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unbroken

unbroken

unbroken Sentence Examples

  • Dean crawled on his hands and knees, peering under the vehicle for Billy's young girlfriend but there was no one else, only a liquor bottle—unlike its victim, unbroken.

  • Once beyond access to the river below, the seldom-used path presented an unbroken cover of fresh white, now blanketed in more than a foot of fresh powder, as it followed the large pipe toward the reservoir.

  • The final leg of the journey was a long dirt road that climbed first through a grove of fir followed by an unbroken forest of hard­wood just beginning to bud.

  • The rest of his body, although bruised, seemed unbroken.

  • If the particles were away, the wave would pass on unbroken and no light would be emitted laterally.

  • The intimacy began in 28 and lasted till 23 B.C. These six years must not, however, be supposed to have been a period of unbroken felicity.

  • The resin does not affect the unbroken skin.

  • in an unbroken chain of some 175 m.

  • Seaboard.The shore of the Mediterranean encircling the Gulf of the Lion (Golfe du Lion) from Cape Cerbera to Martigues is lowlying and unbroken, and characterized chiefly by lagoons separated from the sea by sand-dunes.

  • Along the Atlantic coast from the mouth of the Adour to the estuary of the Gironde there stretches a monotonous line of sanddunes bordered by lagoons on the land side, but towards the sea harbourless and unbroken save for the Bay of Arcachon.

  • The terrace closest to the land, known as the continental shelf, has an average depth of 600 ft., and connects Australia, New Guinea, and Tasmania in one unbroken sweep. Compared with other continents, the Australian continental shelf is extremely narrow, and there are points on the eastern coast where the land plunges down to oceanic depths with an abruptness rarely paralleled.

  • Their summits stand out gaunt and lonely in an unbroken solitude.

  • Where the Green Mountain range is unbroken, in the S.

  • This is most clearly marked on the side of the Apennines, where the great Aemilian Way, which has been the high road from the time of the Romans to our own, preserves an unbroken straight line from Rimini to Piacenza, a distance of more than 150 m., during which the underfalls of the mountains continually approach it on the left, without once crossing the line of road.

  • Its chief disadvantage is the absence of ports, the coast preserving an almost unbroken straight line, with the single exception of Ancona, the only port worthy of the name on the eastern coast of Central Italy.

  • With unbroken spirit, though the objects of his life were unattained, though Italy and Europe had been thrown into confusion, and the issue of the conflict was still doubtful, Gregory expired in 1085 with these words on his lips: I loved justice, I hated iniquity, therefore in banishment I die.

  • Yet while, in its application to history, Hegel's theory of evolution has points of resemblance with those doctrines which seek to explain the worldprocess as one unbroken progress occurring in time, it constitutes on the whole a theory apart and sui generis.

  • They have beer_ preserved for us by the unbroken succession of Pali scholars in Ceylon and Burma.

  • The Arctic-Alpine sub-region consists of races of plants belonging originally to the general flora, and recruited by subsequent additrons, which have been specialized in low stature and great capacity of endurance to survive long dormant periods, sometimes even unbroken in successive years by the transitory activity of the brief summer.

  • If the continuous, unbroken, horizontal extent of land in a continent is termed its trunk,' and the portions cut up by inlets or channels of the sea into islands and peninsulas the limbs, it is possible to compare the continents in an instructive manner.

  • The drug is absorbed through the unbroken skin - a very valuable property in the treatment of such conditions as an incipient whitlow.

  • Now, mere geographical considerations, taken from the situation and configuration of the islands of the so-called Indian or Malay Archipelago, would indicate that they extended in an unbroken series from the shores of the Strait of Malacca to the southern coast of New Guinea, which confronts that of north Australia in Torres Strait, or even farther to the eastward.

  • to its junction with the Tigris below Korna, through an unbroken plain, with no natural hills, except a few sand (or sandstone ?) hills in the neighbourhood of Warka, and no trace of rock, except at el-Haswa, above Hillah.

  • Henceforward he lived a life of unbroken seclusion at Vignay, his only subsequent public appearance being by means of a memoire which he addressed to the king in 1570 under the title Le But de la guerre et de la paix, ou discours du chancelier l'Hospital pour exhorter Charles IX.

  • From the time of Socrates in unbroken succession up to the reign of Hadrian, the school was represented by men of strong individuality.

  • On the other hand, where, as in America, the great volume of freight is raw material and crude food-stuffs, and the distances are great, a low charge per unit of transportation is more important than any consideration such as quickness of delivery; therefore full car-loads of freight are massed into enormous trains, which run unbroken for distances of perhaps 1000 m.

  • With the exception of a few flat ridges running from north to south, it is so low that it requires, to protect it from overflows, an unbroken line of levees averaging 15 ft.

  • The great plain extends, with an almost unbroken surface, from the most western to the most eastern extremity of British India, and is composed of deposits so finely comminuted, that it is no exaggeration to say that it is possible to go from the Bay of Bengal up the Ganges, through the Punjab, and down the Indus again to the sea, over a distance of 2000 m.

  • The extremely dry and hot tracts which constitute an almost unbroken desert from Arabia, through south Persia and Baluchistan, to Sind, are characterized by considerable uniformity in the types of life, which closely approach to those of the neighbouring hot and dry regions of Africa.

  • Few Englishmen retained estates of any importance after the Conquest, but one, Elfin, an under-tenant of Henry de Ferrers, not only held a considerable property but was the ancestor of the Derbyshire family of Brailsford, The families of Shirley and Gresley can also boast an unbroken descent.

  • beyond the heavy batteries, and practically unbroken from the north bank of the James (west of the city) to about 1 m.

  • Under horses are embraced only unbroken horses and horses used solely for agriculture (including mares kept for breeding).

  • Perhaps the most famous institution of Venice is the arsenal, whose history and activity has continued unbroken from the earliest days of the republic down to the present time.

  • We find seven of the Particiachi, five Candiani and three Orseoli reigning in almost unbroken succession, until, with the ostracism of the whole Orseolo family in 1032, the dynastic tendency was crushed for ever.

  • The main supplies have been obtained from strata unbroken and comparatively undisturbed, but the occurrence of anticlinal or terrace structure, however slightly marked or limited in extent, exerts a powerful influence on the creation of reservoirs of petroleum.

  • Here there reigned, during the forty years of the loss of Jerusalem, an almost unbroken peace.

  • In every direction can be seen luxuriant valleys through which rivers thread their silvery way, wild chasms, magnificent waterfalls - that of Maletsunyane has an unbroken leap of over 600 f t.

  • General Cathcart accepted the offer of Moshesh and peace was proclaimed, the Basuto power being unbroken.

  • The average elevation of the surface of the state above the sea-level is less than that of any other state except Louisiana, but there is not the monotony of unbroken level which descriptions and maps often suggest.

  • The range from the same point of view presents a singularly uniform outline, having the appearance of an unbroken wall; in reality, however, it is traversed by a number of deep ravines (wadis), of which the most important are the Yabis, the Ajlun, the Rajib, the Zerka (Jabbok), the Hesban, and the Zerka Ma`in.

  • In the Minoan epoch Athens is proved by the archaeological remains to have been a petty kingdom scarcely more important than many other Attic communities, yet enjoying a more unbroken course of development than the leading states of that period.

  • Wagner fled to Paris and thence to Zurich, where he lived in almost unbroken retirement until the autumn of 1859.

  • But the lakes show a wonderful variety of character, from open expanse and steep rock-bound shores to picturesque island-groups and soft wooded banks; while the mountains have always a remarkable dignity, less from the profile of their summits than from the bold sweeping lines of their flanks, unbroken by vegetation, and often culminating.

  • The power of the Bosnian nobles, though shaken by their defeat, remained unbroken; and they resisted vigorously when their kapetanates were abolished in 1837; and again when a measure of equality before the law was conceded to the Christians in 1839.

  • This work, the Taj-ut-Tevarikh (Crown of Chronicles), is reckoned, on account of its ornate yet clear style, one of the masterpieces of the old school, and forms the first of an unbroken series of annals which are written, especially the later among them, with great minuteness and detail.

  • In the hill tracts and the marshy depression of the Ob they are unbroken, except by the bald summits of the loftier mountains (goltsy); they have the aspect of agreeable bosquets in the Baraba steppe, and they are thinly scattered through south-eastern Transbaikalia, where the dryness of the Gobi steppe makes its influence appreciably felt.

  • Applied externally lead salts have practically no action upon the unbroken skin, but applied to sores, ulcers or any exposed mucous membranes they coagulate the albumen in the tissues themselves and contract the small vessels.

  • Of these the largest are the Semene and Senkunyane (little Senku) and the best known the Maletsunyane, by reason of its magnificent waterfall - an unbroken leap of 630 ft.

  • Thus a universal science of matter and motion was derived, by an unbroken sequence of deduction, from one radical principle; and analytical mechanics assumed the clear and complete form of logical perfection which it now wears.

  • The coast trends, in an almost unbroken line, from S.W.to N.E.

  • Of the reformed Churches of the continent of Europe only the Lutheran Churches of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Finland preserve the episcopal system in anything of its historical sense; and of these only the two last can lay claim to the possession of bishops in the unbroken line of episcopal succession.

  • In the case of the former, claim is laid to the unbroken episcopal succession through the Waldenses, and the question of their eventual intercommunion with the Anglican of the Sermon against Wilful Rebellion," ed.

  • It is then verified that, after integration with respect to dS, (6) gives the same disturbance as if the primary wave had been supposed to pass on unbroken.

  • Should these remain unbroken they constitute a natural barrier to the penetration of most pathogenic and other forms of germ-life into the parts beneath.

  • Only here and there upon its fringe the identity of this great area with the metropolis is lost to the eye, where open country remains unbroken by streets or close-set buildings.

  • Pamphylia consists almost entirely of a plain, extending from the slopes of Taurus to the sea, but this plain, though presenting an unbroken level to the eye, does not all consist of alluvial deposits, but is formed in part of travertine.

  • in area falling in a gradual unbroken slope from its apex not far south of Prome down to the sea.

  • The language is written from left to right in what appears to be an unbroken line.

  • An almost unbroken barrier reef skirts the west shore at about 5 m.

  • On descending into the substratum the finer material decreases and more stones are met with; farther down are seen larger fragments of unaltered rock closely packed, and this brash or rubble grades insensibly into the unbroken rock below.

  • Some writers regard them as a continuation of the Roman collegia and sodalitates, but there is little evidence to prove the unbroken continuity of existence of the Roman and Germanic fraternities.

  • During the greater part of the 19th century the ideal of ploughing was to preserve the furrow-slice unbroken, and this object was attained by the use of long mould-boards which turned the slices gently and gradually, laying them over against one another at an angle of 45°, thus providing drainage at the bottom of the furrow, and exposing the greatest possible surface to the influences of the weather.

  • This tract, known as the Hamad, is a Syrian gravelly plain unbroken by any considerable range of hills desert.

  • In the first his " chief object was to discover and demonstrate the laws of progress, and to exhibit in one unbroken sequence the collective destinies of mankind, till then invariably regarded as a series of events wholly beyond the reach of explanation, and almost depending on arbitrary will.

  • No living poet has ever held England - no poet but Victor Hugo has probably ever held any country - quite so long under his unbroken sway as Tennyson did.

  • Throughout the 26th and 27th a vast train of people, officially estimated at 250,000, and drawn from every rank and class, moved in unbroken procession past the bier.

  • On the south Fuji slopes unbroken to the sea, but on the other three sides the plain from which it rises is surrounded by mountains, among which, on the north and west, a series of most picturesque lakes has been formed in consequence of the rivers having been dammed by ashes ejected from Fujis crater.

  • In fact, seen in profile, forehead and upper lip often form an unbroken line.

  • The thick rectangular mats of uniform size which, fitting together so as to present a level unbroken surface, cover the floor of all modern Japanese houses, were not yet in use: floors were boarded, having only a limited space matted.

  • This fortress fell on the 12th of November, and the troops of the coalition gained possession of an unbroken line from Amsterdam to the Breisgau, while Louis' German allies (Cologne and Munster), now isolated, had to make peace at once.

  • His residence there from 1799 to 1806 was unbroken save for a course of lectures during the summer of 1805 at Erlangen, where he had been named professor.

  • The whole district, from the water's edge to the loftiest mountain on the eastern boundary, may be regarded as almost unbroken forest.

  • The city is laid out with almost unbroken regularity and is compactly built - the streets running nearly with the cardinal points of the compass.

  • However adequate these identifications may seem, the persistence of an independent clan or tribe of Cherethites-Cretans to the close of the 7th century would imply an unbroken chain of nearly six hundred years, unless, as is inherently more probable, later immigrations had occurred within the interval.

  • Between Quemada and Copan, in Honduras, is an unbroken series of mural structures.

  • The remains of numerous other villas lie along the ancient coast-line (which was half a mile inland of the modern, being now marked by a row of sand-hills, and was followed by the Via Severiana), both north-west and south-east of Tor Paterno: they extended as a fact in an almost unbroken line along the low sandy coast - now entirely deserted and largely occupied by the low scrub which serves as cover for the wild boars of the king of Italy's preserves - from the mouth of the Tiber to Antium, and thence again to Astura; but there are no traces of any buildings previous to the imperial period.

  • Its central physical feature is the unbroken mountain chains running N.E.

  • Faulty banking ended in a crisis, and 187 9 proved to be the first of sixteen years of almost unbroken depression.

  • His monks were allowed proper clothes, sufficient food, ample sleep. The only bodily austerities were the abstinence from flesh meat and the unbroken fast till mid-day or even 3 P.M., but neither would appear so onerous in Italy even now, as to us in northern climes.

  • He gives up the spirit; His bones remain unbroken; and from His spear-lanced side blood and water issue (xix.

  • And John alone tells how the bones of the dead body remained unbroken, fulfilling the ordinance as to the paschal lamb (Exod.

  • The real situation that confronts us is not an unbroken tradition of apostolic eye-witnesses, incapable of re-statement with any hope of ecclesiastical acceptance, except by another apostolic eye-witness.

  • The terms exacted were, however, too harsh for a nation yet unbroken to accept permanently.

  • At the outbreak of the war with Spain he resigned from the Navy Department and raised the first volunteer regiment of cavalry, popularly known as the "Rough Riders," because many of its members were Western cowboys and ranchmen expert in the handling of the rough and often unbroken horses of the Western frontier.

  • His life was prosperous, for from his first prize at the university till his acquisition of an earldom, he went on a course of almost unbroken success.

  • Between these ranges and on both sides of the Mu is a plain, unbroken except for some isolated hills in the north and north-east and the low Sadaung-gyi range in the south-east.

  • A guerrilla war was still carried on by his subjects, but their principal leader, the chief Panglima Polim, was captured in 1907; in1908-1910the condition of Achin under the military rule of General Swart was one of almost unbroken peace, and taxes were regularly paid.

  • The inland slope is gradual, but on the northern shore the range terminates in abrupt and almost perpendicular declivities, and here, consequently, some of the finest coast scenery in the island is found, widely differing, with its unbroken lines of cliffs, from the indented coast-line of the west.

  • The union between Church and State thus constituted continued unbroken in the East throughout the middle ages.

  • It follows that, while in the traditional Church, with its claim to an unbroken descent from a divine original, the individual is subordinate to the Church, in the " free churches " the Church is in a certain sense secondary to the individual.

  • 428), maintained its power virtually unbroken down to the Reformation.

  • The American coasts are for the most part mountainous and unbroken, the chief indentation being the Gulf of California; but the general type is departed from in the extreme north and south, the southern coast of South America consisting of bays and fjords with scattered islands, while the coast of Alaska is similarly broken in the south and becomes low and swampy towards the north.

  • The coast of Australia is high and unbroken; there are no inlets of considerable size, although the small openings include some of the finest harbours in the world, as Moreton Bay and Port Jackson.

  • From the Restoration onwards Evelyn enjoyed unbroken court favour till his death in 1 7.06; but he never held any important political office, although he filled many useful and often laborious minor posts.

  • The monotonous Atlantic littoral is unbroken by any large inlet or estuary, and thus contrasts in a striking manner with the varied outlines of the Pacific coast, which includes the three bold promontories of Nicoya, Golfo Dulce and Burica, besides the broad sweep of Coronada Bay and several small harbours.

  • The blister if unbroken was heated, pricked, and then rubbed level with a burnisher; if, as sometimes happened, the silver had flaked away it was replaced by coatings of pure leaf silver rubbed in with a burnisher.

  • The facts, as stated by Napier and Briggs, are in complete accordance, and the friendship existing between them was perfect and unbroken to the last.

  • Except on the summits of the higher mountains New Hampshire was originally an unbroken forest of which the principal trees were the white pine, hemlock, sugar maple, yellow birch, beech, red oak, and white oak in the S., red spruce, balsam, and white birch on the upper mountain slopes, and red spruce, white pine, sugar maple, white spruce and white cedar in the other parts of the N.

  • This was an able body of men, and is the only cabinet in American history that has continued unbroken throughout an entire administration.

  • Otho was still in command of a formidable force - the Dalmatian legions had already reached Aquileia; and the spirit of his soldiers and their officers was unbroken.

  • Meanwhile, both in East and West, the general practice has continued unbroken of reserving the Eucharist, in order that the " mass of the presanctified " might take place on certain "aliturgic" days, that the faithful might be able to communicate when there was no celebration, and above all that it might be at hand to meet the needs of the sick and dying.

  • The acid is capable of passing through the unbroken skin, whereupon it instantly paralyses the sensory nerves.

  • The lower coastal parts, from their accessibility and their smaller relief, are more densely populated; the higher and more rugged interior is still largely forested and thinly settled; there are large tracts of unbroken forest in northern Maine, hardly 150 m.

  • The coastal plain, however, is the result, not of a single recent uplift, but of movements dating back to Tertiary time and continued with many oscillations to the present; nor is its surface smooth and unbroken, for erosion began upon the inner part of the plain long before the outer border was revealed.

  • As in the Atlantic coastal plain, it is only the lower, seaward part of this region that deserves the name of plain, for there alone is the surface unbroken by hills or valleys; the inner part, initially a plain by reason of its essentially horizontal (gently seaward-sloping) structure, has been converted by mature dissection into an elaborate complex of hills and valleys, usually of increasing altitude and relief as one passes inland.

  • Nearly all the rest of the coast is fringed by off-shore reefs, built up by waves from the very shallow sea bottom; in virtue of weak tides, the reefs continue in long unbroken stretches between the few inlets.

  • Finally, there were in 1790 about a score of small trading or military posts, mainly of French origin, scattered over the then almost unbroken wilderness of the upper Mississippi Valley and region of the Great Lakes.

  • The Gulf of St Lawrence with its much indented shores and the coast of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick supply endless harbours, the northern ones closed by ice in the winter, but the southern ones open all the year round; and on the Pacific British Columbia is deeply fringed with islands and fjords with well-sheltered harbours everywhere, in strong contrast with the unbroken shore of the United States to the south.

  • Comparatively few have simple outlines and an unbroken surface of water, the great majority running into long irregular bays and containing many islands, sometimes even thousands in number, as in Georgian Bay and Lake-of-the-Woods.

  • of unbroken and difficult wilderness.

  • The march was one unbroken success, thanks to Wellesley's forethought and sagacity in dealing with the physical conditions and his personal and diplomatic ascendancy among the chieftains of the district.

  • To the unbroken splendours of his military career, to his honourable and conscientious labours as a parliamentary statesman, life unusually prolonged added an evening of impressive beauty and calm.

  • The premolars and molars may be rooted or rootless, with tuberculated or laminated crowns, and are arranged in an unbroken series.

  • Physostigmine has no action on the unbroken skin.

  • The area within the walls is a vast expanse of cultivated land, unbroken by any vestige of antiquity; yet the soil is thick with tile and potsherd, and in hot summers the unevenly growing corn reveals the remains of streets beneath the surface.

  • The Gospel and unbroken tradition offered a better argument.

  • Until the accession of Adrian IV., however, there had been considerable periods of tran- German quillity, years even of unbroken peace and alliance E with the Germanic power.

  • The hardships of his imprisonment, and the long disputations at Oxford, told severely on his health, but he endured all with unbroken cheerfulness.

  • They were usually long parallelograms unbroken by transepts.

  • Since then the country has enjoyed unbroken peace and a stable government.

  • To the east this plain stretches in an unbroken level, as far as the eye can follow it, towards Venice and the Adriatic; on the southern side the line of the Apennines from Bologna to Genoa closes the view; to the west rise the Maritime, Cottian and Graian Alps, with Monte Viso as their central point; while northward are the Pennine, Helvetic and Rhaetian Alps, of which Monte Rosa, the Saasgrat and Monte Leone are the most conspicuous features.

  • Manure that is to be used for the crop should be broken up as fine as possible, for the more completely manure of any kind can be mixed with the soil the better the crop will be, and, of course, if it is dug or ploughed in in large unbroken lumps it cannot be properly commingled.

  • The sequence of Carboniferous strata is not everywhere one of unbroken continuity.

  • 5 in unbroken lines, with the iron-cementite diagram reproduced in broken lines for comparison.

  • In the other phase the cold blast, forced in at A, passes four times up and down, as shown by the unbroken arrows, and escapes as hot blast at B.

  • When " on wind," the cold blast is forced in at A, and passes four times up and down, as shown by means of unbroken arrows, escaping as hot-blast at B.

  • The unbroken arrows show the direction of the incoming gas and air, the broken ones the direction of the escaping products of their combustion.

  • Beneath there appears to be an unbroken surface of mica schist.

  • The crest of the Vosges is pretty high and unbroken, the first convenient pass being near Zabern, which is followed by the railway from Strassburg to Paris.

  • The latter are bought at horse-fairs and private sales, unbroken, and sent to the 25 remount depots, whence, when fit for the service, they are sent to the various units, as a rule in the early summer.

  • g g g total length from east to west was only about 60 m., it was associated in the popular mind with a large and almost unbroken tract of land in the east of Europe.

  • Syon House is now established at Chudleigh in Devon, the only English community that can boast an unbroken conventual existence since preReformation times.

  • The docile, yet robust and hardy peasants, under their foreign leaders, gained an unbroken series of successes in the first Syrian.

  • Stewart, became involved in a charge against an unbroken enemy, and suffered somewhat severely.

  • Titanotherium, of the Oligocene of the Dakotas and neighbouring districts, was a huge beast, with the hinder upper premolars similar in character to the molars, a pair of horn-cores, arising from the maxilla, overhanging the nose-cavity, four front and three hind toes, only twenty dorso-lumbar vertebrae, and an almost continuous and unbroken series of teeth, in which the canines are short; the dental formula being i.

  • On the west an almost unbroken wall of rock extends from Chernychev Bay southwards, rising towards the middle to 500 ft.

  • Luther, though he had probably uttered in private certain expressions of dissatisfaction with Melanchthon, maintained unbroken friendship with him; but after Luther's death certain smaller men formed a party emphasizing the extremest points of his doctrine.'

  • Greek Mainland.-Exploration of 'the Mycenaean sites of the Greek mainland have shown that beneath the characteristic painted pottery which is so plainly derived from the late Minoan wares, there is no unbroken sequence of development such as is found at Cnossos and elsewhere in Crete: that is to say, the Mycenaean civilization was not native to Greece proper, but was imposed there in a mature form upon a more backward culture.

  • The eastern is indented by a series of broad arms of the sea - the firths of Forth and Tay, Moray and Dornoch firths - but is otherwise relatively unbroken.

  • Beginning at Stonehaven, an almost unbroken line of precipice varying up to 200 ft.

  • The schiltrons, or squares of Scottish spearmen, were unbroken by Edward's cavalry, till their ranks were thinned by the English bowmen and could no longer keep out the charging horse.

  • No store of food is accumulated, and the winter sleep is probably unbroken.

  • After years of tentative approaches on Schiller's part, years in which that poet concealed even from himself his desire for a friendly understanding with Goethe, the favourable moment arrived; it was in June 1794, when Schiller was seeking collaborators for his new periodical Die Horen; and his invitation addressed to Goethe was the beginning of a friendship which continued unbroken until the younger poet's death.

  • The Western Ghats form, in fact, a lofty unbroken barrier between the waters of the central plateau and the Indian Ocean.

  • From the gorge of the Indus to that of the Brahmaputra, a distance of 1400 m., the Himalayas form an unbroken watershed, the northern flank of which is drained by the upper valleys of these two rivers; while the Sutlej, starting from the southern foot of the Kailas Peak, breaks through the watershed, dividing it into two very unequal portions, that to the north-west being the smaller.

  • Thenceforth the Great Mogul became a mere name, though the hereditary succession continued unbroken down to the time of the Mutiny.

  • Solitary confinement has neither conquered nor appreciably diminished crime, even where it has been applied with extreme care, as in Belgium, and more recently in France, where it obtains strict and unbroken for long terms of years.

  • This period of almost unbroken solitude is of a painful character, and its duration has therefore been wisely limited.

  • The system of unbroken seclusion, prolonged to five years, is maintained with strictness.

  • On the north and west the slopes of Great Ararat are covered with glittering fields of unbroken neve.

  • The average size of farms in 1850 (when the large Mexican grants were almost the only farms, and these unbroken) was 4466 acres; in 1860 it was 466.4, and in 1900 only 397.4 acres.

  • It teaches that the divine-human Son of God established it, and returning to heaven committed to the apostles, especially to St Peter, his authority, which has descended in an unbroken line through the popes.

  • from the Bay of Fonseca to Salinas Bay, is bold, rocky and unbroken by any great indentation; here, however, are the best harbours of the republic - the southern arm of the Bay of Fonseca (q.v.), Corinto, Brito and San Juan del Sur.

  • Its eastern third consists of rich, unbroken plains.

  • The northern range of mountains begins at Cape Kormakiti (the ancient Crommyon) and is continued from thence in an unbroken ridge to the eastern extremity of the island, Cape St Andrea, a distance of more than 00 m.

  • But it is remarkable for its continuous and unbroken character - consisting throughout of a narrow but rugged and rocky ridge, descending abruptly to the south into the great plain of Lefkosia, and to the north to a narrow plain bordering the coast.

  • Hornafvan is a straight and sombre trough, flanked by high hills of unbroken slope, but Storaf van and the intervening Uddjaur are broad, throwing off deep irregular inlets, and picturesquely studded with numerous islets.

  • The Andes, however, present an unbroken barrier on the east, except at a few points in the south where the general elevation is not over 5000 to 6000 ft., and where some of the Chilean rivers, as the Palena and Las Heras, have their sources on its eastern side.

  • The great central range, which extends, almost unbroken, for nearly 800 m.

  • The internal history of the Parthian dominion is an unbroken sequence of civil war and dynastic strife.

  • These remarkable works, half pamphlets half moral treatises, succeeded each other as a rule at the twelve months' interval, and the succession was almost unbroken for five or six years.

  • Yet his spirit was unbroken; he composed sonnets, and prepared a series of works, forming a complete system of philosophy.

  • A close friendship sprang up between the two young men, which remained unbroken till the death of Louis in 1595.

  • He remained in power during five years of unbroken peace (1851-1856), and carried many useful reforms. The most important of these was the so-called Additional Act of the 5th of July 1852, which amended the charter of 1826 by providing for the direct election of deputies, the decentralization of the executive, the creation of representative municipal councils, and the abolition of capital punishment for political offences.

  • This process, which we have followed as it takes place on an individual portion of the falling liquid, goes through its several phases at different distances from the orifice, so that if we examine different portions of the stream as it descends, we shall find next the orifice the unbroken column, then a series of contractions and enlargements, then elongated drops, then flattened drops, and so on till the drops become spherical.

  • The Coconino forest is one of the largest unbroken pine forests (about 6000 sq.

  • The Lutheran bishops, as a rule, do not possess or claim unbroken "apostolic succession"; those of Finland and Sweden are, however, an exception.

  • The Cork Butter Exchange, where classification of the various qualities is carried out by branding under the inspection of experts, was important in the early part of the 17th century, and an unbroken series of accounts dates from 1769 when the present market was founded.

  • Whatever may be the future history of his other views, he will always be remembered as an originator of a principle more illuminating than any which has appeared since the days of Newton, as one of its two discoverers whose scientific rivalry was only the beginning of a warm and unbroken friendship.

  • (2) The second striking feature is the regular succession of Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks which crop out in almost unbroken lines from the coast of Dorsetshire, whither they appear to converge, to the Cleveland Hills and the Yorkshire coast.

  • The vapour-laden sea air blowing landward against the girdle of snow and glaciers on the mountain barriers a few miles inland drains its moisture in excessive rain and snow upon the lisiere, shrouding it in well-nigh unbroken fog and cloud-bank.

  • In an uncritical age it was attributed to St Augustine himself, and Augustinians, especially the canons, put forward fantastic claims to antiquity, asserting unbroken continuity, not merely from St Augustine, but from Christ and the Apostles.

  • - The conditions of man at the lowest and highest known levels of culture are separated by a vast interval; but this interval is so nearly filled by known intermediate stages, that the line of continuity between the lowest savagery and the highest civilization is unbroken at any critical point.

  • Quinine does not affect the unbroken skin, and cannot be absorbed from it, but it is slightly irritant to the pain-conducting nerves of a raw surface.

  • He looks too old for his years, but quite unbroken; the character of a veteran sage has fully imprinted itself on his countenance; the features are grand, clear and deeply lined, the mouth firmly set and almost stern, the eyes strong and intent beneath their bushy eyebrows, the hair flows untrimmed over his shoulders and commingles with a majestic beard.

  • Sturdza gives - a genealogical table, showing that Radu belonged to the great native dynasty of Bassarab or Bassaraba, which continued, though not in unbroken succession, to rule in Walachia until 1658, and in Moldavia until 1669.

  • The higher masses of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta cover a very limited area, leaving the trade winds a comparatively unbroken sweep across the northern plains until checked by the Western Cordillera, the Panama ranges and the Sierra de Baudo, where a heavy precipitation follows.

  • In spite of his efforts the bill was carried through all its stages by an unbroken phalanx of Liberals, Labour men, and Nationalists, showing a majority in important divisions of rio; and was only rejected by the Lords in the early months of 1913.

  • The whole diagram shows, by the greater gradient of the unbroken straight lines, the greater demand which can be satisfied by the enlargement of the reservoir to the extent necessary to equalize the flow of the two driest consecutive years.

  • There is no serious difficulty in so constructing walls of this kind as to be practically water-tight while they remain unbroken; but owing to the settlement of the earthen embankments and the changing level of saturation they are undoubtedly subject to irregular stresses which cannot be calculated, and under which, speaking generally, plastic materials are much safer.

  • Therefore for balances of precision the end knife-edges are fixed on the top of the beam so as to present a continuous unbroken knife-edge, and the fulcrum knife-edge is also made continuous, the beam being cored out or cut away to admit of the introduction of the stand bearing.

  • The old earl died in 1053, but was succeeded in power by his son Harold, who for thirteen years maintained an unbroken mastery over the king, and ruled England almost with the power of a regent.

  • An almost unbroken series of petty disasters marked the first three years of King Richard.

  • Three years afterwards the same theme was rehandled with no less magnificent mastery in L'Homme qui rit; the theme of human heroism confronted with the superhuman tyranny of blind and unimaginable chance, overpowered and unbroken, defeated and invincible.

  • He introduced Burke to William Gerard Hamilton (1759), now only remembered by the nickname "single-speech," derived from the circumstance of his having made a single brilliant speech in the House of Commons, which was followed by years of almost unbroken silence.

  • An unbroken ridge, extending from Stockholm to Hango in Finland, separates the Baltic basin proper from the depression between Sweden and the Aland Isles, to which the name Aland Haf has been given.

  • Beyond the Oder the coast-line is unbroken as far as the Gulf of Danzig.

  • an enormous and unbroken forest of pines, hemlocks and spruce.

  • Externally, it is not absorbed by the unbroken skin, but when applied to the broken skin, sores, ulcers and mucous surfaces, the ferric salts are powerful astringents, because they coagulate the albuminous fluids in the tissues themselves.

  • Belief in the Trinity is almost unbroken.

  • Classit9ca The classification adopted by Henry de Vilmorin in his - Les Bles meilleurs (Paris, 1881) is based, in the first instance, on the nature of the ear: when mature its axis or stem remains unbroken, as in the true wheats, or it breaks into a number of joints, as in the spelt wheats.

  • The first thing, therefore, is to examine the seals to see that they are unbroken.

  • Though Thessaly is the most level district of Greece, it does not present a uniform unbroken surface, but is composed of a number of sections which open out into one another, divided by ranges of hills.

  • It is also an antiseptic and, in small quantities, a feeble anaesthetic. It is absorbed by the unbroken skin.

  • The climate is thoroughly Arctic. In the northern parts unbroken daylight in summer and darkness in winter last from two to three months each; and through the greater part of the country the sun does not rise at mid-winter or set at midsummer.

  • At the end of this month or in June the ice is breaking up on the lakes, woods rush into leaf, and the unbroken daylight of the northern summer soon sets in.

  • The largest unbroken lava-field in Iceland is Oda6ahraun (Lava of Evil Deeds), upon the tableland north from Vatnajokull (2000 to 4000 ft.

  • Influenced by Jonas Hallgrimsson with regard to language and poetic diction, but keeping unbroken the traditions of Icelandic medieval poetry maintained by Sigur5r Breic fjorc6 (1798-1846), is another school of poets, very unlike the first.

  • The decipherment and interpretation by the learned Jesuits, Fathers Epping and Strassmeier, of a number of clay tablets preserved in the British Museum, have supplied detailed knowledge of the methods practised in Mesopotamia in the 2nd century B.C. 5 They show no trace of Greek influence, and were doubtless the improved outcome of an unbroken tradition.

  • Only by taking them along with the formally political speeches, and regarding the whole as one unbroken series, can we see clearly the full scope of the task which he set before him, - a task in which his long resistance to Philip was only the most dramatic incident, and in which his real achievement is not to be measured by the event of Chaeronea.

  • The unbroken connexion of cause and effect throughout the world becomes thus a manifestation of God.

  • Turning northward to the east of Waterford round Carnsore Point, the lagoon-like harbour of Wexford is passed, and then a sweeping, almost unbroken, line continues to Dublin Bay.

  • From the coasts there is almost everywhere easy access to the interior through the mountains by valley roads; and though the plain exists unbroken only in the midlands, its ramifications among the hills are always easy to follow.

  • Ireland presents to these winds no unbroken mountain ridge running north and south, which would result in two climates as distinct as those of the east and west of Ross-shire; but it presents instead only a series of isolated groups, with the result that it is only a few limited districts which enjoy climates approaching in dryness the climates of the whole of the eastern side of Great Britain.

  • Geographical configuration preserved centres of resistance - the O'Neills in Tyrone and Armagh, the O'Donnells in Donegal, and the Macarthies in Cork being the largest tribes that remained practically unbroken.

  • south-west of the North Carolina border it is unbroken and lined with a smooth, hard beach of light-coloured sand, but below this it becomes increasingly broken by estuaries and is lined with flat and low sea-islands that increase in size and number toward the Georgia border.

  • The plateau of the Istrian Karst is prolonged in several of the bare and desolate mountain chains between the Save and the Adriatic, notably the Great and Little Kapella (or Kapela), which link together the Karst and the Dinaric Alps, culminating in Biela Lazica (5029 ft.); the Pljesevica or Plisevica Planina (5410 ft.), overlooking the valley of the river Una; and the Velebit Planina, which follows the westward curve of the coast, and rises above the sea in an abrupt wall, unbroken by any considerable bay or inlet.

  • South of Cape St Andrew, the north-west angle of the island, the coast-line is unbroken until the estuary of the river Onilahy, or St Augustine's Bay, is reached.

  • Closed in by mountains it flows past Linz in an unbroken stream - below, it expands and divides into many arms until it reaches the famous whirlpool near Grein where its waters unite and flow on in one channel for 40 m., through mountains and narrow passes.

  • Externally, arsenious acid is a powerful caustic when applied to raw surfaces, though it has no action on the unbroken skin.

  • The imagined existence of mountains - called Kong in the west and Komri (Lunar) in the east - stretching in a high and unbroken chain across Africa about 10° N.

  • For seven years, nevertheless, during which he led a life of studious retirement in the Villa Segni at Bellosguardo, near Florence, he maintained an almost unbroken silence.

  • Everything seemed now to promise a close of unbroken prosperity to Galileo's career.

  • He continued his scientific correspondence with unbroken interest and undiminished logical acumen.

  • In later times Christian ecclesiastical writers, finding it difficult to justify the unbroken prosperity of the wicked to an age which believed in the judgment of God and trial by combat, invented a final defeat for Mansur at Calatanaxor.

  • The fanaticism with which the Mandi had inspired his followers remained almost unbroken to the end.

  • SMYRNA (Ismir), in ancient times one of the most important and now by far the greatest of the cities of Asia Minor, has preserved an unbroken continuity of record and identity of name from the first dawn of history to the present time.

  • The common sunflower (the most conspicuous weed of the state) and allied flowers, which spring up in myriads even in the midst of unbroken prairie wherever this is disturbed, line the roads with yellow bands from horizon to horizon, enclose the broken fields and choke waste places.

  • Gilbert White's daily life was practically unbroken by any great changes or incidents; for nearly half a century his pastoral duties, his watchful country walks, the assiduous care of his garden, and the scrupulous posting of his calendar of observations made up the essentials of a full and delightful life, but hardly of a biography.

  • When the river is high the water rolls over the main falls in one great unbroken expanse; at low water (when alone it is possible to look into the grey depths of the great chasm) the falls are broken by crevices in the rock into numerous cascades.

  • central chain, separated from the western chain by the valley of the Cauca and from the eastern by the valley of the Magdalena, is unbroken; it is the more important owing to its greater altitudes and is of volcanic character.

  • Dean crawled on his hands and knees, peering under the vehicle for Billy's young girlfriend but there was no one else, only a liquor bottle—unlike its victim, unbroken.

  • Once beyond access to the river below, the seldom-used path presented an unbroken cover of fresh white, now blanketed in more than a foot of fresh powder, as it followed the large pipe toward the reservoir.

  • The final leg of the journey was a long dirt road that climbed first through a grove of fir followed by an unbroken forest of hard­wood just beginning to bud.

  • The rest of his body, although bruised, seemed unbroken.

  • annealed glass will pass the impact test in BS 6206, by remaining unbroken under impact.

  • arnica cream for bruising of unbroken skin.

  • There were olives on the table, the bread came in a warm unbroken baguette on a board and the candle threatened pyrotechnics.

  • General Cathcart thought he could strike a blow at an unbroken Russian line; Oh!

  • The crater is the largest unbroken ancient caldera in the world.

  • Cool libation under cruisethere are countless comedians plus a almost unbroken chain.

  • He saw from the unbroken early morning cobwebs across the roads east and west, that no one had passed along there.

  • Jesus was sitting upon an unbroken colt, which was covered with their own coats, and was led to Jerusalem.

  • The advantage of an unbroken continuity in the bearing surface seems not to have been sufficiently consulted.

  • On examination I found some nice clean diatoms, many of them unbroken.

  • No additional mechanical fixings are required to secure the sheet leaving the systems with a smooth, unbroken surface finish.

  • When transported in groups, horses must wear halters (unless they are unbroken) and their hind feet must be unshod.

  • Just below the rim is an engraved Latin inscription which runs around the pan in an unbroken sequence.

  • Miraculously escaping from prison Joseph traveled to Britain where he became the ancestor of an unbroken line of valiant knights.

  • Look for a closed padlock or an unbroken key icon on the bottom of your browser.

  • I was aware that these are people who had playwriting 2000 years ago with its long and unbroken traditions.

  • Two o'clock and the thunderous, unbroken roar of thousands of bikers partying like crazy was plain to be heard.

  • Earlier maps (and later ones that continued to show an unbroken terrace) are probably too small-scale to show the gap.

  • By January 1999 consensus was again stymied, heralding three more years of unbroken famine.

  • And unbroken sunshine on the snow gave us all the year's first sunburn.

  • typifyunmistakable unbroken knotwork symbolizing eternal life typifies the ancient Celtic artists and craftsmanship that dates back well over 2000 years.

  • Wells Cathedral has maintained a choral tradition virtually unbroken for over 800 years.

  • The photographic pose is held, almost unbroken, for the seventy minutes of the show.

  • Its central part forms a nearly unbroken plain with a depth rarely exceeding 40m.

  • The prestige of the European Powers was still unbroken.

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