARLIAMENT) was an obvious stumbling-block to some of their more important Bills, and the Unionist control of that House speedily made itself felt, first in wrecking the Education Bill of 1906, then in throwing out the Licensing Bill of 1908, and finally (see LLOYD GEORGE, D.) in forcing a dissolution by the rejection of the budget of 1909, with its novel proposals for the increased taxation of land and licensed houses.

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  • The Unionist party in the country had, meanwhile, been recovering from the Tariff Reform divisions of 1903, and was once more solid under Mr Balfour in favor of its new and imperial policy; but the campaign against the House of Lords started by Mr Lloyd George and the Liberal leaders, who put in the forefront the necessity of obtaining statutory guarantees for the passing into law of measures deliberately adopted by the elected Chamber, resulted in the return of Mr Asquiths government to office at the election of January 1910.

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  • In politics he was a Liberal, and became a Liberal Unionist in 1886.

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  • In October Mr Chamberlain visited Ulster, where he was received with enthusiasm, and delivered several stirring Unionist speeches.

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  • A general election followed in July, and 74 Liberal Unionists were returned, forming with the Conservatives a Unionist party, which outnumbered Gladstonians and Parnellites together by over a hundred.

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  • The Unionist party had adopted a policy of local government for Ireland while opposing legislative independence, and a bill was introduced into the House of Commons by Mr Balfour in February 1892.

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  • The lord-lieutenant, on taking up his quarters in Dublin, refused a loyal address because of its Unionist tone; and in October the government issued a commission, with Mr Justice Mathew as chairman, which had the restoration of the evicted tenants as its avowed object.

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  • During the year 1892 a vast number of Unionist meetings were held throughout Ireland, the most remarkable being the great Ulster convention in Belfast, and that of the three other provinces in Dublin, on the 14th and 23rd of June.

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  • On the 22nd of April 1893, the day after the second reading of the bill, the Albert Hall in London was filled by enthusiastic Unionist delegates from all parts of Ireland.

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  • A general election followed, which resulted in a Unionist majority of 150.

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  • The landlords of Ireland, who had made so many sacrifices and worked so hard to return Lord Salisbury to power, felt that [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] the measure was hardly what they had a right to expect from a Unionist administration.

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  • Local government for Ireland had always been part of the Unionist programme, and the vote on the abortive bill of 1892 had committed parliament to legislation.

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  • But a difficult parliamentary crisis, caused by Irish Unionist suspicions on the subject, was only temporarily overcome by Mr Wyndham's resignation in March 1905.

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  • Macdonnell being retained in office by the Liberal government) his Nationalist leanings again became prominent, and the responsibility of the Unionist government in introducing him into the Irish administration became a matter of considerable heart-burning among the Unionist party.

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  • The general election at the beginning of 1906 was disastrous to the Unionist party, and the Liberal government secured an enormous majority.

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  • Macdonnell at once admitted through the newspapers that he had in his possession letters (rumoured to be " embarrassing " to the Unionist leaders) which he might publish at his own discretion; and the discussion as to how far his appointment by Mr Wyndham had prejudiced the Unionist cause was reopened in public with much bitterness, in view of the anticipation of further steps in the Home Rule direction by the Liberal ministry.

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  • The general election of 1910 placed the Liberal and Unionist parties in a position of almost exact equality in the House of Commons, and it was at once evident that the Nationalists under Mr Redmond's leadership would hold the balance of power and control the fortunes of Mr Asquith's government.

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  • The general election, however, returned to parliament 316 Conservatives, 78 Liberal Unionists, and only 276 Gladstonians and Nationalists, Birmingham returning seven Unionist members.

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  • It was enough for them to be able to tie down the Conservative government to such measures as were not offensive to Liberal Unionist principles.

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  • The influence of Liberal Unionist views upon the domestic legislation of the government was steadily bringing about a more complete union in the Unionist party, and destroying the old lines of political cleavage.

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  • At the general election of 1892 Mr Chamberlain was again returned, with an increased majority, for West Birmingham; but the Unionist party as a whole came back with only 315 members against 355 Home Rulers.

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  • Outside parliament he was busy formulating proposals for old age pensions, which had a prominent place in the Unionist programme of 1895.

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  • In that year, on the defeat of Lord Rosebery, the union of the Unionists was sealed by the inclusion of the Liberal Unionist leaders in Lord Salisbury's ministry; and Mr Chamberlain became secretary of state for the colonies.

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  • Mr Chamberlain's influence in the Unionist cabinet was soon visible in the Workmen's Compensation Act and other measures.

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  • Eventually it was the Liberal and not the Unionist party that carried an Old Age Pensions scheme through parliament, during the 1908 session, when Mr Chamberlain was hors de combat.

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  • During the progress of the Boer War from 1899 to 1902, Mr Chamberlain, as the statesman who had represented the cabinet in the negotiations which led to it, remained the object of constant attacks from his Radical opponents - the "little Englanders" and "Pro-Boers," as he called them - and he was supported by the Imperialist and Unionist party with at least equal ardour.

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  • The problems of empire engrossed him, and a new enthusiasm for imperial projects arose in the Unionist party under his inspiration.

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  • Its reimposition, officially supported for the sake of necessary revenue in war-time, and cordially welcomed by the Unionist party, had justified itself, as they contended, in spite of the criticisms of the Opposition (who raised the cry of the "dear loaf"), by proving during the year to have had no general or direct effect on the price of bread.

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  • The Unionist rank and file were committed to its support, - many even advocating its increase to two shillings at least.

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  • The movement grew quickly, its supporters including a number of the cleverest younger politicians and journalists in the Unionist party.

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  • Meanwhile, the death of Lord Salisbury (August 22) removed a weighty figure from the councils of the Unionist party.

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  • The tariff reform movement itself was now, however, outside the purely official programme, and Mr Chamberlain (backed by a majority of the Unionist members) threw himself with impetuous ardour into a crusade on its behalf, while at the same time supporting Mr Balfour in parliament, and leaving it to him to decide as to the policy of going to the country when the time should be ripe.

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  • In his own words, he went in front of the Unionist army as a pioneer, and if his army was attacked he would go back to it; in no conceivable circumstances would he allow himself to be put in any sort of competition, direct or indirect, with Mr Balfour, his friend and leader, whom he meant to follow (October 6).

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  • The broad fact remained that while Mr Chamberlain's activity gathered round him the bulk of the Unionist members and an enthusiastic band of economic sympathizers, the country as a whole remained apathetic and unconvinced.

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  • One reason was the intellectual difficulty of the subject and the double-faced character of all arguments from statistics, which were either incomprehensible or disputable; another was the fact that substantially this was a political movement, and that tariff reform was, after all, only one in a complexity of political issues, most of which during this period were being interpreted by the electorate in a sense hostile to the Unionist party.

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  • Moreover, the split in the Unionist party brought the united Liberal party in full force into the field, and at last the country began to think that the danger of Irish Home Rule was practically over, and that a Liberal majority might be returned to power in safety, with the prospect of providing an alternative government which would assure commercial repose (Lord Rosebery's phrase), relief from extravagant expenditure, and - as the working-classes were led to believe - a certain amount of labour legislation which the Tory leaders would never propose.

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  • Mr Chamberlain retorted that this was a matter for a general meeting of delegates to decide; if the duke was outvoted he might resign his presidency; for his own part he was prepared to allow the local associations to be subsidized impartially, so long as they supported the government, but he was not prepared for the violent disruption, which the duke apparently contemplated, of an association so necessary to the success of the Unionist cause.

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  • At the crushing Unionist defeat in the general election which followed in January 1906, Mr Chamberlain was triumphantly returned for West Birmingham, and all the divisions of Birmingham returned Chamberlainite members.

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  • J.) which admitted the necessity of making fiscal reform the first plank in the Unionist platform, and accepted a general tariff on manufactured goods and a small duty on foreign corn as "not in principle objectionable."

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  • It may be left to future historians to attempt a considered judgment on the English tariff reform movement, and on Mr Chamberlain's responsibility for the Unionist debacle of 1906.

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  • But while his enemies taunted him with having twice wrecked his party - first the Radical party under Mr Gladstone, and secondly the Unionist party under Mr Balfour - no well-informed critic doubted his sincerity, or failed to recognize that in leaving the cabinet and embarking on his fiscal campaign he showed real devotion to an idea.

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  • Even in the absence of the new issue, defeat was foredoomed for Mr Balfour's administration by the ordinary course of political events; and it might fairly be claimed that "Chinese slavery," "passive resistance," and labour irritation at the Taff Vale judgment (see Trade Unions) were mainly responsible for the Unionist collapse.

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  • The request was ignored, but the section was strongly Unionist in sentiment during the war, and has since been strongly Republican.

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  • Any IRA statement pledging to renounce violence was insufficient in itself to convince unionist parties to share power with Sinn Fein, he said.

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  • Norma, a former shop steward in the Health Service, was a proud trade unionist all her life.

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  • Neither will the unionist people be coerced into a united Ireland through the underhand methods of a Government lacking moral courage.

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  • I 'd love to know Bill how such a vision sits with a committed trade unionist such as yourself?

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  • Although a lifelong trade unionist, he still felt more than a bit concerned with the ideas that I was dealing with.

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  • This weakness is made worse by the vacillating attitude of the government, which frequently panders to unionist intransigence.

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  • Many nationalists fear that behind honeyed words lies a ' unionist veto ' over progress.

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  • Down by the Land Rovers a number of unionist politicians milled around making statements to the press.

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  • A: Unionist voters on the ground simply are not asking about the Agreement.

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  • Unionist Division Could Be Our Downfall A plea for unionist unity at this difficult time.

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  • Here lie the real reasons behind unionist opposition to the Good Friday reforms.

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  • An active trade unionist, member of the TGWU for 25 years.

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  • It is the exercise of a Unionist veto on the agreement.

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  • Either the unionist veto continues or the Good Friday agreement is implemented.

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  • May 1935 Katherine Marjory Stewart Murray, Duchess of Atholl DBE (MP for Kinross & West Perthshire) has the Unionist whip removed.

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  • His father was Tory MP Sir Michael Grylls and his grandmother Patricia Ford was an MP with the Ulster Unionist Party.

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