Under-glass sentence example

under-glass
  • The market-gardeners of Paris and its vicinity have a high reputation for skill in the forcing of early vegetables under glass.
    0
    0
  • Market gardening is a considerable industry, and large quantities of vegetables are raised under glass for the Boston markets.
    0
    0
  • Raffia - which has taken the place of bast - is generally used for tying, and grafting wax is only used occasionally with such plants under glass.
    0
    0
  • The half-hardy series are best sown in pots or pans under glass in mild,heat, in order to accelerate germination.
    0
    0
  • So on throughout the year with other crops, this system of intercropping or overlapping of one crop with another is carried out in a most ingenious manner, not only under glass lights, but also in the open air.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The orchard-house trees should be got under glass before the end of the month.
    0
    0
  • The young plants are kept under glass till early in June when they are hardened and put out.
    0
    0
  • Narrowly escaping the perils of the Revolution, it was exhibited in Paris, by Napoleon's desire, in 1803-1804, and has since been in civil custody at Bayeux, where it is now exhibited under glass.
    0
    0
  • In cold areas start spinach and spinach beet off in pots under glass.
    0
    0
  • The Gods Are Waiting intaglio Plaster intaglios set under glass and framed have been the rage since the 1740s!
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For best results keep the plants growing under glass or on a kitchen windowsill.
    0
    0
  • Sow vegetable marrows and hardy cucumbers on a warm border in the last week; sow cardoons in trenches, or (in the north) in pots under glass shelter; sow chicory for salading.
    0
    0
  • Plant parsley in pots or boxes to protect under glass in case very severe weather occurs.
    0
    0
  • There are large green-houses in and near Ashtabula, and quantities of lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes are raised under glass and shipped to Pittsburg and other large cities.
    0
    0
  • Seed should be sown under glass in early spring, and the seedlings planted in rich light soil and in the hottest part of the garden, as soon as danger from frost is over.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Both in the open air and under glass it blooms in late autumn and winter, the flowers small, and resembling golden catkins.
    0
    0
  • Increase by seeds, root-cuttings, layers, or cuttings of the ripened shoots, rooted under glass in the autumn.
    0
    0
  • Blue-bell Creeper (Sollya) - Beautiful evergreen climbing shrubs from Australia, mostly grown under glass but hardy in the open air in the warmest parts of the south-west of England, Wales, and Ireland.
    0
    0
  • Sow D. sinensis under glass in February, with very little or no bottom-heat; give air freely during open weather, and in April plant out in well-cultivated soil, which need not be rich.
    0
    0
  • It grows freely from seed, but the young plants should be wintered under glass until three or four years old.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Dictamnus (Dittany of Crete) is a pretty plant, somewhat tender, and best grown under glass rather than in the open air, though during mild winters it may survive.
    0
    0
  • The plant needs good soil and a warm place, and is increased by seeds, or cuttings of the ripened shoots rooted under glass.
    0
    0
  • Increase by seeds, which ripen in September, or soft cuttings rooted under glass.
    0
    0
  • Forsythias may be flowered under glass in the greenhouse or the conservatory during the early months of the year, and if so treated they will bloom well.
    0
    0
  • Increase by seeds, or cuttings rooted under glass during summer and early autumn.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is easily grown, flowers freely until frost, and continues until winter if taken under glass.
    0
    0
  • Both kinds are raised from seeds sown in heat early in the year, and the tips of old plants rooted under glass come into flower earlier than seedlings.
    0
    0
  • These, however, may be had by wintering layers under glass and planting them out in late April or early May.
    0
    0
  • To increase the plant, the cutting, a single joint, is potted in sandy soil, and the pot placed in a sunny airy spot under glass and watered very sparingly, and in a short time it will form roots, and commence to push out young shoots.
    0
    0
  • It may be treated either as a half-hardy annual, and sown in February or March under glass or in a hot-bed, but it requires a warmer climate than ours to do well.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It may also be grown in pots plunged in sand in the open air, and in frames in winter, but it becomes "drawn" and delicate under glass.
    0
    0
  • Sow seed under glass in April, for then, even without bottom-heat, they will start freely.
    0
    0
  • L. longiflorum giganteum is the variety generally obtained from Japan; strong bulbs will send up a head of from eight to twelve flowers widely opened; the foliage is bright green; under glass this Lily may easily be forced.
    0
    0
  • Gardening under glass opens the door to a world of year-round possibilities.
    0
    0
  • It has an over and under glass door and dual refrigeration.
    0
    0
    Advertisement